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Refiguring the Future Conference | Day One - YouTube
The Refiguring the Future conference convenes artists, educators, writers, and cultural strategists to envision a shared liberatory future by providing us with ideas that move beyond and critique oppressive systems. Participants in the conference will address concepts of world-building, ecologies, disability and accessibility, biotechnology and the body.

The conference kicks off the opening weekend of the Refiguring the Future, a new exhibition offering a politically engaged and inclusive vision of the intersection of art, science, and technology, organized in partnership with the REFRESH collective and Hunter College Art Galleries,

The Refiguring the Future conference is curated by Eyebeam/REFRESH Curatorial and Engagement Fellow Lola Martinez and REFRESH member Maandeeq Mohamed.

10:00 AM – 10:15 AM | Opening Remarks

Dorothy R. Santos and Heather Dewey-Hagborg, Co-Curators of Refiguring the Future

10:30 AM – 11:30 AM | World-building

Exploring the settler ontologies that govern technoscientific inquiry, this panel will engage technology towards a liberatory, world-building politic.

shawné michaelain holloway, Artist

Rasheedah Phillips, Artist and Co-Creator of Black Quantum Futurism

Alexander G. Weheliye, Professor, Northwestern University

Moderated by Maandeeq Mohamed, Writer


11:30 AM – 12:30 AM | Keynote Lecture


12:30 PM – 02:00 PM | Lunch


02:00 PM – 02:30 PM | Keynote Performative Lecture

In this performative lecture, artist Zach Blas offers critical investigations on issues of the internet, capitalism, and state oppression.

Zach Blas, Artist

Keynote Introduction by Heather Dewey-Hagborg, Artist


02:30 PM – 03:30 PM | Symbiotic Ecologies

Narratives of colonial legacy, migration, and extinction have shifted our cultural imagining of ecologies. Beginning by acknowledging our existence in unsustainable climates, this panel brings forth artistic and activist practices which provoke and foster symbiotic relationships for new understandings within environmental predicaments.

Sofía Córdova, Artist

Jaskiran Dhillon, Associate Professor, The New School

Sofía Unanue, co-founder and co-director of La Maraña

Moderated by Kathy High, Artist.


03:30 PM – 04:00 PM | Coffee Break

04:00 PM – 05:00 PM | Speculative Bodies: A Shell to be Surpassed

Technological biases categorize individuals according to markers such as race, gender, sexuality, and citizenship, and in turn undermine how we live and navigate our present and future worlds. This panel collectively examines how the fields of health, genomics, and technology are reinforced by Western scientific discourses and speculate new insights for alternative systems of knowledge.

Ruha Benjamin, Associate Professor, Princeton University

micha cárdenas, PhD, Assistant Professor, University of California, Santa Cruz

Dr. Pinar Yoldas, Artist

Moderated by Dr. Kadija Ferryman, Researcher at Data and Society.

05:00 PM – 06:00 PM | Keynote Lecture

In this Keynote lecture, Keeanga Yamahtta-Taylor examines the politics of social liberation movements. Author of #BlackLivesMatter to Black Liberation, Taylor offers an examination of the history and politics of Black America and the development of the social movement Black Lives Matter in response to police violence in the United States.

Keeanga Yamahtta-Taylor, Assistant Professor, Princeton University

Keynote introduction by Dorothy R. Santos, Curator and Writer"

[See also:
Refiguring the Future Conference | Day Two
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oCa36fWJhyk

"The Refiguring the Future conference convenes artists, educators, writers, and cultural strategists to envision a shared liberatory future by providing us with ideas that move beyond and critique oppressive systems. Participants in the conference will address concepts of world-building, ecologies, disability and accessibility, biotechnology and the body.

The conference kicks off the opening weekend of the Refiguring the Future, a new exhibition offering a politically engaged and inclusive vision of the intersection of art, science, and technology, organized in partnership with the REFRESH collective and Hunter College Art Galleries,

The Refiguring the Future conference is curated by Eyebeam/REFRESH Curatorial and Engagement Fellow Lola Martinez and REFRESH member Maandeeq Mohamed.

See the full schedule here: https://www.eyebeam.org/events/refiguring-the-future-conference/

In the Annex:

Talks | Refiguring Planetary Health, Building Black Futures

We cannot have a healthy planet that sustains all human beings as long as the systemic oppression of Black and Indigenous peoples continues. And yet, prominent environmental science institutions concerned with conservation and climate change often fail to address this oppression or their role in perpetuating it. In this talk, we will explore how histories of scientific racism and eugenics inform current scientific policies and practice. Cynthia Malone will work with various forms of freedom practice, from hip hop to science fiction to scholarship in the Black Radical Tradition, to consider alternative visions for planetary health that advance both environmental stewardship and liberation from oppressive ideologies and systems.

Cynthia Malone, Activist, Scholar, and Scientist
---
The Spirit of the Water Bear

In this talk, Claire Pentecost will give an introduction and reading of Spirit of the Water Bear, a young adult novel set in a coastal town in the Carolinas. The novel’s protagonist, Juni Poole, is a 15-year-old girl who spends much of her time exploring the natural world. Inevitably, she finds herself confronting the urgency of a crisis that has no end, namely climate change and the sixth great extinction. Through experiences of activism, she finds comrades who feel environmental and political urgency much as she does, and learns that she has a place in the ongoing struggle for environmental justice. The book is a work of “Cli-Fi” or climate fiction, featuring Juni’s adventures, but it is also a work of “Cli-Phi” or climate philosophy, featuring conversations and musings on the nature of our existential predicament.

Claire Pentecost, Artist

Speaker Introductions by Lola Martinez, Eyebeam and REFRESH Curatorial and Engagement Fellow
---
Roundtables and Talks | Visible networks: Community Building in the Digital Arena

As notions of accessibility are being rendered visible on networks and digital medias, disability and chronic illness communities are utilizing networks to provide resources and representations. Yet what does it mean to build community within these platforms? This roundtable discussion offers reflections by artists working to provide new insights into biomedical discourses which reinforce apparent and unapparent representations of disabled bodies.

Hayley Cranberry, Artist

Anneli Goeller, Artist

Yo-Yo Lin, Artist
---
#GLITCHFEMINISM

Legacy Russell is the founding theorist behind Glitch Feminism as a cultural manifesto and movement. #GLITCHFEMINISM aims to use the digital as a means of resisting the hegemony of the corporeal. Glitch Feminism embraces the causality of ‘error’ and turns the gloomy implication of ‘glitch’ on its ear by acknowledging that an error in a social system disturbed by economic, racial, social, sexual, cultural stratification, and the imperialist wrecking-ball of globalization—processes that continue to enact violence on all bodies—may not be ‘error’ at all, but rather a much-needed erratum. The digital is a vessel through which our glitch ‘becoming’ realises itself, and through which we can reprogramme binary gender coding. Our ‘glitch’ is a correction to the machine—f**k hegemonic coding! USURP THE BODY—BECOME YOUR AVATAR!

Legacy Russell, Curator and Writer

Speaker Introductions by Lola Martinez, Eyebeam and REFRESH Curatorial and Engagement Fellow"]

[See also:
"Eyebeam presents Refiguring the Future: an exhibition and conference organized by REFRESH, produced in collaboration with Hunter College Art Galleries."
https://www.eyebeam.org/rtf/

EXHIBITION
Curated by REFRESH collective members Heather Dewey-Hagborg and Dorothy R. Santos, the exhibition title is inspired by artist Morehshin Allahyari’s work defining a concept of “refiguring” as a feminist, de-colonial, and activist practice. Informed by the punk ethos of do-it-yourself (DIY), the 18 artists featured in Refiguring the Future deeply mine the historical and cultural roots of our time, pull apart the artifice of contemporary technology, and sift through the pieces to forge new visions of what could become.

