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Maverick Colleges: Ten Noble Experiments in American Undergraduate Education (1993)
[Second edition (1996) of the book with some additional schools here in PDF: https://ocw.mit.edu/courses/experimental-study-group/es-291-learning-seminar-experiments-in-education-spring-2003/readings/MITES_291S03_maverick.pdf ]

[Wayback:
http://web.archive.org/web/20130730023648/http://www.mit.edu/~jrising/webres/maverick.txt
https://web.archive.org/web/19961105162647/http://www.gse.utah.edu/EdAdm/Galvin/Maverick.html ]

"This book is a product of a University of Utah graduate seminar conducted in the spring of 1991: "Notable Experiments in American Higher Education" (Educational Administration 728). The contributing authors are professor of educational administration L. Jackson Newell and seminar students, each of whom selected an innovative, or "experimental," college for research and reporting."

"Common Themes:

As seminar participants exchanged findings about the ten selected colleges, several prominent themes emerged that had not been predetermined by selection criteria but appeared to indicate common postures among experimental colleges. These include:

• Ideals spawning ideas. In most cases, the ten colleges appeared to start with the ideals of visionary founders. For some, the ideal concerned the citizens who would emerge from the learning experience …

• Emphasis on teaching; retreat from research. The vast majority of experimental colleges are liberal education colleges where the art of teaching and the development of students are values of high esteem. …

• Organization without specialization. Not unexpectedly, these experimental colleges also tended to turn away from the disciplinary organization of scholarship that had sprung from the German research university model. …

• Administrative innovations. Freedom from traditional higher education bureaucracy and hierarchy have been common pursuits of the colleges studied. …

Divergent Approaches:

Just as common themes instruct us about the aims and aspirations of various experimental colleges, so too do their divergent approaches. Two notable areas of difference among the colleges focus on who should attend and how their learning might best be organized during the college years."

[Bits from the section on Black Mountain College:]

"Its educational commitment--to democratic underpinnings for learning that comes from "human contact, through a fusion of mind and emotion" (Du Plessix-Gray 1952:10)-- was reflective of a larger liberal environment that managed a brief appearance before the 1950s ushered in fear of Communism and love of television."



"Rice and his colleagues had stronger convictions about how a college should operate than about how and what students might learn. Democracy would be paramount in the administration of the college, and structure would be loose. Students and faculty joined in marathon, long-winded decision-making meetings with decisions ranging from a faculty termination to a library acquisition.

Particularly prominent, and vital to the democratic underpinnings envisioned by Rice, was the absence of any outside governing body. Rice had determined that control exerted by boards of trustees and college presidents rendered faculty participation meaningless, limiting faculty to debate, "with pitiable passion, the questions of hours, credits, cuts. . . . They bring the full force of their manhood to bear on trivialities. They know within themselves that they can roam at will only among minutiae of no importance" (Adamic, 1938:624).

The faculty did establish a three-member "Board of Fellows," elected from among them and charged with running the business affairs of the College. Within a year, a student member was added to the Board."



"The 23-year history of Black Mountain College was one of few constants and much conflict. Three forceful leaders marked three distinct periods during the 23 years: the John Rice years, the Josef Albers decade, and the Charles Olson era.

During the first 5 years of the College, a solidarity of philosophy and community gradually took shape. It revolved largely around John Rice's outgoing personality (much intelligence and much laughter mark most reports from colleagues and students) and forceful opinions about education. He was determined, for example, that every student should have some experience in the arts.

This translated as at least an elementary course in music, dramatics and/or drawing, because:
There is something of the artist in everyone, and the development of this talent, however small, carrying with it a severe discipline of its own, results in the student's becoming more and more sensitive to order in the world and within himself than he can ever possibly become through intellectual effort alone. (Adamic 1938:626)

Although he cautioned against the possible tyranny of the community, Rice eventually decided that some group activity would,
…help the individual be complete, aware of his relation to others. Wood chopping, road-mending, rolling the tennis courts, serving tea in the afternoon, and other tasks around the place help rub off individualistic corners and give people training in assuming responsibility. (Ibid, 1938:627)



"Rice soon discovered what he would later call the "three Alberses"--the teacher, the social being and the Prussian. The Prussian Albers decried the seeming lack of real leadership at the College and the free-wheeling, agenda-less, community-wide meetings. Rice noted later, "You can't talk to a German about liberty. You just waste your breath. They don't know what the hell you mean" (Duberman 1972:69)."



