recentpopularlog in

robertogreco : alcohol   22

Drugs, Alcohol and Suicide Are Killing So Many Young Americans That the Country’s Average Lifespan Is Falling | Time
"Young Americans are dying in rising numbers because of drugs, alcohol and suicide, according to new federal data.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS) issued its annual comprehensive health and mortality report, which analyzes trends in death rates by cause and demographic. Drugs, alcohol and suicide, the report says, have contributed to the first drops in U.S. life expectancy since 1993. While U.S. life expectancy rose from 77.8 to 78.6 years between 2006 and 2016, the trend reversed during the end of the decade, leading to a 0.3-year decline between 2014 and 2016 — in large part because of rising rates of drug overdoses, suicide and liver disease, as well as Alzheimer’s.

Death rates for Americans ages 15 to 44 rose by around 5% each year between 2013 and 2016, and drugs, alcohol and suicide are chiefly to blame, the CDC report says.

Drug overdoses alone killed more than 63,600 people in 2016, the report says. Among men ages 24 to 35, overdose rates rose by more than 25% each year between 2014 and 2016; nearly 50 out of every 100,000 people in this population died of overdose-related causes by 2016. Women ages 45 to 54 had the most overdoses overall, but those ages 15 to 24 saw the highest rate of increase: about a 19% jump per year between 2014 and 2016.

Alcohol is also a major public health concern. Liver disease replaced HIV as the sixth-leading killer of adults ages 25 to 44 in 2016. Among men and women ages 25 to 34, deaths from liver disease and cirrhosis increased by about 11% and 8% per year, respectively, between 2006 and 2016. Older adults, however, still die of liver disease at much higher rates than young adults.

Suicide, meanwhile, is on the rise in nearly every demographic — but a few trends emerged. Suicide is now the second-leading cause of death among people ages 15 to 24, increasing by 7% in this group each year between 2014 and 2016. It’s also the third-leading cause of death among people ages 25 to 44, killing almost 17 of every 100,000 people in this population in 2016. Suicide rates even rose among children ages 1 to 14, increasing around 9% each year during the study period — though fewer than one of every 100,000 people in this group died by suicide in 2016.

And while men still die by suicide much more frequently than women, increasing rates among young women are starting to narrow that gap. Suicide rates among young and teenage girls rose by 70% between 2010 and 2016, according to previous CDC data.

Nearly three-quarters of the Americans who died in 2016 were older than 65. Rates of many common killers decreased in this population during the preceding decade; deaths from heart disease and cancer, the top two killers of adults older than 65, both declined, as did those from strokes.The exception, however, was Alzheimers, the death rate of which rose by 21%. According to separate CDC data released Thursday, that trend is likely to continue. The number of people affected by Alzheimer’s and related dementias is projected to double by 2060, rising from 5 million people (1.6% of the U.S. population) in 2014 to an estimated 13.9 million people (3.3% of the population) in 2060, according to the CDC."
drugs  alcohol  lifeexpectancy  2018  us  disease  suicide  anxietydepression  mentalhealth  cdc  epidemics  youth  teens  gender  data  health  mortality  society 
september 2018 by robertogreco
Res Obscura: Why Are There So Many 17th Century Paintings of Monkeys Getting Drunk?
"The concept of addiction had not yet taken on anything like its modern form in this period. The word existed, but it simply meant an inclination or tendency: one could be "addicted to horses" or "addicted to song," etc. But the 17th century was a world in which distilled alcoholic spirits were still a relatively new invention, and one in which such addictive substances as tobacco, coffee and opium had become available to most global consumers within living memory of the people creating and buying these paintings.

