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The 'Future Book' Is Here, but It's Not What We Expected | WIRED
"THE FUTURE BOOK was meant to be interactive, moving, alive. Its pages were supposed to be lush with whirling doodads, responsive, hands-on. The old paperback Zork choose-your-own-adventures were just the start. The Future Book would change depending on where you were, how you were feeling. It would incorporate your very environment into its story—the name of the coffee shop you were sitting at, your best friend’s birthday. It would be sly, maybe a little creepy. Definitely programmable. Ulysses would extend indefinitely in any direction you wanted to explore; just tap and some unique, mega-mind-blowing sui generis path of Joycean machine-learned words would wend itself out before your very eyes.

Prognostications about how technology would affect the form of paper books have been with us for centuries. Each new medium was poised to deform or murder the book: newspapers, photography, radio, movies, television, videogames, the internet.

Some viewed the intersection of books and technology more positively: In 1945, Vannevar Bush wrote in The Atlantic: “Wholly new forms of encyclopedias will appear, ready made with a mesh of associative trails running through them, ready to be dropped into the memex and there amplified.”

Researcher Alan Kay created a cardboard prototype of a tablet-like device in 1968. He called it the "Dynabook," saying, “We created a new kind of medium for boosting human thought, for amplifying human intellectual endeavor. We thought it could be as significant as Gutenberg’s invention of the printing press 500 years ago.”

In the 1990s, Future Bookism hit a kind of beautiful fever pitch. We were so close. Brown University professor Robert Coover, in a 1992 New York Times op-ed titled “The End of Books,” wrote of the future of writing: “Fluidity, contingency, indeterminacy, plurality, discontinuity are the hypertext buzzwords of the day, and they seem to be fast becoming principles, in the same way that relativity not so long ago displaced the falling apple.” And then, more broadly: “The print medium is a doomed and outdated technology, a mere curiosity of bygone days destined soon to be consigned forever to those dusty unattended museums we now call libraries.”

Normal books? Bo-ring. Future Books? Awesome—indeterminate—and we were almost there! The Voyager Company built its "expanded books" platform on Hypercard, launching with three titles at MacWorld 1992. Microsoft launched Encarta on CD-ROM.

But … by the mid-2000s, there still were no real digital books. The Rocket eBook was too little, too early. Sony launched the eink-based Librie platform in 2004 to little uptake. Interactive CD-ROMs had dropped off the map. We had Wikipedia, blogs, and the internet, but the mythological Future Book—some electric slab that would somehow both be like and not like the quartos of yore—had yet to materialize. Peter Meirs, head of technology at Time, hedged his bets perfectly, proclaiming: “Ultimately, there will be some sort of device!”

And then there was. Several devices, actually. The iPhone launched in June 2007, the Kindle that November. Then, in 2010, the iPad arrived. High-resolution screens were suddenly in everyone’s hands and bags. And for a brief moment during the early 2010s, it seemed like it might finally be here: the glorious Future Book."



"Yet here’s the surprise: We were looking for the Future Book in the wrong place. It’s not the form, necessarily, that needed to evolve—I think we can agree that, in an age of infinite distraction, one of the strongest assets of a “book” as a book is its singular, sustained, distraction-free, blissfully immutable voice. Instead, technology changed everything that enables a book, fomenting a quiet revolution. Funding, printing, fulfillment, community-building—everything leading up to and supporting a book has shifted meaningfully, even if the containers haven’t. Perhaps the form and interactivity of what we consider a “standard book” will change in the future, as screens become as cheap and durable as paper. But the books made today, held in our hands, digital or print, are Future Books, unfuturistic and inert may they seem."

[sections on self-publishing, crowdfunding, email newsletters, social media, audiobooks and podcasts, etc.]



"It turns out smartphones aren’t the best digital book reading devices (too many seductions, real-time travesties, notifications just behind the words), but they make excellent audiobook players, stowed away in pockets while commuting. Top-tier podcasts like Serial, S-Town, and Homecoming have normalized listening to audio or (nonfiction) booklike productions on smartphones."



"Last August, a box arrived on my doorstep that seemed to embody the apotheosis of contemporary publishing. The Voyager Golden Record: 40th Anniversary Edition was published via a crowdfunding campaign. The edition includes a book of images, three records, and a small poster packaged in an exquisite box set with supplementary online material. When I held it, I didn’t think about how futuristic it felt, nor did I lament the lack of digital paper or interactivity. I thought: What a strange miracle to be able to publish an object like this today. Something independently produced, complex and beautiful, with foil stamping and thick pages, full-color, in multiple volumes, made into a box set, with an accompanying record and other shimmering artifacts, for a weirdly niche audience, funded by geeks like me who are turned on by the romance of space.

We have arrived to the once imagined Future Book in piecemeal truths.

Moving images were often espoused to be a core part of our Future Book. While rarely found inside of an iBooks or Kindle book, they are here. If you want to learn the ukulele, you don’t search Amazon for a Kindle how-to book, you go to YouTube and binge on hours of lessons, stopping when you need to, rewinding as necessary, learning at your own pace.

Vannevar Bush's “Memex” essentially described Wikipedia built into a desk.

The "Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy" in The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy is an iPhone.

In The Book of Sand, Borges wrote of an infinite book: "It was then that the stranger told me: 'Study the page well. You will never see it again.'" Describing in many ways what it feels like to browse the internet or peek at Twitter.

Our Future Book is composed of email, tweets, YouTube videos, mailing lists, crowdfunding campaigns, PDF to .mobi converters, Amazon warehouses, and a surge of hyper-affordable offset printers in places like Hong Kong.

For a “book” is just the endpoint of a latticework of complex infrastructure, made increasingly accessible. Even if the endpoint stays stubbornly the same—either as an unchanging Kindle edition or simple paperback—the universe that produces, breathes life into, and supports books is changing in positive, inclusive ways, year by year. The Future Book is here and continues to evolve. You’re holding it. It’s exciting. It’s boring. It’s more important than it has ever been.

But temper some of those flight-of-fancy expectations. In many ways, it’s still a potato."
craigmod  ebooks  reading  howweread  2018  kindle  eink  print  publishing  selfpublishing  blurb  lulu  amazon  ibooks  apple  digital  bookfuturism  hypertext  hypercard  history  vannevarbush  borges  twitter  animation  video  newsletters  email  pdf  mobi  epub  infrastructure  systems  economics  goldenrecord  voyager  audio  audiobooks  smarthphones  connectivity  ereaders  podcasts  socialmedia  kevinkelly  benthompson  robinsloan  mailchimp  timbuktulabs  elenafavilli  francescacavallo  jackcheng  funding  kickstarter  crowdfunding  blogs  blogging  wikipedia  internet  web  online  writing  howwewrite  self-publishing  youtube 
january 2019 by robertogreco
Announcing Better Worlds: a science fiction project about hope - The Verge
"Contemporary science fiction often feels fixated on a sort of pessimism that peers into the world of tomorrow and sees the apocalypse looming more often than not. At a time when simply reading the news is an exercise in exhaustion, anxiety, and fear, it’s no surprise that so many of our tales about the future are dark amplifications of the greatest terrors of the present. But now more than ever, we also need the reverse: stories that inspire hope.

That’s why, starting on January 14th, we’ll be publishing Better Worlds: 10 original fiction stories, five animated adaptations, and five audio adaptations by a diverse roster of science fiction authors who take a more optimistic view of what lies ahead in ways both large and small, fantastical and everyday.

Growing up, I was surrounded by optimistic science fiction — not only the idealism of television shows like Star Trek, but also the pulpy, thrilling adventures of golden age science fiction comics. They imagined worlds where the lot of humanity had been improved by our innovations, both technological and social. Stories like these are more than just fantasy and fabulism; they are articulations of hope. We need only look at how many tech leaders were inspired to pursue careers in technology because of Star Trek to see the tangible effect of inspirational fiction. (Conversely, Snow Crash author Neal Stephenson once linked the increasing scarcity of optimistic science fiction to “innovation starvation.”)

Better Worlds is partly inspired by Stephenson’s fiction anthology Hieroglyph: Stories and Visions for a Better Future as well as Octavia’s Brood: Science Fiction Stories from Social Justice Movements, a 2015 “visionary fiction” anthology that is written by a diverse array of social activists and edited by Walidah Imarisha and adrienne maree brown. Their premise was simple: whenever we imagine a more equitable, sustainable, or humane world, we are producing speculative fiction, and this creates a “vital space” that is essential to forward progress.

The stories of Better Worlds are not intended to be conflict-free utopias or Pollyanna-ish paeans about how tech will solve everything; many are set in societies where people face challenges, sometimes life-threatening ones. But all of them imagine worlds where technology has made life better and not worse, and characters find a throughline of hope. We hope these stories will offer you the same: inspiration, optimism, or, at the very least, a brief reprieve that makes you feel a little bit better about what awaits us in the future — if we find the will to make it so.

—Laura Hudson, Culture Editor, The Verge

BETTER WORLDS STORIES

“A Theory Of Flight”
By Justina Ireland | Animation by All In Pixel
A daring plan to build an open-source rocket could help more people escape Earth.

“Move The World”
By Carla Speed McNeil
Once in your life, you can choose to pull a lever that resets the world — but will it make things better?

“A Model Dog”
By John Scalzi | Animation by Joel Plosz
An overbearing CEO demands that his employees engineer a solution to his dad’s aging dog.

“Online Reunion”
By Leigh Alexander
A young journalist chronicling a vintage e-pet reunion gets more than she expected.

“St. Juju”
By Rivers Solomon | Animation by Allen Laseter
A young woman must choose between her secure enclave and the one she loves.

“Monsters In Their Season”
By Cadwell Turnbull
An island commonwealth integrates an AI to defend itself against a worsening hurricane season.