"The war years ushered in a different kind of Black Mountain; one where students, and at least some faculty members, started lobbying for more structure in learning, but yet more freedom outside the classroom. Lectures and recitations were starting to occur within the classroom, while cut-off blue jeans and nude sun bathing appeared outside. Influential faculty member Eric Bentley insisted to his colleagues: "I can't teach history if they're not prepared to do some grinding, memorizing, getting to know facts and dates and so on…" (Duberman 1972:198). Needless to say, with Albers and many of the original faculty still on board, faculty meetings were decisive and volatile.

Overshadowing this dissent, however, was a new program that was to highlight at least the public notion of a historical "saga" for the College, the summer institutes. Like much at Black Mountain, the summer institutes started more by chance than choice."



"The summer institutes grew throughout the 1940s to include notable talents in art, architecture, music and literature. And it is probably these institutes and the renown of the individuals in attendance that contributed most to Black Mountain's reputation as an art school."



The excitement and publicity generated by the summer sessions, in addition to a general higher education population explosion spurred by the G.I. Bill, put the Black Mountain College of the late 1940s on its healthiest economic footing yet.

Still, Black Mountain managed to avoid financial stability. Student turnover negated some of the volume gains. Faculty salaries rose substantially, but grants and endowments did not. Stephen Forbes, for example, who had always been counted on to supply money to the College in tough times, refused a request in 1949 because he was disenchanted with the new emphasis on arts education at the expense of general education. The ability to manage what money it had also did not increase at Black Mountain, although Josef Albers proposed a reorganization that would include administrators and an outside board of overseers. In the wake of arguments and recriminations about the financial situation and how to solve it, a majority (by one vote) of the faculty called for the resignation of Ted Dreier, the last remaining faculty member from the founding group. In protest, four other faculty members resigned--including Josef and Anni Albers. By selling off some of the campus acreage, the remaining faculty managed to save the College and retain its original mindset of freedom from outside boards and administrators, while setting the stage for yet another era in its history [Charles Olson].



"What Albers lacked in administrative ability, he compensated for in tenacity and focus. What Rice lacked in administrative ability, he balanced with action and ideas. However, when Olson couldn't manage the administrative function, he simply retreated. His idea about turning the successful summer institutes into a similar series of year-long institutes fell on deaf faculty ears. So he gave up trying to strengthen the regular program."



"The vast majority of former Black Mountain students can point to clear instances of lasting influence on the rest of their lives. Mostly, this seems to have occurred through association: with one or two faculty members who made a difference, with a "community" of fellow individuals who were essential resources to one another, or with a new area of endeavor such as painting or writing or farming. Black Mountain, apparently, was a place where association was encouraged. Perhaps this occurred through the relatively small number of people shouldered into an isolated valley, perhaps by a common dedication to the unconventional, or perhaps to the existence of ideals about learning and teaching. At any rate, the encouragement of association with people and with ideas was not the norm in higher education then, nor is it now. Clearly, it is possible to graduate from most colleges and universities today with little, if any, significant association with faculty, students or ideas.

But at Black Mountain, as at other experimental colleges, association could hardly be avoided. Engagement with people and ideas was paramount; activity was rampant. It was social, and it was educational. As Eric Bentley would remark:

Where, as at Black Mountain, there is a teacher to every three students the advantage is evident. . .a means to … [more]
deepspringscollege  reed  reedcollege  stjohn'scollege  prescottcollege  bereacollege  colleges  alternative  alternativeeducation  lcproject  openstudioproject  experientialeducation  unschooling  deschooling  1991  ljacksonnewell  katherinereynolds  keithwilson  eannadams  cliffordcrelly  kerrienaylor  zandilenkbinde  richardsperry  ryotakahashi  barbrawardle  antiochcollege  antioch  hierarchy  organizations  ephemeral  leadership  teaching  learning  education  schools  research  visionaries  ideals  idealism  specialization  generalists  interdisciplinary  multidisciplinary  crossdisciplinary  crosspollination  transdisciplinary  innovation  freedom  bureaucracy  universityofchicago  collegeoftheatlantic  democracy  democraticeducation  structure  ephemerality  popupschools  small  smallschools  josefalbers  charlesolson  johnandrewrice  lucianmarquis  highered  highereducation  progressivism  blackmountaincollege  bmc  maverickcolleges  evergreenstatecollege  experientiallearning  miamidadecommunitycollege  ucsantacruz  monteithcollege  fairhavencollege  westernwashingtonuniv 
may 2013 by robertogreco
Inquiry HUB
"The Inquiry Hub provides grade 9-12 students an innovative, technology driven, full-time program which allows them to pursue their own learning questions by shaping their educational experience around their interests instead of structured classes."
via:selinjessa  coquitlam  alternative  learning  education  openstudioproject  unschooling  lcproject  inquiry  self-directedlearning  alternativeeducation  inquiry-basedlearning  deschooling  openlearning  britishcolumbia  bc 
january 2013 by robertogreco
Róttæki sumarháskólinn | ReykjavíkurAkademíunni · 8.–14. ágúst 2012
"The Radical Summer University (Róttæki sumarháskólinn) is a series of open lectures that were held in Reykjavík, Iceland, on August 13-18, 2011. The stated purpose was to bring critical thought and political activism together, circling around themes such as economic justice, feminism, minority rights, and democracy.

