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Will the Renovated MoMA Let Folk Art Back In? - The New York Times
"Architectural historians argued against destruction, but protest was not universal. The Williams-Tsien building had problems. Conceived on the scale of a compact townhouse, it was only 40 feet wide. Its narrowness created a cramped interior, with corridor-like galleries inhospitable to art viewing. In addition, some people found its façade — composed of more than 60 plates of a copper-bronze alloy textured to look handworked — uninviting, even forbidding. It was hard to tell at a glance what was housed behind them, what the building was about.

At the same time, nobody denied that the design was distinctive, an interruption in a sea of midtown blandness to which MoMA’s facade contributes. Indeed, the Folk Art Museum looked about as un-MoMA as could be imagined: a small, dark, recessive sculpture set against the mega-museum’s stretch of glass and steel. Anyway, it went. A shame. If a work of architecture, loved or hated, has the weight and personality of an aesthetic object, which the Williams-Tsien building did, it should be considered “museum-worthy” and preserved.

There was another factor that made its loss regrettable. The work it housed — by folk artists, self-taught artists, and so-called outsider artists — was not only deeply charismatic, but filled out the story of Modernism in a way that MoMA itself, in recent years, has largely neglected to do.

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This wasn’t always true at MoMA, whose early leaders regarded folk or self-taught artists as foundational figures in Modern art. In 1938, when the museum was operating out of temporary quarters on West 49th Street, it organized a large exhibition called “Masters of Popular Painting,” described as a survey of “Modern Primitives of Europe and America.” Among its 22 artists were Henri Rousseau and Séraphine Louis, known simply as Séraphine, from France, and the Americans John Kane and Horace Pippin. Pictures by all four soon entered the permanent collection, as would work by the Pennsylvania landscapist Joseph Pickett and the Polish-born New Yorker Morris Hirshfield."



"The presence of the Folk Art Museum on 53rd Street picked up the slack. I even tended to think of the smaller museum as a kind of antechamber to the larger one — an entry point, the place you go to first for historical grounding. The museum still offers this, in its 2 Lincoln Square location on the Upper West Side and its “Self-Taught Genius Gallery” in Long Island City, Queens. But in midtown, MoMA is now again on its own with the tradition of self-taught art. And what, if anything, will it do with it?

The full answer remains, of course, to be seen in October and beyond. All we can do at this point is hope for the best, and give some advice. When, in 2014, the fate of the 53rd Street building was announced, MoMA’s director, Glenn D. Lowry, framed the decision in terms of the larger museum’s need for more space, which, he said, would permit the presentation of “transformative” acquisitions “by such artists as Marcel Broodthaers, Lygia Clark, Steve McQueen, Robert Rauschenberg, Gerhard Richter, Mira Schendel, Richard Serra, Sophie Taeuber-Arp and Cy Twombly, among many others.”

I would suggest that we, and MoMA, don’t need any more Rauschenbergs, or Richters, or Serras, or Twomblys. What we do need is “many others.” And some of those Others were, for 13 years, to be found in the Folk Art Museum next door. Maybe MoMA can now be persuaded to acknowledge its spirit, and their genius, in its expanded home."
folkart  architects  design  moma  2019  art  democracy  elitism  hollandcotter  folkartmuseum  culture  museums  nyc 
june 2019 by robertogreco
Are.na Blog / Unlearning hierarchy at the Free School of Architecture
"The Free School of Architecture is an experimental, tuition-free program founded in 2016 that brings architectural thinkers to Los Angeles for several weeks of participatory learning. Four of the original participants – Elisha Cohen, Lili Carr, Karina Andreeva and Tessa Forde – took over the project in 2017 and organized the 2018 edition, which is extensively archived on Are.na. We caught up with them via email to hear their thoughts on alternative education in art and design."



"FSA takes a maximalist and inclusive approach; this has the advantage of allowing us to connect seemingly different people and projects who might never have met, and between whom unexpected collaborations start to happen. It attempts to bridge the gap between academia and practice and allow the space for conversations about architecture that are often overlooked. This maximalist approach means that there will be some unavoidable confusion as a result. We focused on growth and development of participants over clarity to outsiders. Still transparency was a constant topic of conversation and a goal for us as the organizers, and we realize that this is an area we drastically need to improve.

At the core are a few aspirational (and perhaps naive) values that we hope FSA can act as a testing ground for, no matter how the program evolves in the future:

- Non-hierarchy

- Interdisciplinarity and inclusivity

- Freeness (free from constraints of academy and practice, tuition-free, free to be silent or to question)

Leo: How did you structure things in 2018? Were there instructors and students, or did every participant take on a range of roles in relation to one another?

FSA: We sought to challenge the typical hierarchy of a school and emphasize the value of those attending by removing the impetus on the ‘teacher and student’ relationship. We purposefully avoided using those terms. Everyone involved became a ‘participant.’

This began with the application process. Anyone could apply to be a participant by writing a statement and demonstrating experience engaging with a form of practice relevant to architecture. Then, those who wanted to could also submit a teaching proposal. Not all participants had to host a session, but those who did were also there to listen to others.

This included the organizers—we also submitted our own application statements. This was important because the second stage of admissions was peer-evaluation. We sent each applicant three other essays to respond to in order to be accepted. Some responses were funny, some were graphic, while some wrote long, thoughtful reactions. Here is one example. Most importantly, it generated a dialogue before the school was in session and set the tone for what was to come.

Leo: What do you think you took away from the challenges and advantages of being a more "horizontal" organization?

FSA: The structure and organizational model was a huge learning experience for all of us. It had some incredibly powerful results, including a truly non-hierarchical working dynamic between the four of us that enabled unanimous decision-making and open discussion. We shared responsibility for almost every aspect of the organization. To do this productively took time, discussion, and trust. It is certainly not the most efficient, but we believe in its benefits over this downside.

Despite our intentions as organizers to make the program itself non-hierarchical, it became difficult for us to blend into the participant group and separate ourselves from those roles as we attempted to hand over the torch. The incredible complexity of running a school and the huge amount of admin work involved proved almost impossible to part with. This is an area that we plan to focus on in the future. In many ways we did too much, and further iterations of the school may reimagine it with more flexibility and with a more established system for handing off responsibility."



"Leo: Has working on Free School of Architecture offered ways to share knowledge with other groups thinking about alternative education?

FSA: We are only one example of many types of alternative educational initiatives arising, in the architecture education world but also in the art world, as education becomes increasingly more expensive and continues to perpetuate the agenda of those with cultural power and capital. We have been in touch with other schools with similar intentions, like Utopia School, Learning Gardens, and Aformal Academy, and there is an incredible opportunity to develop a kind of global network of knowledge and ideas exchange. Eventually, we would like to compile a “Free School Tool Kit” to allow others to run similar events and build on what we have learned so far. In fact, we used are.na throughout the summer as part of this same intention towards knowledge sharing. We wanted it to be both a resource for participants but also a growing archive to document the summer in the hopes that it might be interesting or useful to others. It still needs another layer of editing and uploading in order to work as a full archive or tool kit, but it did act as an ongoing platform for exchange at the time. Hopefully in the future we can continue to use it as a way for non-participants to engage as well.

Next up, we (the organizers) are traveling to the Bauhaus in Dessau, Germany to take part in their “Parliament of Schools,” along with others from around the world, including Public School for Architecture, Open Raumlabor University, and many more. It should be a fantastic occasion to engage with and learn about other organizations and explore the future of pedagogy within the architectural field. We’re very excited about how it might influence what we do next!"
unlearning  hierarchy  horizontality  elishacohen  lillicarr  karinaandreeva  tessaforde  2019  freeschools  2017  2018  unschooling  interdisciplinary  freeness  inclusivity  responsibility  decisionmaking  participation  participatory  experimentation  experience  architects  architecture  design  are.na 
april 2019 by robertogreco
A new U.S.-Mexico border? At the Venice Biennale, imagining a binational region called MEXUS
"As part of their research into watersheds, Cruz and Forman have created an inventory of public lands in Los Laureles that can serve multiple purposes — as green space, environmental education center and natural buffers to mitigate flows of waste. And they are working to see how they can create a mechanism to invest in those spaces so that they might be preserved.

