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robertogreco : analysis   63

Carol Black on Twitter: "I'm sorry, but this is delusional. If you don't read the book the first time for rhythm and flow, just *read* it, you haven't read the book. You have dissected it. This is like the vivisection of literature. There is no author ali
"I'm sorry, but this is delusional. If you don't read the book the first time for rhythm and flow, just *read* it, you haven't read the book. You have dissected it. This is like the vivisection of literature. There is no author alive who would want their book read this way."



"Look, the reality is that most people do not want to analyze literature. It's a specialty interest, a niche thing. There is absolutely no reason all people should have to do this. By forcing it we just create an aversion to books.

[@SOLEatHome "Would you consider someone re-reading a book they love and noticing things they missed the first time analysis? It at least fits what has come to be known as "close reading""]

Kids who become writers (or filmmakers, or musicians) re-read, re-watch, re-listen to their favorite things repetitively, obsessively. They internalize structure, rhythm, characterization, language, vocabulary, dialogue, intuitively, instinctively.

Close reading & analysis is a separate activity, it requires a whole different stance / attitude toward the book. It can enhance this deeper intuitive understanding or it can shut it down, turn it into something mechanical & disengaged.

I think it's a huge mistake to push this analytical stance on children when they are too young. I was an English major, & I don't think I benefited from it until college. Younger kids should just find things they love & process them in ways that make sense to them.

This is one of the many delusional things about the way literature is taught in HS. The reality is you have to read a book at the *bare minimum* twice in order to do meaningful analysis. But there is never time for this. So we just club the thing to death on the first reading.

One of the principal things a writer does is to work incredibly hard at refining the way one sentence flows into the next, one chapter springboards off the last. To experience this as a reader you have to immerse yourself, turn off the analytical brain, just *read* the damn book.

To insert analysis into this process on a first reading is like watching a film by pausing every couple of minutes to make notes before continuing. It's fine to do that in later study, but if you do it the first time through you've destroyed everything the filmmaker worked for."

[@irasocol: How a teacher destroys not just reading but culture. Can we let kids experience an author's work without dissection? How I tried to address this in 2012... http://speedchange.blogspot.com/2012/11/why-do-we-read-why-do-we-write.html "]



[This was in repsonse to a thread that began with:
https://twitter.com/SOLEatHome/status/1053338882496958465

"This thread details a real school assignment that was asked of a high school student to do while reading a book they hadn't read before. I assure you this is is not something isolated to one school:

Annotate.

Inside front cover: major character with space for...

...character summaries, page reference for key scenes or moments of character development. Evidently these are enormous books.

Inside Back Cover: list of themes, allusions, images, motifs, key scenes, plot line, epiphanies, etc. Add pg. references or notes. List vocab words...

...if there's still room. (big books or small writing?)

Start of each chapter: do a quick summary of the chapter. Title each chapter as soon as you finish it, esp. if the chapters don't have titles.

Top margins: plot notes/words phrases that summarize. Then go back...

...and mark the chapter carefully (more on these marks to come)

Bottom and side margins: interpretive notes, questions, remarks that refer to the meaning of the page (???). Notes to tie in w/ notes on inside back cover

Header: Interpretive notes and symbols to be used...

...underline or highlight key words, phrases, sentences that are important to understanding the work
questions/comments in the margins--your conversation with the text
bracket important ideas/passages
use vertical lines at the margin to emphasize what's been already marked...

...connect ideas with lines or arrows
use numbers in the margin to indicate the sequence of points the author makes in developing a single argument
use a star, asterisk, or other doo-dad at the margin--use a consistent symbol--(presumably to not mix up your doo-dads?) to...

...be used sparingly to emphasize the ten or twenty most important statements in the book.
Use ???for sections/ideas you don't understand
circle words you don't know. Define them in the margins (How many margins does a page have?)
A checkmark means "I understand"...

...use !!! when you come across something new, interesting or surprising
And other literary devices (see below)

You may want to mark:
Use and S for Symbols: a symbol is a literal thing that stands for something else which help to discover new layers of thinking...

Use an I for Imagery, which includes words that appeal to the five senses. Imagery is important for understanding an authors message and attitudes
Use an F for Figurative Language like similes, metaphors, etc., which often reveal deeper layers of meaning...

Use a T for Tone, which is the overall mood of the piece. Tone can carry as much meaning as the plot does.
Use a Th for Theme: timeless universal ideas or a message about life, society, etc.
Plot elements (setting, mood, conflict)
Diction (word choice)

The end. ::sighs::"]
carolblack  irasocol  howweread  reading  literature  closereading  2018  school  schooliness  education  absurdity  literaryanalysis  writers  writing  howwewrite  filmmaking  howwelearn  academia  academics  schools  unschooling  deschooling  analysis  understanding  repetition  experience  structure  rhythm  characterization  language  vocabulary  dialogue  noticing  intuition  instinct  film  flow 
october 2018 by robertogreco
The Art of Teaching
[via: "The slide deck for the workshop is superb. Such a great experience, so grateful to @tchoi8 & the other participants." https://twitter.com/dphiffer/status/879465006449909760

referencing also: "How I learn to build things. Something I created for @tchoi8’s Art of Learning workshop at @eyeofestival."
https://twitter.com/dphiffer/status/879366496354488322 ]

[video: "Absence is Presence with Distance"
https://vimeo.com/234330230

"As an artist, I work with technology and narrative – formal and relational projects. As an activist, I examine personal and political – practice and praxis. As an educator, I create feedback between plastic and elastic – learning and unlearning. My talk is set at the dawn. We are waiting for the sun to rise and we are full of questions. What’s the role of an artist as an activist now? How can we critique oppressive systems that create the sense of ‘others’ based on ability and legal status? What’s kind of pedagogy can we experiment through alternative schools? How can we create a community among those who have nothing in common? By creating art, we can give form to our intentions, contribute to making the world we want to live in.