The exhibition will present 11 new works alongside re-presented immersive works by feminist, queer, decolonial, anti-racist, and anti-ableist artists concerned with our technological and political moment including: Morehshin Allahyari, Lee Blalock, Zach Blas*, micha cárdenas* and Abraham Avnisan, In Her Interior (Virginia Barratt and Francesca da Rimini)*, Mary Maggic, Lauren McCarthy, shawné michaelain holloway*, Claire and Martha Pentecost, Sonya Rapoport, Barak adé Soleil, Sputniko! and Tomomi Nishizawa, Stephanie Syjuco, and Pinar Yoldas*.

Names with asterik denotes participation in the conference. ]
eyebeam  dorothysantos  lolamartinez  maandeegmohamed  liberation  art  events  2019  heatherdewey-hagborg  shawnémichaelainholloway  rasheedahphillips  alexanderwehelive  zachblas  ecology  ecologies  sofíacórdova  sofíaunanue  jaskirandhillon  lamaraña  speculativefiction  designfiction  keeangayamahtta-taylor  michacárdenas  blacklivesmatter  gender  race  sexuality  citizenship  future  inclusions  inclusivity  health  genomics  speculativedesign  design  arts  pinaryoldas  kadijaferryman  glitchfeminism  feminism  clairepentecost  heyleycranbery  anneligoeller  yo-yolin  cyntihiamalone  climatechange  globalwarming  eugenics  racism  science  scientificracism  oppression  systemsthinking  activism  climatefiction  junipoole  accessibility  legacyrussell  technology  digital  disability  worldbuilding  bodies  biotechnology  morehshinallahyari  queer  decolonization  anti-racist  ableism  abti-ableism  leeblalock  abrahamavnisan  virginiabarratt  francescadarimini  marymaggic  lauranmccarthy  marthapentecost  sonyarapoport  barakadésoleil  sputniko!  tomominishiz 
9 weeks ago by robertogreco
26 | Black Mountain College — Do Not Touch
"We're going back to school and learning about an arts college in the mountains of Asheville, North Carolina. For 24 years the college attracted famous teachers and produced students who would go on to achieve their own fame. I have two guests speaking to me about Black Mountain - Kate Averett from the Black Mountain College Museum + Arts Center and Professor Eva Diaz from Pratt Institute."
bmc  2018  blackmountaincollege  bauhaus  annialbers  johndewey  art  arts  education  highered  highereducation  alternative  experimental  unschooling  deschooling  democracy  horizontality  evadiaz  kateaverett  history  arthistory  pedagogy  lcproject  openstudioproject  form  exploration  liberalarts  roberrauschenberg  willemdekooning  abstractexpressionism  howwework  discipline  self  identity  johncage  mercecunningham  self-directedlearning  self-directed  learning  howwelearn  howweteach  teaching  vision  cognition  expressionism  expression  music  dance  buckminsterfuller  technique  chance  happenings  anarchism  ego  spontaneity  unknown  improvisation  radicalism  transilience  northcarolina  transience  hippies  communes  integration  jacoblawrence  almastonewilliams  outsiders  refugees  inclusion  inclusivity  openness  gender  rayjohnson  elainedekooining  karenkarnes  dorothearockburn  hazellarsenarcher  blackmountaincollegemuseum  susanweil  maryparkswashington  josefalbers  charlesolson  poetry  johnandrewrice 
october 2018 by robertogreco
Black Mountain College: "The Grass-Roots of Democracy" - Open Source with Christopher Lydon
"Our guest, the literary historian Louis Menand, explains that B.M.C. was a philosophical experiment intent on putting the progressive philosopher John Dewey‘s ideas to work in higher education. The college curriculum was unbelievably permissive — but it did ask that students undertake their own formation as citizens of the world by means of creative expression, and hard work, in a community of likeminded people.

The college may not have lived up to its utopian self-image — the scene was frequently riven by interpersonal conflict — but it did serve as a stage-set to some of modern culture’s most interesting personalities and partnerships."
bmc  blackmountaincollege  rutherickson  louismenand  teddreier  theodoredreier  sebastiansmee  taylordavis  williamdavis  2016  robertcreeley  jacoblawrence  josefalbers  robertrauschenberg  annialbers  davidtudor  franzkline  mercecunningham  johncage  charlesolson  buckminsterfuller  johndewey  democracy  art  music  film  poetry  cytwombly  bauhaus  experientiallearning  howwelearn  education  johnandrewrice  unschooling  deschooling  schools  schooling  learning  howelearn  howweteach  pedagogy  christopherlydon  abstractexpressionism  popart  jacksonpollock  arthistory  history  arts  purpose  lcproject  openstudioproject  leapbeforeyoulook  canon  discovery  conflict  artists  happenings  openness  rural  community  highered  highereducation  curriculum  willemdekooning  small  control  conversation  interdisciplinary  transdisciplinary  mitmedialab  medialab  chaos  utopia  dicklyons  artschools  davidbowie  experimentation  exploration  humanity  humanism  humility  politics 
october 2018 by robertogreco
Dodie Bellany: Academonia
"In this lively, entertaining collection of essays, Dodie Bellamy has written not only a helpful pedagogical tool, but an epic narrative of survival against institutional deadening and the proscriptiveness that shoots the young writer like poison darts from all sides. By the 90s funding for the arts had dwindled and graduate writing programs—“cash cows”—had risen to fill the slack. Simultaneously, literary production moved from an unstable, at times frightening street culture where experiment was privileged beyond all else, to an institutionalized realm—Academonia!—that enforces, or tends to enforce, conservative aesthetic values.

Among the questions Bellamy raises: how does the writer figure out how to write? How will she claim her content among censorious voices? Can the avant-garde create forms that speak to political and spiritual crisis? Can desire exist in a world of networking structures? To the keepers of the status quo, what is so goddamned scary about experimental writing? Bellamy’s textual body morphs through sex, ravenous hunger, aging, displacement, cuddling with animals. Along the way she invokes Levi Strauss, Kurosawa, Marvin Gaye, Christiane (the faceless daughter in Georges Franju’s 1959 horror classic Eyes Without a Face), Alice Munro, Michael Moore, Quan Yin, Cinderella, and the beheaded heroine Lady Jane Grey. On Foucault’s grid of invisible assumptions, Academonia casts a blacklight vision, making it glow in giddy FX splendor.

*****

There are the institutions that are created without our input and the institutions that we create with others. Both sorts of institutions define us without our consent. Dodie Bellamy’s Academonia explores the prickly intersection among these spaces as it moves through institutions such as the academy, the experimental writing communities of the Bay Area, feminist and sexual identities, and group therapy. Continuing the work that she began in The Letters of Mina Harker pushing memoir and confession out of its safety zones and into its difficulties, this book provokes as it critiques and yet at the same time manages to delight with its hope.