“Overlay”
By Elizabeth Bonesteel | Animation by Device
A family hopes that running the perfect simulation can wake the father from a coma.

“Skin City”
By Kelly Robson
A street performer gets into trouble after falling for a radical privacy devotee.

“A Sun Will Always Sing”
By Karin Lowachee | Animation by Yeah Haus
A spacecraft carrying precious cargo embarks on a lifetime journey to a better world.

“The Burn”
By Peter Tieryas
As people around the world fall victim to The Burn, AR researchers begin to suspect a pattern."

[See also: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CAyBWYlLGGo ]
theverge  towatch  sciencefiction  scifi  optimism  technooptimism  animation  stories  hope  nealstephenson  walidahimarisha  adriennemareebrown  inspiration  justinaireland  carlaspeedmcneil  johnscalzi  joelplosz  leighalexander  allenlaseter  riverssolomon  cadwellturnbull  elizabthbonesteel  kellyrobson  karinlowachee  petertiervas 
december 2018 by robertogreco
joão do lago 🌱 on Twitter: "PSA: If you pause a youtube video, you can use the , and . keys to scroll through it frame by frame. Very helpful for animation study and reference."
"PSA: If you pause a youtube video, you can use the , and . keys to scroll through it frame by frame. Very helpful for animation study and reference."
youtube  howto  tips  animation  2018 
july 2018 by robertogreco
Summer Camp Island | Searching For Yetis | Cartoon Network - YouTube
"Oscar and Hedgehog are searching for yetis, after learning about them in the camp’s winter guide. The campers take a visit to yeti meadow to see real-live yetis in action!"

[See also:

Summer Camp Island: Opening Sequence
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mffPmElSc-c

official Tumblr
https://summercampsummercamp.tumblr.com/ ]
summercampislands  yeti  yetis  video  animation  2018  cartoons  seokim 
june 2018 by robertogreco
Your Name - Wikipedia
"Your Name (Japanese: 君の名は。 Hepburn: Kimi no Na wa.) is a 2016 Japanese animated drama film written and directed by Makoto Shinkai and produced by CoMix Wave Films. The film was produced by Noritaka Kawaguchi and Genki Kawamura, with music composed by Radwimps. Your Name tells the story of a high school girl in rural Japan and a high school boy in Tokyo who swap bodies. The film stars the voices of Ryunosuke Kamiki, Mone Kamishiraishi, Masami Nagasawa, and Etsuko Ichihara. Shinkai's novel of the same name was published a month before the film's premiere.

Your Name was distributed by Toho, it premiered at the Anime Expo 2016 convention in Los Angeles, California on 3 July 2016, and in Japan on 26 August 2016. It received widespread acclaim from critics, who praised the film for its animation and emotional impact, and was also a major commercial success, becoming the fourth-highest-grossing film of all time in Japan, the 7th-highest-grossing traditionally animated film, the highest-grossing anime and Japanese alike film and the 5th-highest-grossing non-English film worldwide[note 1], with a total gross of more than $355 million. The film won the 49th Sitges Film Festival, 2016 Los Angeles Film Critics Association Awards, and 71st Mainichi Film Awards for Best Animated Feature Film, as well as receiving a nomination for the 40th Japan Academy Prize for the Best Animation of the Year. A live-action remake is currently in the works."
anime  towatch  japan  film  animation  via:robinsloan  makotoshinkai  srg 
november 2017 by robertogreco
The Art Assignment - YouTube
"The Art Assignment is a weekly PBS Digital Studios production hosted by curator Sarah Green. We take you around the U.S. to meet working artists and solicit assignments from them that we can all complete. Check for new episodes every Thursday!"

[via: "3. Intimate, Indispensable GIF - Toyin Odutola"
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wgTWPkK5wvo

"In which The Art Assignment visits New York-based artist Toyin Odutola and receives the challenge to create a GIF! But not just any GIF--it must articulate something intimate that is indispensable to you.

EPISODE 03 INSTRUCTIONS:

1. Think of something intimate that is indispensable to you. (It doesn't have to be a body part. It can be an object, place, memory, anything.)

2. Depict it in the form of a GIF. You don't have to make drawings-you can use photographs, make a sculpture, or whatever you like.

3. Upload it using #theartassignment

4. Fame and glory (your response might be in a future episode)

Find and follow Toyin online: @obia_thethird, toyinodutola.com
and learn more about her work here: http://www.jackshainman.com/artists/toyin-odutola/ "]
art  classideas  gifs  motion  animation  toyinojihodutola 
july 2017 by robertogreco
Storytelling advice (video) | Khan Academy
[via: "Now you can take Pixar’s ‘The Art of Storytelling’ course for free"
http://blog.sfgate.com/techchron/2017/02/16/now-you-can-take-pixars-the-art-of-storytelling-course-for-free/

"Have you always wanted to be Pixar animator? Now that process is a tiny bit easier. The animation studio recently made a number of courses available on the Khan Academy website to help you start your journey — and they’re free.

The group of courses are called “Pixar in a Box” and include short lessons on everything from character modeling and animation to using virtual cameras. Today, it added a new course into the mix: The Art of Storytelling.

The free course is an exploration into the storytelling process at Pixar. From the course description:

“What makes someone a good storyteller? Storytelling is something we all do naturally, starting at a young age, but there’s a difference between good storytelling and great storytelling. In this lesson you’ll hear from Pixar directors and story artists about how they got their start, what stories inspire them, and you’ll begin to think about what kinds of stories you might want to tell.”

Throughout the course, you’ll learn what Pixar creators do to help build their own stories, complete activities, and get advice from Pixar storytellers on how to tell your own stories.

The courses are made up of text and short videos and are designed so that anyone at any skill level can start at the beginning and dive right in. They’re not quite as comprehensive as what you might learn in a college course but can give you a really good overview of a topic to help you decide if you might want to enroll in a course down the line.

Who knows? The next “Toy Story” might even be your idea."]

[Also available from Pixar:
https://www.khanacademy.org/partner-content/pixar ]
khanacademy  pixar  storytelling  classideas  animation  filmmaking  2017 
february 2017 by robertogreco
Don’t need no education: What Danes consider healthy children’s television | The Economist
"A DAY into my holiday (spent with my wife’s family) in Denmark, and the changes are striking enough to move me back to the keyboard. Perhaps it was the display of life-sized nude photographs of young women, kicking off discussion about whether the choice of bodies was representative enough. Or perhaps it’s the casual way Danes use the English word "fuck", not because they’re especially foul-mouthed but because the word was imported without much of its taboo force. On the flight over I heard a nicely dressed middle-aged mother use it with her young daughters, in mild irritation but not anger.

But perhaps the most striking raw difference is on television, and specifically Ramasjang, the public children’s television channel. (It is part of DR, Denmark’s equivalent of the BBC.) It is everything that American or British kids’ programming is not.

It is naughty. Perhaps its most beloved character is Onkel Reje (“Uncle Shrimp”), a sailor-themed character in a red suit with a scruffy beard. He picks his nose. His stinky socks tell each other jokes. But much more than that, in the best Danish tradition, he mocks beloved institutions: his grandmother lights a fart on fire. He says the worst gift he ever got for Christmas—from Queen Margarethe herself—was the washbasin she washes her bare bottom in. And God he says, lives in heaven with Santa Claus and their dog Marianne, implying that the Supreme Being is not only imaginary, but also gay.

DR should have known this is what they would get when they hired, for the actor playing Onkel Reje, Mads Geertsen, who had previously recorded as a kind of avant-garde musician under the name Je m’appelle Mads. It boggles the mind that the producers at Ramasjang saw this video—in which a mostly naked Mads offers rude tributes to Denmark like a dancing pack of cigarettes and a cow pooing—and said “let’s give that man a children’s show.”

Yet somehow it’s also incredibly wholesome. The adult actors are frequently fat or ugly, in a way they never would be in America. Some have tattoos or nose-rings, just as they do in the real world. The shows—mostly live-action or puppets, not animation—move at an unhurried pace, two or three characters on the screen at the time, with little frenetic music and infrequent special effects. Whether made in the 2010s or the 1980s, Ramasjang’s shows are downright languid. The contrast is all the clearer when a British or American animated show that DR has licensed comes on, with every corner of the screen buzzing with unnecessary and overstimulating movement.

Probably most striking, though, is another thing lacking: education. Quite simply, there is none, academic or moral. “Kaj and Andrea”, a pair of puppets, are sweet friends, but also goofily flawed: Kaj is terribly self-obsessed, Andrea is warbling and neurotic. When other characters do something wrong, there is little of the obvious consequence-and-lesson resolution of American shows; the results are usually left to speak for themselves. “Buster’s World”, a glacially slow live-action show from the 1980s, follows the title character through various realistic hardly-adventures in and around a country house. When an older boy bullies Buster’s sister, Buster, in revenge, sabotages the older boy’s motorcycle, causing him to go flying off it. This would only make it past American lawyers if a finger-wagging adult lectured Buster and the audience at the end. Instead, Buster finds that his revenge changed little, and the show wanders aimlessly on.

Finally, there is hardly any of the ABC-123 stuff that fills American public television like “Sesame Street”. Ramasjang is entertainment, not a replacement for parents or school. Parents are expected to know when to switch it off (but just in case, the characters go to bed at 8.00pm, and are shown sleeping until the morning) rather than pretend that it is self-improvement.

What’s the secret? DR, including Ramasjang, is a training ground for the much-admired Danish film and television industry. Though its budget is nothing next to the BBC’s or a big American broadcaster’s, it’s big for Denmark, meaning that it brings in the best young film-makers, writers and actors looking for experience. If this state-led approach seems typically Scandinavian, it is also Danish in the best sense of innovating constantly, while refusing to take itself seriously.