There was no registration fee and the lectures were open to everyone, regardless of prior education or activist involvement. Reading materials were distributed electronically, free of charge. All participants contributed their work on a volunteer basis. The timing of the lectures, on a weekend and in the evenings, was designed to allow people with day jobs to attend more easily."

[via: http://grapevine.is/Home/ReadArticle/The-Radical-Summer-University ]
lcproject  summer  reykjavikacademy  the2837university  deschooling  unschooling  learning  freeschools  democracy  activism  alternativeeducation  alternative  2011  2012  radicalsummeruniversity  iceland  reykjavík 
august 2012 by robertogreco
We Are Red76, Which is...
"Nomadic in nature, Red76's origins reside in Portland, Cascadia/Oregon wherein it was founded in the winter of 2000. The socio-historical landscape of the Cascadian region greatly informs the methodological underpinnings of their work. The group, often in flux and geographically dispersed, is the moniker for initiatives most often conceived by Sam Gould, and collaboratively realized with the assistance of Gabriel Mindel-Saloman, Zefrey Throwell, Dan S. Wang, Mike Wolf, Laura Baldwin, and many others.

Often situating itself in public space, or creating an atmosphere wherein the definition of space maybe have an opportunity to redefine itself, Red76 initiatives utilize overlooked histories and common shared occurrences as a means of creating a framework in which to construct their public inquiries. Social histories, collaborative research, parallel politics, free media, alternative educational constructs, gatherings, masking, and public dialogue play a continuing and vital role within the methodology and concepts of Red76's work.

Along with producing many independent initiatives, on street corners, in laundromats, bars, and kitchen tables, Gould and Red76 have engaged in projects commissioned by the Institute of Contemporary Art Philadelphia, the Drawing Center, the Yerba Buena Center for the Arts, the Lower Manhattan Cultural Council, Printed Matter, Creative Time, the Douglas F. Cooley Memorial Gallery at Reed College, 01 San Jose, SF MoMA, Rhizome/New Museum, The Bureau for Open Culture, The Walker Arts Center, and many others."
cascadia  alternative  education  socialhistory  alternativeeducation  collaboration  gatherings  making  publicinquiry  gabrielmindel-aloman  laurabaldwin  mikewolf  danswang  zefreythrowell  samgould  red76  social  aesthetics  publicart  artists  art 
july 2012 by robertogreco
Mildred's Lane
"…a rustic, 96-acre site deep in the woods of rural northeastern Pennsylvania, in the upper Delaware River Valley, which borders New York state. It is an ongoing collaboration between J. Morgan Puett, Mark Dion, their son Grey Rabbit Puett, and their friends and colleagues. It is a home and an experiment in living. Mildred’s Lane attempts to coevolve a rigorous pedagogical strategy, where a working-living-researching environment has been developed to foster engagement with every aspect of life.

The entire site has become a living museum, or rather – a new contemporary art complex(ity). It is now important to sidestep the debates around what is art ( or design, architecture and fashion) in order to activate these turbulent multiplicities. It is more a question of praxis and action, is it in an institution? Storefront? A gallery? Deep in the woods? At Home?

The Mildred’s Lane site is a home where the Artist/Practitioner, the Student and the Institution have collapsed…"
deschooling  unschooling  storefronts  galleries  life  worklive  pedagogy  mildred'slane  greyrabbitpuett  markdion  jmorganpuett  glvo  pennsylvania  via:salrandolph  lcproject  leisurearts  art  creativity  livework  howwework  workstyles  education  alternative  alternativeeducation  altgdp  artleisure 
june 2012 by robertogreco
The Chumbawamba Principle: A Commencement Address : Krulwich Wonders... : NPR
"It's time to design a version of yourself that might work. That might make you happy…To Become Somebody ... defined by you…

In high school, in grade school, you didn't have to design yourself. The folks in charge were happy to do it for you. You were marched into a school building at age 3, 4 or 5, placed at a desk or put in a circle, inspected by your teachers. And after that, you did what you were told, what everybody is told to do: Show up and learn stuff…

You can't always name the thing you're going to be. For most people it doesn't work that way. You have to back into it…

My second thought is that — and I'm sorry to tell you this — the designing never ends…

I've had to redesign myself so many times, I can't tell you how many…

Here's the point: When you are trying to create a version of yourself that will one day make you happy, half the battle is know your insides — know your pleasures.

