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robertogreco : archiving   53

Webrecorder
"Webrecorder is a web archiving service anyone can use for free to save web pages. Making a capture is as easy as browsing a page like you normally would. Webrecorder automatically archives the page, along with any additional content triggered by interactions.

This open-source project is brought to you by Rhizome at the New Museum.

The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation is lead supporter of the Webrecorder initiative. Additional outreach and research is made possible by the Knight Foundation and the Institute of Museum and Library Services."
onlinetoolkit  rhizome  archives  archiving  python  tools  archive  web  internet  via:soulellis 
january 2019 by robertogreco
Scratching the Surface — 102. Laurel Schwulst
"Laurel Schwulst is a designer, writer, teacher, and webmaster. She runs an independent design practice in New York City and teaches in design programs at Yale and Rutgers. She previously was the creative director for The Creative Independent and a web designer at Linked By Air. In this episode, Laurel and Jarrett talk about how horses got her into graphic design, what websites can be, the potential of the peer-to-peer internet, and how writing and teaching influence her practice."

[Direct link to audio: https://soundcloud.com/scratchingthesurfacefm/102-laurel-schwulst ]
jarrettfuller  scratchingthesurface  laurelschulst  2018  interviews  design  web  online  internet  are.na  lynhejinian  mindyseu  decentralization  neilpostman  charlesweingartner  juliacameron  teachingasasubversiveactivity  teaching  education  learning  howwelearn  kameelahjananrasheed  research  archiving  cv  roombaghost  graphicdesign  websites  webdev  webdesign  p2p  beakerbrowser  decentralizedweb  dat  p2ppublishing  p2pweb  distributed 
january 2019 by robertogreco
Are.na / Blog – Towards A Library Without Walls
"Collaboration has also become key to the way we conceive associative indexing on today’s version of the Internet, which could not have been anticipated by Bush at today’s scale. In “As We May Think,” Bush does acknowledge the possibility of sharing links generated by the Memex in the example of a researcher reproducing a trail on the Turkish bow for inclusion in a colleague’s “more general” trail.6 However, the scale of a hypertextual tool such as Are.na, which has over 20,000 users, far exceeds the one-to-one exchange Bush envisioned for his Memex, with significant implications for associative indexing. This phenomenon has its own neologism, “crowdsourcing,” wherein large numbers of users, most typically through the Internet, contribute to an information platform, as seen widely from commercial endeavors such as Google-owned Waze to non-profit projects such as Wikipedia. The relative advantages and disadvantages of crowdsourcing for knowledge production are the subject of much literature but could be briefly alluded to here in terms of diversity of material, collective intelligence, increased scale, and lack of consolidated control. But at its most promising, crowdsourcing creates the potential for rich communities that can form around information sharing, as is well articulated by Paul Duguid and John Seely Brown writing on the social life of information:
“[D]ocuments do not merely carry information, they help make it, structure it, and validate it. More intriguing, perhaps, documents also help structure society, enabling social groups to form, develop, and maintain a sense of shared identity. Viewing documents as mere information carriers overlooks this social role.”7
"



"Considering the ways in which Are.na operates within a community of artists and culturally-engaged individuals, contrasting Are.na with Bush’s Memex highlights the importance of conceiving how knowledge forms, knowledge tools, and knowledge communities all interplay with one another. By acknowledging other forms of knowledge beyond the scientific and better understanding the role sociality plays in our contemporary experience of information, we can better define what constitutes information and how best to describe, classify, organize, and make it accessible as librarians. Rather than prioritizing static information, fixed organization, and solitary experiences as the conventional library environment is known to do, those of us who work in LIS can adopt the more boundless strategies that we encounter in hypertextual tools such as Are.na for the benefit of the communities that we serve, essentially working towards becoming a library without the brick walls that Lampland and Star refer to in regards to infrastructure that fails to serve user needs. Parallel to thinking about what Are.na might mean for librarianship, we can look to extant projects such as the Prelinger Library and the Sitterwerk’s Kunstbibliothek, whose methods for organizing their material also exist as an alternative to more traditionally-organized libraries.

So to expand on Sam’s question and its inverse: What could a reference interview that uses Are.na look like? What would happen if books in an OPAC were nodes that could be linked by users? And what if the discovery tools we design actually encouraged research that is social, elusive, and nonlinear?"
are.na  libraries  internet  web  online  2017  karlywildenhaus  mlis  archives  archiving  marthalampland  susanleighstar  hypercad  hypertext  vannevarbush  paulotlet  tednelson  stéphanemallarmé  knowledge  information  clissification  taxonomy  accessibility  librarians  social  memex  paulduguid  johnseelybrown  crowdsourcing  aswemaythink  connections  collaboration 
june 2018 by robertogreco
Meme Documentation
""That’s why I love Meme Documentation so much. Because it’s made for Tumblr users by Tumblr users.… And I think that is super important, that communities should be self-archiving. It’s your local library. Every community on the internet needs a local library to go to and find their own history. Know Your Meme is amazing, but it’s also the Library of Congress, and they’re not going to know what this tiny town in Internet Land is doing. I want to stress the importance of communities to realize that everything is fleeting on the internet, and something can get deleted really quickly, and you lose a whole thread of whatever history you’re looking at."

— shoutout to meme librarian Amanda Brennan (@continuants) for mentioning Meme Documentation in an interview on the podcast @fansplaining"

[via: http://finalbossform.com/post/136195165572/thats-why-i-love-meme-documentation-so-much ]
amandabrennan  memes  knowyourmeme  2015  tumblr  internet  web  fleeting  documentation  librarians  archiving  history  recordkeeping  ephemerality  archives  online  socialmedia  ephemeral 
december 2015 by robertogreco
The Collection and the Cloud – The New Inquiry
"Many platforms cease to be relevant and tend to go away wholesale. In engineering terms, the data becomes no longer relevant. As a result, our pasts can exist piecemeal in distributed systems, in more or less moribund conditions, with no consistent means of access."



"The job of an archivist is work outside interfaces, working with the documents outside their native context, often to make sense of a previous generation’s cast-off data for the interest of the current and future ones. “Processing” a collection is an exercise in not only “saving” the important things and anticipating the interests of future interested parties, but in weeding out the stuff that no one wants to see. My first job as a processing archivist was in a mathematics archive. One obscure Romanian mathematician would send a box of junk quarterly, using the archives as a junk drawer. My boss gave me curt instructions on throwing away his bills and divorce papers and told me to be very selective with his vacation photos.

But who would be qualified to make such decisions about the archives of activists who in part have protested their erasure from the historical record? I think of all the brilliant, give-no-fucks activists I follow on Twitter. I would never want to speak for bad_dominicana, or those on the ground in Ferguson — so how could I begin to speak for their archives?"