In other words, these paintings are working through the idea that newly-available psychoactive substances -- and, perhaps, material objects as well -- could dehumanize those who consumed them, reducing them to an animalistic level. Such consumers, it is implied, had moved down a step on the chain of being, having lost their powers of reason and been reduced to creatures that were "sentient" in the original sense of the word: unable to think, and content simply to feel. They had moved from the human realm to that of the "brute beasts" in the schema for hierarchically ordering nature that medieval and early modern thinkers had inherited from Aristotle."
monkeys  history  multispecies  art  drugs  alcohol  addiction  benjaminbreen 
may 2017 by robertogreco
FUTURESTATES | A Robot Walks Into a Bar | Episode | ITVS - YouTube
"Can a new bartending robot help patrons drown their sorrows, all while keeping them from harming themselves? He soon learns his mission may be next to impossible. A film by Alex Rivera."

[reminded of this series by: https://tinyletter.com/jomc/letters/future-series ]

[I have this episode and a bunch more from this series here: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLjtEkYRNN2ongZlotQoMYhkIr8wixZqtT ]
remigration  alexrivera  futurestates  film  video  future  futurism  sanfrancisco  speculativefiction  robots  labor  alcohol  injury 
november 2016 by robertogreco
Like Us, Chimps Go Bananas For Booze | KPBS
"Chimpanzees are smart. They can master sign language, swimming and even cooking. Now, evidence shows they are using their smarts to sip wine.

Scientists spotted wild chimps guzzling wine not once, not twice, but 51 times over the course of a 17-year study in the village of Bossou in Guinea, according to research published Tuesday in Royal Society Open Science.

Here's how they do it.

The chimps hone in on raffia palms, a plant that produces a tree sap that naturally ferments into wine. Villagers in Bossou traditionally leave out containers in the morning at the crown of the trees for the sap to drip into throughout the day. When the coast is clear, the chimps periodically swoop in on the jugs.

They start by gathering a leaf and folding it into a scoop-like tool. Then it's time to dip the leaf in and drink, the study notes. In video recordings of the events, adult chimps hastily swigged the cocktail, averaging about nine dips per minute. Adolescents took part in the shenanigans, too, averaging 9.7 dips per minute.

Anthropologist Kimberley Hockings of Oxford Brookes University lead the study. She says the findings prove that apes — at least in the community studied — are not averse to ethanol; they can even make a habit out of "happy hour."

The research team is cautious to conclude whether the chimps are drinking the raffia wine to get a buzz or just because they like the sweet taste. To find that out, they say you'd have to do an experiment comparing chimpanzees' preference for non-fermented versus fermented palm sap.

Hockings says the study also didn't yield much insight on whether the chimps actually got drunk from the wine. However, in some of the incidents the scientists observed, the apes consumed large enough quantities of sap to influence their behavior.

"On one occasion that I observed, the chimpanzees rested immediately after drinking the palm wine, which struck us at the time as a likely effect of the [drink]," Hockings writes in an email to The Salt. "Although it's tricky to conclude it was because of the ethanol."

Other scientists who've studied wild apes say their intake of alcohol is rare, but not unheard of.

Green monkeys have been caught boozing it up on St. Kitts, a Caribbean island packed with beach resorts. There, the Old World monkeys are frequently spotted snagging vacationers' cocktails and then stumbling about.

But these latest findings are some of the most detailed yet, according to Robert Dudley, an physiologist at the University of California, Berkeley, and author of The Drunken Monkey: Why We Drink and Abuse Alcohol.

"This is a comprehensive assessment of a frequent occurrence that involves not one, or two, but many perpetrators," says Dudley, who was not involved with the study. "It's super important to document anything going on with the great apes, particularly something related to modern human behaviors."

Dudley thinks the study goes beyond proving chimps like to monkey around; it bolsters the idea that human attraction to alcohol is not recent, but deep within our roots.

The findings from Guinea specifically support the hypothesis that the ancestors of modern humans evolved the ability to digest ethanol a long, long time ago, he says. The theory goes that our ability to digest ethanol arose during our transition from the trees to the ground when we needed to obtain energy from fermented fruits that had fallen to the floor, not just ripe fruits on tree limbs.

Richard Wrangham, a primatologist at Harvard University, disagrees with the theory, saying there is consistent evidence that primates avoid fermented, ethanol-rich rotting fruits.

He argues that ethanol in rotting fruits is not the equivalent of ethanol in beer.