And the other half is to know your outsides — to find allies, partners, mentors."
teaching  cv  adaptability  schools  interdisciplinary  interdisciplinarity  howwelearn  alternative  alternativeeducation  unorthodox  tcsnmy  chumbawambaprinciple  chumbawamba  deschooling  unschooling  schooliness  education  self-knowledge  happiness  work  learning  collegeoftheatlantic  2012  commencementspeeches  robertkrulwich  self-defintion  failure  mistakes  yearoff2  yearoff  change  self-reinvention  reinvention  radiolab  jadabumrad  why  yesbut  whynot  commencementaddresses 
june 2012 by robertogreco
wideopenschool.com
"The Hayward Gallery’s Wide Open School is an unusual experiment in learning. Its programme of classes is devised and delivered by over 100 artists from approximately 40 different countries. It is not an art school however. Instead it is a wide-ranging forum where artists lead and facilitate workshops, collaborative projects, collective discussions, lectures and performances about any and all subjects in which they are passionately interested.

That is a territory as expansive as the imaginations of artists."

"Most schools are in the business of transferring knowledge from teachers to students. Wide Open School, on the other hand, is more like a labyrinth of learning in which various possibilities can be explored and developed."

"Wide Open School will take place in classrooms built in the Hayward’s gallery spaces. But is not meant to be an exhibition in any sense, and it demands a very different type of engagement."
lcproject  alternativeeducation  alternative  conversation  workshops  unschooling  deschooling  learning  teaching  artists  haywardgallery  2012  uk  wideopenschool  art  education 
may 2012 by robertogreco
phonebook :: threewalls
"PHONEBOOK 3 is a directory of independent art spaces, programming, and projects throughout the United States and a collection of critical essays and practical information written by the people who run them. PHONEBOOK 3 includes artist-run spaces, public programming, unconventional residencies, alternative schools, and community resources; all of the projects that form and support art ecologies across the nation, as well as historical documents marking their past. Featuring essays and documents from Group Material, Renny Pritikin, Susan Sakash, FEAST Brooklyn, Ox-bow, Faheem Majed, Chances Dances, Paul Durica, Dara Greenwald, Amy Franceschini, Pilot TV, Jon Brumit and Sarah Wagner, PLAND, Andy Sturdevant, Robby Herbst and more."
us  nyc  threewalls  kickstarter  artistresidencies  robbyhebst  andysturdevant  pland  sarahwagner  jonbrumit  pilottv  daragreenwald  pauldurica  chancesdances  faheemmajed  feastbrooklyn  susansakash  rennypritikin  groupmaterial  amyfranceschini  ox-bow  resources  communityresources  education  schools  alternativeeducation  alternative  publicprogramming  artist-run  artspaces  art  glvo  residencies  directories  phonebook3 
may 2012 by robertogreco
Nancy Rommelmann: The Queens of Montague Street
"Then I left my parents a note on the kitchen table, explaining that I didn’t know why I couldn’t be in school but I couldn’t; that it wasn’t their fault, and that they should just leave me alone. I think they knew this was the loudest plea they were going to get, and they let me be…

Had I known about punk rock, I might have joined with a group of kids kicking the stuffing out of the moldy old elite, but I didn’t know about it, and in any case, I wasn’t looking for a movement. I just wanted out…

While it was true all the kids broke off into sets, each set was really tiny, maybe three or four kids per, ergo there was no hierarchy; the stoners had no more or less power than the lesbians, or the eggheads, or the transvestites. This is not to say everyone liked each other or got along, there were no posters encouraging brotherhood, it was simply that, with one hundred students launched from one hundred set of circumstances, there was no system for us to break down one another…"
hierarchy  parenting  alternativeeducation  life  drugs  adolescence  learning  dropouts  deschooling  unschooling  nyc  1970s  nancyrommelmann 
january 2012 by robertogreco
Sir Ken Robinson: Alternative Education is Good Education | MindShift
"In 2006, Sir Ken Robinson presented a TED talk about the importance of nurturing creativity in education. That video has been viewed more than eight million times.

Just a few weeks ago, Robinson presented a video TEDx talk in London, addressing how population growth and technology are fueling huge changes in education, and the imperative to make all schools progressive. He argues that the principles of what’s considered “alternative” education are those that should be applied to mainstream education.

