recentpopularlog in

robertogreco : ancient   17

Guatemala's Maya Society Featured Huge 'Megalopolis,' LiDAR Data Show
"A vast, interconnected network of ancient cities was home to millions more people than previously thought."
classideas  maya  archaeology  empire  history  2018  guatemala  mesoamerica  americas  latinamerica  cities  ancient  lidar  maps  mapping  precolumbian 
february 2018 by robertogreco
Ancient Maya Temples Were Giant Loudspeakers?
"Centuries before the first speakers and subwoofers, ancient Americans—intentionally or not—may have been turning buildings into giant sound amplifiers and distorters to enthrall or disorient audiences, archaeologists say."

[via (with sounds): http://www.negrophonic.com/2010/ancient-mayan-subwoofers/ via: http://twitter.com/demilit/status/18348445865611264 ]
architecture  history  sound  mexico  archaeology  maya  ancient  subwoofers  palenque  wasmaya  pyramids 
december 2010 by robertogreco
Inside Lascaux: Rare, Unpublished - Photo Gallery - LIFE
"A warm afternoon in southwestern France. As two schoolboys hunt rabbits on a ridge covered with pine, oak, and blackberry brambles, their dog chases a hare down a hole beside a downed tree. Widening the hole, removing rocks, the boys follow -- and enter not merely another world, but another time. Underground, they discover "a Versailles of prehistory" -- a series of caves, today collectively known as Lascaux, boasting wall paintings up to 18,000 years old. In 1947, LIFE's Ralph Morse went to Lascaux, and became the first photographer to ever document the astonishing, vibrant paintings. Here, on the 70th anniversary of the discovery of the cave and its treasures, in a gallery featuring rare and never-published photographs, Morse -- still vibrant himself at 93 -- shares with LIFE.com his memories of what it was like to encounter the long-hidden, strikingly lifelike handiwork of a vanished people: the Cro-Magnon."
lascaux  art  history  painting  photography  ancient 
september 2010 by robertogreco
From the Trenches - Carved in Living Color
"Leave your preconceived notions of ancient art at home. A groundbreaking exhibition at Harvard University's Arthur M. Sackler Museum in Cambridge, Massachusetts, shows how marble statues actually looked in antiquity: covered from head to toe in vibrant paint. Based on 25 years of research by Vinzenz Brinkmann, formerly a curator at the Glyptothek Museum in Germany, Gods in Color: Painted Sculpture of Classical Antiquity features more than 20 full-size color reconstructions of Greek and Roman works, alongside 35 original statues and reliefs." [via: http://io9.com/5616498/ultraviolet-light-reveals-how-ancient-greek-statues-really-looked]
ancient  archaeology  greece  sculpture  history  ancienthistory  ancientgreece  arthistory  painting  art  statues 
august 2010 by robertogreco
A Walk Through the Ancient World
"When the first immersive 3D games came out, I asked a programmer if he knew of anyone who had used that technology to create a Virtual Ancient Rome or Ancient Athens. I loved the idea of walking around in a place whose current face was changed out of all recognition from its golden age. He shook his head. Creating virtual worlds was way too time consuming and required too much specialist knowledge and so was too expensive. A virtual Rome wouldn't create the profit that Doom did.

Fast forward a decade and the programming necessary becomes easier to do and the number of people who know how to do it have increased substantially. The costs involved in creating a virtual world have decreased at the same time that academic and scholarly institutions have become much more willing to invest in it.