“Instead of the investing in the wall,” says Cruz, “can we invest to get the poor settlement to regulate the flow of waste? Can we get the poor residents to take care of the rich estuary?’

The subjects are tricky, but in these types of projects, Zeiger says she sees plenty of optimism.

“In architecture, if we don’t allow ourselves to visualize a condition that is different than the current condition, then we really cut off how we will impact the future,” she says.

For Forman, that consists of fomenting a new type of border culture.

“Citizenship,” she says, “is not an identity card. It’s about coexisting and building a city together.”"
teddycruz  fonnaforman  carolinamiranda  border  borders  us  california  mexico  sandiego  tijuana  texas  arizona  newmexico  2018  venicebiennale  architecture  citizenship  politicalequator  geography  geopolitics  mimizeiger  annlui  afrofuturism  architects  mexus  walls  nature  watersheds  land  maps  mapping  territory  ybca 
may 2018 by robertogreco
Bureau Spectacular
"BUREAU SPECTACULAR is an operation of architectural affairs founded and led by Jimenez Lai since 2008. It is located in Los Angeles.

BUREAU SPECTACULAR imagines other worlds and engages the design of architecture through telling stories. Beautiful stories about character development, relationships, curiosities and attitudes; absurd stories about fake realities that invite enticing possibilities. The stories conflate design, representation, theory, criticism, history and taste into cartoon pages. These cartoon narratives swerve into the physical world through architectural installations, models and small buildings.

BUREAU SPECTACULAR is a group of individuals who practice architecture through the contemplation of art, history, politics, sociology, linguistics, mathematics, graphic design, technology, and storytelling. We often find ourselves at the crossroads of all disciplines, yet comfortably embracing the healthy intersections between the many intellectual human discourses."



"JIMENEZ LAI works in the world of art, architecture and education. Previously, Jimenez Lai lived and worked in a desert shelter at Taliesin and resided in a shipping container at Atelier Van Lieshout on the piers of Rotterdam. Before founding Bureau Spectacular, Lai worked for various international offices, including MOS and OMA. Lai is widely exhibited and published around the world, including the MoMA-collected White Elephant. His first book, Citizens of No Place, was published by Princeton Architectural Press with a grant from the Graham Foundation. Draft II of this book has been archived at the New Museum as a part of the show Younger Than Jesus. Lai has won various awards, including the Architectural League Prize for Young Architects and Debut Award at the Lisbon Triennale. In 2014, Lai designed theTaiwan Pavilion at the 14th Venice Architectural Biennale. In 2015, Lai organized the Treatise exhibition and publication series at the Graham Foundation. In 2017, Lai and his studio exhibited a large scale installation at SFMOMA based on the drawing insideoutsidebetweenbeyond, 2014 which the Museum acquired in 2015.



JOANNA GRANT received her M.Arch from Princeton University. She has worked for architecture offices in Los Angeles, Chicago, Guangzhou, and Shenzhen for a diverse range of internationally renowned firms, including the L.A. based firm, Johnston Marklee & Associates. She has previously worked with Beatriz Colomina on a research projects of couples in architecture, as well as the Danish office ADEPT Architects in their Chinese satellite firm. In 2013 she became a member of Bureau Spectacular, assisting in multiple competitions in which they were awarded honorable mentions or finalists, and the winning proposal for the Taiwan pavilion for the 2014 Venice Biennale. Joanna curates the blog "Cloudzwatching," which features student design work from schools across the United States. She has contributed to Conditions Magazine and Nova Organa, and recently organized a conference at Princeton University called "& Delight" with Kevin Pazik. Her work has been described as "Takashi Murakami meets Mario Botta." She likes rainbowy, cute and fluffy architecture. And Postmodernism."

[via: https://www.sfmoma.org/exhibition/bureau-spectacular/ ]

See also some posts about the SFMOMA exhibit:
http://archinect.com/features/article/149995194/new-bureau-spectacular-exhibition-at-sfmoma-explores-the-narrative-properties-of-architecture
https://archpaper.com/2017/02/bureau-spectacular-insideoutsidebetweenbeyond-exhibition/
https://www.dezeen.com/2017/03/10/bureau-spectacular-shows-fantastical-architectural-models-san-francisco-museum-modern-art-sfmoma/ ]

[See also: "Citizens of No Place"
http://graphic-novel-architecture.com/#/lai/
https://www.amazon.com/Citizens-No-Place-Architectural-Graphic/dp/1616890622
http://www.papress.com/html/product.details.dna?isbn=9781616890629
http://www.archdaily.com/253563/citizens-of-no-place-jimenez-lai

See also: "When I Grow Up"
http://miamirail.org/spring-2017/when-i-grow-up/
http://bureau-spectacular.net/when-i-grow-up/ ]
jimenezlai  architects  comics  design  architecture  bureauspectacular  sfmoma  sfsh  classideas  joannagrant  education  art 
august 2017 by robertogreco
What's Wrong with Apple's New Headquarters | WIRED
"But … one more one more thing. You can’t understand a building without looking at what’s around it—its site, as the architects say. From that angle, Apple’s new HQ is a retrograde, literally inward-looking building with contempt for the city where it lives and cities in general. People rightly credit Apple for defining the look and feel of the future; its computers and phones seem like science fiction. But by building a mega-headquarters straight out of the middle of the last century, Apple has exacerbated the already serious problems endemic to 21st-century suburbs like Cupertino—transportation, housing, and economics. Apple Park is an anachronism wrapped in glass, tucked into a neighborhood."



"Apple Park isn’t the first high-end, suburban corporate headquarters. In fact, that used to be the norm. Look back at the 1950s and 1960s and, for example, the Connecticut General Life Insurance HQ in Hartford or John Deere’s headquarters in Moline, Illinois. “They were stunningly beautiful, high modernist buildings by quality architects using cutting-edge technology to create buildings sheathed in glass with a seamless relationship between inside and outside, dependent on the automobile to move employees to the site,” says Louise Mozingo, a landscape architect at UC Berkeley and author of Pastoral Capitalism: A History of Suburban Corporate Landscapes. “There was a kind of splendid isolation that was seen as productive, capturing the employees for an entire day and in the process reinforcing an insular corporate culture.”

By moving out of downtown skyscrapers and building in the suburbs, corporations were reflecting 1950s ideas about cities—they were dirty, crowded, and unpleasantly diverse. The suburbs, though, were exclusive, aspirational, and architectural blank slates. (Also, buildings there are easier to secure and workers don’t go out for lunch where they might hear about other, better jobs.) It was corporatized white flight. (Mozingo, I should add, speaks to this retrograde notion in Levy’s WIRED story.)

Silicon Valley, though, never really played by these rules. IBM built a couple of research sites modeled on its East Coast redoubts, but in general, “Silicon Valley has thrived on using rather interchangeable buildings for their workplaces,” Mozingo says. You start in a garage, take over half a floor in a crummy office park, then take over the full floor, then the building, then get some venture capital and move to a better office park. “Suddenly you’re Google, and you have this empire of office buildings along 101."

And then when a bust comes or your new widget won’t widge, you let some leases lapse or sell some real estate. More than half of the lot where Apple sited its new home used to be Hewlett Packard. The Googleplex used to be Silicon Graphics. It’s the circuit of life.

