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robertogreco : africandiaspora   7

T. S. Eliot Memorial Reading: Fred Moten - YouTube
“The first annual T. S. Eliot Memorial Reading honored the work of Fred Moten, who was introduced by Prof. Teju Cole.

Recorded on April 25, 2019, at the Carpenter Center for the Visual Arts, Harvard University.

Sponsored by the Woodberry Poetry Room and the T. S. Eliot Foundation.“
tseliot  fredmoten  tejucole  2019  towatch  freedom  vigor  love  witness  withness  breakingform  ephasia  art  writing  fluency  transformation  we  uninterrogatedwes  ceciltaylor  language  escape  édouardglissant  tonimorrison  howweread  howwewrite  difference  separability  meaning  meaningmaking  words  poetry  expression  togetherness  liberation  howweteach  lacan  criticaltheory  reading  purity  jamesbaldwin  race  beauty  criticism  self  selflessness  fugitives  fugitivity  work  labor  laziness  us  capitalism  politics  identity  society  belonging  immigration  africandiaspora  diaspora  violence  langstonhughes  looking  listening  queer  queerness  bettedavis  eyes  ugliness  bodies  canon 
august 2019 by robertogreco
ALENA MUSEUM
"Alena Museum is nonprofit 501(c)3 creative space that houses multi-disciplinary arts and work studios to cultivate the cultural richness of the African Diaspora. In the African language of Tigrinya Alena translates to  “we are here!"  Alena Museum declares that "we are here" by providing access for the African Diaspora to create original work and keep dedicated space for creative expression, in the face of the rapid displacement of these communities as a result of gentrification. We are empowering our community to be active players in this new economy in order to directly  mitigate displacement and marginalization."

[See also: https://www.instagram.com/alenamuseum/ ]

[via: https://www.instagram.com/p/BiOzLvhlgtq/ ]
lcproject  openstudioproject  art  arts  coworking  gentrification  studios  africandiaspora  diaspora  oakland  bayarea  tovisit  via:morgansully 
may 2018 by robertogreco
DYNAMIC AFRICA — Presenting ‘Polyglot’: A Berlin-based Webseries...
"Presenting ‘Polyglot’: A Berlin-based Webseries That Centers On Urban Afro-German Experiences.

Created by Amelia Umuhire, a Rwandan-European self-taught filmmaker from Berlin and self-identifying Afro-European, Polyglot is fictional webseries based in the German capital that explores the diverse stories of politics, growing pains, love and the challenges of living in a city as complex as its inhabitants. Each episode centers on individuals who, through their equally complex hyphenated identities, represent these intricacies as they navigate the multi-layered worlds and spaces of their everyday Afro-European lives.

Filmed in an intimate and unconventional style that creates a reality that reflects these layers, with the help of cameraman Ferhat Yunus Topraklar, Polyglot is not only experimental in nature - it is a true work of heart. The first season, which stars Amine Ardhaoui, Axel Ibarroule, Amanda Mukasonga and Hiba Kahla - three young actors and artists living in Berlin, is currently being produced with no budget. It is instead being driven by passion - a love for film, diverse stories and humor.

Watch episode 1 “The Bewerbungsgespräch” with poet, rapper and actress Babiche Papaya on her quest to find an affordable ‘Altbau-Wohnung.’"

[“Afro-German Webseries ‘Polyglot’ Returns with Episode 2: “Le Mal du Pays”.”: http://dynamicafrica.tumblr.com/post/122754528103/afro-german-webseries-polyglot-returns-with

"Created, written, directed and edited by Amelia Umuhire, a Rwandan-European self-taught filmmaker from Berlin and self-identifying Afro-European, Polyglot is fictional webseries based in the German capital that explores the diverse stories of politics, growing pains, love and the challenges of living in a city as complex as its inhabitants. Each episode centers on individuals who, through their equally complex hyphenated identities, represent these intricacies as they navigate the multi-layered worlds and spaces of their everyday Afro-European lives.

Filmed in an intimate and unconventional style that creates a reality that reflects these layers, with the help of cameraman Ferhat Yunus Topraklar, Polyglot is not only experimental in nature - it is a true work of heart. The first season, which stars Amine Ardhaoui, Axel Ibarroule, Amanda Mukasonga and Hiba Kahla - three young actors and artists living in Berlin, is currently being produced with no budget. It is instead being driven by passion - a love for film, diverse stories and humor.

In episode one “The Bewerbungsgespräch”, which premiered on our blog in April, we briefly met poet, rapper and actress Babiche Papaya on her quest to find an affordable ‘Altbau-Wohnung.’ In the second episode, we follow the series’ central character, thus far, during one of those days when homesickness - a strange but all too relatable feeling for many who inhabit the space between two very different worlds - suddenly kicks in. Unable to afford a ticket back home, she opts to do her hair instead.

With familiar scenes of natural haircare, frustration at YouTube tutorials, headwraps and hair stores, the episode also explores the ever-present and ever-changing relationship with hair and the complexities of the relationships we form far away from home, as seen with her encounter and conversation with Mama Omar played by Anna Dushime, wherever that may be."'