"From a collections standpoint, it’s clear that the Internet Archive isn’t the Internet Archive, but an Internet Archive, very much built and collected from a certain standpoint and position of power. Those who are actively collecting in the digital realm represent a specific set of values, a perspective, and as in traditional archives, this perspective reflects a certain hegemonic order of knowledge. The Internet Archive’s Grateful Dead collection is vibrant and exhaustive, developed in the image and enthusiasm of Kahle, an avid Deadhead. Archival institutions tend to have a point of view. University archives collect records of their institution; governmental archives collect government records. The Internet Archive, and other collections of its ilk, collect from the standpoint of old-guard Internet culture.

No one I know of is collecting and preserving from a position that stands to counter this. For the generation of artists, citizens and activists who has come of age in the era of social media platforms, the power of archives is deployed in the banality of surveillance. Distance from one’s data is a design feature, and ownership of one’s data profile seems impossible. What from our digital environments can become historical and archived?

Contemporary archival practices advocate a hybrid of two approaches first some interpretation of keeping the original order of things: respect des fons, and an a posteri organizing stuff into sensible categories. Of course, many of the collections that have been in archives for decades had been organized in ways that simply did not work. I’d been asked several times to “reprocess” a collection and organize it in a way that made more sense to me or my bosses. How often do archives get shifted now when algorithms adjust?

I wonder if the data collected by platforms will at some point become more transparent, and at what cost or contextual shift. Will my daughter be able to sift through my dark data profiles and learn about the egregious number of times I looked at someone else’s profile? Will there be a new round of data mausoleums, offering to sell us peeks at the past? Is data like defaulted debt, ready to be bought and sold at a fraction of the price and subject to a secondary market?

Where are the future archives? Moreover, where are the future points of canonical extinction?"
ameliaabreu  archives  archiving  collecting  socialmedia  2015  internetarchive  brewsterkahle  vintecerf  web  online  pauljaeger  friendster  jasbirpuar  tracebody  data  cloud 
march 2015 by robertogreco
Amber, a new tool to prevent linkrot on websites, is out in beta » Nieman Journalism Lab
"Amber automatically makes a copy of every page linked on a website and stores it on that site’s server — think of Google’s cache. If any of those links go dead, the mirrored version can be offered to visitors. A beta version of the plugin is available for WordPress and Drupal, and they’re looking for publishers interested in testing it out to see how it can be improved before a final 1.0 release. Email amber@cyber.law.harvard.edu if you’re interested."
amber  via:litherland  2015  linkrot  archives  archiving  caching  web  webdev  internet  online  webdesign 
february 2015 by robertogreco
All you need is publish — The Message — Medium
"Publish everything everywhere. Anything anywhere. Publish twice, thrice, just don’t break the contract if you got paid.

Copy the bits, it’s what they want. Data wanna be free. Call the Archive Team. Call the Internet Archive. Call the Library of Congress. Ask them for your tweets, Christmas 2009. 140-character drunken grandpa? Yes, please.

This is not the indie web, this is the web. The web itself has and always will be indie at its core. There are no edges here. The web excels at boundless. Everything sparkles intertwingular. Things connect and disconnect and multiply at will, as long as we’re willing. And willing we are."



"Mass Indie

Mass Indie is the zine publishing of web publishing. The everyperson indie. Godaddy a domain, snag a Tumblr, fiddle a DNS and Go Go Go. Don’t have eight bucks? Skip the domain and jump straight to Go Go Go. It’s right there and it’s faster than a Xerox at Kinkos. Don’t like Tumblr? Ghost it up. Livejournal’s still a thing. Wattpad welcomes all. Geo-plaster at hi.co. Kindle Single it and give it away. Toss it on Scribd. Pastebin the notion. Splatter your post across twenty tweets. Heck, Google Doc it. The Web Is Here For You To Use. Post to multiple platforms. Pledge allegiance to no one. You don’t owe ’em nuttin’. Everybody Minecraft — stake your claim. Then restake it again tomorrow. The land’s wide open and there’s always more IPv6 to go around.

***

Craft Indie

Craft Indie is calculated indie. Laborious indie. Tie-your-brain-in-a-knot indie. No easier than it’s ever been. I’m talking about breathing your bits — really possessing, sculpting, caressing, caring for, caring after your bits. Knowing. Takes buckets of effort. And buckets be heavy.

Craft Indie takes you back to the early ’90s hex editing Renegade BBS software. Takes you back to the mid ’90s with a shell account and PPP emulator — pry open Mosaic, cue exploding head. Craft Indie can never be Mass Indie because the required toolkit is too yawning, esoteric, painful for all but those willing to obsess.

Craft Indie is lose your afternoon to RSS 2.0 vs Atom specifications indie. Craft Indie is .htaccessing the perfect URL indie. Craft Indie is cool your eyes don’t change indie. Craft Indie is pixel tweaking line-heights, margins, padding … of the copyright in the footer indie. Craft Indie is #efefe7 not #efefef indie. Craft Indie is fatiguing indie, you-gotta-love-it indie, you-gotta-get-off-on-this-mania indie.

***

Both indies are united by and predicated on openness. Universal accessibility. This is why to impinge on Net Neutrality is to impinge on the very quintessence of what makes the web the web. Lopsided hierarchy woven into the fabric of the web upends the beautiful latent power of online publishing. The dudette should not abide.

Furthermore, the contours of our words published online shimmer. They exist at well defined URLs, yes, but those URLs can be tenuous, disappearing or rendered useless by server failure, a reconfiguration, a missed payment to a domain registrar. And yet those same words are more easily copied and distributed at scale than ever before. Thanks to vast search engines, their precise address is less important than knowing a snippet of the content. Three or four words. That’s all you need. They’re probably somewhere, indexed and waiting.

The ideas of the indie web sits somewhere within these fuzzy contours. With the vast array of online publishing tools comes multiplicity. Multiplicity is our friend."



"To do indie. To be indie. To publish indie. The indie web? To talk about the indie web — Mass or Craft — is to talk about the web itself. Vast and open and universally accessible.

People ask: What software should I use to publish? Where should I publish? Should I build a platform to publish? How should I do it?

And I say: Whether you own your URL or not, your own app or not, whether you Tumblr or Wattpad, just publish. Export often? Yes. Backup feverishly? Of course. But publish everything everywhere. Anything anywhere. Publish twice, thrice, just don’t break the contract if ya got paid."
web  writing  2014  craigmod  publishing  openweb  internet  archiving  independence  adomainofone'sown  indie  publising  hi.co  tumblr  livejournal  rss  urls  search  indexing  multiplicity  open  openness  netneutrality  redundancy  reclaimhosting  indieweb 
september 2014 by robertogreco
Arjun Appadurai | archive public
"Archive and Aspiration

Social memory remains a mystery to most of us. True, there has been much excellent work by psychologists, neurologists and other sorts of critics about the workings of collective memory. Yet, there is a deep gap between our understandings of the externalities of memory and its internalities. This is a kind of Cartesian gap too, this time not between mind and body but between the biochemistry of memory and its social locations and functions. The arrival of the electronic archive, with its non-hierarchical, digital and para-human characteristics, sometimes seems to have widened this gap, since there is no easy way to get from the neural maps implied in most visions of biological memory and the social maps referred to in such wonderful images as Pierre Nora’s image of the ‘places of memory’. This gap between the neural locus of memory and its social location creates a variety of challenges for different fields and disciplines.