( For a companion posting to this talk visit:

https://medium.com/@tchoi8/absence-is-presence-with-distance-c0712aada56c )]
taeyoonchoi  education  teaching  purpose  routine  ritual  silence  flow  conflict  communication  structure  nurture  authority  kojinkaratani  jean-lucnancy  community  howweteach  pedagogy  learning  howwelearn  eyeo2017  unlearning  curriculum  syllabus  sfpc  schoolforpoeticcomputation  art  craft  beauty  utility  generosity  sfsh  tcsnmy  lcproject  openstudioproject  classideas  cv  reciprocity  gifts  kant  discretion  instruction  discipline  johndewey  bmc  blackmountaincollege  justice  annialbers  stndardization  weaving  textiles  making  projectbasedlearning  materials  progress  progressive  unschooling  deschooling  control  experimentation  knowledge  fabrication  buckminsterfuller  constructivism  constructionism  georgehein  habit  freedom  democracy  paulofreire  judithbutler  sunaurataylor  walking  christinesunkim  uncertainty  representation  intervention  speculation  simulation  christopheralexander  objectives  outcomes  learningoutcomes  learningobjectives  remembering  creativity  evaluation  application  analysis  understanding  emancipation  allankaprow  judychicago  s 
june 2017 by robertogreco
Awakening a Black Child’s Consciousness and Curiosity
"As a writer on race, ethnicity and culture in education, my frank words and activism are influenced and informed by my experiences as a mother. I read the research. I listen to the scholars and experts. And all of that data and information is filtered through the prism of a Black mom with a Black son in public schools.

The link between police in schools and overcriminalization of Black youth is about social justice. It’s also about whether my son could be next. Suspending Black boys at a disproportionate rate for non-violent infractions is the symptom of a racist and unjust system. It’s also a real thing that happens in public schools to students who look like my son. The importance of culturally relevant materials and diverse books is a prized educational value that moves from theoretical to concrete when my son is presented with a summer reading list with not one author of color.

I spend a lot of time documenting and commenting on outrages, so with admiration and appreciation I can share that something special is happening in my son’s ninth-grade Honors English class. With the new semester comes a new teacher. And a refreshing teaching philosophy.
Unless I'm in that book, you're not in it either. History is not a procession of illustrious people. It's about what happens to a people. Millions of anonymous people is what history is about. –James Baldwin

In the last three weeks my son was assigned a project on Emmitt Till (during which he learned for the first time that Till died on my son’s birthday!) Despite my prodding, he was lukewarm on seeing “Selma” until this English assignment. After seeing “Selma” he now wants to learn more about the 16th Street Baptist Church bombing, the horrific act that opens Ava DuVernay's powerful movie. And his English class just started “To Kill A Mockingbird,” opening the door to more spirited conversations on race relations.

Interestingly, somewhere in his recent reading, he also settled on the belief that Coca-Cola and Pepsi are racist and decided to boycott both corporations. His historical take on these soft drink companies is accurate. His decision has made shopping for beverages and snacks a meticulous exercise requiring thorough assessment. As I do backflips inside, watching my child learn, grow and sharpen his social justice concerns.

In real-time I am seeing how culturally relevant teaching helps students develop critical-thinking and analytical skills, as well as disrupt student perceptions – laying the groundwork for adults who confront and challenge assumptions and structural inequalities. Seeing our history and culture reflected in his classroom has awakened my son’s consciousness and curiosity.

Because he’s a teenager, I guard against showing too much exuberance. For fear that anything Mom likes is questionable. But just between us…"
melindatanderson  2015  race  ethnicity  identity  learning  culture  relevance  emmitttill  education  teaching  howweteach  howwelearn  socialjustice  readinglists  criticalthinking  analysis  inequality  assumptions  consciousness  curiosity 
february 2015 by robertogreco
Metafoundry 15: Scribbled Leatherjackets
[Update 23 Jan 2015: a new version of this is now at The Atlantic: http://www.theatlantic.com/technology/archive/2015/01/why-i-am-not-a-maker/384767/ ]

"HOMO FABBER: Every once in a while, I am asked what I ‘make’. When I attended the Brighton Maker Faire in September, a box for the answer was under my name on my ID badge. It was part of the XOXO Festival application for 2013; when I saw the question, I closed the browser tab, and only applied later (and eventually attended) because of the enthusiastic encouragement of friends. I’m always uncomfortable identifying myself as a maker. I'm uncomfortable with any culture that encourages you take on an entire identity, rather than to express a facet of your own identity (‘maker’, rather than ‘someone who makes things’). But I have much deeper concerns.

Walk through a museum. Look around a city. Almost all the artifacts that we value as a society were made by or at the the order of men. But behind every one is an invisible infrastructure of labour—primarily caregiving, in its various aspects—that is mostly performed by women. As a teenager, I read Ayn Rand on how any work that needed to be done day after day was meaningless, and that only creating new things was a worthwhile endeavour. My response to this was to stop making my bed every day, to the distress of my mother. (While I admit the possibility of a misinterpretation, as I haven’t read Rand’s writing since I was so young my mother oversaw my housekeeping, I have no plans to revisit it anytime soon.) The cultural primacy of making, especially in tech culture—that it is intrinsically superior to not-making, to repair, analysis, and especially caregiving—is informed by the gendered history of who made things, and in particular, who made things that were shared with the world, not merely for hearth and home.

Making is not a rebel movement, scrappy individuals going up against the system. While the shift might be from the corporate to the individual (supported, mind, by a different set of companies selling things), and from what Ursula Franklin describes as prescriptive technologies to ones that are more holistic, it mostly reinscribes familiar values, in slightly different form: that artifacts are important, and people are not.

In light of this history, it’s unsurprising that coding has been folded into ‘making’. Consider the instant gratification of seeing ‘hello, world’ on the screen; it’s nearly the easiest possible way to ‘make’ things, and certainly one where failure has a very low cost. Code is 'making' because we've figured out how to package it up into discrete units and sell it, and because it is widely perceived to be done by men. But you can also think about coding as eliciting a specific, desired set of behaviours from computing devices. It’s the Searle’s 'Chinese room' take on the deeper, richer, messier, less reproducible, immeasurably more difficult version of this that we do with people—change their cognition, abilities, and behaviours. We call the latter 'education', and it’s mostly done by underpaid, undervalued women.

When new products are made, we hear about exciting technological innovation, which are widely seen as worth paying (more) for. In contrast, policy and public discourse around caregiving—besides education, healthcare comes immediately to mind—are rarely about paying more to do better, and are instead mostly about figuring out ways to lower the cost. Consider the economics term ‘Baumol's cost disease’: it suggests that it is somehow pathological that the time and energy taken by a string quartet to prepare for a performance--and therefore the cost--has not fallen in the same way as goods, as if somehow people and what they do should get less valuable with time (to be fair, given the trajectory of wages in the US over the last few years in real terms, that seems to be exactly what is happening).