--Juliana Spahr

Way back in the seventies, and before Bellamy, pastiche and bricolage as applied to literature made me yawn. Smug attacks on linear narrative through the use of tired language games aroused my contempt. As far as I was concerned, theory had ruined fiction by making critic and artist too intimate. Then Bellamy’s pioneering graftings of storytelling, theory and fractured metaphor changed all that, giving birth to a new avant-garde. Her writing sweeps from one mode of thought to another in absolute freedom, eviscerating hackneyed constructs about desire and language and stuffing them with a fascinating hodgepodge of sparkling sensory fragments. The result is true postmodernism, not the shallow dilettantism of the “postmodern palette.” She sustains it on page after page, weaving together sex and philosophy, fusing trash with high culture, injecting theory with the pathos of biography and accomplishing nothing less than a fresh and sustained lyricism. What is more, her transfiguration of the trivial details of life by the mechanisms of irony, fantasy, disjunction, nostalgia and perverse point of view prove that it’s not the life you live that matters, but how you tell it.

--Bruce Benderson"
writing  howwewrite  books  dodiebellany  institutions  proscriptiveness  academonia  academia  highered  highereducation  akirakurosawa  levistrauss  marvingaye  alicemonroe  michaelmoore  quanyin  cinderella  ladyjanegrey  foucault  institutionalization  julianaspahr  brucebenderson  bricolage  literature  linearity  form  feedom  structure  language  senses  sensory  postmodernism  dilettantism  culture  bayarea  experimental  experimentation  art  arts  funding  streetculture  2006 
october 2018 by robertogreco
Claire Bishop on PALACE IN PLUNDERLAND - Artforum International
"The construction of yet another enormous venue for culture feels like the harbinger of a horrible new world in which all public services are drained of resources but every High Net Worth Individual can evade taxes by pouring a fraction of their profits into a cultural project that enhances their social status. The über-wealthy once gave a percentage of their riches to the church; today they give them to flexible and adaptable visual art/performance spaces."



"A Schema for a School is one thing; the more radical proposition would be a cultural institution that includes within its architecture crucial services like a public school, day care, or a branch of the New York Public Library."
charitableindustrialcomplex  philanthropicindustrialcomplex  philanthropy  charity  publicgood  inequality  wealth  2018  via:shannon_mattern  clairebishop  arts  architecture  taxevasion  democracy  oligarchy  capitalism  influence  power  museums  control 
september 2018 by robertogreco
Keire Johnson en Instagram: “Shout out @finhan_ for making this after watching Minding the Gap! What I take from this piece (personally) : The paper bag over the…”
"Shout out @finhan_ for making this after watching Minding the Gap!
What I take from this piece (personally) : The paper bag over the skater's face to me represents how skateboarding suppresses all the negative emotions you can feel growing up and acts almost as a cloak of some sort.

When you take the bag off after skating, all of the bullshit comes back to you. Skateboarding cures heartache however it has limited powers. It can't cure everything.

That's where other creative outlets come in.
Music, art, dance, writing, and ect.
I am luck enough to have multiple outlets but I recommend finding a creative outlet that works for you. It's good for you.
Thanks again @finhan_"
keirejohnson  skateboarding  skating  2018  adolescence  youth  teens  self-medication  escape  creativity  music  art  arts  dance  writing  outlets  identity 
september 2018 by robertogreco
76X Marin Headlands Express | SFMTA
[via: "Onboard the 76X! @peterhartlaub and @hknightsf weren’t able to include this route for #TotalMuni2018 because it’s weekends only. Marin Headlands, here we come!"
https://twitter.com/that_mc/status/1023622994067828736

We met a fan on the 76X, and now I get to feel like Beyoncé, @peterhartlaub! Was a beautiful if chilly afternoon at Rodeo Beach, where we visited @TMMC and @HeadlandsArts, not to mention a run in with @apthornley! #totalmunisummer
https://twitter.com/that_mc/status/1023684500591525889 ]
togo  sanfrancisco  muni  marin  todo  buses  sfmta  marinemammalcenter  marinheadlands  headlandscenterforthearts  art  arts  science  classideas 
july 2018 by robertogreco
Home - SPARCinLA - Social and Public Art Resource Center | ART | COMMUNITY | EDUCATION | SOCIAL JUSTICE | SINCE 1976
"Our Mission
SPARC’s intent is to examine what we choose to memorialize through public art, to devise and innovate excellent art pieces; and ultimately, to provide empowerment through participatory processes to residents and communities excluded from civic debate. SPARC’s works are never simply individually authored endeavors, but rather a collaboration between artists and communities, resulting in art which rises from within the community, rather than being imposed upon it.

• The ideas we propagated have gained credibility over the years:
• That art was for everyone regardless of their status in society
• That the distinctions between high and low art, fine art and folk art were false
• That innovation is important only while nurturing the significant traditions in which various ethnic groups preserve their cultures
• That art should not dwell only in rarefied halls but in the places where people live and work
• That the process not only the product, is the measure of the value of an art work
• That all Americans could be participants in the making of art and that collaborations work
• And last… That the arts can have significant transformative impact on the most significant social problems of our time"

SPARC’s INHERENT NATURE
SPARC was born in a time of change – the 1970s. It has, since its inception, been a catalyst for social change through the arts and a home for artistic innovation. Being a catalyst has often meant handling the many currents that flow through historical events at the moment they are occurring and working outside of typical art venues in the places where people live and work.

SPARC is a facilitator – finding ways to tell richly textured stories that help community participants and artists achieve a measure of change and transformation. SPARC endeavors to communicate to the larger public – the means of communication may take many forms, from built architectural monuments, to murals or to new technological spaces such as the Internet. As with many organizations that articulate new visions and push the edges of content and aesthetics, SPARC is determined to be sustainable and relevant to the time we are living.

Since it was founded in 1976 by Chicana muralist and Distinguished UCLA Professor Judith F. Baca, Filmmaker/Director Donna Deitch, and Artist/Teacher Christina Schlesinger, SPARC’s artistic direction was formulated with the concept that the arts could be engaged with the most important issues of our time and that ordinary people/community members could be participants in the arts. SPARC chose to amplify the voices of those marginalized in our Los Angeles communities and to provide a new vision of what art could do: women, people of color, poor and working people, day laborers, youth, prisoners, etc became the focus in our programming. We believed, then as we do now, that art can exist in places where people live and work, therefore we are focused on a new “public art.” Our works are monuments that rise out of communities; memorializing what the people choose to remember.

Since 1976, we have taken the work to blighted streets in the inner city of Los Angeles and to concrete flood control channels; scars where our rivers once ran. We painted a 1/2-mile of the river with murals with 400 youth, built parks in vacant lots, hung photographic tapestries in senior citizens centers, and built sculptures for children to play on in vacant lots and produced hundreds of murals. Los Tres Grandes of Mexico, the popular culture of low riders, tattoos and political street writing, transformed by the aesthetics of each changing cultural group with whom we work, informed our sense of beauty and order. We continue to capture the rhythm of the streets in giant works that place an ethnic face on a city where a 129 languages are spoken in our schools but whose life and aesthetics are often not represented in the cities physical and aesthetic environments.

This concept, now more accepted, was radical in an era of “arts for arts sake” thought, during which we pioneered these aesthetic values. However, the need for our work has steadily grown with the massive demographic shifts affecting our city and country. Still today, no issue raised by a community is too difficult for us to approach with an artistic solution. In 1977, we opened the center with the ‘Jail House Break’ celebration and examined our own home, the former Venice Police Station and its historic use.