Except when you have a statement building like the Spaceship, the circuit can’t complete. If Apple ever goes out of business, what would happen to the building? The same thing that happened to Union Carbide’s. That’s why nobody builds these things anymore. Successful buildings engage with their surroundings—and to be clear, Apple isn’t in some suburban arcadia. It’s in a real live city, across the street from houses and retail, near two freeway onramps.

Except the Ring is mostly hidden behind artificial berms, like Space Mountain at Disneyland. “They’re all these white elephants. Nobody knows what the hell to do with them. They’re iconic, high-end buildings, and who cares?” Mozingo says. “You have a $5 billion office building, incredibly idiosyncratic, impossible to purpose for somebody else. Nobody’s going to move into Steve Jobs’ old building.”"



"The problems in the Bay Area (and Los Angeles and many other cities) are a lot more complicated than an Apple building, of course. Cities all have to balance how they feel about adding jobs, which can be an economic benefit, and adding housing, which also requires adding expensive services like schools and transit. Things are especially tough in California, where a 1978 law called Proposition 13 radically limits the amount that the state can raise property taxes yearly. Not only did its passage gut basic services the state used to excel at, like education, but it also turned real estate into the primary way Californians accrued and preserved personal wealth. If you bought a cheap house in the 1970s in the Bay Area, today it’s a gold mine—and you are disincentivized from doing anything that would reduce its value, like, say, allowing an apartment building to be built anywhere within view.

Meanwhile California cities also have to figure out how to pay for their past employees’ pensions, an ever-increasing percentage of city budgets. Since they can’t tax old homes and can’t build new ones, commercial real estate and tech booms look pretty good. “It’s a lot to ask a corporate campus to fix those problems,” Arieff says.

But that doesn’t mean that it shouldn’t try. Some companies are: The main building of the cloud storage company Box, for example, is across the street from the Redwood City CalTrain station, and the company lets people downtown park in its lot on weekends. “The architecture is neither here nor there, but it’s a billion times more effective than the Apple campus,” Arieff says. That’s a more contemporary approach than building behind hills, away from transit.

When those companies are transnational technology corporations, it’s even harder to make that case. “Tech tends to be remarkably detached from local conditions, primarily because they’re selling globally,” says Ed Glaeser, a Harvard economist who studies cities. “They’re not particularly tied to local suppliers or local customers.” So it’s hard to get them to help fix local problems. They have even less of an incentive to solve planning problems than California homeowners do. “Even if they see the problem and the solution, there’s not a way to sell that. This is why there are government services,” Arieff says. “You can’t solve a problem like CalTrain frequency or the jobs-to-housing ratio with a market-based solution.”

Cities are changing; a more contemporary approach to commercial architecture builds up instead of out, as the planning association’s report says. Apple’s ring sites 2.5 million square feet on 175 acres of rolling hills and trees meant to evoke the Stanford campus. The 60-story tall Salesforce Tower in San Francisco has 1.5 million square feet, takes up about an acre, has a direct connection to a major transit station—the new Transbay Terminal—and cost a fifth of the Apple ring. Stipulated, the door handles probably aren’t as nice, but the views are killer.

The Future

Cupertino is the kind of town that technology writers tend to describe as “once-sleepy” or even, and this should really set off your cliche alarm, “nondescript.” But Shrivastava had me meet her for coffee at Main Street Cupertino, a new development that—unlike the rotten strip malls along Stevens Creek Blvd—combines cute restaurants and shops with multi-story residential development and a few hundred square feet of grass that almost nearly sort of works as a town square.

Across the actual street from Main Street, the old Vallco Mall—one of those medieval fortress-like shopping centers with a Christmas-sized parking lot for a moat—has become now Cupertino’s most hotly debated site for new development. (The company that built Main Street owns it.) Like all the other once-sleepy, nondescript towns in Silicon Valley, Cupertino knows it has to change. Shrivastava knows that change takes time.

It takes even longer, though, if businesses are reluctant partners. In the early 20th century, when industrial capitalists were first starting to get really, really rich, they noticed that publicly financed infrastructure would help them get richer. If you own land that you want to develop into real estate, you want a train that gets there and trolleys that connect it to a downtown and water and power for the houses you’re going to build. Maybe you want libraries and schools to induce families to live there. So you team up with government. “In most parts of the US, you open a tap and drink the water and it won’t kill you. There was a moment when this was a goal of both government and capital,” Mozingo says. “Early air pollution and water pollution regulations were an agreement between capitalism and government.”

Again, in the 1930s and 1940s, burgeoning California Bay Area businesses realized they’d need a regional transit network. They worked for 30 years alongside communities and planners to build what became BART, still today a strange hybrid between regional connector and urban subway.

Tech companies are taking baby steps in this same direction. Google added housing to the package deal surrounding the construction of its new HQ in the North Bayshore area—nearly 10,000 apartments. (That HQ is a collection of fancy pavilion-like structures from famed architect Bjarke Ingels.) Facebook’s new headquarters (from famed architect Frank Gehry) is supposed to be more open to the community, maybe even with a farmers’ market. Amazon’s new headquarters in downtown Seattle, some of 10 million square feet of office space the company has there, comes with terrarium-like domes that look like a good version of Passengers.

So what could Apple have built? Something taller, with mixed-use development around it? Cupertino would never have allowed it. But putting form factor aside, the best, smartest designers and architects in the world could have tried something new. Instead it produced a building roughly the shape of a navel, and then gazed into it.

Steven Levy wrote that the headquarters was Steve Jobs’ last great project, an expression of the way he saw his domain. It may look like a circle, but it’s actually a pyramid—a monument… [more]
apple  urbanism  cities  architects  architecture  adamrogers  2017  applecampus  cupertino  suburbia  cars  civics  howbuildingslearn  stevejobs  design  housing  publictransit  civicresponsibility  corporations  proposition13  bart  allisonarieff  bayarea  1030s  1940s  1950s  facebook  google  amazon  seattle  siliconvalley  isolationism  caltrain  government  capitalism  publicgood  louisemozingo  unioncarbide  ibm  history  future  landscape  context  inequality 
june 2017 by robertogreco
How Bad Urban Planning Led To The Birth Of A Billion-Dollar Genre | The FADER
"Architect Mike Ford traces the relationship between structural racism, public housing projects, and hip-hop."



'Hip-hop lyrics are [filled] with first-hand accounts of living conditions in the projects. The hip-hop MC used lyrics to create a dialogue, to give commentary and counterpoints to the modernist vision [that birthed towers like 1520 Sedgwick Ave]. The MCs served as a voice for disenfranchised communities and often un-consulted end users of public housing. Think about Streetlife’s contribution to Wu Tang Clan’s [1998 song] “S.O.S”: Street chronicle, wise words by the abdominal/ High honorable, rap quotable phenomenal/ Seniority kid, I speak for the minority/ Ghetto poverty fuck the housing authority. Or Snoop Dogg’s song “Life in the Projects,” [from the soundtrack of the animated TV show The PJs]: Ain't no trees, the grass ain't green/And when I say it's all bad, you know what I mean. They provided realistic accounts of what life in the projects was like, of the failed urban planning and deplorable conditions of high-rise, low-income housing developments in contrast to the utopia imagined by Le Corbusier.

Corbusier’s plan [did receive] its fair share of criticisms. A critique of the plan was published in the French architectural magazine L’Architecte, and spoke to the uncertainty of the social impact of high density living and Corbusier’s machine-like architecture: “Is the next generation really destined to pass its existence in these immense geometrical barracks, living in standardized mass production houses with mass production furniture…Their games, and by that I mean their recreations, are all based on the same model…Poor Creatures! What will they become in the midst of all this dreadful speed, this organization, this terrible uniformity?” I argue that this 1925 criticism is a prediction of hip-hop culture.