It's not, of course, that there's anything wrong with making (although it’s not all that clear that the world needs more stuff). It's that the alternative to making is usually not doing nothing—it's nearly always doing things for and with other people, from the barista to the Facebook community moderator to the social worker to the surgeon. Describing oneself as a maker—regardless of what one actually or mostly does—is a way of accruing to oneself the gendered, capitalist benefits of being a person who makes products.

I am not a maker. In a framing and value system that is about creating artifacts, specifically ones you can sell, I am a less valuable human. As an educator, the work I do is, at least superficially, the same year after year. That's because all of the actual change is at the interface between me, my students, and the learning experiences I design for them. People have happily informed me that I am a maker because I use phrases like 'design learning experiences', which is mistaking what I do for what I’m actually trying to elicit and support. The appropriate metaphor for education, as Ursula Franklin has pointed out, is a garden, not the production line.

My graduate work in materials engineering was all about analysing and characterizing biological tissues, mostly looking at disease states and interventions and how they altered the mechanical properties of bone, including addressing a public health question for my doctoral research. My current education research is mostly about understanding the experiences of undergraduate engineering students so we can do a better job of helping them learn. I think of my brilliant and skilled colleagues in the social sciences, like Nancy Baym at Microsoft Research, who does interview after interview followed by months of qualitative analysis to understand groups of people better. None of these activities are about ‘making’.

I educate. I analyse. I characterize. I critique. Almost everything I do these days is about communicating with others. To characterize what I do as 'making' is either to mistake the methods—the editorials, the workshops, the courses, even the materials science zine I made—for the purpose. Or, worse, to describe what I do as 'making' other people, diminishing their own agency and role in sensemaking, as if their learning is something I impose on them.

In a recent newsletter, Dan Hon wrote, "But even when there's this shift to Makers (and with all due deference to Getting Excited and Making Things), even when "making things" includes intangibles now like shipped-code, there's still this stigma that feels like it attaches to those-who-don't-make. Well, bullshit. I make stuff." I understand this response, but I'm not going to call myself a maker. Instead, I call bullshit on the stigma, and the culture and values behind it that reward making above everything else. Instead of calling myself a maker, I'm proud to stand with the caregivers, the educators, those that analyse and characterize and critique, everyone who fixes things and all the other people who do valuable work with and for others, that doesn't result in something you can put in a box and sell."

[My response on Twitter:

Storified version: https://storify.com/rogre/on-the-invisible-infrastructure-of-often-intangibl

and as a backup to that (but that doesn't fit the container of what Pinboard will show you)…

“Great way to start my day: @debcha on invisible infrastructure of (often intangible) labor, *not* making, & teaching.”
https://twitter.com/rogre/status/536601349756956672

“[pause to let you read and to give you a chance to sign up for @debcha’s Metafoundry newsletter http://tinyletter.com/metafoundry ]”
https://twitter.com/rogre/status/536601733791633408

““behind every…[maker] is an invisible infrastructure of labour—primarily caregiving, in…various aspects—…mostly performed by women” —@debcha”
https://twitter.com/rogre/status/536602125107605505

“See also Maciej Cegłowski on Thoreau. https://static.pinboard.in/xoxo_talk_thoreau.htm https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eky5uKILXtM”
https://twitter.com/rogre/status/536602602431995904

““Thoreau had all these people, mostly women, who silently enabled the life he thought he was heroically living for himself.” —M. Cegłowski”
https://twitter.com/rogre/status/536602794786963458

“And this reminder from @anotherny [Frank Chimero] that we should acknowledge and provide that support: “Make donuts too.”” http://frankchimero.com/blog/the-inferno-of-independence/
https://twitter.com/rogre/status/536603172244967424

“small collection of readings (best bottom up) on emotional labor, almost always underpaid, mostly performed by women https://pinboard.in/u:robertogreco/t:emotionallabor”
https://twitter.com/rogre/status/536603895087128576

““The appropriate metaphor for education, as Ursula Franklin has pointed out, is a garden, not the production line.” —@debcha”
https://twitter.com/rogre/status/536604452065513472

““to describe what I do as 'making' other people, diminish[es] their own agency & role in sensemaking” —@debcha”
https://twitter.com/rogre/status/536604828705648640

“That @debcha line gets at why Taylor Mali’s every-popular “What Teachers Make” has never sat well with me. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RxsOVK4syxU”
https://twitter.com/rogre/status/536605134185177088

““I call bullshit on the stigma, and the culture and values behind it that reward making above everything else.” —@debcha”
https://twitter.com/rogre/status/536605502805798912

“This all brings me back to Margaret Edson’s 2008 Commencement Address at Smith College. http://www.smith.edu/events/commencement_speech2008.php + https://vimeo.com/1085942”
https://twitter.com/rogre/status/536606045200588803

“Edson’s talk is about classroom teaching. I am forever grateful to @CaseyG for pointing me there (two years ago on Tuesday).”
https://twitter.com/rogre/status/536606488144248833

““Bringing nothing, producing nothing, expecting nothing, withholding … [more]
debchachra  2014  making  makers  makermovement  teaching  howweteach  emotionallabor  labor  danhon  scubadiving  support  ursulafranklin  coding  behavior  gender  cv  margaretedson  caseygollan  care  caretaking  smithcollege  sensemaking  agency  learning  howwelearn  notmaking  unproduct  frankchimero  maciejceglowski  metafoundry  independence  interdependence  canon  teachers  stigma  gratitude  thorough  infrastructure  individualism  invisibility  critique  criticism  fixing  mending  analysis  service  intangibles  caregiving  homemaking  maciejcegłowski 
november 2014 by robertogreco
Emotional Processing and Qualitative Research on Race (with tweets) · alwaystheself · Storify
"A few notes from the methodological appendix of "Resurrecting Slavery", a book I'm writing about the contemporary legacies of racial slavery and white supremacy in France."
crystalfleming  research  emotions  race  methodology  2014  slavery  whitesupremacy  academia  repression  recism  inequality  experience  analysis  storify 
september 2014 by robertogreco
The New Aesthetic and its Politics | booktwo.org
"Let us be clear: just as my work on the form of the book in the digital age was concerned not with the physical or digital object, but with people’s understanding and emotions concerning literature; just as my drone works are not about the objects themselves, but about the systems – technological, spatial, legal and political – which permit, shape and produce them, and about the wider implications of seeing and not seeing such technological, systematic, operations; so the New Aesthetic is concerned with everything that is not visible in these images and quotes, but that is inseparable from them, and without which they would not exist.