Memory and the Archive

In the humanist imagination, the archive is no more than a social tool for the work of collective memory. It is a neutral, or even ethically benign, tool which is the product of a deliberate effort to secure the most significant portions of what Maurice Halbwachs called ‘the prestige of the past’. Its quintessential expression is the document, a graphic trace, usually a written text, whose accidental survival has been reinforced by the protection offered to it by the archive. In this sense the archive is an empty box, a place, a site or an institution, whose special role is the guardianship of the document. Over time, the idea of the document has been broadened to include artifacts, monuments, products, even whole neighborhoods and cities. UNESCO’s longstanding mission to conserve important monuments as tributes to human heritage is, in fact, a product of this ethical view of the archive as a container or body, animated by something less visible – usually the spirit of a people, the people, or humanity in general."



"Thus, we should begin to see all documentation as intervention, and all archiving as part of some sort of collective project. Rather than being the tomb of the trace, the archive is more frequently the product of the anticipation of collective memory. Thus the archive is itself an aspiration rather than a recollection. This deep function of the archive has been obscured by that officializing mentality, closely connected to the governmentalities of the nation-state, which rests on seeing the archive as the tomb of the accidental trace, rather than as the material site of the collective will to remember."

[via: https://twitter.com/tchoi8/status/506940967694663682 ]
archives  archiving  imagination  memory  collectivism  humanism  humanities  arjunappadurai  foucault  migration  aspiration  memorygaps  desire  memories  socialmemory  arjenmulder  michelfoucault 
september 2014 by robertogreco
| gallery 9 | Cohen/Frank/Ippolito - The Unreliable Archivist
"The Archivist window will move to the front when it has finished loading; this should take 2-4 minutes on a 28.8 kb connection. (Mac users: please wait until the status bar indicates a complete download.) Once this page is loaded, there are no other downloads necessary to view the project.

When the Archivist window appears, you will see a Web page assembled from components drawn from different äda'web projects. Clicking on the arrow tab will open a panel with four sliders that allow you to alter this archetypal äda'web page to suite your preferences.

A toggle switch on the slider panel allows you to view the sources of the äda'web components rather than the slider settings. Where these sources are underlined, you may click on them to open the original äda'web page in a third, separate window.

This version of The Unreliable Archivist requires Netscape 4.07+; we hope to have a version compatible with Internet Explorer posted later. If performance seems sluggish, you may want to increase your browser's cache to at least 5 MB. (Mac users may also want to allocate at least 25 MB of RAM to their browser; you can do this when Netscape is closed using the Get Info command from the Finder menu.)"

[See also: http://news.artnet.com/in-brief/olafur-eliasson-launches-online-artwork-doubling-as-archive-89094 ]
via:shannon_mattern  1998  janetcohen  keithfrank  jonippolito  uncertainty  archives  web  internet  online  archiving 
august 2014 by robertogreco
Olafur Eliasson Launches Online Artwork Doubling as Archive
"In conjunction with his current solo exhibition at Denmark’s Louisiana Museum of Modern Art (see “Olafur Eliasson Floods Danish Museum with River Installation“), renowned artist Olafur Eliasson has relaunched his homepage, along with an innovative new web-based artwork entitled Your uncertain archive. A WebGL-based dive into Eliasson’s  immense body of work, inspirations, and interests, the piece is evocative of the Internet itself in its sprawling format. The experimental archive has been under construction for over four years, which is evident from both both its intricacy and impeccable, easy design.

Users can browse freely in “Drift” mode, following an ever-growing pool of connections and associations, or pick a specific interest category to explore—choices include topics like “doughnut,” “fivefold symmetry,” and “Ai Weiwei.” Selecting, for example, the doughnut category, reveals all of Eliasson’s sculptures that resemble doughnuts, of which there are seven. The result of this seemingly endless web is an illuminating artwork made of artworks that would take weeks to fully explore.

“I am thrilled that Your uncertain archive is finally open to the world,” the artist said in a statement. “It is a reality-producing machine, built to generate new content through proximity and contact, and a source of great inspiration to me. It is a living archive that expands continuously. Embrace uncertainty!”"

[See also: The Unreliable Archivist
http://www.walkerart.org/archive/8/A773750C8FDB27636164.htm ]
olafureliasson  archives  art  2014  via:shannon_mattern  uncertainty  internet  cv  howwework  personalarchives  design  archiving 
august 2014 by robertogreco
Kenneth Goldsmith - Talks | Frieze Projects NY
[Direct link to .mp3: http://friezeprojectsny.org/uploads/files/talks/Kenneth_Goldsmith.mp3 ]

"‘I Look to Theory Only When I Realize That Somebody Has Dedicated Their Entire Life to a Question I Have Only Fleetingly Considered’

A keynote lecture by the poet Kenneth Goldsmith, whose writing has been described as ‘some of the most exhaustive and beautiful collage work yet produced in poetry’ (Publishers Weekly). Goldsmith is the author of eleven books of poetry and founding editor of the online archive UbuWeb. In 2013, he was named as the inaugural Poet Laureate of MoMA."
kennethgoldsmith  copying  uncreativewriting  mercecunningham  writing  internet  web  online  remixing  culture  art  poetry  originality  appropriation  quantity  quality  curiosity  harrypotter  poetics  digital  reproduction  translation  displacement  disjunction  corydoctorow  change  howwewrite  pointing  data  metadata  choice  authorship  versioning  misfiling  language  difference  meaning  ethics  morality  literature  twitter  artworld  marshallmcluhan  christianbök  plagiarism  charleseames  rules  notknowing  archiving  improvisation  text  bricolage  assemblage  cv  painting  technology  photography  readerships  thinkerships  thoughtobjects  reassembly  ubuweb  freeculture  moma  outreach  communityoutreach  nyc  copyright  ip  intellectualproperty  ideas  information  sfpc  vitoacconci  audience  accessibility  situationist  museums  markets  criticism  artcriticism  economics  money  browsers  citation  sampling  jonathanfranzen  internetasliterature  getrudestein  internetasfavoritebook  namjunepaik  johncage  misbehaving  andywarhol  bobdylan  barbarakruger  jkrowling  china  creati 
august 2014 by robertogreco
We're sharing more photos but getting less in return
"Theoretically, we could have an up-to-the-minute photo database of any popular location. We'd just need Instagram to include more metadata by default and allow users to sort by location (or let a third-party app do the same).