Today we have contemporized our historic processes through the incorporation of technology in our UCLA@SPARC Digital/Mural Lab where we produce large scale imagery both painted and digitally printed, work with communities across the country and internationally over the internet, and continue to innovate new materials that seek permanence in outdoor environments. Our programs have been widely emulated across the country and internationally as we continue to stay on the cutting edge of innovation of large-scale public art works and community interactive processes. Organizations like SPARC maintain the spirit and substance of transformation we need no more than ever in our city and country, by visualizing change through the arts and by engaging our communities in much needed civic discourse.

KEY ACCOMPLISHMENTS OF SPARC FROM 1976-2013
1) 1976-Present: The Great Wall of Los Angeles 1/2 mile-long Mural/Education Project is one of Los Angeles’ true cultural landmarks and one of the country’s most respected and largest monuments to inter-racial harmony. SPARC’s first public art project and its true signature piece, the Great Wall is a landmark pictorial representation of the history of ethnic peoples of California from prehistoric times to the 1950’s, conceived by SPARC’s artistic director and founder Judith F. Baca. Begun in 1974 and completed over six summers, the Great Wall employed over 400 youth and their families from diverse social and economic backgrounds working with artists, oral historians, ethnologists, scholars, and hundreds of community members.

2) 1988-2002: Neighborhood Pride, a program initiated and developed by SPARC and sponsored by the City of Los Angeles Cultural Affairs Department produced 105 community artworks in every ethnic community in Los Angeles, commissioned 95 artists and trained over 1800 youth apprentices. In 2002 alone (the last year of the program), SPARC conducted 80 community dialogues citywide with community participants determining the placement and content of 15 new large-scale public artworks. These works confronted some of the most critical issues in our city such as; the on going migration and integration of the Central Americans particularly in the 1980’s to Pico Union from el Salvador, Nicaragua and Guatemala, and the changing demographics in our schools, creating the phenomena of “ chocolate schools in vanilla suburbs” which has resulted in the demise of the age old “neighborhood school’ concept in many Los Angeles communities.

3) 1990-Present: World Wall: A Vision of the Future Without Fear, conceived by Judith F. Baca, consists of seven 10’ x 30’ portable mural panels on canvas. This 210’ mural addresses contemporary issues of global importance: war, peace, cooperation, interdependence, and spiritual growth. As the World Wall tours the world, seven additional panels by artists from seven countries will be added to complete this visual tribute to the “Global Village.”

4) 1976-Present: The Mural Resource and Education Center (MREC): In the course of our community cultural development work we have amassed one of the country’s largest collections of written and visual information about public art, including an archive of over 60,000 mural slides. Hundreds of students, educators, scholars, artists and art historians avail themselves of the MREC’s resources each year. In addition, the MREC sponsors public mural tours, giving visitors and Angelenos alike an opportunity to view the city’s unique outdoor gallery.

5) 1976-Present: The Dúron Gallery: SPARC’s headquarters in the 10,000 square foot facility of the 1929 old art deco Venice Police Station in Venice California houses a converted cellblock exhibition space. Exhibitions take place year round in the facility, which is well known for exhibitions of socially relevant work and the work of children and youth. SPARC’s programming recognizes the vital function the arts play in any social justice movement.

6) 1996-Present: The UCLA@SPARC Digital/Mural Lab is the leading research and production facility in the country devoted to the creation of large-scale digitally generated murals, educational DVD’s, animations, community archives and digital art. In its community setting at SPARC’s headquarters in the old Venice jail, the Lab develops new methods for combining traditional mural painting techniques with computer generated imagery, collaborates across distance with local, national and international communities to create public art expressing the concerns of diverse communities, and develops new methods of preservation and restoration for mural art through use of digital prints and new materials.

7) 2005-2009: Otis School of Art & Design/Digital Media lab for High School Students @ SPARC: O TEAM: Otis Teens, Educators, Artists and Mentors: O TEAM prepares Venice youth for a productive life through skill-based art and design education and mentoring to facilitate their personal development and entry into higher education and the workplace. The O TEAM program is designed to support the aspirations of young people, instill core values, and reinforce self-esteem by providing them with the tools to succeed. O TEAM meets downstairs in SPARC’s basement; the students fondly call their group “Underground Roots.”

8) 2008-Present: Planet Siqueiros Peña, is inspired by Mexican muralist David Alfaro Siqueiros and the South American musical Peñas, which produced a wave of music that utilized old rhythms to express new realities. The movement emerged during the 1960s in … [more]
losangeles  art  education  venicebeach  socialjustice  community  lcproject  openstudioproject  arts  via:carwaiseto  restoration 
july 2018 by robertogreco
Stockyard Institute
"The Stockyard Institute , founded by Jim Duignan, associate professor, is an arts and pedagogical initiative that establishes collaborative, community-wide arts and education projects with youth, teachers, artists and residents deep inside Chicago communities. The Stockyard Institute coordinates with area schools, youth centers, cultural organizations, and community facilities to design and organize temporary public art projects and sustainable art and education programs. Since its inception in 1995, the Stockyard Institute has connected with thousands of DePaul University students, local teachers, youth and community residents building, teaching, exhibiting, exchanging and publishing projects in Chicago, the U.S. and around the world. Duignan’s work and models have been published by The Atlantic Monthy, A Blade of Grass Foundation, Prestel Publishing, New Art Examiner, Artforum, Chicago Reader, Whitewalls, Proximity Magazine, New City, Palm Press, Routledge, AREA Chicago, Green Lantern Press and the New York Times. Recent projects, artworks, and ideas of the Stockyard institute and Jim Duignan have been exhibited at the Hyde Park Art Center and Smart Museum (2017), Chicago Cultural Center, Reykjavik Art Museum, Public Art Saint Paul, (2016), Brooklyn’s interference Archive and 6018North in Chicago (2015), and Hul House Museum, Kochi-Muziris Biennial, Sullivan Galleries, EXPO Chicago, and Columbia College (2014).



(2017 MIT Nomination)

Over the past 20 years, across Chicago neighborhoods, Jim has been quietly leading an underground educational network called Stockyard Institute. Born and raised deep in the city, trained from self-education as an artist and from community education as an Eagle Scout, Jim took up residence in an abandoned school in the Back of the Yards neighborhood in 1995, where he began to work with community youth. In the early days, Jim invited youth to talk openly about the violence that marked their everyday lives– an unheard of practice in city pedagogy, which has always emphasized teaching children to look away from difficult knowledge and refrain from formally expressing emotionally-charged, authentic lived experiences– and invited them to express the needs that sprung from the everyday neighborhood through making collaborative sculpture. Together, they created the “gang-proof suit,” a symbol of the freedom youth yearned for, to walk without fear of being overtaken in the streets, to be liberated from the systems of schools and culture that made them feel locked in place with their fates sealed. From this initial gesture, Jim established Stockyard Institute as a vector space, bringing resources, knowledge, skill-building, and opportunities together from various parts of the city underground to create a network of civic love only seen at the street level, under the radar, and often against the rules of massive Chicago city institutions that direct from the top. Who gets to say what’s worth doing, being, or becoming? For whose benefit are they saying this? What happens when the neighborhood leads its own education? What happens when the youth are invited to make the tools they need to be liberated from cycles of oppression?