Much of the critical confusion around the New Aesthetic has clustered around the use of the term “aesthetic”, by which I meant simply, “what it looks like” – I wasn’t even really aware of how key the term aesthetics was to art historical and critical discourse. As a result of my use of this term, much of the critical reaction to it has only looked at the surface, and has – sometimes wilfully it feels – failed to engage with the underlying concerns of the New Aesthetic, its own critique and politics. This criticism still concerns itself only with images, despite the wealth of texts also included in the project, and the numerous recorded lectures I’ve given on the subject. The tumblr is just one aspect of, the sketchbook or playlist for, a wider project. In short, this form of criticism has been looking at the pixelated finger, not the moon.

There are two necessary understandings to counter this, I think. One is the important recognition that the New Aesthetic project is undertaken within its own medium: it is an attempt to “write” critically about the network in the vernacular of the network itself: in a tumblr, in blog posts, in YouTube videos of lectures, tweeted reports and messages, reblogs, likes, and comments. In this sense, from my perspective, it is as much work as criticism: it does not conform to the formal shapes – manifesto, essay, book – expected by critics and academics. As a result, it remains largely illegible to them, despite frequent public statements of the present kind.



the deeper and more interesting aspect of this misreading of the New Aesthetic is that it directly mirrors what it is describing: the illegibility of technology itself to a non-technical audience.



The New Aesthetic is not superficial, it is not concerned with beauty or surface texture. It is deeply engaged with the politics and politicisation of networked technology, and seeks to explore, catalogue, categorise, connect and interrogate these things. Where many seem to read only incoherence and illegibility, the New Aesthetic articulates the deep coherence and multiplicity of connections and influences of the network itself.

I believe that much of the weak commentary on the New Aesthetic is a direct result of a weak technological literacy in the arts, and the critical discourse that springs from it. It is also representative of a far wider critical and popular failure to engage fully with technology in its construction, operation and affect.



But if we don’t move the debate to a deeper level, none of this will change. There is a justified and rising opposition to drone warfare (and in the last week, to issues around computational surveillance and intelligence), which may or may not produce lasting political change; but even if successful this will only change the images and objects employed, not the modes of thinking, coupled to technological mastery, which drive it. Without a concerted effort to raise the level of debate, we just loop over and over through the same fetishisations and reifications, while the real business of the world continues unexamined. Those who cannot understand technology are doomed to be consumed by it. (The idea that these ideas lack politics is especially laughable when you look at what’s happening in much of the art world, and most of the digital art world. A young, post-Iraq generation who have had all hope of political participation kettled out of them, and are then endlessly accused of apathy to boot. No wonder it’s all personal brands, car culture, glossy gifs and facebook performances.) Technology is political. Everything is political. If you cannot perceive the politics, the politics are being done to you.



In part, this unwillingness to codify is a reproduction of the network’s own refusal to be pinned down, controlled, routed and channeled, which must be considered one of its core, inherent qualities. But it is also born of a sincere desire not to foreclose discussion: the New Aesthetic may be considered a work, a conversation, a performance, an experiment, and a number of other things (although, please, not a movement). This intention of keeping the field open was, and perhaps remains, naive. Nevertheless, I firmly believe it is the way it has to be. As such, the presentation of a so-called gaudy heap of images is an appeal to, and act of confidence in, the network itself, in the systems and people that comprise it, to follow their own ideas and intuitions, educate themselves and, outwith a hierarchical commentariat, come to their own conclusions. The onus is on the reader to explore further, just as and because the onus is on the individual in a truly networked politics. So why is it important to critique the critique as well? Because we live in a world shaped and defined by computation, and it is one of the jobs of the critic and the artist to draw attention to the world as it truly is."
jamesbridle  art  newaesthetic  commentary  vernacular  computing  technology  society  politics  drones  surveillance  books  media  criticism  systems  systemsthinking  audience  aesthetics  academia  analysis  understanding  2013 
june 2013 by robertogreco
tcsnmy8 - Introduction to Poetry Analysis
"Introduction to Poetry Analysis
by Billy Collins

I ask them to take a poem
and hold it up to the light
like a color slide

or press an ear against its hive.

I say drop a mouse into a poem
and watch him probe his way out,

or walk inside the poem’s room
and feel the walls for a light switch.

I want them to waterski
across the surface of a poem
waving at the author’s name on the shore.

But all they want to do
is tie the poem to a chair with rope
and torture a confession out of it.

They begin beating it with a hose
to find out what it really means."
poetry  tcsnmy7  tcsnmy8  poems  analysis  literature  life  living  language  poetryanalysis  eleanorduckworth  teaching 
april 2013 by robertogreco
John Kay - The parable of the ox
"By this time, there was a large industry of professional weight guessers, organisers of weight- guessing competitions and advisers helping people to refine their guesses."
analysts  analysis  finance  consulting  experts  2012  fallacies  johnkay  parables  markets  economics 
august 2012 by robertogreco
Two talks about data on Env
"Both of these discuss the limits of data visualization and indeed data and indeed knowledge. It’s not hard to find people claiming that we don’t know very much, but these two are experts at figuring out and showing what we know. Skepticism about the power of scatterplots means something serious – is more than sophomoric nihilism – when it comes from them.

I hope these might be news of a fresh wave of data work: analysis and visualization that retains a sense of play, but also admits its responsibility as rhetoric and is more able to expose its own assumptions and omissions. In my head I’ve been calling this data with context, but I think we need something catchier."
patterns  patternrecognition  sensemaking  rhetoric  interpretation  design  skepticism  designinggeopolitics  context  datawithcontext  analysis  dataanalysis  usmanhaque  eyeo  jenlowe  visualization  data  2012  charlieloyd 
june 2012 by robertogreco
Text analysis, wordcount, keyword density analyzer, prominence analysis
"Welcome to the online text analysis tool, the detailed statistics of your text, perfect for translators (quoting), for webmasters (ranking) or for normal users, to know the subject of a text. Now with new features as the anlysis of words groups, finding out the keyword density, analyse the prominence of word or expressions. Webmasters can analyse the links on their pages. More instructions are about to be written, please send us your feedback!"
english  wcydwt  classideas  onlinetoolkit  text  software  analysis  research  language  tools  writing 
december 2011 by robertogreco
The Effort by Billy Collins | The Writer's Almanac with Garrison Keillor
"Would anyone care to join me
in flicking a few pebbles in the direction
of teachers who are fond of asking the question:
"What is the poet trying to say?""