It’s crazy because every architecture school around the country celebrates people like Corbusier and Moses as being great. I’m changing up the story and saying that these people and their ideas were flawed, you know? They created these awful conditions that birthed hip-hop. This is something that’s left out of architectural studies. It hides the hands of those that damaged communities and blames the existence of the “hood” on African-American culture.

As long as people from the outside are telling the story, that narrative will continue. We need to continue to get people of color involved in architecture, as urban planners, as professors, as authors. It’s important for minorities to enter architecture because, throughout the United States, our communities have been designed, uprooted, and pretty much destroyed by architects and urban planners who do not look like us and unfortunately have little to desire to communicate with us during the planning of those events.

So what can happen if we get more minorities involved in architecture and architecture fields such as urban planning? You’re gonna have people at the table who are sensitive to the fabrics of [their] communities and understand what it means to not uproot them. Having a voice at that table to be an advocate for those underrepresented communities is essential. Architecture can destroy and inhibit people from becoming their best, but it also has the power to uplift and empower them. If we’re going to achieve the latter, it’s got to be a collaborative effort."
mikeford  architects  architecture  design  urbanplanning  music  history  hiphop  bronx  nyc  robertmoses  lecorbusier  housing  housingprojects  urbandesign  urbnism  racism  race  us  wutangclan  snoppydogg 
september 2016 by robertogreco
‘This is the dirty, magical realism future of Los Angeles’ | Buildings | Architectural Review
"Maltzan’s bold, stacked forms engage with a formerly industrial neighbourhood in downtown LA

Fundamental transformations are taking place within the two main urban centres of California, the state that exemplified a previous model of laissez-faire sub-urbanity. The force of change is a new generation of urban dwellers that bring a different set of values around identity, community and responsibility. The effect of these changes seems to differ between the two cities, as a forum commenter recently pointedly summarised: ‘San Francisco is a utopia gone wrong, while Los Angeles is a dystopia gone right.’ While SF’s development has become dubiously intertwined with the tech boom and its relating social disparities, LA is possibly evolving towards a more enmeshed alternative. These developments deserve attention, as even more than the car-oriented suburb of the ’60s, this current idea of the city might well become the model for other developing regions around the globe.

Los Angeles for decades was understood as an entropic field of enclaves. A mat-city where sunshades and windshields allowed for a coexistence of minimal interaction, as depicted so cleverly in Robert Altman’s Shortcuts (1993). The city’s downtown frequents as hell-on-earth in numerous sci-fi movies. For years, the dark and haunted vision of this part of town, as depicted in Blade Runner (1982), was an idée fixe. Come 2014, Spike Jonze’s magical realism brings us a radically new notion of what LA’s future might look like. In Her, the movie in which protagonist Theodore Twombly falls in love with an OS with an exceptionally seductive voice, the future of downtown LA is clean, dense and comfortable. According to Her cinematographer Hoyte Van Hoytema, Jonze wanted an LA set in the not-so-distant future – a ‘world that was tactile and pleasant: the very opposite of a dystopian future’.

Los Angeles architect Michael Maltzan has been contemplating the not-so-distant future of LA for a while, leading in 2011 to his book No More Play. ‘The city is at a moment where much of the way that it has been developed in the past, which has created both the physical and psychological identity for the city – a city that just continued to push the boundaries outward and sprawl into the periphery – that data equation is probably untenable at this point. There is an extraordinary pressure back in and onto the city that is creating a kind of overwriting of the city in a very intense way.’ This brings up a number of questions that other cities, older more traditional cities, probably have dealt with in the past, things like transport, and certainly scale and density as important urban questions. What Maltzan has been most interested in, ‘is trying to imagine how you deal with those questions, but deal with them in a way that is inspired by and specific to Los Angeles. I don’t think it really helps at all to try to import models from other established or more traditional cities into a culture that has its own identity, its own character, its own spirit’.

This spirit is increasingly emerging in Maltzan’s own work. His lines and forms are daring and bold. His predominantly white massings, shaped through hard chamfers and sharp facets, gain their expression in the dark shadows of the Sunshine State. More particular is his embrace of the raw and given – the reality of the everyday in all its looseness and unpredictability. This engagement with the real, which was also crucial for fellow Angeleno and former employer, Frank Gehry, is helping Maltzan now add two significant projects to LA evolving downtown less than a mile apart."



"As the project’s linear form moves south, it begins to shift, delaminating to create views and ground-level connections across its width for a clear connection to the LA River and future transit nodes. Says Maltzan, ‘It’s seen as a three-dimensional armature that eventually weaves itself into the city.’ Interspersed in this connective network are the contemporary perks these buildings require such as pools, barbecue decks and gyms as points of orientation.

Both The Star Apartments and One Santa Fe are frugal encampments of wood and stucco on top of a new ground with its concrete structures and ordinary plumbing exposed. They are built to current economic realities and construction techniques. In their parti, the projects evoke Masato Otaka’s Sakaide Artificial Ground development (1968-86). This Japanese Metabolist established an artificial datum over a seismically unstable slum area in Sakaide, using a fixed concrete slab and beam platform, which housed itinerant salt workers in a series of prefabricated housing structures on the slab. Underneath was occupied by offices, shops, parking and a network of pedestrian alleys. The second ground certainly is not a new concept in architecture, but other than in its utopian or Structuralist precursors, Maltzan’s new ground is not infused with radical rhetorics. Somewhere within the amalgam of new realities, housing subsidies, affordability ratios, zoning requirements, ROI models, parking quota, etc, Maltzan is able to create two projects that are both unique and memorable.

In addition to that, in their pragmatism and embrace of the currents of our time, they form a ‘casual’ manifesto of how the city could transform. Unlike in other cities, space in LA is actually not yet precious, so doubling the ground is not to create more; it is the introduction of a layer within the city that can take on new community or urban roles. The new public layers appear as a testing ground, or antechamber, allowing the changing and diverse LA populace to gradually get reconnected, to both the outside and to the other. ‘I think architecture through building form has a responsibility to try to point to what urban forms are going to look like and what the city’s going to look like. These buildings are trying to do that,’ says Maltzan. If this is where the city is heading, a ‘dirty’, magical realism awaits us in the not-too-distant future."
losangeles  sanfrancisco  california  2015  architects  housing  cities  michaelmaltzan  design  urbanism  onesantafe  dystopia  spikejonze  her  future  sprawl  density 
december 2015 by robertogreco
Opinion: Alexandra Lange on how architects should use social media
"It’s easy to make fun of Bjarke Ingels on Instagram. Selfie, LEGO selfie, girlfriend (I hope), Gaga, monograph, fog, fox socks. His Instagram has a lot to do with the architecture of self-promotion, but little to do with actual building. The same goes for many architects' Twitter feeds: lecture, lecture, award, positive review, lecture. You could say that's just business today. But social media can do more for architecture than showcase pretty faces and soundbites. Architects need to start thinking of social media as the first draft of history.

There's an unofficial rule of thumb that you should only tweet about yourself 30 percent of the time. That's a rule many architects break over and over again. They treat Twitter and Instagram as extensions of their marketing strategy, another way to let people know where their partners are speaking, that their projects are being built, and that the critics like them. Happy happy happy. Busy busy busy. Me me me. In real life, most architects aren't quite as monomaniacal as their feeds. (There are exceptions.) They read reviews written about others. They look at buildings built by others. Heck, they even spend some time not making architecture. That balance, between the high and the low, the specific and the general, the obvious and the obscure makes life, not to mention design, much more interesting.

That unselfish reading, writing, seeing and drawing form part of the larger cloud of association that, one day, critics will use to assess and locate the architecture of today. A more flexible, critical and conversational use of social media could suggest interpretations before the concrete is dry. As an example, consider Philip Johnson, perhaps the most networked architect of his day. Philip Johnson would have been really good at social media. He understood, better than most, that interest is created by association. That was the principle of his salons, drawing the latest and greatest from a variety of cultural realms. Those young artists and architects helped him stay young and current, he helped them by offering literal or metaphorical institutional support.