Over the past 20 years in Chicago, Jim has been a shadow helper of unparalleled impact, who is almost never seen in person except inside communities, and never seems to credit himself for his enormous efforts by name, only saying work is done by “Stockyard Institute.” When I asked him why he always says this name, or says that work is done, “by us,” he replied (and I must paraphrase), “I speak in collective terms because all of this work is equally shared. Youth risk something when we create a radio station and they speak their voices into the neighborhood, sharing their true stories. It empowers them, and it is a big deal to stake a claim to one’s own life experiences. All of our contributions are equally important.” Currently, at the age many people are considering retirement or have retired, Jim is quietly beginning a new project, building a new peace center inside the converted classroom of an operating public school in the Humboldt Park neighborhood, which ranks among the city’s neighborhoods most affected by violent crimes. These examples only reflect a tiny fraction of the number of works for goodness Jim has engineered over his lifetime, without monetary budget to speak of, but with strong networks of relationships and bonds between individuals committed to uplifting fellow Chicago residents, who scrap together what is needed from what is around in the urban plenty. This work is directly disobedient to the systems of education that say there is official knowledge that is most important, that schools have it, that all people must buy into it in order to ever have any chance of having “the American dream.” On the contrary, Jim has accumulated a life’s work of examples of what transformations are possible when the streets are not seen as a place of deficit but potential, when urban children are not seen as deficient people who need to be molded into proper citizens, but powerful people with vision, force, community spirit, civic pride, and the brightest possible future.

Where schools become pipelines to prisons, in a zero-tolerance society where students must accept a binary choice of either (1) blindly and uncritically complying with orders (which often reproduce oppression and disenfranchise kids of color, queer youth, immigrant youth, homeless youth, and others in the urban majority), (2) or dropping out of school and being cast out of social options, Jim Duignan is proposing that we have to look for a third option, and a fourth, and a fifth, and 3 million more: by creating meaningful, anti-institutional education that centers around the lives of urban youth, rebuilt from scratch in collaboration each time, mindfully embracing all of the complications of reality that mark survival tactics, he has transformed the lives of countless individual urban youth, like himself, and has been central to the creation of a network of resource sharing in the underground of civically-engaged creativity, ingenuity, and care in Chicago. This work is slow, patient, underground, durational, and built in bonds of keeping one’s word over decades.

-Rachel L. S. Harper

Nomination for the MIT Disobedience Award 2017

Contact Jim Duignan at stockyardinstitute@gmail.com"
jimduignan  mit  art  arts  education  lcproject  openstudioproject  youth 
may 2018 by robertogreco
ALENA MUSEUM
"Alena Museum is nonprofit 501(c)3 creative space that houses multi-disciplinary arts and work studios to cultivate the cultural richness of the African Diaspora. In the African language of Tigrinya Alena translates to  “we are here!"  Alena Museum declares that "we are here" by providing access for the African Diaspora to create original work and keep dedicated space for creative expression, in the face of the rapid displacement of these communities as a result of gentrification. We are empowering our community to be active players in this new economy in order to directly  mitigate displacement and marginalization."

[See also: https://www.instagram.com/alenamuseum/ ]

[via: https://www.instagram.com/p/BiOzLvhlgtq/ ]
lcproject  openstudioproject  art  arts  coworking  gentrification  studios  africandiaspora  diaspora  oakland  bayarea  tovisit  via:morgansully 
may 2018 by robertogreco
Reasons To Be Cheerful
"I’m starting an online project here that is an continuation and extension of some writing and talks I’ve done recently.

The project will be cross-platform—some elements may appear on social media, some on a website and some might manifest as a recording or performance… much of the published material will be collected here.

What is Reasons To Be Cheerful?

I imagine, like a lot of you who look back over the past year, it seems like the world is going to Hell. I wake up in the morning, look at the paper, and go, "Oh no!" Often I’m depressed for half the day. It doesn’t matter how you voted on Brexit, the French elections or the U.S. election—many of us of all persuasions and party affiliations feel remarkably similar.

As a kind of remedy and possibly as a kind of therapy, I started collecting good news that reminded me, "Hey, there's actually some positive stuff going on!" Almost all of these initiatives are local, they come from cities or small regions who have taken it upon themselves to try something that might offer a better alternative than what exits. Hope is often local. Change begins in communities.

I will post thoughts, images and audio relating to this initiative on whichever platform seems suitable and I’ll welcome contributions from others, if they follow the guidelines I’ve set for myself.

These bits of good news tend to fall into a few categories:

Education
Health
Civic Engagement
Science/Tech
Urban/Transportation
Energy
Culture

Culture, music and the arts might include, optimistically, some of my own work and projects, but just as much I hope to promote the work of others that has a proven track record.

Why do I do this? Why take the time? Therapy, I guess, though once in awhile I meet someone who has the connections and skills but might not be aware of some of these initiatives and innovations, so I can pass the information on. I sense that not all of this is widely known.

Emulation of successful models- 4 guidelines

I laid out 4 guidelines as I collected these examples:

1. Most of the good stuff is local. It’s more bottom up, community and individually driven. There are exceptions.

2. Many examples come from all over the world, but despite the geographical and cultural distances in many cases others can adopt these ideas—these initiatives can be utilized by cultures other than where they originated.

3. Very important. All of these examples have been tried and proven to be successful. These are not merely good IDEAS; they’ve been put into practice and have produced results.

4. The examples are not one-off, isolated or human interest, feel-good stories. They’re not stories of one amazing teacher, doctor, musician or activist- they’re about initiatives that can be copied and scaled up.

If it works, copy it

For example, in an area I know something about, there was an innovative bike program in Bogota, and years later, I saw that program become a model for New York and for other places.

The Ciclovia program in Bogota"
davidbyrne  politics  urban  urbanism  bogotá  curitiba  addiction  portugal  colombia  brazil  brasil  jaimelerner  cities  society  policy  qualityoflife  economics  drugs  health  healthcare  crime  ciclovia  bikes  biking  bikesharing  activism  civics  citybike  nyc  medellín  afroreggae  vigariogeral  favelas  obesity  childabuse  education  casamantequilla  harlem  civicengagment  engagement  women'smarch  northcarolina  ingridlafleur  afrotopia  detroit  seattle  citizenuniversity  tishuanajones  sunra  afrofuturism  stlouis  vancouver  britishcolumbia  transportation  publictransit  transit  velib  paris  climatechange  bipartisanship  energy  science  technology  culture  music  art  arts  behavior  medellin 
january 2018 by robertogreco
Stuart Hall and the Rise of Cultural Studies | The New Yorker
"Culture, he argued, does not consist of what the educated élites happen to fancy, such as classical music or the fine arts. It is, simply, “experience lived, experience interpreted, experience defined.” And it can tell us things about the world, he believed, that more traditional studies of politics or economics alone could not."



"Broadly speaking, cultural studies is not one arm of the humanities so much as an attempt to use all of those arms at once. It emerged in England, in the nineteen-fifties and sixties, when scholars from working-class backgrounds, such as Richard Hoggart and Raymond Williams, began thinking about the distance between canonical cultural touchstones—the music or books that were supposed to teach you how to be civil and well-mannered—and their own upbringings. These scholars believed that the rise of mass communications and popular forms were permanently changing our relationship to power and authority, and to one another. There was no longer consensus. Hall was interested in the experience of being alive during such disruptive times. What is culture, he proposed, but an attempt to grasp at these changes, to wrap one’s head around what is newly possible?

Hall retained faith that culture was a site of “negotiation,” as he put it, a space of give and take where intended meanings could be short-circuited. “Popular culture is one of the sites where this struggle for and against a culture of the powerful is engaged: it is also the stake to be won or lost in that struggle,” he argues. “It is the arena of consent and resistance.” In a free society, culture does not answer to central, governmental dictates, but it nonetheless embodies an unconscious sense of the values we share, of what it means to be right or wrong. Over his career, Hall became fascinated with theories of “reception”—how we decode the different messages that culture is telling us, how culture helps us choose our own identities. He wasn’t merely interested in interpreting new forms, such as film or television, using the tools that scholars had previously brought to bear on literature. He was interested in understanding the various political, economic, or social forces that converged in these media. It wasn’t merely the content or the language of the nightly news, or middlebrow magazines, that told us what to think; it was also how they were structured, packaged, and distributed.