"Chimps have long been known to drink ethanol in human fermented productions," he tells The Salt in an email. "So the big question is, 'What's the difference?' "

The study authors say we may get more answers once additional research is conducted on chimps and how they forage for foods containing ethanol."
chimpanzees  animals  apes  behavior  alcohol  2015 
june 2015 by robertogreco
How To Fight Depression
"Talk to someone. The somewhat facile message of "get help" can be pretty annoying if you're a depressed person, because the state of mental health care in most places is a real mess; getting good help can be difficult, expensive, scary, and prohibitively exhausting for a person who's having trouble just getting out of bed. But talking to someone is crucial, whether it's a friend, a family member, a clergy person, or a counselor. I know it seems basic, but saying what you're feeling–honestly and straightforwardly—can lighten your burden anywhere from a little to a whole lot. And don't be scared to ask for exactly what you need, whether it's just an ear or help with grocery shopping; people can be daunted by depression and not know what to do, but if they care about you, they'll be glad to help you out. (Don't forget to be mindful of the fact that caring for a depressed person is a lot of emotional labor, but I think most depressed people lean too little on others rather than too much.)



Exercise. Oh, I hate this one. Exercising is hard and sucks. But what I probably hate the most about it is that it actually works, so now I have to do it. You don't have to become a gym rat or anything, but adding just a little movement and sweatiness to your day does some annoyingly super-effective mood-boosting thing to your brain. If you're not a gym or sports person (lord knows I'm not), try to work it into your daily routine by walking to a farther transit stop than usual, taking the stairs at work, or doing an exercise video at home. The real trick, though I've never managed this one myself, is to do it often enough that you get "addicted" to it—this is what people say happens! I swear!—and then you're stuck being slightly happier forever. Good luck with that.

Stop drinking, at least for a bit. This one can be pretty hard, because alcohol is fun, tastes good, makes socializing easier, and breaks up the monotony of your shitty feelings a bit. People will tell you alcohol is a depressant, and if you're anything like me, you'll smugly be like, "Actually, that's not technically even what depressant means," and finish your delicious beer.

But you know, even if alcohol doesn't actually make you more depressed (I anecdotally think it does, though the studies tend to be bedeviled by the obvious entanglement of cause and effect), it makes you more impulsive, which is extra dangerous when you're depressed. When you don't drink, you might be way bored and awkward at social events, and have to stay brutally aware of all your feelings (I'm sorry, I'm not really selling this), but you're also much less likely to scare the shit out of your friends with your uncontrollable weeping or to make a big old mess texting your ex. Who needs to deal with the consequences of drunk behavior when you're already depressed? Plus, the dark synergy of depression + hangover is to be avoided at all costs, and I always find my mood the day after drinking is a little lousier than usual. Worth giving it a rest for a bit, just to see if it helps. (And if you find you can't give it a rest, that tells you something important, too.)

Try practicing mindfulness. The idea of mindfulness comes from Buddhist practice; stated most basically, it means being non-judgmentally present in the moment, no matter where you are or what you're doing. Which maybe makes it sound really hard and not that fun: Probably the present moment doesn't seem that great, right? But with practice it can be an astonishingly anti-depressant brain habit that makes the present much more tolerable. It's got something for everybody—you can connect it with spiritual practice if you're into that, or do it on its own, and it also has a lot of support from peer-reviewed research as a treatment for anxiety and depression.

Hang out with some animals. I don't know what it is about animals that has such an anti-depressant effect. Maybe it's that they remind you that there's a different way to move through the world than "excruciatingly," or just that they're funny and cute or cool-looking. I like to go to the aquarium because looking at fish chills me out; either that or I play with a friend's dog. Volunteering at an animal shelter is another good way to get some quality animal time, plus doing any sort of volunteer work gets you out of the house and creates a brand new source of meaning in your life—another challenging but really effective anti-depression tactic.