It’s hard to argue with these ideas."
johndewey  piaget  montessori  deschooling  unschooling  schools  technology  change  learning  schooling  progressive  alternativeeducation  lcproject  tcsnmy  toshare  education  2011  2012  kenrobinson  jeanpiaget 
january 2012 by robertogreco
Radical alternatives? Surely we can do better? « The Third University
"2. …Mimicking what we are railing against is comfortable but changes little. It simply gives us a new, safe space in which to rail and exclude.

3. The process of consensus is disabling where it is shackled to a perceived need to be productive or by self-imposed time constraints or by the fear of being bogged down in long discussions, and by the desperate, unquestioned desire to act now. However, we’ve seen the allegedly direct democratic process of consensus used in time-limited ways to marginalise or simply give voice to those more experienced in the process. In this way it is no different to standard institutionalised forms of governance. But what is worse is the subtext that it is more open and transparent, and that somehow at every point we don’t have to out power relationships. The network, for all our trite statements about newness, is neither new nor power free. It is just as hateful and disabling, or just as counter-hegemonic and different."
technology  principles  answers  commodities  gandhi  vinaygupta  alternativeeducation  radical  criticalpedagogy  permaculture  place  employability  pedagogy  anarchy  anarchism  education  deschooling  unschooling  lcproject  hypocrisy  organizations  capitalism  process  consensus  democracy  change  2011  thirduniversity  hierarchy  control  power 
december 2011 by robertogreco
Finding the Courage to Work for Change « Cooperative Catalyst
"I make a decent, middle-class salary as a college professor, healthcare costs are reasonable (in part because I don’t have children), and there is a pension plan for my future (assuming it does not go bankrupt!). While I do live rather frugally and have a good start on my own retirement savings, I just can’t seem to muster up the courage of potentially stepping away from all that. What if I quit my job to start a school and it goes kaput?"<br />
<br />
[Some good comments with pointers to other posts.]
entrepreneurship  socialentrepreneurship  startups  fear  security  aero  education  unschooling  deschooling  risktaking  honesty  kristanmorrison  alternativeeducation  teaching  cv  democraticschools  2011 
august 2011 by robertogreco
Marcel Kampman "Reinventing schools - project Dream School" - Lift Conference
"What if you could reinvent a school from scratch? What would you change, how would the technologies that reinvent education impact the construction and design of the building? Marcel Kampman is taking over that challenge in the Netherlands, and share the story of "Project DreamSchool"."
projectdreamschool  dreamschool  droomschool  marcelkampman  2011  lcproject  tcsnmy  education  learning  children  parenting  alternativeeducation 
august 2011 by robertogreco
Program or be Programmed: The GeekDad Interview With Douglas Rushkoff | GeekDad | Wired.com [Embedded video is worth watching too]
"first step toward maintaining autonomy in any programmed environment is to be aware that there’s programming going on…

We returned to status quo mainstream broadcast culture, where “participation” had more to do w/ achieving spectacle-approved celebrity than changing the world around us.

…overculture will always try to devalue anything truly threatening. If you gain access to dashboard of civilization…you will be called a geek…have to keep us away from anything truly empowering. So they make cool stuff seem uncool, & the stupid stuff seem cool…

I would prepare my kids for life, not some fictional computer event…reading & writing…still great things for kids to learn…basic math…a bit of…programming…it’s not too late for us to educate ourselves to the point where understanding technology, & even participating in democracy, are still possible…

our technologies become more complex while we become more simple. They learn about us while we come to know less & less about them…"
douglasrushkoff  education  learning  hacking  democracy  unschooling  deschooling  media  participation  participatory  broadcastculture  empowerment  literacy  tcsnmy  programming  coding  books  2011  trends  interviews  counterculture  understanding  alternativeeducation  civilization  gamechanging  change  purpose  meaning  meaningmaking 
july 2011 by robertogreco
Quote of the Day :: IDEA ["Compulsory Mis-Education by Paul Goodman…quote…remarkably summarizes IDEA's goals."]
"Thus at present, facing a a confusing state of automated technology, excessive urbanization, & entirely new patterns of work & leisure, the best educational brains ought to be devoting themselves to *various* means of educating & paths of growing up, appropriate to various talents, conditions, & careers. We should be experimenting / different kinds of school, no school at all, the real city as school, farm schools, practical apprenticeships, guided travel, work camps, little theatres & local newspapers, & community service. Many others…Probably more than anything, we need a community, & community spirit, in which many adults who know something, & not only professional teachers, pay attention to the young."

…I recognize…experimentation Goodman is referring to.