According to Slack and Lawrence Grossberg, the editors of “Cultural Studies 1983,” Hall was reluctant to publish these lectures because he feared they would be read as an all-purpose critical toolkit rather than a series of carefully situated historical conversations. Hall himself was ambivalent about what he perceived to be the American fetish for theory, a belief that intellectual work was merely, in Slack and Grossberg’s words, a “search for the right theory which, once found, would unlock the secrets of any social reality.” It wasn’t this simple. (I have found myself wondering what Hall would make of how cultural criticism of a sort that can read like ideological pattern-recognition has proliferated in the age of social media.)

Over the course of his lectures, Hall carefully wrestles with forebears, including the British scholar F. R. Leavis and also Williams and Hoggart (the latter founded Birmingham University’s influential Center for Contemporary Cultural Studies, which Hall directed in the seventies). Gradually, the lectures cluster around questions of how we give our lives meaning, how we recognize and understand “the culture we never see, the culture we don’t think of as cultivated.” These lectures aren’t instructions for “doing” cultural studies—until the very end, they barely touch on emerging cultural forms that intrigued Hall, such as reggae and punk rock. Instead, they try to show how far back these questions reach."



"Hall found ready disciples in American universities, though it might be argued that the spirit which animated cultural studies in England had existed in the U.S. since the fifties and sixties, in underground magazines and the alternative press. The American fantasy of its supposedly “classless” society has always given “culture” a slightly different meaning than it has in England, where social trajectories were more rigidly defined. What scholars like Hall were actually reckoning with was the “American phase” of British life. After the Second World War, England was no longer the “paradigm case” of Western industrial society. America, that grand experiment, where mass media and consumer culture proliferated freely, became the harbinger for what was to come. In a land where rags-to-riches mobility is—or so we tend to imagine—just one hit away, culture is about what you want to project into the world, whether you are fronting as a member of the élite or as an everyman, offering your interpretation of Shakespeare or of “The Matrix.” When culture is about self-fashioning, there’s even space to be a down-to-earth billionaire."
2017  stuarthall  culture  culturalstudies  huahsu  arts  crossdisciplinary  multidisciplinary  interdisciplinary  transdisciplinary  popularculture  richardhoggart  raymondwilliams  humanities  resistance  consent  jenniferdarylslack  lawrencegrossberg  frleavis  society  canon  marxism 
december 2017 by robertogreco
Edwidge Danticat on Why 'All Immigrants Are Artists' - The Atlantic
"All your life is a work of art. A painting is not a painting but the way you live each day. A song is not a song but the words you share with the people you love. A book is not a book but the choices you make every day trying to be a decent person."
art  arts  edwidgedanticat  immigrants  immigration  making  being  living  life  everyday  leisureart  artleisure  creativity  invention  2013  leisurearts 
november 2017 by robertogreco
Latino Cultures in the US — Google Arts & Culture
"Discover the contributions and experiences of Latinos in the United States"

[via: "Google Just Launched One of the Largest Digital Collections of Latino Art & History"
http://remezcla.com/lists/culture/google-latino-cultures-in-the-us/

"In 1969, Raphael Montañez Ortiz founded El Museo del Barrio to provide a platform for the Latino art that mainstream museums ignored. Since then, things have changed. This fall, for example, LA museums will showcase an unprecedented number of exhibitions that explore the connections between Latin America and Los Angeles. But despite these strides, we still remain woefully underrepresented at these institutions. For years, Latino members of Congress have pushed for a national Latino museum (though the idea first emerged in the mid-1990s) without success. Because we also don’t often see ourselves accurately depicted in film, media, and even in US history classes across the country, many Latinos aren’t able to access their own histories. But a new Google Arts & Culture collection is hoping to correct this imbalance. Launched on September 7, Latino Cultures in the US is one of the largest digital collections of Latino art, culture, and history.

Google collaborated with about 50 institutions, including the Smithsonian Latino Center, UCLA Chicano Studies Research Center, California State Archives, and Miami Dade College. The collection features more than 2,500 pieces of art through 90 exhibits. (Google is also creating curriculums so that more students can learn about Latino history, the company reports.) The digital collection is impressive and much-needed, but it’s still incomplete because it doesn’t capture every facet of our identities."]
latinos  art  arts  culture  digital  collections  history  us 
october 2017 by robertogreco
Not Leadership Material? Good. The World Needs Followers. - The New York Times
"The glorification of leadership skills, especially in college admissions, has emptied leadership of its meaning."



"In 1934, a young woman named Sara Pollard applied to Vassar College. In those days, parents were asked to fill out a questionnaire, and Sara’s father described her, truthfully, as “more a follower type than a leader.”

The school accepted Sara, explaining that it had enough leaders.

It’s hard to imagine this happening today. No father in his right mind (if the admissions office happened to ask him!) would admit that his child was a natural follower; few colleges would welcome one with open arms. Today we prize leadership skills above all, and nowhere more than in college admissions. As Penny Bach Evins, the head of St. Paul’s School for Girls, an independent school in Maryland, told me, “It seems as if higher ed is looking for alphas, but the doers and thinkers in our schools are not always in front leading.”

Harvard’s application informs students that its mission is “to educate our students to be citizens and citizen-leaders for society.” Yale’s website advises applicants that it seeks “the leaders of their generation”; on Princeton’s site, “leadership activities” are first among equals on a list of characteristics for would-be students to showcase. Even Wesleyan, known for its artistic culture, was found by one study to evaluate applicants based on leadership potential.

If college admissions offices show us whom and what we value, then we seem to think that the ideal society is composed of Type A’s. This is perhaps unsurprising, even if these examples come from highly competitive institutions. It’s part of the American DNA to celebrate those who rise above the crowd. And in recent decades, the meteoric path to leadership of youthful garage- and dorm-dwellers, from Steve Jobs to Mark Zuckerberg, has made king of the hill status seem possible for every 19-year-old. So now we have high school students vying to be president of as many clubs as they can. It’s no longer enough to be a member of the student council; now you have to run the school.

Yet a well-functioning student body — not to mention polity — also needs followers. It needs team players. And it needs those who go their own way.

It needs leaders who are called to service rather than to status.

Admissions officers will tell you that their quest for tomorrow’s leaders is based on a desire for positive impact, to make the world a better place. I think they mean what they say.

But many students I’ve spoken with read “leadership skills” as a code for authority and dominance and define leaders as those who “can order other people around.” And according to one prominent Ivy League professor, those students aren’t wrong; leadership, as defined by the admissions process, too often “seems to be restricted to political or business power.” She says admissions officers fail to define leadership as “making advances in solving mathematical problems” or “being the best poet of the century.”

Whatever the colleges’ intentions, the pressure to lead now defines and constricts our children’s adolescence. One young woman told me about her childhood as a happy and enthusiastic reader, student and cellist — until freshman year of high school, when “college applications loomed on the horizon, and suddenly, my every activity was held up against the holy grail of ‘leadership,’ ” she recalled. “And everyone knew,” she added, “that it was not the smart people, not the creative people, not the thoughtful people or decent human beings that scored the application letters and the scholarships, but the leaders. It seemed no activity or accomplishment meant squat unless it was somehow connected to leadership.”