Think about medication. This is a obviously a super-personal choice that requires the care and guidance of experts far more expert than me, and lots of people are opposed to taking antidepressants for all sorts of legitimate reasons, but talk to a handful of people who have dealt with depression and you'll definitely find someone who says medication saved his or her life. To me, this makes it at the very least worthy of some thoughtful consideration and discussion with a doctor. There's nothing to be ashamed of in using medications for depression, any more than there is for any other illness. They can give you the breathing room you need to get better.

Don't give up. "Easier said than done" is an understatement. But people who struggle with depression can have awesome, happy lives, too. Because if this endless winter proved anything, it's that even endless things don't last forever."
depression  lilybenson  2015  mindfulness  alcohol  mentalhealth  exercise  conversation 
march 2015 by robertogreco
Junior Seau: Song of sorrow | UTSanDiego.com
"Within two years of retiring, three out of four NFL players will be one or more of the following: alcohol or drug addicted; divorced; or financially distressed/bankrupt. Junior Seau was all three."
bankruptcy  drugs  alcohol  depression  suicide  2012  nfl  juniorseau  football  sports 
october 2012 by robertogreco
Alcohol's Neolithic Origins: Brewing Up a Civilization - SPIEGEL ONLINE - News - International
"A secure supply of alcohol appears to have been part of the human community's basic requirements much earlier than was long believed. As early as around 9,000 years ago, long before the invention of the wheel, inhabitants of the Neolithic village Jiahu in China were brewing a type of mead with an alcohol content of 10 percent, McGovern discovered recently. … [McGovern's] bold thesis, which he lays out in his book "Uncorking the Past. The Quest for Wine, Beer and Other Alcoholic Beverage," states that agriculture -- and with it the entire Neolithic Revolution, which began about 11,000 years ago -- are ultimately results of the irrepressible impulse toward drinking and intoxication. "Available evidence suggests that our ancestors in Asia, Mexico, and Africa cultivated wheat, rice, corn, barley, and millet primarily for the purpose of producing alcoholic beverages," McGovern explains. While they were at it, he believes, drink-loving early civilizations managed to ensure their basic survival."
alcohol  archaeology  brewing  history  pre-history  via:Preoccupations 
november 2011 by robertogreco
California bellies up to the bar for infused liquor - Political Blotter - Politics in the Bay Area and beyond
"Cocktail lovers can rejoice, as California Jerry Brown today signed a bill ending the state’s ban on infused alcoholic beverages.

SB 32, by state Sen. Mark Leno, D-San Francisco, updates state law to recognize the widespread artisanal practice of infusing small amounts of alcohol with fruits, vegetables, herbs or spices for use in cocktails. The fight for the bill dates back to early last year, when state liquor regulators started cracking down on Bay Area bars."
law  prohibition  california  2011  via:mattarguello  liquor  food  drink  alcohol 
october 2011 by robertogreco
Bassett Blog, 2011/09: Insights from the College Front [Bassett gets it right, but seems to take credit for ideas that predate him & are contrary to some of what he pushed during his first many years at NAIS.]
"The university leaders also confirmed…that 30–40% of the undergrads on anti-depressants, and 10% of girls suffered from eating disorders. While the university leaders were quick to point out that their universities were mirroring national data, it is particularly interesting to me that the students at these colleges had already “won the lottery” by matriculating at places that were nearly impossible to get into for mere mortals, and yet so many were still stressed beyond belief and needing medication (prescribed or, probably in much larger numbers, self-medicating — see the next bullet point).

Footnote to “success-driven parents and college counselors”: beware what you wish for: What we actually do well is place students in the “best match” college, where they will be successful and can pursue interests that will keep them engaged and balanced."