[via: http://twitter.com/houstfriend/status/71981296313831424 retweeted by Luke Neff]
literature  poetry  billycollins  teaching  analysis  2008  education  schooliness 
may 2011 by robertogreco
Fiction - Reality A and Reality B - NYTimes.com
"Viewed from such a professional perspective, it would seem that the interface between us and the stories we encounter underwent a greater change than ever before at some point when the world crossed (or began to cross) the millennial threshold. Whether this was a change for the good or a less welcome change, I am in no position to judge. About all I can say is that we can probably never go back to where we started.

Speaking for myself, one of the reasons I feel this so strongly is the fact that the fiction I write is itself undergoing a perceptible transformation. The stories inside me are steadily changing form as they inhale the new atmosphere. I can clearly feel the movement happening inside my body. Also happening at the same time, I can see, is a substantial change in the way readers are receiving the fiction I write.

There has been an especially noteworthy change in the posture of European and American readers. Until now, my novels could be seen in 20th-century terms, that is, to be entering their minds through such doorways as “post-modernism” or “magic realism” or “Orientalism”; but from around the time that people welcomed the new century, they gradually began to remove the framework of such “isms” and accept the worlds of my stories more nearly as-is. I had a strong sense of this shift whenever I visited Europe and America. It seemed to me that people were accepting my stories in toto — stories that are chaotic in many cases, missing logicality at times, and in which the composition of reality has been rearranged. Rather than analyzing the chaos within my stories, they seem to have begun conceiving a new interest in the very task of how best to take them in."

By contrast, general readers in Asian countries never had any need for the doorway of literary theory when they read my fiction. Most Asian people who took it upon themselves to read my works apparently accepted the stories I wrote as relatively “natural” from the outset. First came the acceptance, and then (if necessary) came the analysis. In most cases in the West, however, with some variation, the logical parsing came before the acceptance. Such differences between East and West, however, appear to be fading with the passing years as each influences the other."

[…]

"We often wonder what it would have been like if 9/11had never happened — or at least if that plan had not succeeded so perfectly. Then the world would have been very different from what it is now. America might have had a different president (a major possibility), and the Iraq and Afghanistan wars might never have happened (an even greater possibility).

Let’s call the world we actually have now Reality A and the world that we might have had if 9/11 had never happened Reality B. Then we can’t help but notice that the world of Reality B appears to be realer and more rational than the world of Reality A. To put itin different terms, we are living a world that has an even lower level of reality than the unreal world. What can we possibly call this if not “chaos”?"
culture  fiction  literature  writing  change  international  global  harukimurakami  analysis  perspective  reality  writerreaserrelationship  influence  influences 
december 2010 by robertogreco
New Designs for Learning: A Conversation with IDEO Founder David Kelley | LFA: Join The Conversation - Public School Insights
"Analytical thinking is great. It’s the way you learned to be step-by-step—to collect data, analyze it & come up w/ a conclusion, like you did in science class. It is really useful, & I hope people keep doing it. It's very important. Design thinking is more experimental & less step-by-step. It's fuzzier. It's intuitive. It's empathic. We often say that it’s integrative thinking, where you put together ideas from different sources—it’s synthesis. This is a way of thinking that is not quite so linear, but you can build confidence in it if you do it over & over again…the basic premise of design thinking revolves around empathy, being understanding of what other people want, & how the world is put together from a social & emotional point of view…wouldn’t you have multiple faculty members with different points of view in the same classroom, so that the kids are not biased"

[via: http://stevemiranda.wordpress.com/2010/09/05/david-kelley-on-design-thinking-from-the-archives/ ]
analysis  synthesis  d.school  creativity  design  education  learningspaces  emergent  tcsnmy  schools  lcproject  designthinking  empathy  intuition  criticalthinking  21stcenturyskills  socialemotionallearning  bias  k12lab  prototyping  toshare  topost  nclb  making  doing  realworld  storytelling  generalists  scaling  davidkelley  socialemotional 
september 2010 by robertogreco
Why Old Spice matters « Snarkmarket
"blogs are actu­ally more related to live the­ater than they are to, say, news­pa­pers. The things that make a blog good are almost exactly the things that make a live per­for­mance good...most impor­tant...is inter­play w/ the audience...

...this cam­paign [also] made me think of 48 Hour Mag­a­zine...same sense of you-gotta-see-this...can-they-really-do-it. It was an event..."But [an event’s] urgency—its live­ness, human vital­ity, &, frankly, its risk & unpredictability—is what makes it more than just another link in the stream"...

one final rea­son to take this for­mat seriously:

...It’s tons of fun. Any­body who’s writ­ten a blog, got­ten deep into Twit­ter, run a Kick­starter project, pulled strings on an ARG will tell you...There’s a spe­cial sat­is­fac­tion to see­ing its impact on the world immediately—and adjust­ing based on what you see. It’s alive, it’s elec­tric, it’s addic­tive. It’s con­nected and communal."
robinsloan  socialmedia  storytelling  advertising  oldspice  2010  theater  analysis  marketing  media  digital  creative  casestudy  video  events  ted  realtime  twitter  blogs  blogging  feedback  interactive  interactivity 
july 2010 by robertogreco
I Write Like
"Check what famous writer you write like with this statistical analysis tool, which analyzes your word choice and writing style and compares them to those of the famous writers.
analysis  language  literature  comparison  writing  fun  english  authors  classideas  via:robinsloan 
july 2010 by robertogreco
140kit: application : welcome
"Research: 140kit is more than your personal stash of Tweets; when you signup, you have access to two powerful default scrape types: You can either search terms (with/without our similar term branching algorithm enabled) from this moment using the powerful Streaming API or soon access one of our Whitelisted machines for REST access to collect as many tweets as possible from any number of accounts.

Explore: Once your data collection is complete, you have access to an expanding list of analytical offerings to measure your data sets rapidly and in new ways. From there, you can quickly export data, view general charts, and soon have access to an experimental re-tweet network graph visualization. Use this data for academic research, one-off fact-checking blog posts, or anything else you can think of, really.