This young woman tried to overhaul her personality so she would be selected for a prestigious leadership role as a “freshman mentor.” She made the cut, but was later kicked out of the program because she wasn’t outgoing enough. At the time, she was devastated. But it turned out that she’d been set free to discover her true calling, science. She started working after school with her genetics teacher, another behind-the-scenes soul. She published her first scientific paper when she was 18, and won the highest scholarship her university has to offer, majoring in biomedical engineering and cello.

Our elite schools overemphasize leadership partly because they’re preparing students for the corporate world, and they assume that this is what businesses need. But a discipline in organizational psychology, called “followership,” is gaining in popularity. Robert Kelley, a professor of management and organizational behavior, defined the term in a 1988 Harvard Business Review article, in which he listed the qualities of a good follower, including being committed to “a purpose, principle or person outside themselves” and being “courageous, honest and credible.” It’s an idea that the military has long taught.

Recently, other business thinkers have taken up this mantle. Some focus on the “romance of leadership” theory, which causes us to inaccurately attribute all of an organization’s success and failure to its leader, ignoring its legions of followers. Adam Grant, who has written several books on what drives people to succeed, says that the most frequent question he gets from readers is how to contribute when they’re not in charge but have a suggestion and want to be heard. “These are not questions asked by leaders,” he told me. “They’re fundamental questions of followership.”

Team players are also crucial. My sons are avid soccer players, so I spend a lot of time watching the “beautiful game.” The thing that makes it beautiful is not leadership, though an excellent coach is essential. Nor is it the swoosh of the ball in the goal, though winning is noisily celebrated. It is instead the intricate ballet of patterns and passes, of each player anticipating the other’s strengths and needs, each shining for the brief instant that he has the ball before passing it to a teammate or losing it to an opponent.

We also rely as a society, much more deeply than we realize, on the soloists who forge their own paths. We see those figures in all kinds of pursuits: in the sciences; in sports like tennis, track and figure skating; and in the arts. Art and science are about many things that make life worth living, but they are not, at their core, about leadership. Helen Vendler, a professor of English at Harvard, published an essay in which she encouraged the university to attract more artists and not expect them “to become leaders.” Some of those students will become leaders in the arts, she wrote — conducting an orchestra, working to reinstate the arts in schools — “but one can’t quite picture Baudelaire pursuing public service.”

Perhaps the biggest disservice done by the outsize glorification of “leadership skills” is to the practice of leadership itself — it hollows it out, it empties it of meaning. It attracts those who are motivated by the spotlight rather than by the ideas and people they serve. It teaches students to be a leader for the sake of being in charge, rather than in the name of a cause or idea they care about deeply. The difference between the two states of mind is profound. The latter belongs to transformative leaders like the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. and Gandhi; the former to — well, we’ve all seen examples of this kind of leadership lately.

If this seems idealistic, consider the status quo: students jockeying for leadership positions as résumé padders. “They all want to be president of 50 clubs,” a faculty adviser at a New Jersey school told me. “They don’t even know what they’re running for.”

It doesn’t have to be this way.

What if we said to college applicants that the qualities we’re looking for are not leadership skills, but excellence, passion and a desire to contribute beyond the self? This framework would encompass exceptional team captains and class presidents. But it wouldn’t make leadership the be-all and end-all.

What if we said to our would-be leaders, “Take this role only if you care desperately about the issue at hand”?

And what if we were honest with ourselves about what we value? If we’re looking for the students and citizens most likely to attain wealth and power, let’s admit it. Then we can have a frank debate about whether that is a good idea.

But if instead we seek a society of caring, creative and committed people, and leaders who feel called to service rather than to stature, then we need to do a better job of making that clear."
susancain  leadership  leaders  sfsh  followers  community  courage  honesty  purpose  2017  colleges  universities  admissions  canon  small  slow  helenvendler  arts  art  artists  followership  soccer  football  us  values  credibility  military  authority  power  dominance  ivyleague  admission  capitalism  politics  elitism  adamgrant  introverts  extroverts  allsorts  attention  edg  srg  care  caring  maintenance  futbol  sports 
april 2017 by robertogreco
Ruth Asawa San Francisco School of the Arts - Wikipedia
[See also: http://www.sfsota.org/
https://sota-sfusd-ca.schoolloop.com/ ]

"The Ruth Asawa San Francisco School of the Arts (also known as SOTA) is a public arts high school in San Francisco, California, United States, which offers students an alternative college preparatory experience: a full academic curriculum complemented by a pre-professional arts training program in which students develop critical thinking and problem-solving skills. The creative community at SOTA is a socioeconomically and ethnically diverse population, representative of the celebrated diversity of San Francisco.

The Ruth Asawa San Francisco School of the Arts is the only San Francisco public high school with an audition process for admission. Prospective students can choose to apply to one of nine disciplines: Creative Writing, Dance, Instrumental Music (Band, Guitar, Orchestra, World Music), Media, Piano, Technical Theatre, Theatre, Visual, and Vocal (Classical Voice, Musical Theatre).

Students receive academic instruction in the morning and spend the balance of the day immersed in learning the essential skills and craft of their chosen area of creative study. The department directors have created an inspiring hands-on program that draws on the talents of over 66 Artists-in-Residence working in the broader arts community, recruited to support specific goals of each department’s curriculum. This unique teaching structure exposes students to fresh ideas and experiences, creating a learning environment where vision, creativity and passion are valued in the formation of the whole person.

SOTA ranks among the top public high schools in the district. Among the graduates pursuing higher education, 90% attend traditional colleges and universities; the remaining 10% choose to matriculate to art schools and conservatories. A number of SOTA alumni have gone on to attend the Juilliard School, Rhode Island School of Design, the Curtis School of Music, the Colburn School, Art Center College of Design, and numerous esteemed institutions for higher learning in the arts.

In 2010, the school was renamed the Ruth Asawa San Francisco School of the Arts in honor of Ruth Asawa.[1] In 2011, the school was recognized as a "California Distinguished School" by the California Department of Education as one of the state's most "exemplary and inspiring" public schools, demonstrating significant gains in narrowing the achievement gap among its students.[2]

Many programs that now benefit students across the Bay Area were launched at this school and continue to serve students throughout the entire Bay Area: Art and Film for Teenagers and Engineers Alliance for the Arts. The Ruth Asawa School of the Arts has an active PTSA. The Friends of SOTA Foundation is a 501(c)3 non-profit organization which manages the arts budgets and actively fundraises and provides support for the artists-in-residence and other programs, materials and equipment needed for the nine arts disciplines. The community is invited to attend school events - all are listed at sfsota.org. The school website sfsota.org lists recent news items and all upcoming performances and events. The school Facebook page is: Ruth Asawa San Francisco School of the Arts The school Twitter feed is: @ Ruth_Asawa_SOTA"
schools  sanfrancisco  ruthasawa  arts 
april 2016 by robertogreco
Room to Rise: The Lasting Impact of Intensive Teen Programs in Art Museums | Whitney Museum of American Art
"Explore findings from a groundbreaking research and evaluation initiative investigating the long-term impacts of museum programs for teens. Drawing on reflections and input from hundreds of program alumni across the United States, this study documents powerful effects on participants, including lasting engagement with arts and culture, significant personal and professional development, and increased leadership skills and civic engagement. 