Danish kids begin school much later than they do in Britain or other countries pushing the beginning of formal education earlier and earlier. There is plenty of time for school, and when Danes get there, they end up doing rather well. But until then, they seem utterly unharmed by a childhood of hearing about the queen’s bottom and watching grandma light some bodily gas on fire."

[plenty of Onkel Reje on YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=Onkel+Reje ]
denmark  television  tv  education  parenting  society  via:tealtan  2016  us  uk  comparison  learning  animation  film  funding 
august 2016 by robertogreco
Paint of Persia by dunin
"Paint of Persia is an rotoscoping pixel-art tool where you can draw on top of any window or wallpaper or anything you want!

It is specially made for pixel-art animation and sprites.

For example, Anthropomorphic Suspect [https://dunin.itch.io/suspect ] was made with it."

[via http://www.gamasutra.com/view/news/276094/New_Paint_of_Persia_tool_helps_devs_rotoscope_film_into_pixel_art.php
via "Paint of Persia, an app that rotoscopes film into pixel art" https://twitter.com/beep/status/748583986285412352 ]
animation  software  art  filters  rotoscoping  windows  pixelart  video  edg  srg 
june 2016 by robertogreco
How a Car Engine Works - Animagraffs
"Did you know that your car will take in 20,000 cubic feet of air to burn 20 gallons of fuel? That’s the equivalent of a 2,500 sq. ft. house! If your only experience with a car engine’s inner workings is “How much is that going to cost to fix?” this graphic is for you. Car engines are astoundingly awesome mechanical wonders. It’s time you learned more about the magic under the hood!"
motors  encines  visualization  animation  cars  jacobo'neal  illustration 
april 2016 by robertogreco
CHARACTER MODEL
"Concept Character Art, Character Model Sheets from Games, Movies, Comics, Toys and Animation. Some good Fanart too."
tumblrs  art  characterdesign  comics  television  film  animation  games  videogames  gaming  toys  via:robinsloan 
february 2016 by robertogreco
Google Maps Streetview Player
"The google maps streetview player will take in either a starting point and end point, or a provided file of a route and provide a playthrough of the google streetview images that are available."
googlemaps  streetview  maps  animation  playthrough  googlestreetview 
february 2016 by robertogreco
DIGITAL-MATERIALITY-OF-GIFS
HI, my name is Sha.

I love gifs.

Some of my best friends are gifs. One of my sideprojects is GifPop, a site where people upload gifs to print animated cards.

But that's a longer story.

What I do want to talk about is animated gifs as a design material.

But first off, a quick reminder: no one owns language.

People argue about gif or jif, but it doesn't matter. No one owns language, and even if anyone did no one is a jraphic designer or jraffiti artist.

What i love about gifs are their history and their materiality.

First specified in 1987, the creators later stated in their 1989 revision that "the graphics interchange format is not intended as a platform for animation, even though it can be done in a limited way."

And what a gloriously, gloriously limited way it is.

Animated gifs, whether you are hypnotized by them or nauseated by them, have become a visual language unto themselves, an emotive vocabulary made out of culture.

Gifs are now a medium, and their portability and accessibility to anyone allows for endless remixing and reinterpretation.

Gifs weren't always this way.

We all remember the various under construction or dancing baby gifs from the 90s, and all the bedazzled backgrounds on myspace pages.

The gif spec limits color palettes to 256 colors, and must store the pixels that have changed for every frame of animation.

This makes them very inefficient for rendering or storing entire movies, but has made them nicely equipped to capture the most delicate of moments.

Because gifs can specify an infinite loop, they both break time and increase legibility, creating the beauty we call a reaction gif.

But gifs aren't just about cutting up bits of media.

The inefficiency of the file format and the upload limits of the social networks themselves have created a whole ecosystem of experimentation and juggling around constraints.

In Jamie Beck and Kevin Burg's work, they realized that by isolating movement they could make gifs at a much higher quality than most, and still fit Tumblr's strict upload requirements, creating the style they call cinemagraphs.

Sports editors like @dshep25 have taken this technique even further, taking advantage of controlled camera angels to collapse and collage many similar shots into a single gif, like this one of Lebron James.

Artists of course are leading this exploration.

The work of dvdp and 89-a both explore extremely limited color palettes while using tight loops and large swaths of black to reduce file size.

The work of Nicolas Fong explores this dense looping to a ridiculous extreme, creating hyperintricate animations that evoke the phenakistoscopes of the 1800s.

And we even see the seams of the network in the content that's posted.

On Tumblr, where upload limits are small but multiple side-by-side gifs are permitted, people collage snippets of dialogue together.

On Imgur, the preferred uploader for redditors, upload limits are much higher, enough for entire scenes to be remixed.

Here on Newhive, artists like molly soda take advantage of the support for transparency and collaging to make pieces like this, displaying messages from her Okcupid inbox.

Content like this just explodes, and with attention comes money.

Newer networks like Vine have popped up, creating their own medium of looping video.

These days for every Vine THERE are a dozen competing looping apps trying to capitalize on this meme economy.

But while these advances are exciting, the mainstreaming of gifs is not without its losses.

Tumblr now has a minimum resolution size.

Imgur is now promoting its own videogif format.

Facebook and Twitter have started converting gifs to video by default.

While individually these decisions to decrease file sizes or stop gifs from autoplaying make sense, this desire to optimize as well as commercialize gifs ends up siloing these animations from each other, removing the portability and ease of remixing that makes gifs exciting at all.

Gifs are a dumb, limited file format, and in the end this is why they are important:

They do not belong to anyone.

Because of their constraints they become a design material, to be played with, challenged, and explored. to try and domesticate them would be missing the point.

This was written BY SHA HWANG For a Pecha Kucha talk in Brooklyn and made into a remixable newhive. The ideas are from the internet.

Thank you to animatedtext for creating the amazing title gif. more detailed sources are INLINE ON THE PAGE to the right >>>>>>>>>

[Also at this URL: http://newhive.com/shashashasha/digital-materiality-of-gifs ]
shahwang  gifs  animatedgifs  internet  web  facebook  vine  twitter  fileformats  constraints  art  webart  tumblr  memes  remixing  portability  video  animation  emotions  imgur  okcupid  redit  newhive  phenakistoscopes  dvdp  89-a  @dshep25  cinemagraphs  jamiebeck  kevinburg  history  media  legibility  resolution  reactiongifs  accessibility  1987  1989  gifpop  culture  remixculture  multiliteracies 
january 2016 by robertogreco
--ºVvVvV∆VvVvVº--
[alternate URL: http://normalfutu.re/esthetics-of-variability/presentation/ ]

"N O R M A L T Y P E is designed to be a display font with no fixed shape. Version 1 came out as a piece of parametric typography, but we thought it was important to introduce motion in our application as soon possible. Hence why now, it comes with the same parameters as in the previous version, but also a ‘step sequencer’ so you can create animation loops to then export as animated GIFs! On top of that, we added a few new parameters such as ‘connections’ between characters, more punctuation and also a small window for text editing.

N O R M A L T Y P E a été conçue comme une typographie sans aspect fixe. La Version 1 était déjà changeante grâce à sa conception paramétrique , mais nous avons pensé qu’il était capital d’offrir des options d’animation. C’est pourquoi, en plus des paramètres déjà présents dans la dernière mouture, un ‘séquenceur’ a été ajouté afin de pouvoir créer des boucles animées, exportables en GIF! En plus de cela, nous avons ajouté de nouveaux paramètres comme notamment la ‘connexion’ de caractères, plus de ponctuation et même une fenêtre d’édition de texte.

Download N O R M A L T Y P E v1.5.4"
typography  fonts  animation  motion  normaltype  normals 
december 2015 by robertogreco
The Untapped Creativity of the Chinese Internet | VICE | United States
"[image]

Somewhere in mainland China, a kid in the grips of puppy love posts one of those raw, unmediated posts so saccharine it's both unbearably endearing and ridiculously funny. It's so completely melodramatic that other users stumble across the post and begin adding their own feelings and thoughts, remixing it to be even funnier. The words are skewed, images and music added, and finally uploaded to Bilibili.com, where users overlay their own comments onto the video in real-time.

The resulting GIFs, poems, videos, and comments spread through the Chinese internet on Sina Weibo and WeChat in a flurry of color and flashing animations. This is So in love, w​ill never feel tired again, an online exhibition of work by Chinese new media and net artist Yin​​g Miao, and it serves as a counterpoint to the West's view of the Chinese internet as bland and heavily censored. Despite all that I've been told in the West, the internet here looks incredibly fun and vibrant to me.

[image]

"The Chinese internet is really raw," Miao tells me. "It's so unlimited but also limited. It's really rich material." We are sitting in a café with our laptops open in downtown Beijing, a brief bike ride from Tiananmen Square. Miao is walking me through her artwork in preparation for the launch of the online exhibition series Ne​tizenet. Miao impresses upon me the depth of creativity on the Chinese internet, showing how memes emerge and morph across platforms and ideologies and around censorship.

While I'm becoming accustomed to relying on my VPN or Tor to use boringly functional sites like Gmail, Miao is taking me on an unblocked tour of her inspirations, the wildest and weirdest of the Chinese internet from behind the so-called Great Firewall. Here, everything can be remixed and .GIFs are always welcomed. Conversations on WeChat (the most popular messaging platform here) are an endless stream of reaction .GIFs that put Tumblr to shame.

[image]

In the series, LAN Love Poem, Miao explores her complicated feelings around the Chinese web. LAN stands for local area network and is suggestive of the localized nature of the internet, in both law and culture, that we in the West are rarely confronted with. Miao uses type inspired by Taobao.com (a site akin to eBay) and intentionally poor English translations of odes to her censored net.