Collaborate: What if you wanted to combine multiple data sets and look at their sum value?..."
twitter  microblogging  datamining  rss  database  research  scraping  api  data  analysis  via:robinsloan 
july 2010 by robertogreco
We Have A President - The Daily Dish | By Andrew Sullivan
"What we are seeing… is what we see everywhere with Obama: a relentless empiricism in pursuit of a particular objective & a willingness to let the process take its time. The very process itself can reveal - not just to Obama, but to everyone - what exactly the precise options are. Instead of engaging in adolescent tests of whether a president is "tough" or "weak", we actually have an adult prepared to allow the various choices in front of us be fully explored. He is, moreover, not taking the decision process outside the public arena. He is allowing it to unfold w/in the public arena…What strikes me about this is the enormous self-confidence this reveals. Here is a young president, prepared to allow himself to be portrayed as "weak" or "dithering" in the slow & meticulous arrival at public policy. He is trusting the reality to help expose what we need to do. He is allowing the debate - however messy & confusing & emotional - to take its time & reveal the real choices in front of us."
barackobama  afghanistan  confidence  leadership  politics  debate  via:migurski  andrewsullivan  foreignpolicy  military  terrorism  analysis  policy  process  empiricism  2009  middleeast  us  presidency 
november 2009 by robertogreco
ZaidLearn: The Finnish Education System Rocks! Why?
"In short, Singapore and Finland have become world renowned for their education systems, but interestingly they have achieved their success using quite different approaches (to say it mildly!). To get the juicy details of both, please read Amran Noordin's 6-part series mentioned above."
education  teaching  finland  singapore  comparison  systems  change  analysis  schools  policy 
october 2009 by robertogreco
Persuade xor Discover
"It's hard enough to overcome one's own misconceptions without having to think about how to get the resulting ideas past other people's. I worry that if I wrote to persuade, I'd start to shy away unconsciously from ideas I knew would be hard to sell. When I notice something surprising, it's usually very faint at first. There's nothing more than a slight stirring of discomfort. I don't want anything to get in the way of noticing it consciously.