[All “Polyglot” posts at Dynamic Africa:
http://dynamicafrica.tumblr.com/tagged/polyglot ]
ameliaumuhire  polyglot  germany  afro-european  africandiaspora  film  rwanda  africa 
june 2015 by robertogreco
Four Lessons About Pan-Africanism Today from Cecile Emeke's #Strolling -
"Cecile Emeke is taking the world by storm. A UK-based filmmaker, she has been capturing the attention of many through videos such as, “Fake Deep” and her web series, “Ackee & Saltfish,” which, in my opinion, is the best thing to hit YouTube since Issa Rae’s “Misadventures of Awkward Black Girl.” But her mini-documentary series #Strolling is not one to miss. From the UK to France and onward to other countries, Cecile has been using her camera to capture the unfiltered musings of Black millennials to connect “the scattered and untold stories of the Black/African diaspora.”

Here are four things #Strolling shows about diasporic reconnection today.

1. We are going to learn to listen and speak in MULTIPLE languages.

Cecile’s series began in the UK, but she’s on the move. Right now she’s highlighting the voices of our Francophone siblings in France, and that means we’re going to use the French term for these instances of uninhibited streams of black consciousness: flâner.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3h3-sOFnLYY

Because here’s the thing: People of African descent are EVERYWHERE, and each place carries nuances and subtleties that do not translate exactly from one language to another. Even if our experiences are similar, they’re not the same. That’s where our magic lies. So sometimes that means we can’t use the same terms. Have you ever heard of “Fatou”? Learn a lesson from Gaëlle and Christelle [https://twitter.com/crystallmess ].

2. We will make room for all of our stories.

Diaspora isn’t just displacement. It also showcases dual (or multiple) rooted-ness. There are many reasons why we’ve each ended up where we are. Each one of those routes has its history, and each matters. We’re going to talk about slavery, colonialism, immigration, etc. as we navigate home in more than one way. We can’t always just privilege the African American slavery narrative, and the American experience cannot always adequately capture the experience of our siblings, as Fanta [https://twitter.com/littleglissant ] lays out.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Fy0Uid9afM8

We’re also not going to ignore some of our elephants in the room, one of them being mental health. Listen to Simone.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IWmsZf4bBXo

3. We will be free and our freedom doesn’t have to be “respectable.”

Respectability politics is a real thing. Depending on who you are or where you’re at, that might be the hustle. Do you. But “respectability” is not the end goal. Our end goal is to create the space to become the most free version of ourselves. We are a constellation of dispersed dreamers, each of us connected by our inherent right to define ourselves in any number of ways and for any number of reasons that we, as respective individuals and as broader collectives, desire. Our gaze is and will be our own. If you don’t believe me, check Rianna‘s [https://twitter.com/xaymacans ] meditations.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=okAofXZppTE

And if you’re still not convinced, Kevin [https://twitter.com/Kevinmorosky ] will remind you why your addiction to boxes won’t work in your interest.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=d0k9pCdPK4Q

4. We will tolerate absolutely no f*ckboys!

Yep, that’s right. Just watch Anne [https://twitter.com/FrenchHeaux ] lay it out below.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Q5qyXZ46qBw

Today’s Pan-Africanism is going to be unabashedly feminist. Bringing the global diaspora together is not just about Black representation. We’re also going to unlearn the mechanisms we’ve inherited that separated us in the first place. Does that include racism? Yes. But we’re also going to address patriarchy. Strolling showcases how truly effortless it is to highlight the stories Black women, such as Vanessa [https://twitter.com/scarlet_voice ], tell in order to talk about ourselves as women and as Black people.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jnUYUczAhAM

But strolling also highlights how Black men must hold themselves to that same standard. You better be bout that bell hooks life for Black liberation for more than just the booty. Abe [https://twitter.com/abefeels ] gets it.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=D7aAIAhHH1U "
cecileemeke  2015  pan-africanism  strolling  diversity  colonialism  migration  immigration  diaspora  africandiaspora  sexuality  respectabilitypolitics  bellhooks  feminism  patricarchy  blackness  blackwomen  gender  film  filmmaking 
june 2015 by robertogreco
Open Arms Closed Doors - Brazil - Viewfinder - Al Jazeera English
"Brazil's booming economy brings many African migrants to its shores, but once there does the dream of a better life die?"
brasil  brazil  2104  immigration  african  africandiaspora  film  fernandapolacow  julianaborges 
december 2014 by robertogreco
Space and Culture: How to make a Favella
"What follows applies specifically to Salvador, Bahia Brazil (a distinctive Afro-Brazilian capital comparable in significance or more important than New Orleans and New York for the African diaspora). However, it provides an glimpse of the economic geogra
cities  economics  society  policy  people  race  africandiaspora  colonialism  ownership  urban  urbanism  design  latinamerica  poverty  personal  brasil  architecture  homes  housing  favelas  brazil 
november 2006 by robertogreco

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