[Also covered: alcohol abuse, demonstrations of learning / digital portfolios, foreign language requirements…]
patbassett  2011  criticalthinking  creativity  communication  admissions  highereducation  highered  collegeadmissions  technology  collaboration  character  antidepressants  students  parenting  education  stress  schools  learning  policy  balance  society  competition  digitalportfolios  nais  alcohol  demonstrationsoflearning  resilience  risktaking  foreignlanguage  languages  fluency  testing  standardizedtesting  self-medication  eatingdisorders  socialnorming 
september 2011 by robertogreco
Brene Brown: The power of vulnerability | Video on TED.com
"Brene Brown studies human connection -- our ability to empathize, belong, love. In a poignant, funny talk at TEDxHouston, she shares a deep insight from her research, one that sent her on a personal quest to know herself as well as to understand humanity. A talk to share."
psychology  ted  vulnerability  purpose  meaning  behavior  human  measurement  connectedness  shame  connection  empathy  humanity  brenebrown  insecurity  love  research  belonging  worthiness  imperfection  courage  wabi-sabi  authenticity  identity  self  compassion  certainty  uncertainty  joy  perfectionism  obesity  depression  emotions  drugs  alcohol  children  struggle  numbness  apologies  transparency  living  wisdom  gratitude  listening  kindness  gentleness  parenting 
february 2011 by robertogreco
Flavorwire » Blurry Oil Paintings of Drunken Cab Rides
"We discovered work of Poland-born, New York-based artist Alexandra Pacula over on Animal NY; looking at her blurry oil paintings — which are intended to recreate the “wonder and disorientation” of urban nightlife — is like riding around the city in a speeding cab after having a drink (or ten drinks) too many. “I concentrate on how the mind perceives and evaluates surroundings while under the influence of a social climate,” she explains. “I want the viewer’s eye to travel within my composition and experience a familiar exhilarating event of an actual nightly excursion.” Minus the hangover, naturally. Click through to check out a gallery of Pacula’s work."
art  painting  drunkeness  perception  alexandrapacula  disorientation  alcohol 
january 2011 by robertogreco
Why Alcohol Is Good for You | Wired Science | Wired.com
"Alcohol is a delightful social lubricant, a liquid drug that is particularly good at erasing our interpersonal anxieties. & this might help explain why, according to the new study, moderate drinkers have more friends and higher quality “friend support” than abstainers. They’re also more likely to be married.<br />
<br />
What does this have to do with longevity? In recent years, sociologists and epidemiologists have begun studying the long-term effects of loneliness. It turns out to be really dangerous. We are social primates, and when we’re cut off from the social network, we are more likely to die from just about everything (but especially heart disease). At this point, the link between abstinence and social isolation is merely hypothetical. But given the extensive history of group drinking – it’s what we do when we come together – it seems likely that drinking in moderation makes it easier for us develop and nurture relationships. And it’s these relationships that help keep us alive."
alcohol  beer  culture  health  psychology  science  research  jonahlehrer 
september 2010 by robertogreco
Jack London's many sides emerge in James L. Haley's Wolf. - By Johann Hari - Slate Magazine
"The United States has a startling ability to take its most angry, edgy radicals and turn them into cuddly eunuchs. The process begins the moment they die. Mark Twain is remembered as a quipster forever floating down the Mississippi River at sunset, while his polemics against the violent birth of the American empire lie unread and unremembered. Martin Luther King is remembered for his prose-poetry about children holding hands on a hill in Alabama, but few recall that he said the U.S. government was "the greatest purveyor of violence in the world today."

But perhaps the greatest act of historical castration is of Jack London. This man was the most-read revolutionary Socialist in American history, agitating for violent overthrow of the government and the assassination of political leaders—and he is remembered now for writing a cute story about a dog. It's as if the Black Panthers were remembered, a century from now, for adding a pink tint to their afros."
jacklondon  addiction  alcohol  socialism  alcoholism  literature  history  biography  authors  racism  us  marktwain  memory  via:lukneff  johannhari  via:lukeneff 
august 2010 by robertogreco
BigThink videos: Penn Jillette and Dan Ariely - Boing Boing
"A couple of great videos from BigThink. First, Penn Jillette on how reading the great religious texts will make you into an atheist, the future of magic, and how he and Teller work together."