The extreme creativity and vibrancy on the Chinese internet is hard to grasp as a Westerner who is a devout defender of free speech. My ignorance of Miao's raw material, and the many other aspects of Chinese net culture that are difficult to grasp is what Netizienet (or 网友网 in Mandarin and Wǎngyǒuwǎng in Pinyin) is all about.

[image]

Using NewHive, a multimedia publishing platform, Netizenet will examine the internet as a medium from within China, an internet very different from what I grew up with in the States. Through an ongoing series of online exhibitions by Chinese and international artists--of which Miao is the first--Netizenet asks important questions about creativity, differing online aesthetics, and location-based web access. Is the Chinese internet uniquely different from the rest of the world's, or does every country's web have its own unique aesthetics and traits?

The curator behind Netizenet is Michelle Proksell, an independent curator, researcher, and artist currently based in Beijing. Proksell was born in Saudi Arabia to expatriate American parents, and moved to the United States when the Gulf War was starting. Proksell loved traveling through Asia as a kid and this is why she eventually returned and has lived in China for over two years.

Proksell sees a ton of potential in Beijing and Shanghai for the arts, especially net art, and wants to help cultivate the scene. She was fascinated by how the Chinese internet influenced Miao's "artistic aesthetic, process and production," writing that Miao "has a bit of a love affair with the kitschy, low-tech aesthetic, and unreliable nature of this part of the [world wide web.]" ​

[image]

Miao is one of the few net artists in mainland China. She and Proksell have adopted the monumental task of helping to encourage a net art discourse in a country of over 620 million internet users as well as introducing that culture to the West. Proksell tells me, "I really wanted to set a tone for the project by working with an artist who had been intimate with this side of the web early in her art practice."

Miao has certainly been exploring the aesthetics and issues of access in the internet in her work for some time. In 2007, for her undergrad thesis exhibition at the China Academy of Fine Arts near Shanghai, Miao made The Blind Spot, which meticulously documented every word blocked from Google.cn. The piece took Miao three months to make and is a brilliant DIY version of Jason Q. Ng's work documenting blocked words on the popular Chinese social network Sina Weibo. But Miao has no interest in only focusing on the limitations of the Chinese internet, believing there are much more fascinating things underway.

For instance, iPhone Garbage is an incredible convergence of Chinese manufacturing, social media, and ​Shanzhai (slang for pirated and fake goods) culture. A heavily remixed video shows a young entrepreneur aggressively promoting his custom smartphone while continually calling the iPhone "garbage." In Miao's work we see a pushback on Western aesthetics and corporations in favor of a more local flavor.

[image]

Miao suggests that the emerging narrative of Shanzhai might be replicated in net art in China. At first Shanzhai referred only to cheap knockoffs that rarely worked and were an annoying thorn in "legitimate" companies' sides. Now, as Joi Ito has found, Shanzhai merchants are beginning to build entirely unique hardware, offering entirely different capabilities than their Western smartphone counterparts. Miao believes too that Chinese net culture should embrace their differences and push them as far as possible.

In an int​erv​iew between Miao and Proksell, Miao said, "I think there is a bright future for Chinese internet art." Proksell and Miao have an uphill battle proving that to the West, but just as I had never seen many of Miao's influences, this culture is emerging with or without the West's acknowledgement or support. Whether that appreciation comes or not, Netizenet is off to an amazing start and I for one will definitely keep my eyes open for the next show and on Miao."
via:unthinkingly  aesthetic  newaesthetic  internet  web  china  online  accretion  beijing  netart  netizenet  byob  michelleproksell  lanlovepoem  yingmao  newmedia  benvalentine  tumblr  newvibe  gifs  memes  poetry  poems  sinaweibo  weibo  wechat  animation  screenshots  low-techaesthetic  changzhai  socialmedia  joiito  2014  webrococo  newhive 
december 2015 by robertogreco
Hayao Miyazaki - The Essence of Humanity - YouTube
broken, try https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eTq_D5aFy-M ]

[via: http://kottke.org/15/10/what-makes-a-miyazaki-film-a-miyazaki-film

"Lewis Bond takes a look at the work of master filmmaker Hayao Miyazaki and what sets him apart from other makers of animated movies, including his work’s realism and empathy."]
animation  hayaomiyazaki  humanism  humanity  filmmaking  storytelling  lewisbond  empathy  realism  emotions  reality  unpredicatablity  subtlety  anime  manga  expressiveness  expressions 
october 2015 by robertogreco
Mooooooving — Animated GIFs by Guy Moorhouse
"Mooooooving is a side project featuring animated gifs I make using Processing and Flash.

My one rule is that the animations must start and end on a blank white frame — I kind of like the idea that they come out of nothing and return to nothing.

Anyway, hope you like them."

[via: http://interconnected.org/home/2015/10/05/filtered ]
tumblrs  motion  geometry  design  animation  guymoorhouse  gifs  processing  flash  coding 
october 2015 by robertogreco
MODERN POLAXIS
"Modern Polaxis is a paranoid time traveller. Polaxis writes about all his strange experiences in his private journal. BUT, all his secret information, his paranoid delusions and conspiracy theories, he hides that away in a layer of Augmented Reality. Get the app and the book to hear and see the world as Polaxis sees it.

Story
Polaxis believes the world we live in is a holographic projection from another plane in the universe. This projection is known as Intafrag and is patrolled by Intafrag agents. The agents monitor glitches and pursue time travelling fugitives. Polaxis believes he is one of these fugitives. But, he can't quite prove any of this because he was pretty wasted the last time he time travelled. Polaxis must hurry, for IF the fabric of our reality is merely a flickering light, what happens when someone flicks the switch off?

Creators
Written, Illustrated and animated by: SUTU
Programming by: Lukasz Karluk
Music by: Lhasa Mencur"


[See also:
https://itunes.apple.com/au/app/polaxis/id550870541
https://vimeo.com/108436404

"(┛`д´)┛ Sutu is an interactive comic artist and the creator of Modern Polaxis, Nawlz and Neomad. www.sutueatsflies.com www.modernpolaxis.com"
http://www.sutueatsflies.com/
https://instagram.com/sutueatsflies/
http://sutueatsflies.tumblr.com/ ]

[via: https://instagram.com/p/6UJOlHpjqb/ ]
comics  sutu  edg  srg  augmentedreality  comicbooks  applications  ios  animation  ar 
august 2015 by robertogreco
Animated interactive of the history of the Atlantic slave trade.
"Usually, when we say “American slavery” or the “American slave trade,” we mean the American colonies or, later, the United States. But as we discussed in Episode 2 of Slate’s History of American Slavery Academy, relative to the entire slave trade, North America was a bit player. From the trade’s beginning in the 16th century to its conclusion in the 19th, slave merchants brought the vast majority of enslaved Africans to two places: the Caribbean and Brazil. Of the more than 10 million enslaved Africans to eventually reach the Western Hemisphere, just 388,747—less than 4 percent of the total—came to North America. This was dwarfed by the 1.3 million brought to Spanish Central America, the 4 million brought to British, French, Dutch, and Danish holdings in the Caribbean, and the 4.8 million brought to Brazil.

This interactive, designed and built by Slate’s Andrew Kahn, gives you a sense of the scale of the trans-Atlantic slave trade across time, as well as the flow of transport and eventual destinations. The dots—which represent individual slave ships—also correspond to the size of each voyage. The larger the dot, the more enslaved people on board. And if you pause the map and click on a dot, you’ll learn about the ship’s flag—was it British? Portuguese? French?—its origin point, its destination, and its history in the slave trade. The interactive animates more than 20,000 voyages cataloged in the Trans-Atlantic Slave Trade Database. (We excluded voyages for which there is incomplete or vague information in the database.) The graph at the bottom accumulates statistics based on the raw data used in the interactive and, again, only represents a portion of the actual slave trade—about one-half of the number of enslaved Africans who actually were transported away from the continent.

There are a few trends worth noting. As the first European states with a major presence in the New World, Portugal and Spain dominate the opening century of the trans-Atlantic slave trade, sending hundreds of thousands of enslaved people to their holdings in Central and South America and the Caribbean. The Portuguese role doesn’t wane and increases through the 17th, 18th, and 19th centuries, as Portugal brings millions of enslaved Africans to the Americas.

In the 1700s, however, Spanish transport diminishes and is replaced (and exceeded) by British, French, Dutch, and—by the end of the century—American activity. This hundred years—from approximately 1725 to 1825—is also the high-water mark of the slave trade, as Europeans send more than 7.2 million people to forced labor, disease, and death in the New World. For a time during this period, British transport even exceeds Portugal’s.

In the final decades of the trans-Atlantic slave trade, Portugal reclaims its status as the leading slavers, sending 1.3 million people to the Western Hemisphere, and mostly to Brazil. Spain also returns as a leading nation in the slave trade, sending 400,000 to the West. The rest of the European nations, by contrast, have largely ended their roles in the trade.