Isn't that how these platforms work too? I look better when I spread the word about everyone's good work, not just my own. And seeing others' projects gives me new ideas. Johnson was a curator at the Museum of Modern Art, but he was also a "curator" in contemporary parlance, collecting and distributing people and objects and styles.

That's why his physical library at his Glass House in New Canaan, CT remains of interest: the shelves reveal what he thought worth reading and keeping. Outside, its form reveals the same: the work of architect Michael Graves, promoted and digested. Even earlier, in the September 1950 issue of Architectural Review, Johnson set out the inspirations – possibly decoys – for that same Glass House. There's Mies, of course, but there are also the less expected references to Suprematist painter Kasimir Malevich and eighteenth century architect Claude Nicolas Ledoux. There's an image showing the Brick House, the almost windowless box set behind the Glass House where he actually slept, a building often eliminated from later photography of the site. There are many readings of this combination of text and images, few of them straightforward. But I'll take false fronts and red herrings over pure self-promotion any day. Trails of breadcrumbs like this are catnip for critics then and now. Johnson used a prestigious journal to try out his version of the Glass House genealogy. You architects could be doing this every day.

Instagram is popularly characterised as a more perfect version of everyday life: the artfully mismatched tablescape, the colour-balanced Christmas tree, the accessorised child. But it doesn't have to be that way. We get enough better-than-reality images of buildings on sites like Dezeen. I’ve started Instagramming my visits to exhibitions and buildings, as a way of sharing the first cut, taking visual notes, and focusing on details and moments that didn't make the press packet. We so often see the same images of a building, over and over. What about the rest of it? My unprofessional photographs pick up on different things. At Herzog & de Meuron's Parrish Art Museum, for example, I snapped the sign required to point you to the "Main Entrance." And the ten-foot, blackened, windowless doors that could flatten a five-year-old. These images can be critical in a different way - fleeter, funnier, like popcorn - from the endangered building review. Could architects point out their own mistakes? Or – with love, of course – those of their colleagues? Of their heroes?

At a higher artistic level, there's the example of the Instagram of architectural photographer Iwan Baan. His Instagram reveals that he has seen more contemporary architecture (and more of it from helicopters) than anyone. I find something aggrandising, even aggressive, about the relentlessness of his travel and the harsh aerial views. There's also something humanising about his Instagram as a series of outtakes, capturing the surround for the more perfect images that end up on the websites of the architects. We see the faces of people, the buildings imperfectly lit or weathered. The heroic and the ordinary combine in this extra work, and will ultimately contribute to the way we look at the official pictures too. It would be even better if the architects were right there beside him, taking pictures of what else they see. I know architects make design pilgrimages. Why not take us there?"



"Social media can make criticism, interpretation, dialogue and history part of daily life. Don’t leave it to the critics.

In a more recent example, the announcement that the American Institute of Architects would award its first Gold Medal to a woman to Julia Morgan, dead these 56 years, was announced, praised, dissected, and reconsidered, all in a matter of hours on Twitter. Dezeen's own post on the matter quoted me from Twitter; Architect Magazine created a reaction story to its own story by Storifying a discussion between several architecture critics (and didn’t have to pay us a dime). What do architects think of her work? What woman would you have nominated? It shouldn’t just be critics in on that discussion.

Architects sometimes forget what other people don’t know – or forget to share the positive assets of the past before, during and after they are threatened. Social media collects in real time. You can hashtag your firm. You can collate your campus work. You can geolocate your project. You can tip your hat to a colleague. You can tell us what you're reading. In doing so architects contribute to a broader dialogue about what makes a good experience. What social media can do for architects is make criticism, interpretation, dialogue and history part of daily life. Don't leave it to the critics. Don't farm it out to your communications staff. That's boring. Surely you don’t want to be boring? I'd be surprised if one social media platform or another weren't part of most designers' daily practice (at least those under 50). Let the rest of us in, so it doesn't take bankruptcy, demolition or obituary to get people talking about architecture."
2014  instagram  alexandralange  process  iwanbaan  bjarkeingels  socialmedia  howto  curating  curation  design  architecture  architects  context  communication  sharing  conversation  criticism  critique  interpretation  dialog  history  juliamorgan  philipjohnson  twitter  #daydetroit  #folkmoma  archives  tumblr  glasshouse 
december 2014 by robertogreco
My City: Life as a blind architect in San Francisco | TED Blog
"Downey became intrigued with architecture when he was 6 years old, when his parents worked with an architect to design a brand-new house in his hometown of Nashville, Tennessee. He realized that buildings and structures could be creative and fun. “I got to explore the house being constructed, which was great. It was like a playground — you could walk onto the roof from the tall side of the house, and it was built around big trees, creating a courtyard. It was a modern space that tied into the landscape.”

Now, as one of the few blind architects in the world, Downey has taken a keen interest in multisensory design, which is important for visually impaired people who rely on touch, sound or smell to navigate. “Think about architectural environments that are [visually] monotonous, like hospitals or big convention centers,” he says. “Try that blind, when it all feels the same and sounds the same.”

When he first returned to work in Oakland, for example, he found that he couldn’t get to the bathroom on his own. “I returned to the office before I started orientation and mobility training,” he recalls. “The bathrooms were out of the office and down a few hallways. I typically had the office manager guide me there.”

These days, he says, he designs with a tactile palette, not just a color palette, in mind. “Blind people rely on acoustics to get around. I test materials with my cane to see how they feel. Instead of doing a ‘walk-through,’ we create a ‘tap-through,’ so you hear what it’s like when you tap your cane throughout the building.” He uses an embossing printer to print out drawings of the spaces he works on. (Recent projects include eye centers in California and at Duke University, and innovative transportation hubs in the Bay Area.)

“The San Francisco Bay Area really does have a vibrant and empowering blind community,” he says. “I’ve always been quite intentional about networking. I wanted to meet the most effective, aggressive and accomplished blind people that I could. It seemed important to have great mentors while also keeping the bar high relative to expectations and goals. The blind crowd had it down, with all sorts of pragmatic and philosophical advice. Besides, it seemed like I kept meeting all sorts of really cool and interesting people — I was miffed that I had to lose my sight to meet them!” Today, Downey is himself a key member of the city’s blind network, and also serves on the board of directors for LightHouse, an organization promoting independence and self-reliance for those who are blind or visually impaired.

“The blind crowd tends to be pretty resilient and great problem-solvers,” he continues. For Downey, that resilience includes a newfound appreciation for life’s everyday sounds.

“I love sitting on our front porch,” he muses. “It’s something I didn’t think that much of before I lost my sight. I’ll be sitting there, early in the morning, just listening to the birds coming out and the breezes blowing through. It’s an incredible sensory experience. I’m hearing leaves falling off the branches and bouncing off other branches and hitting the sidewalk. It’s not that I hear any better, it’s just that I never would have noticed that before. It’s incredibly beautiful to think about.” 