Big Picture Learning
Democratic/SudVal/Free schools
Unschooling groups and families
Unschooling Adventures Group
Place-based education
Online Education
Specialized schools"
paulgoodman  education  unschooling  deschooling  variety  alternative  alternativeeducation  zulekairvin  bigpictureschools  onlinelearning  democraticschools  sudburyschools  freeschools  place-basededucation  situatedlearning  cityasclassroom  community  servicelearning  apprenticeships  guidedtravel  farmschools  diversity  learning  lcproject  tcsnmy  experimentation  choice  place-basedlearning  place-based  place-basedpedagogy 
july 2011 by robertogreco
The Third University
"Leicester’s Third University is an open, citizen run space where people can meet, exchange ideas and learn for free. It stands as an alternative to marketised education, a place where wealth is unimportant and divisiveness unwelcome."

[On Twitter: http://twitter.com/thirduniversity ]
thirduniversity  leicester  uk  alternative  alternativeeducation  education  freeschools  free  unschooling  deschooling 
june 2011 by robertogreco
Between the By-Road and the Main Road: An Alternative to High School: Humanities High School
"There are three concepts that frame the thinking in the development of Humanities High School (HHS): equity, leveraging learning everywhere, and rhizomatic learning…

At HHS, learners, teachers, and community-based mentors work collaboratively to provide students with the occasion to compose a cohesive liberal arts education that privileges the arts, humanities, problem solving and problem finding. HHS is committed to preparing students to be global citizens positioned for career and college choices."
maryannreilly  education  lcproject  alternativeeducation  teaching  learning  unschooling  deschooling  schools  schooldesign  2011  tcsnmy  globalcitizens  arts  humanities  community  mentoring  mentorships  problemsolving  rhizomaticlearning  learningeverywhere  humanitieshighschool  hhs  gillesdeleuze  guattari  deleuze  vygostgy  davecormier  mentorship  félixguattari 
june 2011 by robertogreco
Adventures in Free Schooling
"Adventures in Free Schooling was started for several reasons: to have a dialogue about democratic, alternative, creative, and popular education and critical pedagogy; to share resources on teaching and learning that is geared towards anti-oppression and liberation; to discuss the history of schools and their impact on our society; to explore current models and experiments in alternative education, teaching, and learning; and more.The discussions and topics found here have a heavy focus on history and the relation between workplace democracy and learning-place democracy. This blog is also dedicated to education that is focused on fighting societal injustices and creating liberation through learning and teaching. Last, but not least, Adventures in Free Schooling is a space that’s purpose is to create new and innovative ideas for alternative learning places and critical teaching methods."
freeschools  free  schools  education  democracy  democraticschools  learning  unschooling  deschooling  brianvanslyke  liberation  freedom  teaching  alternativeeducation  alternative  society  lcproject  history  workplace  opression  anti-opression  colonization  pedagogy 
june 2011 by robertogreco
Joichi Ito Named Head of M.I.T. Media Lab - NYTimes.com
"For centuries diplomas have been synonymous w/ the nation’s universities.

That makes MIT’s decision to name a 44-year old Japanese venture capitalist who attended, but did not graduate, from 2 American colleges as director of one of the world’s top computing science laboratories an unusual choice…

Mr. Ito first attended Tufts where he briefly studied computer science but wrote that he found it drudge work. Later he attended the U of Chicago where he studied physics, but once again found it stultifying…later wrote of his experience: “I once asked a professor to explain the solution to a problem so I could understand it more intuitively. He said, ‘You can’t understand it intuitively. Just learn the formula so you’ll get the right answer.’ That was it for me.”