By the conclusion of the trans-Atlantic slave trade at the end of the 19th century, Europeans had enslaved and transported more than 12.5 million Africans. At least 2 million, historians estimate, didn’t survive the journey. —Jamelle Bouie"
maps  mapping  animation  slavery  slavetade  history  africa  americas  us  brasil  brazil  caribbean  southamerica  northamerica  centralamerica  europe  andrewkahn  timelines 
june 2015 by robertogreco
On Repeat - Learning - Source: An OpenNews project
"How to use loops to explain anything"



"GIFs in the Future

I am pretty confident that there are many more ways to use GIFs for journalism. And while I’m not sure what sorts of forms GIFs will take in the future, I urge you to think of ways to bring loops into the world of storytelling on the web in a purposeful, insightful, or just plain humorous way. Because who knows what sorts of impossible or magical or transformative experiences we can create—all with the power of loops."
lenagroeger  gifs  journalism  video  looping  visual  history  animation  animatedgifs  eadweardmuybridge  howthingswork  explanation  probability  communication  classideas  repetition  storytelling  exposuretherapy  giphy 
june 2015 by robertogreco
Keynote Motion Graphic Experiment — Linda Dong
"[video: https://vimeo.com/129807396 ]

I was experimenting with Keynote's animation tools and decided for fun to make a short animated motion graphic to showcase what the app can do. It's pretty impressive how much Keynote can stand up to pro animation apps like After Effects and Motion and how fast it makes process. Honestly the most time consuming part of this was trying to get an adequate screen recording (video codecs blah).

[image]

I've always been a huge advocate of using Keynote for basic prototyping because there are a lot of great animation/drawing goodies hidden in this app and it's so easy to set a scene up. Same thing goes with motion graphics. Even if you're not planning on making your final animation in Keynote, it's an incredibly fast way to audition different effects and narratives.

The available animations may seem basic, but they can get you through most situations. I primarily used default Keynote transitions for this video and very rarely had to set up custom animation paths. Using the Magic Move feature and some clever masking can get you through most complex transitions. Here are some tips for making your own motion piece:

[images with captions]"
keynote  animation  howto  lindadong  2015  motiongraphics  classideas  mac  osx 
june 2015 by robertogreco
Walking City on Vimeo
"Winner of Golden Nica at Ars Electronica 2014
prix2014.aec.at/prixwinner/12662/

Architecture + Evolution + Movement

Referencing the utopian visions of 1960’s architecture practice Archigram, Walking City is a slowly evolving video sculpture. The language of materials and patterns seen in radical architecture transform as the nomadic city walks endlessly, adapting to the environments she encounters.

universaleverything.com/projects/walking-city/

Soundtrack by Simon Pyke
soundcloud.com/freefarm/walking-city "
edg  3d  animation  video  sculpture  art  architecture  walkingcity  archigram  2014  simonpyke 
april 2015 by robertogreco
Hear Bucky Fuller Talk About Life, Airplanes, and the Future
[Direct link to video: https://vimeo.com/122335390 ]

"There's something jarring about hearing old interviews of legendary futurist Buckminster Fuller. He speaks at a rapid pace, like each word is racing to get out before the next. But both Fuller's style and his self-assuredness make it hard not to get swept up in his unbridled optimism about the future of technology — especially in this new animated video created from audio interviews conducted by Studs Terkel in 1965 and 1970.

Yes, the short film appears to be sponsored by Squarespace, but even if it's a thinly veiled ad for building your own website (which I guess it kind of is) it's still worth six minutes of your time.

Fuller talks about everything from seeing the world through his child's eyes to how we might achieve weather control one day. And it all has an air of optimism that's downright infectious, even for dyed in the wool cynics like myself.
Fuller: I recall in Chicago wheeling my little child in her baby carriage in Lincoln Park. I was amazed, because a little biplane went over Lincoln Park. Airplanes were not very common in those days. I said, "Isn't it amazing. Here's my child looking up at that airplane and that airplane in the sky is as natural to her as a bird." Because when I was born, the airplane did not exist. It was really the start of the beginning of impossible things happening.

Fuller was an incredibly complex man, filled with contradictions. But there really is something transfixing in his voice; something that in the moment makes you want to believe that technology is fundamentally a force for good in the world. And then he stop talking, and you realize that Fuller himself is an advertisement — a man who's trying to sell you on a world that doesn't yet (and may never) exist."

[See also: http://mentalfloss.com/article/62240/video-premiere-buckminster-fuller-geodesic-life
and http://experimenters.squarespace.com/ ]
buckminsterfuller  studsterkel  animation  2015  generalists  specialists  geodesicdomes  airplances  future  life  living  parenting 
march 2015 by robertogreco
Hayao Miyazaki- Nature, Culture, & Character on Vimeo
"A closer look at the storytelling techniques of one of Japan's greatest animation directors, Hayao Miyazaki. For non-commercial and educational purposes only.

Voiceover- Gacinta Moran, vimeo.com/user25329456
Editor- Zackery Ramos-Taylor

Music:
Joe Hisaishi-
"A Road to Somewhere"
"Day Of The River"
"The Sixth Station"

Footage:
Hayao Miyazaki- A Tribute (2014)- vimeo.com/102392560
How to Train Your Dragon 2 (2014)- youtube.com/watch?v=0JEh8-py4WA
Inside Out Trailer #2 (2015)- youtube.com/watch?v=_MC3XuMvsDI
Kiki's Delivery Service (1989)- DVD
My Neighbor Totoro (1988)- DVD
Ponyo (2008)- youtube.com/watch?v=_7fjxESbTU0, youtube.com/watch?v=YTrEECZhpL0
Princess Mononoke (1997)- youtube.com/watch?v=4OiMOHRDs14
Sailor Moon (1995-2000)- youtube.com/watch?v=RK4ZJWGfkYw
The Secret World of Arrietty (2010)- youtube.com/watch?v=HchZQ1CAS3s
The Simpsons (1989- )- youtube.com/watch?v=R94Q6NhuS3A
Spritied Away (2001)- DVD
Toy Story 3 (2010)- youtube.com/watch?v=gscNB7ULFTA
The Wind Rises (2013)- youtube.com/watch?v=vh57zcmI3WQ, youtube.com/watch?v=gQIZVh60YpQ
Hayao Miyazaki in Conversation with Roland Kelts (2010)- youtube.com/watch?v=wZWmOYq3fX4 "
hayaomiyazaki  via:tealtan  animation  film  filmmaking  nature  culture  character  narrative  philosophy  spiritedaway  ponyo  princessmononoke  thewindrises  kiki'sdeliveryservice  2014  gacintamoran  zackeryramos-taylor  society  technology  civilization  children  tradition  storytelling  religion  totoro  myneighbortotoro  work  duty  culturalrehabilitation  self-sacrifice  endurance  customs  characterdevelopment  identity  gender  japan  japanese  studioghibli 
january 2015 by robertogreco
Encyclopedia Pictura Interview - Spore and Bjork Animators Encyclopedia Pictura - Esquire
"How do you produce some of the world's most advanced and mind-blowing digital animation? Communally, in the deep woods, part-time, after the goat has been milked."
2009  encyclopediapictura  troutgluch  isaiahsaxon  darenrabinovitch  seanhellfritsch  animation  filmmaking  mearao'reilly 
august 2014 by robertogreco
Make: Talk 018 – Isaiah Saxon of DIY.org | MAKE
"Our maker this week is Isaiah Saxon (@isaiah_saxon_). He’s the co-founder of DIY.org, an organization that encourages kids to make stuff and is a film director at Encyclopedia Pictura, which has made videos for the musician Bjork and others (the image above is from Bjork’s “Wanderlust” video).

He’s also working on an animated feature film about a group of DIY kids who have to rebuild civilization. Above, a gallery of screenshots of concept art for the movie (Click on the images to enlarge them.)

Here’s a time-lapse video that shows how Isaiah creates his amazing artwork.

Here’s Isaiah’s answer to a question that he didn’t get to answer fully during my interview with him. My question was about DIY.org. Was he planning on making it a nonprofit organization or a for-profit company? Here is his answer:

We decided to structure DIY.org as a for-profit startup because we know that if we create a tool that boosts kids’ creativity, that will be of tremendous value to parents. Rather than being a non-profit and begging wealthy donors to fund us, we aim to build a great service that parents are excited to pay for. We’ll never sell information about our users to advertisers and we’ll never allow advertising on the site. Membership to DIY.org will include embroidered skill patches that come in the mail once earned, and potentially a kit service as well. Using a majority of the site’s features will remain free for non-members. Also, we use a very flexible Creative Commons license for all the content uploaded to the site, and our team releases much of DIY’s platform as open source on a nearly weekly basis.

MAKE profiled Isaiah Saxon and his partners at Encyclopedia Pictura in MAKE volume 30. Here’s a PDF of the article."
isaiahsaxon  encyclopediapictura  diy.org  interviews  filmmaking  troutgulch  björk  animation  2012 
august 2014 by robertogreco
Andrea Dezsö
"Andrea Dezsö is a visual artist who works across a broad range of media including drawing, painting, artist's books, cut paper, embroidery, animation, sculpture, site-specific installation and permanent public art. Dezsö's large-scale permanent public art has been installed in two New York City subway stations and at the United States Embassy in Bucharest, Romania. Community Garden, Dezsö's mosaic in the New York City subway was awarded Best American Public Art in 2007. Dezsö is an award-winning illustrator whose work has been featured in many books, magazines, and CD covers, and by The New York Times, Sony Music, and Candlewick Press. Dezsö exhibits in museums and galleries around the world, and teaches widely. She is Assistant Professor of Art at Hampshire College in Amherst, MA. Dezsö is represented by the Nancy Margolis Gallery in New York and the Pucker Gallery in Boston."



Artist Statement

"I wanted to be alone in quite an unusual, new way. The very opposite of what you are
thinking: namely, without myself…” – Luigi Pirandello

In my drawings, paper cuts and paintings I tell stories. My visual narratives range from the
mystical to the absurd and I often use traditional techniques to express non-traditional or
subversive content. I am drawn to the visually unusual, weaving together psychological,
historical and ornamental themes, and find unspeakable beauty in the natural world.
Sometimes in my dreams I fly, although not as often as when I was a child in Romania, then
I flew every night.