Now that it's quite a bit easier to find a virtual ancient city to stroll through, I thought I would survey a few options and provide you with a short virtual atlas of the ancient world."
ancient  ancientrome  classics  archaeology  middleages  history  ancientgreece  3d  virtual  tcsnmy  classideas  ancientcivilization  ancienthistory  ancienchina  china  rome  athens  mexico  ancientmexico 
july 2010 by robertogreco
Encyclopedia Mythica: Pronunciation guide [via: http://ayjay.jottit.com/links_for_students]
"This pronunciation guide is mainly for English speaking readers. The pronunciation of Greek and Latin words in other languages, such as Dutch or German or Spanish, is quite different. We can expect that the pronunciation of some words will remain highly disputable and we will never get consensus about. The main function of this guide is to give readers at least some idea of how to pronounce the names of the various deities mentioned in this encyclopedia."
tohare  tcsnmy  ancientgreece  pronunciation  greek  greece  mythology  myths  literature  classics  ancient  srg 
july 2010 by robertogreco
Paul Halsall/Fordham University: Internet History Sourcebooks Project
"The Internet History Sourcebooks Project is a collection of public domain and copy-permitted historical texts presented cleanly (without advertising or excessive layout) for educational use."
education  art  teaching  online  database  primarysources  reference  literature  research  religion  resources  encyclopedia  search  documents  medieval  ancient  europe  history  ebooks  books  archives  world  socialstudies 
december 2009 by robertogreco
Internet Ancient History Sourcebook: Main Page
"The Ancient and Modern Sourcebooks have a different role: since there are already ample online repositories of texts for these periods, the goal here is to provide and organize texts for use in classroom situations. Links to the larger online collections are provided for those who want to explore further. The distinctive feature of the Sourcebooks' layout remains here - the avoidance of images and multiple "clicking" to find texts."
archaeology  ancienthistory  research  reference  literature  rome  mesopotamia  primarysources  ancient  mythology  greek  education  culture  history  books  resources  religion  philosophy  greece  egypt  classics  worldhistory  tcsnmy  ancientcivilization  socialstudies  classresources 
november 2009 by robertogreco
Senior City-zens: The World's 10 Oldest Still-Inhabited Cities | WebUrbanist
"Urban society may seem a modern phenomenon but cities have been around for a lot longer than one might think. Indeed, once nomadic tribes began to settle in one location, they saw that it was good, became fruitful, and multiplied. Decades, centuries and millennia passed while war, climate change and human migration all took their toll. Relatively few ancient cities have managed to survive the test of time. Here are 10 that have not only survived, but continue to thrive."
culture  architecture  history  archaeology  asia  civilization  cities  urban  ancient  geography  world  travel 
july 2009 by robertogreco
Codex Sinaiticus
"Codex Sinaiticus is one of the most important books in the world. Handwritten well over 1600 years ago, the manuscript contains the Christian Bible in Greek, including the oldest complete copy of the New Testament. Its heavily corrected text is of outstanding importance for the history of the Bible and the manuscript – the oldest substantial book to survive Antiquity – is of supreme importance for the history of the book"
codexsinaiticus  manuscripts  online  history  greek  ancient  digitization  classics  christianity  bible  religion  archives 
july 2009 by robertogreco
EyeWitness to History - history through the eyes of those who lived it
"Your ringside seat to history - from the Ancient World to the present. History through the eyes of those who lived it, presented by Ibis Communications, Inc. a digital publisher of educational programming."
history  reference  education  socialstudies  world  ancient  middleages  medieval  renaissance  us  europe  asia  tcsnmy 
june 2009 by robertogreco
BBC NEWS | Middle East | Iraq's damaged Babylon hopes for revival
"Beneath a patch of stony, desert ground on the River Euphrates, surrounded by date palms, many of the secrets of the cradle of civilisation are still waiting to be uncovered." more here: http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/in_pictures/7729443.stm
archaeology  culture  art  history  tcsnmy  ancient  ancientcivilization  anthropology  mesopotamia  babylon  via:cburell 
november 2008 by robertogreco
In search of Western civilisation's lost classics | The Australian
"The unique library of the Villa of the Papyri in Herculaneum, buried beneath lava by Vesuvius's eruption in AD79, is slowly revealing its long-held secrets"
history  libraries  epicurus  ancient  pompeii  herculaneum  archaeology  civilization  classics  tcsnmy  books 
august 2008 by robertogreco

Copy this bookmark:





to read