Mr. Ito’s colleagues minimize the fact that he is w/out academic credentials. “He has credibility in an academic context,” said Lawrence Lessig…"
mit  medialab  joiito  larrylessig  innovation  dropouts  postcredentials  credentials  alternative  alternativeeducation  learningbydoing  2011  creativecommons  unschooling  deschooling  connectivism  connections  mozilla  venturecapital  mitmedialab 
april 2011 by robertogreco
Aprender Sem Escola
"A maior parte dos pais manda os filhos para a escola sem saber que tem o direito de os educar em casa. Em Portugal, como em vários outros países, o ensino doméstico é legal, definido como "aquele que é leccionado no domicílio do aluno, por um familiar ou por pessoa que com  ele habite."
education  learning  homeschool  unschooling  deschooling  portugal  portuguese  blogs  alternative  alternativeeducation  schooling 
march 2011 by robertogreco
Amazon.com: The Film Club: A Memoir: David Gilmour: Books
"In this sensitive memoir, Canadian film critic and novelist Gilmour tells of the bargain he struck with his son, 15-year-old Jesse, who was unhappy at school. Gilmour would allow Jesse to drop out if he would agree to watch three movies a week with his dad. Over the next three years, the two would wrangle over movies that the elder Gilmour thought his son would love but didn’t (A Hard Day’s Night) and experience the irrational thrills of “guilty pleasures” (Showgirls). More important, they edged slantwise, in typical male fashion, into more personal discussions of  big topics, such as sexual jealousy (Last Tango in Paris) and alcoholism (Volcano: An Inquiry into the Life and Death of Malcolm Lowry). At the same time, Jesse dealt with serious heartbreak, while his father struggled to find steady work and worried incessantly over whether he had made the right decision in allowing his son to drop out of school.…"
unschooling  deschooling  film  books  toread  2009  davidgilmour  parenting  dropouts  learning  education  alternative  alternativeeducation  thefilmclub 
march 2011 by robertogreco
The Purple Thistle Institute
"The PTI will be something like an alternative university, or maybe better: an alternative-to-university. The idea is to bring together a bunch of engaged, interested people to talk about theory, ideas and practise for radical social change. We’ll have a great time, meet good people, get our praxis challenged and with luck refine and renew our ideas, politics and energies.

Importantly, the conversations will very deliberately cut across radical orientations – anarchists, socialists, lefties, progressives, anti-colonialists, anti-authoritarians, ecologists of all stripes are welcome. The idea is to work, think and talk together – to articulate and comprehend differences sure – but to find common ground, get beyond factionalized pettiness and stimulate radical ecological and egalitarian social change. We want to get good people with good ideas together to talk and listen to each other."
conferences  unconferences  the2837university  agitpropproject  unschooling  deschooling  education  learning  conversation  matthern  vancouver  socialecology  change  egalitarian  ecology  anti-colonialism  socialism  anarchism  anarchy  left  progressive  radical  2011  britishcolumbia  altgdp  alternative  alternativeeducation  socialchange  gamechanging  politics  policy  astrataylor  cecilynicholson  carlabergman  amjohal  geoffmann  glencoulthard  decolonization  activistart  art  urbanstudies  economics  contemporary  socialphilosophy  criticaltheory  bc 
february 2011 by robertogreco
DesignInquiry
"non-profit educational organization devoted to researching design issues in intensive team-based gatherings. An alternative to the design conference, it brings together practitioners from disparate fields to generate new work & ideas around a single topic.

…selects a topic to explore at an intensive gathering of presentations, discussions, & workshops. We invite professionals, educators & students of diverse disciplines to contribute to the topic in any way they think is appropriate. We share these responses, while working toward a publication that binds the outcome: a free-to-download boost of information, meant to inspire & inform its readers.

…an alternative to one-way delivery of a standard conference: each participant contributes & is equally responsible for the quality of the gathering; a collaborative production where we both learn and teach the aesthetics and ethics that are central to Design (& life). Days become nights; the program doesn't stop when dinner is served."
design  unconferences  conferences  togo  designinquiry  lcproject  glvo  restaurants  collaboration  collaborative  making  doing  northeast  interdisciplinary  multidisciplinary  crossdisciplinary  generativewebevent  generativeevents  makegood  openstudio  education  learning  alternative  alternativeeducation  teaching  unschooling  deschooling  schools  schooldesign  maine  montreal  generativewebevents 
february 2011 by robertogreco
"No Common Thread": Identity Crisis at an Alternative School (JUAL)
"This study uses the phenomenon, or case, of the White Pine School as the basis for developing an understanding of how schools make their identities clear, distinct, and attractive to participants. This twenty six year old parent cooperative "alternative" private school seems to be experiencing an identity crisis in which there is little consistency of vision and practices with which to enact that vision. The causes, manifestations, and possible solutions to this identity crisis are herein examined."
alternative  alternativeeducation  schools  progressive  education  tcsnmy  toshare  lcproject  identity  organizations  leadership  missionstatements  vision  dysfunction  management  administration 
january 2011 by robertogreco
City As School - Wikipedia
"City-As-School is a alternative NYC public high school built on the idea that all children learn differently, some learn by seeing, some by hearing, others by doing. The school's stated objective is to help strengthen, motivate & guide students through their high school experience.

While students have many opportunities for in-house classes, experiential learning is the foundation of CAS. Students are required to register for an internship each cycle; a cycle is half the time of a regular semester. Currently, CAS has over 500 open internship relationships.

Graduation from CAS is through a portfolio presentation before a panel of adult and peers.