I didn't make a deliberate choice to write to discover, rather than writing to persuade. In fact, I didn't realize how opposed they were till I wrote this. This essay was originally about being ingratiating. It started from the faintest sense that something was amiss: why do so many people take a violent dislike to Michael Arrington? But I'm glad I picked at that anomaly instead of ignoring it. It was only by writing to discover that I learned I don't write to persuade."
writing  essays  michaelarrington  discovery  paulgraham  analysis  persuasion  communication 
september 2009 by robertogreco
Document Analysis Worksheets
"The following document analysis worksheets were designed and developed by the Education Staff of the National Archives and Records Administration. You may find these worksheets useful as you introduce students to various documents. Thousands of documents are available throughout sections of the National Archives website, including: Teaching With Documents, Online Exhibits, and the ARC Online Catalog."
worksheets  primarysources  teaching  socialstudies  history  nationalarchives  us  analysis  tcsnmy  via:cburell 
september 2009 by robertogreco
Systemic Flaws In the Reported World View - Chris Anderson
"In fact, most meta-level reporting of trends show a world that is getting better. We live longer, in cleaner environments, are healthier, and have access to goods and experiences that kings of old could never have dreamed of. If that doesn't make us happier, we really have no one to blame except ourselves. Oh, and the media lackeys who continue to feed us the litany of woes that we subconsciously crave."
chrisanderson  optimism  politics  history  analysis  future  culture  news  stateoftheworld  violence  philosophy  ideas  progress  edge  media  world  pessimism 
may 2009 by robertogreco
TimesOnline - Joseph Cassano: the man with the trillion-dollar price on his head
"Starting in 1952, two generations of economists worked to show that people are like molecules, whose behaviour can be predicted in ways that are stable over time. Science then infected everything, from how much capital banks need to protect themselves against insolvency, to the risk in credit-default swaps. But there was a flaw: the City’s faux physicists never go back far enough in their analysis, because the data on the Bloomberg terminal cover a tiny period of history. “Real scientists tend to be much more sceptical about their data and their models,” says William Janeway, an MD of the private-equity firm Warburg Pincus and a Cambridge University lecturer. “They had all of the maths, but none of the instincts of good scientists.” There is also the 4x4 effect: if you give people a safer car (read, a safer world through financial innovation), they tend to drive faster. But we are getting ahead of ourselves."
aig  finance  capitalism  banking  business  collapse  2009  crisis  economics  analysis  history  math  science  research  modeling 
may 2009 by robertogreco
WikiMatrix - Compare them all
"Find the Wikis that match your personal needs: Just answer a few questions in the Wiki Choice Wizard or create a customized Search. Compare the Wikis of your choice in a comfortable side-by-side table. Just select them on the left and click the button. Use the forum to talk to other Wiki users, ask questions and discuss everything Wiki. Or find professional support in the Consultant Marketplace. Add your own Engine to the Matrix or share your knowledge about Wikis in WikiMatrix's Documentation Wiki."
wikis  comparison  socialsoftware  collaboration  onlinetoolkit  analysis  wikimatrix  reference 
february 2009 by robertogreco
WikiDashboard - Providing social transparency to Wikipedia
"The idea is that if we provide social transparency and enable attribution of work to individual workers in Wikipedia, then this will eventually result in increased credibility and trust in the page content, and therefore higher levels of trust in Wikipedia." ... "While tongue-in-cheek, it brings up a valid point. Because the information is out there for anyone to examine and to question, incorrect information can be fixed and two disputed points of view can be listed side-by-side. In fact, this is precisely the academic process for ascertaining the truth. Scholars publish papers so that theories can be put forth and debated, facts can be examined, and ideas challenged. Without publication and without social transparency of attribution of ideas and facts to individual researchers, there would be no scientific progress."
tcsnmy  wikipedia  transparency  collaboration  wikis  complexity  authority  visualization  networking  socialsoftware  analysis  wikidashboard  reference  research  credibility 
february 2009 by robertogreco
M-Lab | Welcome to Measurement Lab
"Measurement Lab (M-Lab) is an open platform for researchers to deploy Internet measurement tools. By enhancing Internet transparency, we aim to help sustain a healthy, innovative Internet."
internet  performance  via:preoccupations  broadband  isp  netneutrality  bandwidth  monitoring  security  analysis  analytics  neutrality  bittorrent  traffic  testing  networking  tools  sysadmin  google 
january 2009 by robertogreco
Don’t Trust Anyone In A Tie | Print Article | Newsweek.com
"High-frequency data is the problem, because we can't interpret it correctly. Our environment is increasingly complicated, and the data that we choose to single out and interpret isn't always relevant [to the problem we are trying to understand]. You can always find correlations if you look. I could find a correlation between your father's blood pressure & some aspect of the market. Any number that you hear can act as an anchor for your beliefs. If I ask you your Social Security number, then ask you how you think the market will perform, the numbers will be correlated. So you have the idea that you are charting the world of randomness, but you aren't. This goes for funds as well—a lot of the metrics they use are ridiculous." "Take risks away from bankers. Let hedge funds—and the high-net-worth people—take it. At least they aren't threatening society. Also, don't use an economist as Treasury secretary. The world needs fewer economists in general. I believe in psychology, not economics."
nassimtaleb  data  flow  context  bigpicture  relevance  miopia  correlationcausation  randomness  blackswans  finance  analysis  crisis  2008  banking  investment 
december 2008 by robertogreco
FT.com | The Economists’ Forum | A time for humility
"This, in short, is a time for humility. Why did we mostly get “it” so sensationally wrong? How did something that looks increasingly like the precursor of a slump creep up on almost all of us this year? It is a pretty good question. It is a pretty embarrassing one, too. ... I would insist that one of the big lessons of this experience is that economics is too compartmentalised and so, too, are official institutions. To get a full sense of the risks being run, we needed to combine the worst scenarios of each sets of experts. Only then would we have had some sense of how the global imbalances, inflation targeting, the impact of China, asset price bubbles, financial innovation, deregulation and risk management systems might interact."
economics  crisis  2008  specialization  bigpicture  generalists  martinwolf  analysis  finance  markets  specialists 
november 2008 by robertogreco
QuarkBase : Everything about a Website
"Quarkbase is a free tool to find complete information about a website. It is a mashup of over 30 data sources and many algorithms gathering information from Internet on various topics like social popularity, traffic, associated people, etc."
statistics  internet  online  ranking  analytics  info  domain  stats  information  data  analysis  website  webdesign  web  traffic  trends  whois  onlinetoolkit  webdev 
september 2008 by robertogreco
The world needs more foxes and fewer hedgehogs [via: http://askpang.typepad.com/relevant_history/2008/08/foxes-hedgehogs.html see also: http://askpang.typepad.com/relevant_history/2008/08/berlin-on-hedge.html]
"Hedgehogs fit what they learn into a world view. Foxes improvise explanations case by case...world needs both but today needs fewer hedgehogs, more foxes...some pundits are better than others...A little knowledge is helpful. Dilettantes...do much better than...[those] who based their judgment on one-page summary of issues. But experts have little advantage over dilettantes...Bad forecasters are consulted more frequently than good ones...more famous the expert, the worse his prognostications...Foxes are better at prediction than hedgehogs because they derive information from many sources, adjust views in line with events, see a range of perspectives on each situation. Hedgehogs have one clear view, seek evidence that confirms that view, have ready explanations for apparent failures of foresight...Effective management teams include both hedgehogs & foxes...modern tendency to appoint hedgehogs and allow them to surround themselves by like-minded hedgehogs is so dangerous"
decisionmaking  predictions  pundits  politics  policy  opinion  analysis  business  journalism  futurism 
august 2008 by robertogreco
Pasta&Vinegar » Blog Archive » Taleb's "fooled by randomness"
Nassim Taleb: "I prefer to read poetry. If an event is important enough, it will find its way to my ear...explains why it is better to read the New yorker on Mondays than the Wall Street Journal every morning..." + Nicolas Nova: "reason why I walk around in cities or take so much trains: to have time to ruminate from different “information-filled” places: the internet, my apartment and newsstands+book-shops."
nassimtaleb  randomness  flow  information  predictions  news  attention  trading  bias  patterns  analysis  nicolasnova  blackswans 
august 2008 by robertogreco
RealScoop's software analyzes statements made by public figures in audio... (kottke.org)