If we were properly organizing the photos we're already putting online, I could see how a festival was going, and Google Maps could show me all the photos taken from the Eiffel Tower in the last five minutes. I could even see if a popular bar is crowded without any official system. We'd be able to see the world right now, as clearly as we see its past on Google Street View, as quickly as news spreads on Twitter.

We have the data and the technological infrastructure, but we're stuck because no developer can access all the data.

If anyone was going to deliver these capabilities, it would be Flickr. In 2006, it was the canonical destination for photos. If you wanted to see photos of a certain place or subject, that’s where you went. But Facebook replaced Flickr as a social network, killing it on the desktop, and Instagram released a simpler mobile app, killing it there too. That would have been fine if Facebook and Instagram kept their photos data-rich and fully exportable. But both services give fewer tagging, grouping, and other sorting options, and they built their photos into incompatible databases. Facebook won't organize photos any way but by human subject or uploader. Instagram has just a few view options and focuses solely on the friend-feed.

We're photographing everything now, building this amazing body of work, but we're getting less and less out of it.

We do get some benefits from not having one monopoly in charge of photo sharing: Instagram did mobile better than Flickr, Facebook can link a photo of someone to their whole social profile, and Foursquare efficiently arranges photos by location. These advantages, however, have replaced Creative Commons licensing, advanced search, and any other tool that relies on treating the world's photo pool as a mass data set rather than a series of individualized feeds.

Twitter, Tumblr, and Imgur siphon off bits of the photo market without giving them back into the mass set. Meanwhile, any photo service that dies off (RIP Picasa, Zooomr, Photobucket) becomes a graveyard for photos that will probably never get moved to a new service.

Why are we giving up this magical ability to basically explore our world in real-time? The bandwidth is lower than streaming video; the new-data-point frequency is lower than Twitter; the location sorting is less complicated than Google Maps or Foursquare. But no one service has an incentive to build this tool, or to open up its database for a third party. Instead they only innovate ways to steal market share from each other. Flickr recently downgraded its mobile app, removing discovery options and cropping photos into squares. The new app is an obvious Instagram imitation, but it won't help Flickr recapture the market. If any photo service beats Instagram, it won't be by making data more open.

Our collective photo pool suffers from a tragedy of the commons, where each service snaps up our photos with as few features as it can, or by removing features. (Snapchat, for example, actively prevents photos from joining the pool by replacing the subscription model with a one-to-one model, efficiently delivering photos straight from my camera to your feed.) We are giving our photos to these inferior services, they are making billions of dollars from them, and what we're getting back is pathetic.

The best agnostic tool we have is the archaic Google Image Search, which doesn't effectively sort results, doesn't distinguish between image sources, and doesn't even touch location search. The lack of agnostic metadata is keeping us in the past. As Anil Dash pointed out in 2012, the photo pool (like blogs and status updates) is becoming fragmented and de-standardized. Everything we're putting online is chopped up by services that don't play well together, and that's bad for the user.

Dash wrote, "We'll fix these things; I don't worry about that." I do. I don't think technology has to work out right. We can build expressways where we should have built bullet trains. We can let an ISP monopoly keep us at laughable broadband speeds. We can all dump our memories into the wrong sites and watch them disappear in 10 years. We can share postage-stamp-sized photos on machines capable of streaming 1080p video.

Even if we do fix this, it will not be retroactive. There are stories about whole TV series lost to time because the network stupidly trashed the original reels. Now that we take more photos than we know what to deal with, we won't lose our originals—we'll just lose the organization. When Facebook and Instagram are inevitably replaced, we'll be left without the context, without the comments, without anything but a privately stored pile of raw images named DCIM_2518.JPG.

Just a heap of bullshit, really."
nickdouglas  flickr  metadata  photography  2014  instagram  tags  tagging  search  storage  facebook  tumblr  imgur  twitter  picasa  zooomr  photobucket  archives  archiving  creativecommons  realtime  foursquare  googlemaps  snapchat  anildash  googleimagesearch  technology  regression  socialmedia  fragmentation  interoperability 
may 2014 by robertogreco
The Web as a Preservation Medium | inkdroid
"So how to wrap up this strange, fragmented, incomplete tour through Web preservation? I feel like I should say something profound, but I was hoping these stories of the Web would do that for me. I can only say for myself that I want to give back to the Web the way it has given to me. With 25 years behind us the Web needs us more than ever to help care for the archival slivers it contains. I think libraries, museums and archives that realize that they are custodians of the Web, and align their mission with the grain of the Web, will be the ones that survive, and prosper. Brian Fitzpatrick, Jason Scott, Brewster Kahle, Mislav Marohnic, Philip Cromer, Jeremy Ruten and Aaron Swartz demonstrated their willingness to work with the Web as a medium in need of preservation, as well as a medium for doing the preservation. We need more of them. We need to provide spaces for them to do their work. They are the new faces of our profession."
archiving  web  digitalpreservation  digital  facebook  archiveteam  archives  twitter  internet  edsummers  2013  preservation  aaronswartz  timberners-lee  marshallmcluhan  kisagitelman  matthewkirschenbaum  davidbrunton  linkrot  www  adamliptak  supremecourt  scotus  lapsteddomains  brewsterkahle  urls  html  permalinks  paulbausch  jasonscott  mihaiparparita  zombiereader  googlereader  impermanence  markpilgrim  jonathangillette  rss  _why  information  markdown  mslavmarohnic  philipcromer  jeremyruten  github  williamgibson  degradation  data  cern  grailbird  google  davewiner  rufuspollock  distributed  decentralization  collaboration  brianfitzpatrick 
december 2013 by robertogreco
Media Archaeology Lab
"Founded in 2009 and based at the University of Colorado at Boulder, the motto of the Media Archaeology Lab (MAL) is that “the past must be lived so that the present can be seen.” Nearly all digital media labs are conceived of as a place for experimental research using the most up-to-date, cutting-edge tools available. However, the MAL—which is the largest of its kind in North America—is a place for cross-disciplinary experimental research and teaching using obsolete tools, hardware, software and platforms, from the past. The MAL is propelled equally by the need to both preserve and maintain access to historically important media of all kinds – from magic lanterns, projectors, typewriters to personal computers from the 1970s through the 1990s – as well as early works of digital literature/art which were created on the outdated hardware/software housed in the lab."