Some of CAS students are eligible to take classes at local colleges tuition free."
education  schools  nyc  alternative  alternativeeducation  lcproject  internships  jean-michelbasquiat  basquiat  mosdef  adamhorovitz  learning  city-as-school  brooklyn  manhattan  ricksafran  fredkoury  publicschools  experiential 
december 2010 by robertogreco
Mission Science Workshop
...seeks to combine traditional activities in experimental science—use of microscopes, balances, thermometers, culturing plants and animals—with building a variety of projects with clay, wood, and plastic, including pendulums, electric and mechanical toys, musical instruments, and apparatuses that enhance our explorations of sound, light, and color.<br />
In all our activities in the workshop the emphasis is upon learning from observation and direct experience with real things rather than simply accepting the truth of transmitted knowledge, whether the source is books or teachers. Our favorite quote is from physicist Richard Feynman: “Science doesn’t teach anything, experience teaches it.”
parenting  homeschool  unschooling  science  sanfrancisco  dansudran  missionscienceworkshop  lcproject  education  learning  handsonlearning  handson  schools  teaching  children  alternative  alternativeeducation  experiential  scientificmethod 
december 2010 by robertogreco
A place to awaken S.F. kids' inner Einsteins
"Those are magic words to Dan Sudran, 64, who conducted the balloon experiment the other day in the Mission Science Workshop he runs in a former high school auto shop on Church Street in San Francisco.

Sudran's do-it-yourself laboratory is to science what a wizard's lair is to sorcery. Complete animal skeletons hang from the ceiling or from perches - a cow found in the Salinas Valley, an ostrich acquired by way of Sudran's butcher, a dolphin donated by a guy in Bolinas.

There's a mummified cat that a janitor found at a middle school, its fangs still agape in terror. A pelican in dramatic rigor mortis is available for inspection. Bones, flippers, femurs, hooves, teeth and beaks are arranged in evolutionary order on a table. Donors include bears, pigs, sea lions, armadillos and humans."
via:caterina  parenting  homeschool  unschooling  science  sanfrancisco  dansudran  missionscienceworkshop  lcproject  education  learning  handsonlearning  handson  schools  teaching  children  alternative  alternativeeducation  experiential  scientificmethod 
december 2010 by robertogreco
College Unbound
"College Unbound is designed to harness the passion of students. By connecting students with live-learning (internship) experiences that are rich with working knowledge and building skills, students become immersed in their learning. College Unbound is a vibrant, fast-paced learning environment. The College Unbound program brings educational concepts and theories to life and unites personal motivation and discipline with progressive coursework and real-world learning."
alternativeeducation  college  dennislittky  education  progressive  innovation  highereducation  schools  teaching  learning  creativity  lcproject  internships  apprenticeships  unschooling  deschooling  experientiallearning  realworld  collgeunbound  rhodeisland  providence 
october 2010 by robertogreco
YouTube - Deep Roots; An Ideal Preserved
"Short documentary on Deep Springs College in Inyo Valley, CA. An Academy of Integrated Media project that embodies the American character."

[Also at: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=v01LKW1EshU ]
deepspringscollege  education  colleges  universities  self-governance  omnicompetence  learning  failure  schools  empowerment  tcsnmy  california  alternative  alternativeeducation  purpose  urgency  transformation 
september 2010 by robertogreco
Shikshantar - The Peoples' Institute for Rethinking Education and Development
"Shikshantar is an applied research institute dedicated to catalyzing radical systemic transformation of education in order to facilitate Swaraj-development throughout India."
alternativeeducation  education  india  learning  deschooling  activism  development  dialogue  organizations  research  unschooling  lcproject  factoryschools  tcsnmy  transformation  gamechanging  ivanillich  johnholt  kenrobinson  johntaylorgatto  schools  schooling  schooliness  paulofreire  dialog 
august 2010 by robertogreco
Experimental School Gets Rid of Classes, Teachers : NPR
"imagine a school where the organizational structure is completely flat. At the New Country School in Henderson, MN, there is no front office. Visitors are immediately embraced by an airy atrium that is the centerpiece of this one-room schoolhouse...all around the room, New Country's 124 students sit at desks — real office desks — working at their own personal computers. The feeling is comfortable...hum of constant conversation, none of the screaming & yelling heard in a traditional school. Kids are free to move about the school, so there's no need for hall passes or for teachers to patrol the hall. & there's no need to send kids to the office...Students spend most of their day in front of their computers, working on interdisciplinary projects. If they're working on a history project, they have to do enough writing to fulfill the state curriculum requirements. If they don't fulfill the requirements, they have to do another project."
education  future  teaching  learning  innovation  schooling  alternative  flat  alternativeeducation  collaborative  community  tcsnmy  schools  lcproject  2007  toshare  topost 
february 2010 by robertogreco

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