["See a gallery of photographs of Downey’s favorite places in San Francisco" http://blog.ted.com/2013/12/04/san-francisco-in-pictures-chris-downey-on-the-experience-of-a-city/ ]

[via: http://studiox-nyc.tumblr.com/post/69085416482/in-2008-architect-chris-downey-had-successful ]

[See also: http://99percentinvisible.org/episode/episode-10-99-sound-and-feel/
http://www.theatlantic.com/magazine/archive/2010/10/design-within-reach/308220/
https://web.archive.org/web/20151230021453/http://archpaper.com:80/news/articles.asp?id=4814 ]
chrisdowney  sanfrancisco  2013  architects  architecture  blind  blindness  acoustics  design 
december 2013 by robertogreco
death does come, of this we are sure
"Based on our data, it would appear that the typical architect1 dies from Heart Failure at the age of 73. You've been warned!"
memorial  architecture  health  humor  death  architects  bryanboyer 
november 2012 by robertogreco
DUS Architects Amsterdam -
"DUS architects was founded by Msc Arch. Hans Vermeulen (1977), Msc Arch. Martine de Wit (1977) and Msc Arch. Hedwig Heinsman (1980) in 2004. The office builds 'Public Architecture': Design that consciously influences our daily life. This social significance shows at all levels of DUS' work, ranging from large urban strategies to outdoor breakfast designs. DUS sees architecture as a craftsmanship and combines research and design with a 'hands on' approach and unique use of materials.

DUS currently works on a variety of projects that range from art installation, product- and event design to architecture, planning and long-term urban transformation trajectories. The office is based in Amsterdam and is run by the three partners together with a varying team of employees and freelancers. By practicing their credo 'DESIGN by DOING'…"

[via: http://www.flickr.com/photos/anthonyalbright/7738447800/ ]
dus  urbanism  temporary  urban  art  architects  social  netherlands  amsterdam  architecture 
august 2012 by robertogreco
raumlabor berlin
"yes we do love the great ideas of the 60s 70s & the optimism which is inherent in changing the world at the stroke of a pen to the better. but we strongly believe that complexity is real & good & our society today does need a more substantial approach. therefore our spacial proposals are small scale & deeply rooted in the local condition…. BYE BYE UTOPIA!"

"There was once a society that believed the future would bring better living conditions to everyone. There were people, utopian thinkers, who thought about the big questions of the city. Today only a feeling remains, half desire, half melancholy, reminiscing of those architects who wanted to live in a better society and who had dreamed of better places. Such an era is now over. Here begins my work.

raumlaborberlin is a network, a collective of 8 trained architects who have come together in a collaborative work-structure. We work at the intersection of architecture, city planning, art and urban intervention…"
crossdisciplinary  multidisciplinary  interdisciplinary  interdisciplinarity  activism  history  transformation  experimentalarchitecture  experimental  adaptability  change  adaptation  dynamic  masterplanning  meaningmaking  place  research-baseddesign  urbaninterventions  complexity  urbanplanning  cityplanning  collaboration  cities  architects  art  design  urbanism  urban  architecture  berlin  raumlabor  local  small 
april 2012 by robertogreco
Rafael Viñoly on a Sunday | Blogs | Archinect
"At a time when masses of people are protesting wealth inequality, or protesting, oh, the dismantling of schools like Cooper Union, it seems more than immodest to talk about the "one indulgence" of owning nine pianos. Or three homes. (How's that sustainability side of the business doing?) But at least he didn't mention the private jet (or did he have to tighten the belt?)

Meanwhile, some seem to be saying that perhaps Viñoly would benefit from a little more cover from the spotlight. All of this ostentatious display of wealth could draw scrutiny of Viñoly's period of building for the Argentine junta. There's that little detail that hangs over Viñoly's head—the busy period when he "was so concentrated on the work," he "almost didn’t notice the politics." Remember?"
rafaelviñoly  architecture  architects  wealth  disparity  2011  consumptions  incomegap  argentina  thesoulless  inequality  the99%  class  javierarbona 
november 2011 by robertogreco
tiny houses | pdx : rlingard.com
"This project provides an affordable, infill development alternative for entry-level Portland, Oregon home buyers. On a single 50'x100', 4 compact single family houses share the space of a typical, single family residence. The operable fence partitions and interior layout of these homes allows each living space to open either to the communal garden space, the private courtyard or both. Modular construction is used to minimize construction waste, increase quality and performance, and maintains the project's tight budget goals."
ryanlingard  portland  oregon  architecture  homes  housing  tinyhouses  small  design  architects 
august 2011 by robertogreco
SO – IL [Solid Objectives – Idenburg Liu (SO – IL)]
"…an idea-based design office. With a global reach, it brings together extensive experience from the fields of architecture, academia and the arts. Founders Florian Idenburg and Jing Liu envisioned their New York-based studio in 2008 as a creative catalyst involved in all scales and stages of the architectural process. With roots in Europe, China and Japan – and sharing the optimism for architectural feasibility typical in those countries – Idenburg and Liu vehemently strive to realize their ideas in the world.

Since its inception, SO – IL has worked on an array of projects ranging in scale from a series of prints for the Guggenheim Museum to the master plan of a cultural campus in Seoul…

What unifies these projects is an intellectual and artistic rigor that has become SO – IL’s hallmark. Recognition for this approach is manifested through numerous prizes such as the MoMA PS1 Young Architects Program as well as the AIA NY Young Practices Award, both in 2010."
design  art  architecture  florianidenburg  jingliu  nyc  brooklyn  architects 
july 2011 by robertogreco
Peter Zumthor: In pursuit of perfection | Art and design | The Observer
"His interest in craft owes much to the route he took into architecture. "The first 10 years of my professional life had only to do with running away from my father," he says. "He was a wonderful cabinet-maker and me being the eldest son I had to take over his shop, his profession and so on and so on. I tried to escape by going to art school and then going on to industrial design and then interior design. This was going step by step towards architecture." He never qualified, although the Swiss authorities much later awarded him the title of architect, "because they loved my work"."
architecture  architects  self-taught  design  peterzumthor  outsiders  art  generalists  autodidacts  outsider 
june 2011 by robertogreco
Mario Pérez de Arce Lavín (1917 – 2010) | Plataforma Arquitectura
"A los 93 años de edad fallece el destacado arquitecto chileno Mario Pérez de Arce Lavín, arquitecto de larga trayectoria y con una gran cantidad de obras construidas en Chile.

Mario Perez de Arce nace en 1917, se titula de la Facultad de Arquitectura y Bellas Artes de la Universidad Católica de Chile en 1941 y se gradúa de “Master in Arts and Architecture” en la Universidad de Florida en 1942.

Tras años de experiencia y con una gran cantidad de obras construidas, en 1989 recibe el Premio Nacional de Arquitectura, el galardón más importante que puede recibir un arquitecto en Chile."
chile  architecture  architects  obituary  mariopérezdearcelavín  design 
november 2010 by robertogreco
Mario Pérez de Arce Lavín (1917 – 2010) | Plataforma Arquitectura
"A los 93 años de edad fallece el destacado arquitecto chileno Mario Pérez de Arce Lavín, arquitecto de larga trayectoria y con una gran cantidad de obras construidas en Chile.

Mario Perez de Arce nace en 1917, se titula de la Facultad de Arquitectura y Bellas Artes de la Universidad Católica de Chile en 1941 y se gradúa de “Master in Arts and Architecture” en la Universidad de Florida en 1942.