"What the MAL does best is that it provides direct access to defining moments in the history of computing and e-literature. In addition to landmark computers such as the Commodore 64 from 1982, the Vectrex Gaming Console also from 1982, the Compaq III portable laptop from 1987, the NeXT Cube from 1990, the lab also houses working Apple IIe’s and a rare Apple Lisa. These last two computers are particularly important for understanding the history of personal computing and computer-mediated writing; while they were both released in 1983, the shift in interface from the one to the other, and therefore the shift in the limits and possibilities for what one could create, is remarkable. The Apple II series of computers all used the command-line interface and they were also the first affordable, user-friendly, and so most popular personal computers ever while the Apple Lisa was the first commercial computer to use a Graphical User Interface."
collaboration  computers  medialab  technology  mediaarchaeology  loriemerson  archives  archiving  archaeology  mitmedialab 
july 2013 by robertogreco
Amy Radcliffe: Scent-ography: a post-visual past time
"Scent-ography: A post-visual past time

Our sense of smell is believed to have a direct link to our emotional memory. It is the sense that we react to most instinctually and also the furthest away from being stored or replicated digitally. From ambient smell-scapes to the utterly unique scent of an individual, our scent memory is a valuable resource yet to be systematically captured and archived.

If an analogue, amateur-friendly system of odour capture and synthesis could be developed, we could see a profound change in the way we regard the use and effect of smells in our daily lives. From manipulating our emotional wellbeing through prescribed nostalgia, to the functional use of conditioned scent memory, our olfactory sense could take on a much more conscious role in the way we consume and record the world.

How to succeed with your MADELEINE... [https://vimeo.com/68778690 ]

The Madeleine is, to all intents and purposes, an analogue odour camera. Based on current perfumery technology, Headspace Capture, The Madeleine works in much the same way as a 35mm camera. Just as the camera records the light information of a visual in order to create a replica The Madeleine records the molecular information of a smell."
via:ablerism  scent-ography  smell  smells  memory  art  artists  amyradcliffe  atemporality  archiving  nostalgia  scentmemory  senses  smell-scapes 
june 2013 by robertogreco
SFMOMA | OPEN SPACE » Blog Archive » Do Physical Objects Have the Right to Exist?
"And I think it’s going to start happening in my field (archival film), where professional ethics and historical precedent currently dictate that you don’t throw away original material except in very special circumstances, even though you may have copied it to a more stable format. So while archives used to junk flammable nitrate film after copying it to safety, they now keep the nitrate cool and dry, because emerging technologies may enable us to make better preservation copies in the future. This is both ethical and reasonable. And yet, considering the vast amount of analog film and videotape that’s clogging moving image archives, ethics may be at risk. Only a small fraction of film on the shelves ever gets seen by researchers, scholars, or the public. And only a small fraction of that ever gets reused. The rest sits waiting for a longshot request that might bring it out of obscurity. At the same time the costs of bricks-and-mortar storage, human stewardship, cooling and dehumidification all rise, as the amount of film in storage escalates.

Information is archival capital, but too much information is a liability. I foresee institutions starting to tune their collections more finely as they recalculate the relationship between comprehensiveness and fiscal balance. “Repositories of last resort” may step in to save one or two copies of each physical object after it’s digitized, but I wouldn’t count on it.

Does the obsolescence of physical objects constitute a serious loss? While I would almost never excuse the intentional destruction of cultural materials (don’t ask me to explain “almost,” as this post would then go over limit), I don’t necessarily lament the existence of gaps in the cultural record. Desire to restore what’s missing, to address gaps in the record, can be a powerful motivator of history (and, for that matter, art). Loss can be formative. Much artistic and historical practice today has an archaeological inflection; it’s devoted to chasing forgotten discourses, near-mythical communities, and liminal situations. But archaeology is certainly easier when the evidence hasn’t been thrown away.

What civil rights do we want to grant to physical objects with artistic, cultural, and historical significance? Objects are mute, and each may one day have its own quiet moment of reckoning."
objects  archives  archiving  2013  rickprelinger  nicholsonbaker 
june 2013 by robertogreco
Archivists in France Fight a Privacy Initiative - NYTimes.com
"One of the European Union’s measures would grant Internet users a “right to be forgotten,” letting them delete damaging references to themselves in search engines, or drunken party photos from social networks. But a group of French archivists, the people whose job it is to keep society’s records, is asking: What about our collective right to keep a record even of some things that others might prefer to forget?

The archivists and their counteroffensive might seem out of step, as concern grows about American surveillance of Internet traffic around the world. But the archivists say the right to be forgotten, as it has become known, could complicate the collection and digitization of mundane public documents — birth reports, death notices, real estate transactions and the like — that form a first draft of history."
archives  2013  archiving  forgetting  online  europe  history  documentation  rights 
june 2013 by robertogreco
Archive as Strategy — Conversations about Self-historicisation Across the East
"Archive as Strategy is an on-going research strand which forms a core part of the Calvert 22 Foundation programme. Envisaged as a two year-long series of events, presentations and meetings, Archive as Strategy is an open-ended and discursive platform which encourages participants to play an active role in the development of the series.

As its point of departure, this series addresses the growing phenomenon of self-historicisation – a social trend which has developed throughout Eastern Europe over the last three decades. Since the 1980s, communities of artists and intellectuals across the East have faced parallel states of precarity which profoundly affected the ability of ‘official’ art institutions to perform the traditional duties of supporting, archiving, historicising and providing a critical framework for local artistic outputs. As a result, artists have increasingly taken it upon themselves to perform the role historian, archivist and curator, in the hopes of historicising their own artistic production as well as that of their peers. The Archive as Strategy series aims to connect these histories across the region by identifying and examining several key self-archiving initiatives and by mapping these activities in relation to significant topics in Calvert 22’s current exhibition season.

This series takes place at regular intervals, where events are primarily held at the Calvert 22 Foundation. Each event focuses on one particular self-archiving project and is explored via screenings, curator/artist presentations, workshops, and/or discussions. Many past Archive as Strategy events have been documented (photography and video), and are available for view on www.archiveasstrategy.org. The materials, conversations and documents collected during the course of the Archive as Strategy series will eventually be developed into a reader published by Calvert 22.

The Archive as Strategy series is supported by a growing interest for the research and study of artistic practices in the East, and is produced in cooperation with the History of Art Department at University College London (UCL)."
archives  archiving  calvert22  self-historicization  easterneurope  self-archiving  archiveasstrategy 
june 2013 by robertogreco
DrupalCon Portland 2013: DESIGN OPS: A UX WORKFLOW FOR 2013 - YouTube
"Hey, the dev team gets all these cool visual analytics, code metrics, version control, revision tagging, configuration management, continuous integration ... and the UX design team just passes around Photoshop files?

Taking clues from DevOps and Lean UX, "DesignOps" advocates more detailed and durable terminology about the cycle of user research, design and production. DesignOps seeks to first reduce the number of design artifacts, to eliminate the pain of prolonged design decisions. DesignOps assumes that the remaining design artifacts aren't actionable until they are reasonably archived and linked in a coherent way that serves the entire development team.