In one way or another, many of the images I’ve been creating lately touch on the idea of
disappearance and absence. There is a sort of absence when a space has never been
inhabited, and then there is a different sort of absence that is left behind when something
or someone has been removed and is no longer present. It’s more of a negative imprint.
I feel that I’m disappearing sometimes, liberated from the confines of a particular self, a
reward I experience through my studio practice, the cessation of self-preoccupation and
doubt."
andreadezsö  art  artists  embroidery  animation  sculpture  installation  romania  dreams 
august 2014 by robertogreco
Loop 60Hz: City of Drones by Liam Young + John Cale + FIELD.io
"City of Drones is an interactive digital environment developed by musician John Cale, speculative architect Liam Young and digital artists FIELD. Charting the story of a lost drone drifting through an abstract cityscape, players are invited to pilot a virtual craft and remotely explore this imaginary world. Samples from Cale’s original soundscape compositions echo across the landscape as we see the city through the eyes of the drone, buzzing between the buildings, drifting endlessly, in an ambient audio visual choreography."
animation  art  drones  audio  liamyong  johncale  2014  via:javierarbona 
august 2014 by robertogreco
Old School Color Cycling with HTML5 | EffectGames.com
"Anyone remember Color cycling from the 90s? This was a technology often used in 8-bit video games of the era, to achieve interesting visual effects by cycling (shifting) the color palette. Back then video cards could only render 256 colors at a time, so a palette of selected colors was used. But the programmer could change this palette at will, and all the onscreen colors would instantly change to match. It was fast, and took virtually no memory. Thus began the era of color cycling.

Most games used the technique to animate water, fire or other environmental effects. Unfortunately, more often than not this looked terrible, because the artist simply drew the scene once, picked some colors to be animated and set them to cycle. While this technically qualified as "color cycling", it looked more like a bad acid trip. For an example, just look at the water in this game.

However, there was one graphic artist who took the technique to a whole new level, and produced absolutely breathtaking color cycling scenes. Mark J. Ferrari, who also illustrated all the original backgrounds for LucasArts Loom, and some for The Secret of Monkey Island, invented his own unique ways of using color cycling for envrironmental effects that you really have to see to believe. These include rain, snow, ocean waves, moving fog, clouds, smoke, waterfalls, streams, lakes, and more. And all these effects are achieved without any layers or alpha channels -- just one single flat image with one 256 color palette.

Unfortunately the art of color cycling died out in the late 90s, giving way to newer technologies like 3D rendering and full 32-bit "true color" games. However, 2D pixel graphics of old are making a comeback in recent years, with mobile devices and web games. I thought now would be the time to reintroduce color cycling, using open web technologies like the HTML5 Canvas element.

This demo is an implementation of a full 8-bit color cycling engine, rendered into an HTML5 Canvas in real-time. I am using 35 of Mark's original 640x480 pixel masterpieces which you can explore, and I added some ambient environmental soundtracks to match. Please enjoy, and the source code is free for you to use in your own projects (download links at the bottom of the article)."

[See also: http://www.effectgames.com/demos/canvascycle/ ]
animation  graphics  html5  javascript  colorcycling  via:vruba  canvas  8bit 
august 2014 by robertogreco
AnimGIFs need a better codec
"Short, looped silent video clips have become a medium. They're a way to quote, remix and comment on longer videos. They're a way to share jokes and cats' mishaps. AnimGIFs are to videos what Twitter is to blogs.

The problem is that the video codec powering this medium is horribly outdated and inefficient. Browsers already support better video codecs natively, but due to historical reasons, they're not allowing animGIFs to take advantage of the better technology.

The divide between "animations" and "proper videos" is a false dichotomy and creates needless complexity. Plenty of GIFs are conversions from YouTube and other videos. 4chan allows GIF-like WebM clips. Websites like gfycat and Twitter convert GIFs back to H.264 or WebM to save bandwidth.

RealPlayer is gone, codecs are not a pain any more

Annoying plug-ins from the '90s have left a long-lasting impression that video codecs must be slow, clunky and could not be played without a special ceremony. It's not true any more.

The latest codecs are not only much more bandwidth-efficient, they can be cheaper to decode as well (thanks to hardware acceleration and ability to seek). There is no reason to keep GIF as the only video codec with special privileges and force faster codecs to have limited usefulness."
gifs  animation  webdev  codecs  video  internet  webdesign 
july 2014 by robertogreco
Photoshop Animation Techniques (Redux, Creative Cloud) on Vimeo
"This tutorial is an update from my first tutorial. This time around I use Photoshop CC and delve into a few more techniques that I've learned while working in production.

Adobe Photoshop is a tool that a great number of creative minds are familiar and comfortable with. While it isnt software package that has been built with animation specifically in mind there it has huge potential as an animation tool. The ability to control an aesthetic within the software gives a very hands on feel to the process and endless possibilities for your end result. I hope that this tutorial will help bridge the gap between designer and animator, beginner and professional."
animation  design  photoshop  tutorials  howto  via:tealtan  alexgrigg  edg 
april 2014 by robertogreco
GIF hearts Tumblr: a fairytale for the internet age (Wired UK)
""The reason everyone thought MySpace was going to die, was because these (GIFs) are really ugly," says meme-master general Kenyatta Cheese, speaking at Story Festival in London. Cheese helps to run the Doctor Who Tumblr for BBC America, the second biggest Tumblr in the world, and was also a cofounder of Know Your Meme.

Cheese describes himself as being "of the internet", but says he is mainly interested in the way people do things online. "Our myths that we have don't necessarily reflect the things that we do, so I want to create new myths," he says.

The GIF, he continues, is a 30-year-old file format, which is woefully inefficient and yet despite all the innovation in technology, is used to tell stories all over the internet today. When he looked it up on a Wikipedia, all that was there was was a description of what it was and where it came from, but a disappointing lack of insight into its cultural significance. "I don't think it's the facts that are important," he continues. The GIF has a story of its own -- a fairytale, in fact -- but it is a story based on emotion, not fact.

"There was a king named browser and a queen named CompuServe," he begins. The king and queen have a daughter called GIF, who is considered a novelty, but is not taken seriously as "she can render rainbows and unicorns", even though all she wants to do is be useful. When the queen dies, the king remarries and his new queen -- Queen Flash -- decides to banish GIF to the subculture forest, as her magic mirror on the wall -- the tech blogs -- tell her she is no longer the most useful format of them all.

Fortunately for GIF, the trolls take her in and she makes her GIFs again using viral video clips and NSFW webcam footage, which lays the foundation for the viral web. The forum users get to work making GIFs, simply for the purpose of having fun and expressing themselves. "This is creating these small moments in time that we're able to share with one another," says Cheese. "You're now using GIFs on forums instead of writing a 200-word response."

While even Queen Flash realises her reign is over, along comes Prince Tumblr into the subculture forest, where he meets and falls in love with GIF (Prince Tumblr: "Your work gives me all the feels"; GIF: "lol thanks").

It is this union that spread the culture of GIF creation far and wide. "What happens on the internet is when people migrate from forum to forum they take their culture with them," says Cheese. It has led to people making GIFs in all kinds of different contexts -- as works of art, as sets of instructions and even for making porn, says Cheese. It also resulted in people using and reappropriating GIFs to suit their own purposes.

"GIFs were perfect for Tumblr, because people started using them in ways not just to express themselves but in a reblog so they spread really fast," Cheese explains. People might create a GIF set of their favourite scene from a film and that post gets flagged and reposted, and then somebody might take one of those images, save it to their hard drive and use it as a reaction GIF. "All of a sudden it's used everywhere," he says.

Since that's happened all the other kingdoms on the internet have realised that they too can use GIFs, including journalism -- from Buzzfeed writers to data journalists.

"This becomes a story of a 30-year-old file-format that everyone thought was dead," he says. In all its archaic inefficiency, he adds, it rose up again "not because people thought they could profit off it, but because they wanted to do something useful"."

[See also (another talk): http://videos.theconf.se/video/8580175/kenyatta-cheese-how-visual-media ]
kenyattacheese  gifs  tumblr  web  internet  animation  animatedgifs  2014 
february 2014 by robertogreco
Knitting Digital
"This research project represents a slight but significant shift in my practise an an artist. I usually work with video, and only came across a knitting machine for the first time last year, whilst filming the NEPHRA knitting group in North Manchester. I was struck by the parallels between punchcards and film reels, stitches and pixels, and began to relate to it in terms of digital imaging as much as textiles. Further to this, I was introduced to examples of other artists who had hacked electronic knitting machines and developed software tools in order to send them digital images. I’m very much standing on the shoulders of giants in using these tools, but I felt strongly that I could bring something to this field, not as a programmer, but as someone who works with digital tools, moving images, communities and contributions. I have since outlined a series of experiments and works I will undertake over the next 6 months, including:

- collating and sharing research on field of artists working with knitting / digital

- working with the knitting group to document our own practice and discussion around – digital / textiles, creating tutorials for techniques

- creation of a large-scale knitted banner for the 8 Hour Day movement – PUNCHCARD ECONOMY, for exhibition at FACT Liverpool in December 2013

- development and proof of concept of knitted animations – approaches to moving image textiles

For more about me and work, visit my website – www.smeech.co.uk "
knitting  sammeech  animation  film  art 
february 2014 by robertogreco
Colab | Creative Technologies at AUT
"Colab is the collaboratory for Design and Creative Technologies at the Auckland University of Technology (AUT), New Zealand.

Our aim is to encourage researchers, students and stakeholders to imagine, construct, articulate and navigate rapidly changing social, economic, technological and career environments.

We are a diverse community of creative people, working together in an environment from which new ideas emerge on a daily basis. Colab researchers come from a range of backgrounds, including art, design, computer science, animation, game design, engineering, mechatronics, architecture, business and organisational development.