Tras años de experiencia y con una gran cantidad de obras construidas, en 1989 recibe el Premio Nacional de Arquitectura, el galardón más importante que puede recibir un arquitecto en Chile."
chile  architecture  architects  obituary  mariopérezdearcelavín  design 
november 2010 by robertogreco
shin egashira [via: http://bldgblog.blogspot.com/2010/06/slow-box.html]
"Shin Egashira is an artist/architect, Diploma Unit Master of the Architectural Association School of Architecture (http://aaschool.ac.uk/study/undergraduate/dip11.php), Founder/organizer of Koshirakura Landscape Workshop (http://koshirakura.com)."
architects  architecture  installation  japan  artist  photography  glvo  tcsnmy  greatartists  building  design  landscape  mechanics  classideas  shinegashira 
june 2010 by robertogreco
Archigram Archival Project
"The Archigram Archival Project makes the work of the seminal architectural group Archigram available free online for public viewing and academic study. The project was run by EXP, an architectural research group at the University of Westminster. It was funded by the Arts and Humanities Research Council and made possible by the members of Archigram and their heirs, who retain copyright of all images"
archigram  architecture  archive  buildings  creativity  portfolio  projects  uk  design  drawing  1960s  history  experimental  architects 
april 2010 by robertogreco
Pezo von Ellrichshausen Architects: Contexto y Sistema de Trabajo / Spanish Subs on Vimeo
"“Pezo von Ellrichshausen Architects: Contexto y Sistema de Trabajo” es un nuevo corto de 0300TV.
pezovonellrichshausen  chile  architecture  art  architects  installation 
november 2009 by robertogreco
Fosc House / Pezo von Ellrichshausen Architects | ArchDaily
"This project is both an exercise of formal and structural concentration. The dense program of this house for a family with four children (five bedrooms, three bathrooms, family room, studio, etc) is fitted between a regular interior duct and the surface of the largest legally possible exterior wall. The prospect of a future division of the site adds to the decision of concentrating all the program in a three storey prism on the highest point of the land so as to have vistas beyond the trees located on the lowest area of the plot."
architecture  homes  design  chile  pezovonellrichshausen  architects 
november 2009 by robertogreco
REX architecture / joshua prince-ramus interview [also see section on advice to the young]
"would like to have more money to play w/, but if there are big constraints, you're obliged to come to very creative solutions...never seen a constraint that we didn't like. office's ethos is about not designing objects, but designing processes...to have the confidence that with enough people, enough intelligence & enough energy, the process will lead to a conclusion that far exceeds anything you could have sketched initially or individually. we call this the 'lost art of productively losing control.’ ... I have a rule with my daughter. she's just turning four, but from the day she was born, I've always tried to make her understand there's no concept of 'away.’ you can't throw it ‘away.’ you can't flush it ‘away.’ it may not be here any longer, but it's there, somewhere, impacting the world. what troubles me most - as an architect - is that I'm a participant in the problem...we don't exercise the option of 'no.’...the fact that we can do less bad, doesn't mean we're doing good"
princeramus  architecture  interviews  sustainability  parenting  process  problemsolving  remkoolhaas  oma  rex  architects  design  tcsnmy  glvo 
october 2009 by robertogreco
Die Baupiloten
"Susanne Hofmann’s intention in founding the Baupiloten in June 2003 was to give fourth and fifth year architecture students practical experience on architectural projects and to teach them the skills to develop and realise a design.

In spring 2004 the TU Berlin chose to use the Baupiloten-course as part of Studienreformprojekt – the attempt to reform some of the teaching programme in the faculty. During the next two years the architect – since January2005 supported by architect Martin Janekovic – has been given the brief toestablish a design studio which brings together theory and practice, whichthen – provided it is successful – should be integrated into theregular teaching programme."

[various school design projects and this: http://www.baupiloten.com/en/projekte/cs/Main_cs.htm ]
education  design  children  germany  architects  schooldesign  architecture  furniture  portfolios  lcproject  tcsnmy  participatory  interiors 
june 2009 by robertogreco
fruitful contradictions
"This thesis seeks to identify a design methodology that allows for critical engagement in the informal city. To be effective, this way of working needs to be flexible, accommodating unexpected change across time. It should also take into account the social and environmental conflicts inherent in informal settlements. Program: The design of a community center, 30 houses, a waste water treatment plant, and plant nursery Site: San Bernardo colonia in Tijuana, Mexico. Thesis Advisor: Eric Howeler Special Advisor: Teddy Cruz 'Client': Oscar Romo, Tijuana River Estuary"
quilianriano  architecture  architects  thesis  teddycruz  tijuana  us  mexico  borders  informalcity 
march 2009 by robertogreco
ELEMENTAL
"ELEMENTAL is a Do Tank affiliated to the PUCA de Chile and COPEC, its focus is the design and implementation of urban projects of social interest and public impact. ELEMENTAL is based in three principles: A. To think, design and build better neighborhoods, housing and the necessary urban infrastructure to promote social development and overcome the circle of poverty and inequity of our cities; B. In order to trigger a relevant qualitative leap-forward, our projects must be built under the same market and policy conditions than any other, working to achieve “more with the same”. C. By quality we understand projects whose design guarantees incremental value and returns on investment over time, in order to stop considering it a mere “social expense”. In this spirit, ELEMENTAL contributes to improve the quality of life in Chilean cities, providing state of the art architecture and engineering, understanding the city as an unlimited resource to build social equity."
chile  design  architecture  collective  elementalchile  elemental  studio  architects  urban  community  activism  housing  portfolio  urbanism  social  neighborhoods  alejandroaravena 
march 2009 by robertogreco
The Demon-Haunted World
"I want to talk about cities, and “practical city magic” City Magic is a phrase I use a lot - I have a whole bunch of things tagged with ‘City Magic’ on delicious. Where next? It comes from a comic book I love called “The Invisibles” by Grant Morrison... Where next?"
mattjones  technology  ubicomp  everyware  psychogeography  urbancomputing  architecture  urban  cities  geography  local  location-based  location-aware  culture  infrastructure  archigram  presentation  2009  talk  webstock  gamechanging  future  pivotalmoments  mobile  phones  architects  design  history  networks  socialsoftware  situationist  botanicalls  behavior  environment  sustainability  exploration  urbanism  landscape  awareness  nuagevert  bignow  longhere 
february 2009 by robertogreco
Portland's 11xDesign Home Tour - Dwell Blog - dwell.com
"It’s not every local homes tour that merits attention beyond a city’s borders. But the 11xDesign tour, scheduled for February 21, featuring some of Portland’s most inspired contemporary residential design, is not a traditional home tour. ... s the city has become infused with new talent, a small group of promising and accomplished designer-developers have banded together in a hybrid of traditional architectural or development practice. Small firms and sole practitioners here like Path Architecture, Atelier Waechter, and Building Arts Workshop still operate as individual businesses, and even compete for buyers. But they share research, marketing and design ideas; they’ve become a community."
portland  oregon  homes  housing  architecture  design  events  cascadia  community  cooperative  development  crisis  housingbubble  hometours  collective  architects  modernism 
february 2009 by robertogreco
Architect Aoki's Office Wins Good Design Award - BusinessWeek
"I'm more interested in designs that might at first glance seem orthodox but in fact reflect an unusual or innovative take on something that already exists." ... "create a space that would be as close to a blank slate as possible...tenants would have greater freedom to customize the space as they saw fit" ... "The building's most distinctive characteristic, though, is its windows. They are all perfect squares, but are cut to seven different sizes. Adding to their motley appearance: Some of the glass panes are nearly flush with the outer wall while others aren't. Aoki and his staff made nearly 100 patterns from paper cutouts before settling on one they liked. The deciding factor: Its resemblance to things found in nature. "For example, a tree's leaves initially look similar, but if you line them up they're actually very different," says Aoki."
junaoki  architects  architecture  japan  tokyo 
december 2008 by robertogreco
Jørn Utzon - Telegraph
"Utzon rarely used a sketchbook, but would draw on anything that was available. He drew the initial plan for an art museum at Silkeborg, in Denmark, with poured salt on a restaurant table in Sydney, which he then photographed with a borrowed camera. Based on Buddhist caves he had visited near the Gobi Desert, the museum was never built. Another friend recalled Utzon using a charred stick on a pavement to sketch the cross-section of a cave-room he had seen in China, which was to form the basis for his design for a new house; sadly the sketch was washed away by a thunderstorm that same night."
jørnutzon  architects  architecture  design  howwework  sketching  drawing  cv 
december 2008 by robertogreco
sou fujimoto - interview with the japanese architect.
"I call it 'primitive future'. a sort of primitive situation that relates to the human 'cave' habitation but at the same time I like to create something
architects  architecture  design  japan  homes  housing 
november 2008 by robertogreco
elseplace: Brian A. Murphy in Cross Town Traffic
"Brian Murphy’s transition from being a lifeguard to carpenter to a well known architect was no accident, he could ride that wave because of his artistic talent. His work among the other names I have just mentioned was a total outsider coup. How an architecture school dropout could be considered among the ground breakers, ivy school graduates, grid busters, stucco cannibals and space chasers? I know few others tried hard in the group, but for Brian, it was mainly being himself. How great is that for an architect...