This talk will introduce the idea of DesignOps with the assumption that the audience has experience with a basic user research cycle — iterative development with any kind of user feedback.

DesignOps is a general approach, intended to help with a broad array of questions from usability testing issues, documentation archiving, production-time stress, and general confusion on your team:

What are the general strategies for managing the UX design process?
How do you incorporate feedback without huge cost?
What happened to that usability test result from last year?
How much space goes between form elements?
Why does the design cycle make me want to drink bleach?
WTF why does our website look like THIS?
* Features turnkey full-stack (Vagrant ) installation of ubuntu with drupal 7 install profile utilizing both php and ruby development tools, with all examples configured for live css compilation"
chrisblow  contradictions  just  simply  must  2013  drupal  drupalcon  designops  fear  ux  terminology  design  audience  experience  shame  usability  usabilitytesting  work  stress  archiving  confusion  relationships  cv  canon  collaboration  howwework  workflow  versioncontrol  versioning  failure  iteration  flickr  tracker  creativecommons  googledrive  tags  tagging  labels  labeling  navigation  urls  spreadsheets  links  permissions  googledocs  timelines  basecamp  cameras  sketching  universal  universality  teamwork  principles  bullshitdetection  users  clients  onlinetoolkit  offtheshelf  tools  readymadetools  readymade  crapdetection  maps  mapping  userexperience  research  designresearch  ethnography  meetup  consulting  consultants  templates  stencils  bootstrap  patterns  patternlibraries  buzzwords  css  sass  databases  compass  webdev  documentation  sharing  backups  maintenance  immediacy  process  decisionmaking  basics  words  filingsystems  systems  writing  facilitation  expression  operations  exoskeletons  clarification  creativity  bots  shellscripts  notes  notetaking  notebo 
may 2013 by robertogreco
Editing the Past | Swell Content
"I’m looking into ways of making my posts living, breathing things. I don’t feel like I have any of the answers yet, so I’m compiling some questions about the effects of editing the past.

Looking at the archive…

**As an evolution of feelings**

What’s the best way to update old blog posts? Does my audience care if I’ve changed the meaning of something from 2011 [http://www.swellcontent.com/2011/05/scratching-the-greatest-itch/ ] or simply removed the harshness of my tone? What about the fact that I often write to get it halfway there (or even 5% there), just to help myself understand my feelings?

What if my feelings turn inside out? What if I want to delete something, because it’s just plain bad?

Do I get to decide what’s important as the author? Why? Or do my readers get to decide with traffic, comments, or attention?

Is frequency important, or is all of this an exhaustive attempt at making order out of chaos? [https://readmill.com/nicoleslaw/reads/the-library-at-night/highlights/0i9t9g ] Maybe I should stop right now.

**As a written record**

What are the ethics of deleting something? Or hiding it? What if I just shove it in a corner or an armpit, only to be found by Google or someone with a link? Why bother keeping it there, if it’s not worth sharing openly?

Is it an archive if I don’t preserve my words as they were originally posted? Or does it break the web to think anything should be static for more than a month or two? Do we breathe here in minutes, months, or milliseconds?

**As a resource**

Is this helpful if it’s not updated? Should I announce every change I make, or put notes within each article? Do I get to summarize my own summaries, or is there a more programmatic way of showing changes, like a differential or commit?

Should I notify anyone of anything? Or is it annoying and uninteresting to know about teeny changes on a personal site? But isn’t everything connected? Even if my opinions are small and unsharpened, isn’t that the point of sharing them and working on them over a lifetime?"

[Recorded here ;]
archives  archiving  nicolejones  2013  addendums  changes  history  longnow  past  future  writing  sharing  web  digital  internet  personalarchives  evolution  recordkeeping  time  memory  persistence  change  nicolefenton 
february 2013 by robertogreco
[this is aaronland] The "Drinking Coffee and Stealing Wifi" 2012 World Tour
"On some levels, you could reduce this entire talk down to a very simple question: Why are keeping any of this stuff? Or rather: If we as public institutions, or even private ones that wish to bask in the warm fuzzy glow of the public "trust", can't figure out how to provide access to all of this stuff we're collecting then what exactly are we doing?

We tend to justify these enourmous and fabulous buildings we create to showcase our collections on the grounds that they will, sooner or later, be the spotlight that embraces the totality of the things we keep. Yet that doesn't really happen, does it?"
mapping  maps  metadata  objects  parallel-flickr  sebchan  pharlap  australia  paolaantonelli  cooper-hewitt  databases  data  macguffin  revdancatt  gowanusheights  identification  integers  privatesquare  joannemcneil  jamesbridle  flickr  penelopeumbrico  collections  museums  archiving  archives  2012  aaronstraupcope 
december 2012 by robertogreco
Gimme the Loot | Jacobin
"Pirate ships were different – they were under democratic worker control. Captains weren’t absolute rulers, but elected leaders who commanded only during battle. Day-to-day operations were handled democratically by the entire crew. Loot was divided equally and immediately, and pirates ate – and drank – better than their law-abiding contemporaries. This was the major reason pirates were feared: it was easy to convince exploited sailors to join up with them. And join up they did.

Pirate crews were a polyglot, multiracial multitude…"

"This is the fundamental difference between capitalists and pirates. Capitalists accumulate. Pirates archive. A capitalist wants profit from the sale of every commodity and will enforce scarcity to get it. Pirates work to create vast common spaces, amassing huge troves of content, much of it too obscure to be of much use to very many people. Piracy destroys exchange value, and pays little heed to use value."
mpaa  filesharing  pirateparty  google  kimdotcom  software  markets  archiving  2012  megaupload  anonymous  piracy  pirates  capitalism 
august 2012 by robertogreco
ShoeBox for iPhone and Android | 1000memories
"Turn your phone into a photo scanner. Download for iPhone Download for Android

ShoeBox is the fastest way to scan old paper photos with your phone and share them with family and friends."
android  shoebox  photos  photography  archiving  scanners  scanning  applications  ios  iphone 
august 2012 by robertogreco
Remember the web? [.pdf]
"Advance talk notes from a presentation at Personal Archiving 2012 by Maciej Cegłowski."
pda12  2012  bookmarking  bookmarks  online  caching  linkrot  web  internet  archiving  archives  personaldigitalarchives  pinboard  maciejceglowski  maciejcegłowski 
february 2012 by robertogreco
Notes on Forgetting by Casey A. Gollan
"Notes on Forgetting, Archiving, and Existing on the Internet: What if instead of encouraging us to chatter, our tools helped us relate, merge, revise and evolve bits over time? What if we were to move away from the idea of the stream and towards editing and maintaining a non-linear constellation of ideas? What if instead of dealing with our glut of information by erasing it, we came up with ways to deprecate our past, update our present and make sure that our digital histories are preserved for the future? I think that somewhere between writing, remixing and reblogging, between editing a wiki and branching code on a project in Git, is a new model for existing online."
ideas  digitalhistory  remixing  reblogging  archives  archiving  internet  memory  forgetting  caseygollan  remixculture 
february 2012 by robertogreco
old paradigms for a new mode « savasavasava
"Blair talks about an interesting concept: florilegium.