"...or video and plots the results on a scale of believability that runs from believable to highly questionable. RealScoop uses advanced emotion-based voice analysis technology to rate the believability of people's statements."
truth  audio  video  lies  voice  analysis  technology  emotion 
april 2008 by robertogreco
OWL Music Search » Use YOUR music to find NEW music!
"Owl Music Search compares your favorite songs to thousands of others to find similar songs for you to listen to, enjoy, and purchase."
music  search  sudio  analysis  creativecommons  comparison  audio  mp3 
april 2008 by robertogreco
Evaluating Web Pages: Techniques to Apply & Questions to Ask
"Train eye & fingers to employ series of techniques that help quickly find what you need to know about web pages + Train mind to think critically, even suspiciously, by asking series of questions that help decide how much web page is to be trusted."
evaluation  internet  web  reference  informationliteracy  information  literacy  trust  tutorials  analysis  e-learning  research  infoliteracy  howto  education  technology  reliability 
april 2008 by robertogreco
Anatomy of a Mob: The Lacy/Zuckerberg Interview - TechnoSocial
"As citizens of the online world, we have a responsibility to step forward when we see people misbehaving. It doesn't take much to tone things down. People need to be reminded that the target of their frustrations is a real person."
sxsw  twitter  mobs  social  crowds  facebook  sarahlacy  statistics  visualization  community  relationships  psychology  keynote  socialmedia  society  etiquette  technology  alwayson  communication  analysis  casestudy  web  internet  online  howardrheingold  backchannel  via:hrheingold 
march 2008 by robertogreco
Autodesk - Sponsorships - Autodesk at TED2008
"BIGVIZ is an exploration in visualizing the Big Ideas presented on the TED mainstage. Two visual cartographers, David Sibbet and Kevin Richards, created over 700 spontaneous sketches of the presenters' ideas using Autodesk Sketchbook Pro software running
sketching  visualization  notetaking  ted  graphics  mindmap  mindmapping  analysis  infographics 
march 2008 by robertogreco
Where World Wide Web Went Wrong
"I have had the opportunity to examine and compare much of the software presently used on the Internet, I have a good background in hypermedia designs and concepts, and I felt that with the prevalence of hype about the World Wide Web it would be valuable
via:preoccupations  www  history  interet  web  criticism  analysis 
march 2008 by robertogreco
5 Whys - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
"The five whys is a question asking method used to explore the cause/effect relationships underlying a particular problem. Ultimately, the goal of applying the 5 Whys method is to determine a root cause of a defect or problem."
problemsolving  management  projectmanagement  process  experiencedesign  engineering  analysis  ux  lifehacks 
january 2008 by robertogreco
cityofsound: The Personal Well-Tempered Environment
"real-time dashboard for buildings/neighbourhoods/city focused on conveying energy flow in/out of spaces, centred around behaviour of individuals/groups within buildings...real-time & longitudinal info needed to change behaviour"
architecture  behavior  cityofsound  danhill  datavisualization  sustainability  socialnetworking  environment  green  information  design  computing  cities  energy  homes  buildings  analysis  lastfm  flickr  buglabs  electricity  postoccupancy  wattson  water  usage  ubicomp  spimes  everyware  ubiquitous  gamechanging  visualization  monitoring  efficiency  community  consumption  conservation  games  statistics  surveillance  dashboard  interaction  last.fm 
january 2008 by robertogreco
bunnie’s blog » Blog Archive » OLPC XO-1
"its mechanical design is brilliant...fairly clean-sheet redesign of traditional notebook PC mechanics around the goal of survivability, serviceability, and robustness"
olpc  laptops  analysis  unboxing  hacking  hardware  design  reviews  technology 
january 2008 by robertogreco
ICT4D Bibliography » Bibliographies » Reader: Web 2.0 and Education
"Description: Articles about Web 2.0 applied to Education, e-Learning 2.0, University 2.0. More resources: Universidad 2.0, Web Educativa 2.0. Proudly improved thanks to Biblioteca 2.0."
professionaldevelopment  learning  web2.0  connectivism  bibliography  reference  academia  research  analysis  e-learning  education 
november 2007 by robertogreco
Welcome to MyRocketbook.com! | ROCKETBOOK Online Study Guides: Watch. Read. Succeed.
"Rocketbooks are video study guides that provide summaries and detailed analyses of literary works. Our WikiNotes section offers a new user experience allowing fresh viewpoints and expressions from today's students, educators, and literature enthusiasts t
homework  learning  literature  english  teaching  education  mp3  video  ebooks  books  analysis  schools  homeschool 
november 2007 by robertogreco
stevenberlinjohnson.com: Literary Style By The Numbers
"I compiled stats for 3-4 books for each author, except Gladwell who has written two, and then plotted them on a scatter chart, with the y axis representing % complex words and the x axis representing words per sentence. The results were pretty fascinatin
amazon  analysis  books  complexity  words  sentences  statistics  style  visualization  information  language  literature  reference  writing  sales 
october 2007 by robertogreco
All Linkin Park songs look the same - Hometracked
"it’s hard not to view the six images above as a statement on the music industry...major labels decry actions of listeners who download music from free sources. But...the alternative they offer: The same song, repackaged six different ways."
music  analysis  audio  visualization  marketing  business  sound  commentary  songs  culture 
october 2007 by robertogreco
TitleZ: Book trends for publishers
"makes it easy to see how a book or group of books has performed over time, relative to other books on the market. Simply enter a search phrase, book title, or author, and TitleZ returns a comprehensive listing of books from Amazon along with our historic
amazon  analysis  books  tracking  performance  sales  rankings  trends  reputation  publishers  statistics  data 
october 2007 by robertogreco
14 million people interacted with Facebook Applications in August
"The chart is a visual representation of the Activities that the Facebook community used in August."
use  facebook  interaction  web  socialsoftware  social  statistics  diagrams  analysis 
october 2007 by robertogreco
Real Time Rome
"The project aggregated data from cell phones (obtained using Telecom Italia's innovative Lochness platform), buses and taxis in Rome to better understand urban dynamics in real time."
rome  italy  mapping  maps  mobile  phones  visualization  analysis  architecture  ambient  surveillance  technology  cartography  cities  culture  movement  society  social  urbanism  urban  travel  tracking  traffic  networks  data  flow  infographics  interaction  location  locative 
september 2007 by robertogreco
ClickTale™ :: Record - Watch - Understand
"Record visitors' every action as they browse your website. Watch movies to understand visitor behavior, gain valuable insights and improve your website's usability."
usability  webdesign  web  recording  design  user  behavior  browser  analysis  tracking  traffic  browsers  webdev 
september 2007 by robertogreco
Science Journal - WSJ.com
"We all make mistakes and, if you believe medical scholar John Ioannidis, scientists make more than their fair share. By his calculations, most published research findings are wrong."
medicine  research  science  statistics  studies  data  critique  analysis  peerreview 
september 2007 by robertogreco
Yahoo: 13 rules for making your web pages faster | Tech news blog - CNET News.com
"Yahoo's Exceptional Performance team has put together a list of "13 rules for making web pages fast" and posted it on Yahoo's developer network. The list, which includes "Make fewer HTTP requests," "Use a content delivery network," and "Avoid redirects,"
css  usability  webdev  website  webdesign  programming  tools  analysis  firefox  plugins 
july 2007 by robertogreco
YSlow for Firebug
"YSlow analyzes web pages and tells you why they're slow based on the rules for high performance web sites. YSlow is a Firefox add-on integrated with the popular Firebug web development tool."
analysis  webdesign  javascript  firefox  plugins  performance  website  web  extensions  browser  programming  testing  webdev  browsers 
july 2007 by robertogreco
Pew Research Center: Tagging Play
"Forget Dewey and His Decimals, Internet Users Are Revolutionizing the Way We Classify Information - and Make Sense of It"
del.icio.us  flickr  folksonomy  tags  tagging  statistics  standards  socialsoftware  taxonomy  trends  use  classification  community  analysis  libraries  journalism  media  networking  pew  play  research 
july 2007 by robertogreco
On the ground running: Lessons from experience design « Speedbird
"people are already organizers and designers of experience par excellence...Weiser wanted to offer users ways to reach into and configure the systems they encountered; ideally, such seams would afford moments of pleasure, revelation and beauty."
toread  ipod  ux  experience  design  nike+  apple  adamgreenfield  ideo  control  urban  planning  architecture  cocreation  user  usability  web  internet  online  extensibility  human  systems  ubicomp  ubiquitous  beautifulseams  technology  interface  networks  analysis  collaboration  opensource  users  services  innovation  interaction  folksonomy  product  everyware  interactiondesign  experiencedesign  webdesign  webdev  process  productdesign 
june 2007 by robertogreco

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