The original bad boy, named for his ironic moves of transparent walls, undulating roofs, charcoal drawn fireplace surrounds, ‘s’ curved concrete walkways defying direct line, drafting triangle sconces, clip on chandeliers, see through glass floors, was quickly picked up by no other than ultimate badling Dennis Hopper, at that time almost forgotten between Easy Rider and Blue Velvet, to design his house/studio/workshop in less than glorious inner Venice."
architecture  brianmurphy  bam  architects  design  autodidacts  losangeles  outsiders  outsider 
september 2008 by robertogreco
cityofsound: Lyons House, Sydney
"indicated value of client who knew what he wanted in terms of function...good fortune in meeting sympathetic architect at top of his craft...house faces inwards, with pool a form of courtyard - one side left open with view through trees to blue of bay beyond...more interested in...way building would perform....functional element to architecture. "As a machine"...As well as the Japanese influence, it’s also easy to correlate this space with promise of modernism...great open spaces w/out visible means of support...Peter Blake commented that Boyd’s houses were often “almost invisible from outside...isolationist suburban plot has done more harm than good. However...even with its back turned on audience like Miles Davis, this house still gives more back to this street than any of the houses surrounding it....examples of those everyday craftsmen of earlier age, when ability to design, build & repair physical material seemed widespread, useful & valued"
danhill  cityofsound  modernism  architects  architecture  design  homes  australia  sydney  melbourne  robinboyd 
august 2008 by robertogreco
The Jonathan [Jonathan Segal] - New Homes - dwell.com
"Since 1988, the native Californian has designed and built 245 smart, modern, and relatively eco-friendly rental units on odd and otherwise undesirable lots in and around the area, then turned them over to his wife Wendy to manage."
sandiego  development  lajolla  design  architecture  architects  jonathansegal 
may 2008 by robertogreco
The Work of Sebastian Mariscal « BUILD Blog
"We often wonder why so many great lessons from mid-century modern architecture, and most notably the Case Study House Program, have been lost over the years...Sebastian Mariscal, whose work authenticates these ideas and more."
homes  housing  modern  sebastianmariscal  architecture  architects  sandiego  design 
may 2008 by robertogreco
Urban Outfitter: Sebastian Mariscal Develops, Designs, and Builds–One Project at a Time | Architect Online
“Many amazing architects—Le Corbusier, Mies van der Rohe, Tadao Ando—didn't go to school. My approach was just different [from traditional path]. You learn at the jobsite, you learn at the office dealing with projects, you learn what the consequence
sebastianmariscal  lajolla  sandiego  architects  architecture  design  alternative  education  autodidacts  modern  homes  housing 
may 2008 by robertogreco
Sebastian Mariscal Mixes Design with Business and Social Responsibility | Design Vanguard | Features | Architectural Record
"Eschewing a formal architectural education, four years into his apprenticeship with his father, he opened his own design firm. He remodeled some interiors, then designed buildings in Mexico ranging from houses to a television studio."
sebastianmariscal  architecture  design  architects  sandiego  mexico  homes  housing  alternative  education  apprenticeships 
may 2008 by robertogreco
BLOG DE CASAS: Casas Fay - Sebastian Mariscal
"Las obras que ha construido Sebastian Mariscal en San Diego y el La Jolla utilizan volumenes puros que se ensamblan con el uso de materiales que muestran su proceso constructivo y es justo en su articulacion donde se logran fuertes relaciones hacia adent
homes  housing  architecture  design  sandiego  lajolla  sebastianmariscal  architects 
may 2008 by robertogreco
Architects of Buenos Aires » Buenos Aires, City of Faded Elegance
"The architects of Buenos Aires have left some of the most vivid impressions on the surface of this city. Stunning facades and architectural details are among the primary characteristics that create the beauty of Buenos Aires."
architects  architecture  buenosaires  argentina  via:cityofsound 
march 2008 by robertogreco
ARCHIGRAM
"After twelve years on the road, the ARCHIGRAM Exhibition has concluded its world tour with an extremely popular presentation at the Art Tower Mito in Japan last year"
archigram  exhibits  urban  architects  architecture  uk  history  design  movements  neo-nomads  nomads  urbanism  mobile  movement  future 
february 2008 by robertogreco
BLDGBLOG: Without Walls: An Interview with Lebbeus Woods
"architecture should not just be something that follows up on events but be a leader of events. That’s what you’re saying: That by implementing an architectural action, you actually are making a transformation in the social fabric and in the political fabric. Architecture becomes an instigator; it becomes an initiator.

That, of course, is what I’ve always promoted – but it’s the most difficult thing for people to do. Architects say: well, it’s my client, they won’t let me do this. Or: I have to do what my client wants. That’s why I don’t have any clients! [laughter] It’s true.

Because at least I can put the ideas out there and somehow it might seep through, or filter through, to another level."
architecture  politics  borders  cities  lebbeuswoods  culture  sciencefiction  scifi  theory  future  fiction  interviews  nyc  spaces  design  philosophy  bldgblog  art  architects  science 
october 2007 by robertogreco
Polshek Partnership - Architects - Newhouse School - - New York Times
"Polshek Partnership Architects does not specialize in media buildings. But in an odd confluence, three such projects by this firm are opening in succession."
architecture  architects  communication  media  design 
september 2007 by robertogreco
Peter Gluck’s Social Work
"An outspoken architect points the way to socially responsible practice by building his own designs."
architecture  architects  design  construction  schooldesign  homes  housing  education  change  alternative  aia  business  practice 
september 2007 by robertogreco
The Fine Art of Choosing an Architect | Edutopia
"Mistakes can happen. But hopefully not to you. Here's how to audition school-savvy designers."
architecture  architects  schools  schooldesign  lcproject  education  design  administration 
september 2007 by robertogreco
TAKAHARU TEZUKA+YUI TEZUKA
see Fuji Kindergarten and Houses: Porch (in Dwell), My Own Sky, Sandou, Observatory Room, Eaves, Floating Roof, Jyubako, Shoe Box, Big Window, Observation, Clipping Corner, House to Catch the Sky 4 (and III), Saw Roof, Skylight
architecture  design  homes  japan  practice  materials  tezuka  architects  housing  fujikindergarten  tezukaarchitects  kindergarten  tokyo  schooldesign  schools  education  takaharutezuka  2007 
august 2007 by robertogreco
Q&A With U.K. Starchitect David Adjaye -- New York Magazine
"Lauded and pilloried (well, by one client), the U.K. sensation heads to our shores." "discourse about private retreat and public engagement...public work dissolves barriers.. encourage permeability...house is...retreat from urbanity...city...tranquil spa
architecture  architects  davidadjaye  design  uk  nyc 
july 2007 by robertogreco
From architect to 'starchitect' | Art And Architecture | Arts | Telegraph
Already making waves in Britain, David Adjaye looks set to crack the US and become an international name. He talks to Dominic Bradbury
architecture  uk  us  architects  davidadjaye 
june 2007 by robertogreco
Science -- Cohen 287 (5451): 210
"Lured by a surge of funding and the growing prestige of science, world-famous architects, in partnership with special lab consultants, are changing the public face of research"
science  space  design  architecture  architects  laboratories  research 
june 2007 by robertogreco
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