“… which, rather than summarizing, selected the best passages or “flowers” from authoritative sources.”

Tweets can be thought of as forced florilegium – the constraint of 140 characters forces us to distill the important or best information (our own or from others) and share it. the idea that each tweet is a specially picked flower puts the onus on the author of the tweet to be trusted to have picked the ‘best flower’ to share. this also points to the role of curator that individuals often play – we choose what to tweet based on how we would like ourselves and the communities we are affiliated with to be represented."

…Twitter allows for varied forms of note-taking, some covered by Blair, but also beyond those examples partly because of the affordances of the new tools. a type of collaborative note-taking manifests in the ‘chat’ communities on Twitter during their scheduled meetings…"

[See the comments too.]
2012  notes  florilegium  summarization  annotation  sharing  notetaking  archiving  quotes  cv  twitter  savasaheli 
january 2012 by robertogreco
History, our future - Preoccupations [Thoughtful, link-and-quote-rich post by David Smith on cloud computing and digital archiving]
"I’m no programmer, though decades ago I learned to use Fortran, writing my own program for an A level Biology project, and played with BASIC. Now, I’m playing with a Mac Mini server and a Pegasus R6. I want to know that we can hand on certain things … music, audio, photos, text and, increasingly important, video. History for the future.<br />
<br />
Last Christmas, I was hoping we’d see some development in 2011 around the Mac Mini, though I suspected the game plan was more likely to be centred on the ecosystem that individuals, families and groups weave around multiple Apple devices. There’s room for both and it seems that Apple thinks so, too. I use cloud services a great deal, and this won’t stop as I play with creating our own, centralised repository of music, audio, photos, text and videos. I want our own backup and personally maintained server and store, but I know the cloud offers us so much, too."
cloud  cloudcomputing  icloud  future  history  archives  archiving  computers  digital  2011  davidsmith  memory  persistence  privacy  socialsoftware  mobility  digitallife 
august 2011 by robertogreco
Omeka
"Omeka is a free, flexible, and open source web-publishing platform for the display of library, museum, archives, and scholarly collections and exhibitions. Its “five-minute setup” makes launching an online exhibition as easy as launching a blog.

Omeka falls at a crossroads of Web Content Management, Collections Management, and Archival Digital Collections Systems"

[Via: http://learningthroughdigitalmedia.net/teaching-and-learning-with-omeka-discomfort-play-and-creating-public-online-digital-collections ]
opensource  omeka  publishing  online  web  software  cms  web-publishing  exhibitions  museums  education  libraries  webdev  contentmanagement  archives  archiving  digitalcollections  webdesign 
april 2011 by robertogreco
Forever / from a working library
"perhaps when it comes to our collective cultural memory, a single life is long enough: long enough, that is, for the next generation to pick up the torch.

This, I believe, is why a book feels permanent, even though enough libraries have burned over the centuries that we ought to know better. A well-made book, stored upright, in a dry, dark place, will survive a hundred years—that is, a lifetime. More if it is especially well printed, and only carefully handled, but a hundred years is a safe bet. Plenty of time to read it as a child, hold onto it through adolescence and adulthood, and then give it to your first great-grandchild. That’s as much forever as any of us can reasonably conceive. … no civilization has ever saved everything; acknowledging that fact does not obviate the need to try and save as much as we can"
culture  books  preservation  archiving  technology  memory  culturalmemory  permanence  eternity  perspective  scale  human  libraries  posterity  civilization  generations  limitations  longnow  longhere  archives  via:preoccupations 
february 2011 by robertogreco
Coleccionistas de sonidos · ELPAÍS.com
"Los especialistas de grabaciones de campo catalogan los sones en peligro de extinción y los cuelgan en la Red"
maps  mapping  archives  archival  archiving  nature  web  music  community  environment  via:regine  fieldrecording  online 
december 2010 by robertogreco
Memolane | Your time machine for the web
"Keep your memories alive. Capture photos, music, tweets, posts, and much more. View and share your entire online life in one place. Explore and search your history."
socialmedia  tools  lifestream  timeline  visualization  flickr  facebook  twitter  spotify  rss  lastfm  tripit  foursquare  picasa  memolane  search  archives  archiving  backup  aggregator  timelines  last.fm 
december 2010 by robertogreco
Archive Fever: a love letter to the post real-time web | mattogle.com
"By providing us with new ways to share what we’re doing right now, the real-time web also captures something we might not have created otherwise: a permanent record of the event. We’ve all been so distracted by The Now that we’ve hardly noticed the beautiful comet tails of personal history trailing in our wake. We’ve all become accidental archivists; our burgeoning digital archives open out of the future."

"The current philosophy underlying most of the real-time web is that if it’s not recent, it’s not important. This is what we need to change."

"I believe we, as makers of online services, have an incredible opportunity to ground the things we create in both the present and the past, making them — and thus ourselves — richer, more beautiful, and more human.

But first we need to catch archive fever."

[via: http://log.scifihifi.com/post/2348978639/by-providing-us-with-new-ways-to-share-what-were ]
twitter  internet  memory  memoryplatforms  realtime  realtimeweb  now  archives  archiving  search  2010  foursquare  web  facebook  last.fm  memoryretrieval  cv  commonplacebooks  perspective  hereandnow  past  present  lastfm 
december 2010 by robertogreco
Sci-Fi Hi-Fi: By providing us with new ways to share what we’re...
"brings us full circle back to “Web 2.0’s” origins in what Delicious creator Joshua Schachter has called a “memory platform.” …there are some powerful social memory experiences possible that aren’t yet appreciated by an industry (and public) preoccupied with “The Now.” The immediacy of services like Twitter, Foursquare, and Instagram is a powerful incentive for average people to fit journaling into their daily lives. But, as Matt Jones points out, in many ways “The Now” is the least interesting part of the spacetime light cone. Without deep access to archives, and compelling ways to navigate them, real time services are falling short of their true potential."
buzzandersen  mattjones  now  hereandnow  realtime  realtimeweb  memory  memoryplatforms  joshuaschachter  2010  twitter  del.icio.us  web2.0  archives  archiving  commonplacebooks  bookmarks  bookmarking 
december 2010 by robertogreco
Memento: Adding Time to the Web
"Memento wants to make it as straightforward to access the Web of the past as it is to access the current Web.