[Videos are at: http://bigthink.com/pennjillette AND http://bigthink.com/danariely ]
behavior  rationality  religion  pennjillette  skepticism  atheism  irrationality  primarysources  criticalthinking  magic  pennandteller  performance  business  partnerships  ikeaeffecy  ikea  onlinedating  math  politics  tolerance  respect  morality  right  wrong  glenbeck  abbiehoffman  libertarianism  honesty  humility  tcsnmy  classideas  civics  policy  humanity  context  media  perspective  evil  good  wisdom  disagreement  debate  philosophy  drugs  alcohol  modeling 
july 2010 by robertogreco
Secret of AA: After 75 Years, We Don’t Know How It Works | Magazine [via: everyone] [Jonah Lehrer responds: http://scienceblogs.com/cortex/2010/07/alcoholism.php]
"It’s all quite an achievement for a onetime broken-down drunk. And Wilson’s success is even more impressive when you consider that AA and its steps have become ubiquitous despite the fact that no one is quite sure how—or, for that matter, how well—they work. The organization is notoriously difficult to study, thanks to its insistence on anonymity and its fluid membership. And AA’s method, which requires “surrender” to a vaguely defined “higher power,” involves the kind of spiritual revelations that neuroscientists have only begun to explore.
addiction  alcohol  alcoholicsanonymous  alcoholics  aa  alcoholism  faith  culture  medicine  psychology  behavior  religion  recovery  community  anonymous  history 
july 2010 by robertogreco
Is Dobson Right About Our Moral Decline? « The Enterprise Blog
"In fact, a great deal of empirical evidence argues that, if anything, we are in the midst of a social and cultural re-norming of some significance."
statistics  crime  divorce  teens  alcohol  drugs  us 
january 2010 by robertogreco
Teach Drinking - The Atlantic (July/August 2009)
"The way our society addresses this problem has been about as effective as a parachute that opens on the second bounce. Clearly, state laws mandating a minimum drinking age of 21 haven’t eliminated drinking by young adults—they’ve simply driven it underground, where life and health are at greater risk."
drinking  alcohol  laws  us  society  health  culture  politics  teaching  innovation  drink  teens  learning 
july 2009 by robertogreco
The Myth of Fernet: The saga of Fernet, and its cultlike popularity, says a lot about San Francisco
"The legendary liquid in that emerald bottle is more than merely San Francisco's preferred method of self-medication; it's an intoxicating fairy tale. And even though Dammann's story is one that demonstrates the devotion of Fernet's fans, in a city that drinks more of the liqueur than any other locale in the United States and more per capita than any place on Earth, there are plenty of asses on barstools with a story to tell about Fernet-Branca. And in telling the tales, they continue the life of the drink itself, which was born of myth, and somehow along the way has become perfectly suited to San Francisco's palate." also at: http://www.sfweekly.com/2005-12-07/news/the-myth-of-fernet/1
fernet  sanfrancisco  via:tomc  alcohol  drinks  food  italy 
january 2009 by robertogreco
George F. Will - Survival of the Sudsiest - washingtonpost.com
"gene pools of human settlements became progressively dominated by survivors...those genetically disposed to...drink beer. "Most of world's population today...made up of descendants of early beer drinkers...have largely inherited their genetic tolerance f
beer  history  georgewill  stevenjohnson  health  evolution  cities  alcohol 
july 2008 by robertogreco
LIQUOR AND LIT
"I went from high school to Caltech as a math major...none of my previous math & science teachers had informed me that I wasn't a genius...I discovered the truth by sitting next to an authentic genius or two at Caltech, I was crushed."
alcohol  writing  library  history  cv  math  science  us  literature  charlesdeemer  libraries 
december 2007 by robertogreco
Making Sport Civilized Again: Doping Agency Lifts Alcohol Ban for Pétanque - International - SPIEGEL ONLINE - News
"Devotees of the French sport of pétanque will now be able to enjoy a glass of pastis before a match again: The World Anti-Doping Agency is to remove alcohol from its list of prohibited substances for competitions."
drugs  sports  tradition  france  alcohol  recreation  drink  petanque 
october 2007 by robertogreco

Copy this bookmark:





to read