Colab has also established a Faculty Labs Network within AUT, to manage and develop a number of high-end technology facilities, researching subjects ranging from textile design and production, 3D printing, to motion capture, interactive technologies and virtual worlds.

We pride ourselves on having great relationships with industry and organisational bodies throughout Auckland and abroad, and welcome the opportunity to collaborate with researchers, organisational partners, creative-thinkers, and entrepreneurs. Perhaps, even you?"
newzealand  aukland  openstudioproject  lcproject  via:chrisberthelsen  aut  art  design  compsci  computerscience  animation  gamedesign  architecture  research  makerspaces 
february 2014 by robertogreco
The Future of UI and the Dream of the ‘90s — UX/UI human interfaces — Medium
"In other words, we’re expected to translate our emotions through emotionless interfaces."



"While application interfaces probably don’t need to make use of immersive soundtracks, the addition of sound effects can add to a user’s experience (provided they have the option to opt-out.) Apps like Clear and Duolingo added cheery and triumphant sound effects to their completion actions. These sounds are a recognition of the user’s success and reinforces the visual mark of a, typically green, success state."



"What can we learn from the masters of animation and how can we apply that to our work in UI? Replicating what we see in everyday life reminds us of our personal experiences. In Disney animators Ollie Johnston and Frank Thomas’ book, The Illusion of Life: Disney Animation, they outline 12 basic principles to creating more realistic animations.

While not the key point of an interface, we can apply these principles on a micro-level. Excellent examples of delightful animation can be seen in Tweetbot, Apple Maps and Vine."



"While seemingly a very obvious way to communicate—copy and how we deal with inputs is often overlooked. In our rush to replace popular actions with iconography, designers often forget that sometimes copy can be just as powerful.

We can make use of copy to speak to users conversationally, eliminate the chore of form input or provide discoverable and fun easter eggs. All three ways give the illusion of a person behind the product or device."
ux  helentran  ui  interface  2014  design  minorityreport  animation  emotions  sound  frankchimero  journey  clear  duolingo  vine  tweetbot  pixar  maps  mapping  copy  content  writing  gestures 
january 2014 by robertogreco
STET | Attention, rhythm & weight
"For better or worse, we live in a world of media invention. Instead of reusing a stable of forms over and over, it’s not much harder for us to create new ones. Our inventions make it possible to explore the secret shape of our subject material, to coax it into saying more.

These new forms won’t follow the rules of the scroll, the codex, or anything else that came before, but we can certainly learn from them. We can ask questions from a wide range of influences — film, animation, video games, and more. We can harvest what’s still ripe today, and break new ground when necessary.

Let’s begin."

[See also: http://publishingperspectives.com/2013/10/books-in-browsers-iv-why-we-should-not-imitate-snowfall/ and video of Allen's talk at Books in Browsers 2013 (Day 2 Session 1) http://www.ustream.tv/recorded/40164570 ]
allentan  publishing  writing  internet  web  timcarmody  2013  papermodernism  literacy  fluency  intuitiveness  legibility  metaphor  interaction  howweread  howwewrite  communication  multiliteracies  skills  touch  scrolling  snowfall  immersive  focus  distraction  attention  cinema  cinematic  film  flickr  usability  information  historiasextraordinarias  narrative  storytelling  jose-luismoctezuma  text  reading  multimedia  rhythm  pacing  purpose  weight  animation  gamedesign  design  games  gaming  mediainvention  media 
december 2013 by robertogreco
giphoscope
"As GIF creators - OKKULT Motion Pictures is our brainchild - we know it's very easy to show/share an animated GIF on the web, but it's hard to find an offline GIF player to exhibit and sell a GIF as a single, unique artwork. We have conceived, designed and handcrafted the Giphoscope with the objective of proposing to artists/galleries/museums/collectors a minimalistic, unconventional, retrofuturistic analog GIF player, entirely tailor made and handmade in Italy. Thanks to Giphoscope, animated GIF becomes a tangible and exclusive artwork.

The Giphoscope is inspired by the Mutoscope, an early motion picture device, patented by Herman Casler on November 21, 1894. The Mutoscope worked on the same principle as the "flip book". The individual image frames were conventional black-and-white, silver-based photographic prints on tough, flexible opaque cards. Rather than being bound into a booklet, the cards were attached to a circular core. A reel typically held about 850 cards, giving a viewing time of about a minute (from Wikipedia)."
via:annegalloway  animation  animatedgifs  giphoscope  mutoscope  hermancasler 
december 2013 by robertogreco
What Screens Want by Frank Chimero
"We need to work as a community to develop a language of transformation so we can talk to one another. And we probably need to steal these words from places like animation, theater, puppetry, dance, and choreography.

Words matter. They are abstractions, too—an interface to thought and understanding by communication. The words we use mold our perception of our work and the world around us. They become a frame, just like the interfaces we design."



"When I realized that, a little light went off in my head: a map’s biases do service to one need, but distort everything else. Meaning, they misinform and confuse those with different needs.

That’s how I feel about the web these days. We have a map, but it’s not for me. So I am distanced. It feels like things are distorted. I am consistently confused.

See, we have our own abstractions on the web, and they are bigger than the user interfaces of the websites and apps we build. They are the abstractions we use to define the web. The commercial web. The things that have sprung up in the last decade, but gained considerable speed in the past five years.

It’s the business structures and funding models we use to create digital businesses. It’s the pressure to scale, simply because it’s easy to copy bits. It’s the relationships between the people who make the stuff, and the people who use that stuff, and the consistent abandonment of users by entrepreneurs.

It’s the churning and the burning, flipping companies, nickel and diming users with in-app purchases, data lock-in, and designing with dark patterns so that users accidentally do actions against their own self-interest.

Listen: I’m at the end of a 4-month sabbatical, and I worry about this stuff, because the further I get from everything, the more it begins to look toxic. These pernicious elements are the primary map we have of the web right now.

We used to have a map of a frontier that could be anything. The web isn’t young anymore, though. It’s settled. It’s been prospected and picked through. Increasingly, it feels like we decided to pave the wilderness, turn it into a suburb, and build a mall. And I hate this map of the web, because it only describes a fraction of what it is and what’s possible. We’ve taken an opportunity for connection and distorted it to commodify attention. That’s one of the sleaziest things you can do.

So what is the answer? I found this quote by Ted Nelson, the man who invented hypertext. He’s one of the original rebel technologists, so he has a lot of things to say about our current situation. Nelson:
The world is not yet finished, but everyone is behaving as if everything was known. This is not true. In fact, the computer world as we know it is based upon one tradition that has been waddling along for the last fifty years, growing in size and ungainliness, and is essentially defining the way we do everything. My view is that today’s computer world is based on techie misunderstandings of human thought and human life. And the imposition of inappropriate structures throughout the computer is the imposition of inappropriate structures on the things we want to do in the human world.



We can produce a vision of the web that isn’t based on:

consolidation
privatization
power
hierarchies
surveillance

We can make a new map. Or maybe reclaim a map we misplaced a long time ago. One built on:

extensibility
openness
communication
community
wildness

We can use the efficiency and power of interfaces to help people do what they already wish more quickly or enjoyably, and we can build up business structures so that it’s okay for people to put down technology and get on with their life once their job is done. We can rearrange how we think about the tools we build, so that someone putting down your tool doesn’t disprove its utility, but validates its usefulness.



Let me leave you with this: the point of my writing was to ask what screens want. I think that’s a great question, but it is a secondary concern. What screens want needs to match up with what we want.

People believe there’s an essence to the computer, that there’s something true and real and a correct way to do things. But—there is no right way. We get to choose how to aim the technology we build. At least for now, because increasingly, technology feels like something that happens to you instead of something you use. We need to figure out how to stop that, for all of our sakes, before we’re locked in, on rails, and headed toward who knows what.

One of the reasons that I’m so fascinated by screens is because their story is our story. First there was darkness, and then there was light. And then we figured out how to make that light dance. Both stories are about transformations, about change. Screens have flux, and so do we."
frankchimero  2013  screens  flux  build2013  plasticity  jamesburke  plastic  skeoumorphs  containers  materials  change  transitions  perception  flatdesign  windowsphonemetro  ios7  software  replacement  shape  affordances  grain  design  paper  print  eadwardmuybridge  movement  motion  animation  customization  responsivewebdesign  responsiveness  variability  mutability  mutations  ux  interactiondesign  interfaces  language  ethanmarcotte  maps  mapping  representation  cartography  embodiedmeaning  respresentation  tednelson  computersareforpeople  softwareisforpeople  unfinished  responsivedesign 
november 2013 by robertogreco
Shoji Kawamori's Spring & Chaos - trailer - YouTube
"TOKYOPOP Presents the anime art film Spring & Chaos by esteemed anime director Shoji Kawamori (Macross, Escaflowne). This beautiful piece was created exclusively for Japanese television in Iwate Prefecture and is based on the life-story of Japan's most famous modern poet Kenji Miyazawa.

This is NOT a robot-battle, teen-schoolgirl, ninja or samurai anime (not that those aren't awesome) - so if you're looking for that type of anime, keep moving. Instead, this is a moving, dramatic look into early 20th century Japan and how Kenji Miyazawa, a teacher and poet, touched the lives of many students, challenging their view of the world."

[Film available on Hulu (for now): http://www.hulu.com/watch/162653 ]
cats  biography  mindchanges  mindchanging  howweteach  worldview  teaching  poets  kenjimiyazawa  shojikawamori  japan  animation  anime  via:robinsloan 
august 2012 by robertogreco
Penumbra - Samantha Gorman
"Penumbra is a hybrid art/literature application in development for tablet media. It expands “ebook” conventions by carefully integrating video, illustration and fiction. These media work equally together to inform the total reading. Tablets are a promising literary medium with the potential to redefine our reading practice beyond a simple emulation of print on screen. Increasingly, ebooks could represent a growing platform for the consumption and dissemination of media art: a platform that is inherently interactive and readily mobile.