If you know the URI of a Web resource, the technical framework proposed by Memento allows you to see a version of that resource as it existed at some date in the past, by entering that URI in your browser like you always do and by specifying the desired date in a browser plug-in. Or you can actually browse the Web of the past by selecting a date and clicking away. Whatever you land upon will be versions of Web resources as they were around the selected date. Obviously, this will only work if previous versions are available somewhere on the Web. But if they are, and if they are on servers that support the Memento framework, you will get to them."
internet  archives  time  firefox  browser  extensions  atemporality  preservation  archiving  browsers 
november 2010 by robertogreco
x design project: » Digesting the Information
"Although cultural ephemera is rich and important museums can archive in a variety of ways and we can design the cultural afterlife of our material artifacts. Digestion is the new medium. And information and material are not inexorably tied.<br />
<br />
Exploring the Afterlife!: You are invited to partake in an experiment to revise this cultural habit–a collective but correctable error. We simply substitute temporal materials for the longlasting, and design how they degrade and circulate thru our socio-ecolgocial systems. We use an inexpensive, enzymatically driven high=performance biodegradation process : your digestive tract. The aggregated efforts of many of us can outperform most industrial processes… you are a digesting machine!"
nataliejeremijenko  art  science  environment  digestion  enzymes  biodegradation  systems  culture  archiving  edible  2010  xspecies 
august 2010 by robertogreco
rodcorp: The file-burning stove
"One technique for managing paperwork that's fairly common in productivity circles is the Noguchi filing system, in which files are always re-filed on the left of a shelf. This results in a gradient of freshness, with old or stale files naturally sorting themselves to the right, whence they can be discarded or permanently archived.
rodmclaren  filing  memory  archiving  discarding  cv  noguchifilinfsystem 
march 2009 by robertogreco
fabric of folly: Virtual moonbeams: the impossible task of capturing the web
"So, how do you solve a problem like archiving the web? The two most likely solutions to my mind are 1.) a massive, open, SETI@home-style distributed networking approach 2.) Google does it."
archives  archiving  google  web  internet  bookmarks  boomarking  images  dynamic 
june 2008 by robertogreco
iterasi [via: http://www.fabricoffolly.com/2008/05/virtual-moonbeams-impossible-task-of.html]
all of that dynamic personalization makes it extremely difficult to save pages for future use...to help, we've created a simple browser-based tool for saving any Web page—dynamically generated or otherwise—with the click of a button.
bookmarking  archiving  web  online  internet  tools  onlinetoolkit  bookmarks  tagging 
june 2008 by robertogreco
Long Views » Blog Archive » World’s Largest Audio-Visual Archive
"means that archivists must re-copy or auto-refresh existing digital archives on ongoing basis – in parallel w/ creating archives from original formats. Until cost-effective, ultra-long-term digital storage is achieved, “re-archiving the archives” w
archiving  audio  video  film  audiovisual  kevinkelly  digitization  automation 
march 2008 by robertogreco
Evernote Offers a Backup For Your Brain | Compiler from Wired.com
"Evernote wants to be a database for every bit of knowledge in your life. It takes all of the digital data you collect throughout your day, both the important and the inconsequential, and stores them in a centrally-located library that's accessible in an
lifelogging  memory  notes  notetaking  productivity  backup  evernote  windows  mac  catalog  archiving  applications  software  service  online  web  onlinetoolkit  internet 
march 2008 by robertogreco
Software over the rainbow » Blog Archive » Mess up, dig for context, scatter… and find your stuff
"scattering could inject some healthy variety to our experience of digital information, giving us a richer context in which to manage our own data...we might be making our storage less efficient, but we’d be improving our memory of it."
storage  memory  data  bookmarks  tumblr  del.icio.us  bookmarking  digital  archiving  recall  search  context  scattering 
february 2008 by robertogreco
circaVie | Create and Share Timelines
"circaVie, or "times of your life," is a place to celebrate your life in an exciting new way ... chronologically through an interactive timeline. Tell your life story or the story of your latest road trip, a day to remember, or a trip around the world. An
archive  archiving  blogging  blogs  charts  collections  digitalstorytelling  storytelling  timelines  socialnetworking  photography  web2.0  visualization  socialnetworks  socialsoftware  mindmap  onlinetoolkit  history  time  graphics 
january 2008 by robertogreco
The Papernet
"There is a limit to computer magic because human language is also magic and computers are still dumb." see also: http://www.aaronland.info/weblog/2006/12/17/meat/#papernet
mobile  williamgibson  travel  ubicomp  wikipedia  internet  howwework  gamechanging  qrcodes  productivity  maps  mapping  paris  PDF  notebooks  moleskines  wikis  drawing  diy  archiving  wine  recipes  webdev  paper  webdesign 
december 2007 by robertogreco
[this is aaronland] The Papernet
"Information wants to be used not managed...I want to use the Internets for the things they are good at — like distribution and searchification — but I am not ready to give up something I can hold in my hands."
mobile  williamgibson  travel  ubicomp  wikipedia  internet  howwework  gamechanging  qrcodes  productivity  maps  mapping  paris  PDF  notebooks  moleskines  wikis  drawing  diy  archiving  wine  recipes  webdev  paper  computing  webdesign 
december 2007 by robertogreco
Click opera - From Stockhausen to stock repertoire
"Thanks to our conservative tastes and our advanced technology, we can't forget, can't purge, can't let stuff flow and go, can't rip it all up and start again, an act of destruction which is crucial to all acts of new creation."
music  momus  evolution  audio  art  memory  forgetting  creativity  progress  technology  storage  archiving 
december 2007 by robertogreco
The Slide And Negative To Digital Picture Converter. at Hammacher Schlemmer
"This device converts old 35mm slides and film negatives into digital images, allowing you to easily preserve your memories without having to rely on a conversion service, and allowing you to clear valuable storage space of cluttered slide carousels and d
photography  scanner  slides  negatives  archiving 
november 2007 by robertogreco
collision detection: Should online newspapers be programmed to "forget" old, incorrect articles?
"Programming a database to forget: I love it! This whole issue is another symptom of our increasingly weird digital world, where feats of memory that are superhuman -- or inhuman, or both -- are made possible via silicon"
media  memory  online  internet  journalism  forgetting  technology  archiving  reputation  binglogg  google  news  web 
september 2007 by robertogreco
BBC NEWS | Technology | Warning of data ticking time bomb
"The growing problem of accessing old digital file formats is a "ticking time bomb", the chief executive of the UK National Archives has warned."
data  file  formats  obsolescence  archives  archiving 
july 2007 by robertogreco
Lost Format Preservation Society
"The society was founded in 2000 with the design of Emigre issue no. 57. It's sole purpose is to save formats from obscurity."
media  movies  music  recording  computers  collections  archive  analog  information  format  film  design  retro  storage  vinyl  technology  formats  archiving  digital  software  history 
june 2007 by robertogreco

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