Investment in actively reading the interface relies on our experience with interaction design; the goal is to implement touch-screen gestures in service of the story’s content. Touching and tilting the screen places the reader in the position of the main protagonist. The reader can use the interface to decide how long the protagonist focuses on his external vs. internal world."

[Now called Pry: http://samanthagorman.net/Pry
http://prynovella.com/
https://vimeo.com/78973518

Penumbra video:
https://vimeo.com/33515808 ]
floatingtext  animation  perspective  worldswitching  thebookofjudith  ephemerality  gestures  mediaart  penumbra  ios  interactivefiction  content  video  futureofmedia  literature  storytelling  interactiondesign  interaction  tablets  ebooks  ebook  2012  samanthagorman  reading  ipad  digitaltext  if  applications  cyoa  ephemeral  pry  novellas 
april 2012 by robertogreco
Synaesthesia on Vimeo
"Synaesthesia a phenomonon involving the blending of the senses. This short follows a character throughout his life and his experiences of being a synaesthete.

Created as a final year project at Massey University 2011"
2011  animation  synesthesia 
february 2012 by robertogreco
NYPL Labs : Stereogranimator
"Create and share animated GIFs and 3D anaglyphs using more than 40,000 stereographs from The New York Public Library."
history  stereographics  stereograms  art  photography  newyorkpubliclibrary  nypl  animation  stereogranimator 
january 2012 by robertogreco
How Anime is Made
"In mid October 2010, the Culture Japan crew went along to the headquarters of Production IG to see what goes on behind the scenes of making hit anime titles such as Ghost in the Shell, East of Eden and recently Sengoku Basara. Today we get to take a look and try some of the processes that are involved in making anime.

I remember when I could hardly speak Japanese back in the UK. Ghost in the Shell was released on video and I remembering it being such an inspiring movie. Was great to be able to visit the company responsible for the movie."
animation  ghostintheshell  productionig  srg  edg  design  art  process  japan  2011  howwework  manga  anime 
december 2011 by robertogreco
Creativity Is Hustle: Make Something Every Day - Kasia Cieplak-Mayr von Baldegg - Video - The Atlantic
"I think doing something start to finish each day not only helps you get over the fear of starting a project, but also the fear of finishing one. I know it can be hard to let stuff go when you know you could make it better, but at some point in every project, at some level you need to be like, "fine, good enough." That's really hard for some people, but this can definitely help.

I've think a project like this also helps with the notion that you need to be in some totally inspired state of zen to create art. Art is like taking a dump, it's not always fun or convenient but it's something you gotta do everyday and you shouldn't get to hung up if the product looks like pile of crap. Yer not gonna make a masterpiece everyday or even 95% of the time, but it's a numbers game and the you've got to get rid of all those crappy ideas before you can get to the good ones. Just showing up is 90% of the battle."
faketv  mikewinkelman  glvo  making  doing  howwework  ideas  creativity  cv  projects  plp  focus  2011  kasiacieplak-mayrvonbaldegg  interviews  animation  art 
october 2011 by robertogreco
Making Cutting-Edge Animation On A DIY Homestead : NPR
"It's pretty common these days for young people to live with their parents after college, but few have managed to transform their old homestead quit like filmmaker Isaiah Saxon has.

With the help of filmmaking buddies Sean Hellfritsch and Daren Rabinovitch, Saxon has transformed 10 hilly acres surrounding his mother's house in Aptos, Calif. into Trout Gulch, a kind of rural hacker space where they build their own houses, grow organic vegetables, milk goats and produce state-of-the-art digital animation.

Saxon explains how his group of 21st-century pioneers takes a do-it-yourself approach to just about everything."
sustainability  film  diy  green  california  troutgulch  homesteading  2011  animation  meaning  well-being  design  glvo  architecture  agriculture  farming  gardening  isaiahsaxon  seanhellfritsch  darenrabinovitch 
august 2011 by robertogreco
Dear Cooper Union community, We regret to inform... - Fresser.
"Damn. I make no secret of the fact that I didn’t like Cooper Union much when I went there. But I loved Bob Breer. He taught me how to see some things I’d never really looked at, and was the kind of professor who taught from the margins, from the edges, and respected the work that came from those same places.

Among everything else, Bob was — like my dad — a product of the period immediately following WW2, when America (and in Bob’s case, Paris) provided opportunities for veterans who would otherwise never have had them. Which is just a reminder of the value of such things, because that was value that was passed on to at least two generations of his students. He was generous with his ideas and his time, and I have thought of him often. RIP, Bob Breer."
kevinslavin  teaching  bobbreer  margins  edges  opportunity  cooperunion  2011  film  animation  legends  generosity  whatmatters  relationships  tcsnmy  cv 
august 2011 by robertogreco
Apple - Pro - Profiles - W+K Tokyo Lab
"W+K Tokyo Lab is a new music label concept launched by Wieden+Kennedy Tokyo in 2003. Our mission is to bring new experiences that can only be created in Tokyo through a unique global mix of music, visuals, and other forms of creative expression through a DVD and CD. Tokyo attracts some of the world’s most innovative creative collaborators. We are passionate about the development of new ideas with our creators and connecting them to a new audience. Simply put, it is about good music, fresh visuals, and new concepts of creative expression."

[Now available here: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=w-6eB01J5r8 AND http://www.apple.com/ca/fr/pro/profiles/wk/ ]
design  technology  art  music  wk  wktokyolab  tokyo  apple  animation  japan  hifana 
august 2011 by robertogreco
‪How To Be Alone‬‏ - YouTube
"A video by fiilmaker, Andrea Dorfman, and poet/singer/songwriter, Tanya Davis.

Davis wrote the beautiful poem and performed in the video which Dorfman directed, shot, animated by hand and edited. The video was shot in Halifax, Nova Scotia and was produced by Bravo!FACT http://www.bravofact.com/

For more information on Tanya, go to http://www.tanyadavis.ca or visit her facebook page at http://www.facebook.com/?ref=home#!/pages/Tanya-Davis/8063194647?ref=sgm You can purchase her first two CDs Make A List and Gorgeous Morning on iTunes and look out for her third CD which will be released in the fall!

For more information on Andrea Dorfman, visit her facebook page http://www.facebook.com/pages/Andrea-Dorfman-Films/110789945626226?ref=mf or http://www.andreadorfman.com "
alone  solitude  andeadorfman  tanyadavid  howto  art  psychology  film  animation  poetry  society  stillness  loneliness  silence  acceptance  well-being  peace 
july 2011 by robertogreco
Animated GIFs Triumphant - Anil Dash
"The facts about animated GIFs are stark. They only support a palette of 256 colors. No current browser lists support for animated GIF as a codec for the HTML5 <video> tag. That omission is understandable, as GIF compression of animation isn't particularly efficient. They even lived under an unfashionable cloud of patent uncertainty during the web's formative years. And those are just some of the traits I love about the format…

But to my eye, GIF is the most popular animation and short film format that's ever existed. It works on smartphones in millions of people's pockets, on giant displays in museums, in web browsers on a newspaper website. It finds liberation in constraints, in the same way that fewer characters in our tweets and texts freed us to communicate more liberally with one another. And it invites participation, in a medium that's both fun and accessible, as the pop music of moving images, giving us animations that are totally disposable and completely timeless."
culture  history  web  animation  anildash  animatedgifs  gifs  2011  kickstarter  constraints  technology 
july 2011 by robertogreco
Animaps - Create and view beautifully informative animated maps, for free!
"Animaps extends the My Maps feature of Google Maps by letting you create maps with markers that move, images and text that pop up on cue, and lines and shapes that change over time.

When you send your Animap to friends it appears like a video - they can play, pause, slow and speed up the action!"
maps  mapping  animation  onlinetoolkit  googlemaps 
july 2011 by robertogreco
GIF SHOP for iPhone 3GS, iPhone 4, iPod touch (4th generation), iPad 2 Wi-Fi, and iPad 2 Wi-Fi + 3G on the iTunes App Store
"GIF SHOP is the animated .gif maker for your iPhone!

Easily create and edit looping animations, upload to Facebook, Twitter and Tumblr all on the go!"
iphone  animation  applications  animatedgifs  gifs  ios  via:frankchimero 
july 2011 by robertogreco
Q&A: Cesar Harada on the Promise of an Open-Source Oil Skimming Robot - Environment - GOOD [See also: http://www.kickstarter.com/projects/cesarminoru/protei-open-hardware-oil-spill-cleaning-sailing-ro ]
"Cesar Harada is a Renaissance Man of the old school. But with some very new school skills. He's probably best described now as an open-source environmental engineer, but even a convoluted label like that doesn't do his work justice. Harada was a construction manager in Kenya for Ushahidi, the open-source crisis mapping organization (which we've covered), building their offices, but also building their network and some of their websites. Construction & engineering are in his half-Japanese, half-French blood. His father is a sculptor, & the Japanese side of his family has long worked in the structural engineering field, earthquake-proofing buildings.<br />
<br />
Harada got his first masters in animation film, & then another in design interaction. He's also a pretty accomplished glassblower and a TED Senior Fellow. These days, Harada is focusing on Protei, an open-source ocean skimming robot that he believes could revolutionize oil spill cleanup. (raising money for prototype on Kickstarter)"
cesarharada  renaissancemen  good  ted  tedfellows  environment  environmentalism  design  engineering  kenya  ushahidi  opensource  construction  glvo  animation  film  interactiondesign  protei  oilspills  cleanup 
april 2011 by robertogreco
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