ABOUT THE STUDY

Room to Rise is the result of a multi-year collaboration between the Whitney Museum of American Art, the Walker Art Center, the Contemporary Arts Museum Houston, and The Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles, with support from a National Leadership Grant from the federal Institute of Museum and Library Services. Each of the participating museums is home to a nationally recognized teen program that has operated continuously since the 1990s. These programs bring highly diverse urban youth together to work collaboratively with museum staff and artists, developing vibrant activities and events to engage teen audiences, from tours and exhibitions to performances and fashion shows. Lead Research Advisor Mary Ellen Munley and a network of critical friends and expert advisors guided this practitioner-driven research, which incorporates innovative arts-based methods. The study offers a detailed look at the lasting impact of these programs, and highlights key engagement strategies for educators.



PROJECT FINDINGS

Program participants reported that their experiences as teens in museums were transformational, shaping their adult lives in significant ways. This study traces a relationship between high impact engagement strategies, short-term outcomes, and long-lasting impacts for alumni, including:

Personal identity and self-knowledge
Lifelong relationship to museums and culture
Expanded career horizons
A worldview grounded in art
Community engagement and influence"
art  arteducation  research  teens  youth  via:caseygollan  moca  walkerartcenter  whitney  longterm  lcproject  openstudioproject  education  learning  identity  arts  culture  museums  slef-knowledge  community  2015  sfsh 
april 2016 by robertogreco
Place Lab
"A catalyst for mindful urban transformation and creative redevelopment for equitable and livable cities.

Place Lab is a team of professionals from the diverse fields of law, urban planning, architecture, design, social work, arts administration, and gender and cultural studies. The think tank is a partnership between Arts + Public Life, an initiative of UChicago Arts, and the Harris School of Public Policy. Led by renowned artist and University of Chicago faculty member Theaster Gates, this joint enterprise merges Chicago Harris’ Cultural Policy Center’s commitment to cultural policy and evidence-based analysis with Place Lab’s work at Arts + Public Life on arts- and culture-led neighborhood transformation.

Over the course of three years, the team works to document and demonstrate urban ethical redevelopment strategies initiated through arts and culture. Place Lab is based in Chicago, extending much of the team’s project management, design, programming, real estate, community building, and documentation acumen towards advancing arts and culture place-based projects on the mid-South Side of Chicago.

Place Lab observes the spaces that Gates reimagines, supports their programmatic activation, captures methods, and shares findings with the partnering demonstration cities of Gary, Akron, Detroit, and other Knight Communities. This work situates artists and creatives in conversations about the urban context. To effectuate policy change, Place Lab amplifies artistic innovators as civic leaders. In order for cities to develop in mindful and equitable ways, artists must be integrated into shaping neighborhoods and public spaces."
placelab  chicago  theastergates  urban  urbanism  architecture  urbanplanning  socialwork  art  arts  culture  cities  redevelopment  gary  detroit  akron  ohio  michigan  indiana 
february 2016 by robertogreco
The ArtScience Prize: Cloud Founation
[See also: http://www.yelp.com/biz/the-cloud-foundation-boston ]

"The Boston ArtScience Prize is a part of ArtScience Labs and is hosted by the Cloud Foundation. Our building is referred to as Cloud Place, or The Idea Translation Lab at Cloud Place.

The Mission

The Cloud Foundation aims to foster confidence and hope in urban teens through artistic creation and cross-cultural expression.

The History

From Science to Art: David and Aurélie Edwards created the Cloud Foundation in 1999 to provide opportunities for urban teens to create with passion across cultural boundaries, as they have since their own youths. Scientists, the Edwards’ chose to work through the arts, recognizing that very often, before ideas grow as science, they emerge as art the most natural language of youth. From 1999 to 2001 the Cloud Foundation provided grants to Boston-area nonprofits to support work arts programming for urban teens. From 2001 to 2004, the Cloud Foundation opened and established Cloud Place in Boston’s Copley Square as a venue for urban teens’ artistic development and expression. The Foundation continued in this era to provide grants to nonprofits throughout the city. From 2004 to 2009 the Cloud Foundation made Cloud Place the core of its cultural enrichment model.

Over these first ten years the Cloud Foundation, and its founders, pursued parallel activities in Paris, France, and at Harvard University. Each year urban teen artists traveled from Boston to Paris, and from Paris to Boston, where they explored the meaning of their art, and of their lives, across cultural boundaries. Urban teen artists also began working with university students and Harvard faculty to develop projects of greater and greater scope. These projects, like MuseTrek, often provided new and intriguing cross-cultural questions and barriers that became catalysts of learning and artistic expression.

From Art to Science: In 2007, with the opening of Le Laboratoire in Paris, France, and with the publication of David’s essay Artscience: Creativity in the Post-Google Generation (Harvard University Press 2008), David and Aurélie Edwards began to work with fellow Cloud Foundation board members Marti Wilson Taylor and Bob Carson to create a network of experimental idea development organizations, the international ArtScience Labs, through which opportunities for urban teens’ artistic creation and expression might grow even more beneficially across cultural boundaries. Integral to this reflection was the experience of the Idea Translation Lab at Harvard, created by David Edwards to accelerate student learning through idea creation and development, a process David calls “Idea Translation.” In 2009 the Idea Translation Lab at Harvard produced student ideas that led to new cultural exhibitions, new nonprofit organizations, and new companies, guided by the arts and reflecting ideas at the frontiers of science. The Idea Translation Lab now forms the core of The Laboratory at Harvard, which David Edwards opened in the University’s Northwest Building in November, 2009. With the launch of the ArtScience Prize in January 2009, the Cloud Foundation enters its second decade as a core partner of the ArtScience Lab, an international network of creative organizations which aims to expand access to the benefits of artistic creation and expression in Boston and other cities of the world.

The Idea Translation Lab
at Cloud Place

In its second decade, the Cloud Foundation now hosts the Idea Translation Lab at Cloud Place as an artistic learning and creation environment for Boston high school students, in support of the Boston ArtScience Prize. Through the Idea Translation Lab at Cloud Place participating Boston high school students work with professional artist mentors and teachers to develop their ideas within a curriculum that both reflects the practice of the Idea Translation Lab at Harvard and also is specially designed for urban teens, building on the Cloud Foundation’s last decade of rich experience in youth development and artistic creation."
cloudfoundation  art  openstudioproject  lcproject  arts  education  teens  youth  boston 
january 2016 by robertogreco
Learn By Painting - The New Yorker
"What made Black Mountain different from other colleges was that the center of the curriculum was art-making. Students studied pretty much whatever they wanted, but everyone was supposed to take a class in some kind of artistic practice—painting, weaving, sculpture, pottery, poetry, architecture, design, dance, music, photography. The goal was not to produce painters, poets, and architects. It was to produce citizens.

Black Mountain was founded by a renegade classics professor named John Andrew Rice, who had been kicked out of Rollins College, in Florida. Rice believed that making something is a different learning experience from remembering something. A lot of education is reception. You listen to an expert explain a subject to you, and then you repeat back what you heard to show that you learned it. Teachers push students to engage actively with the material, but it’s easy to be passive, to absorb the information and check off the box.

Rice thought that this made for bad social habits. Democracy is about making choices, and people need to take ownership of their choices. We don’t want to vote the way someone else tells us to. We want to vote based on beliefs we have chosen for ourselves. Making art is making choices. Art-making is practice democracy.

Rice did not think of art-making as therapy or self-expression. He thought of it as mental training. As anyone who has tried to write a poem knows, the discipline in art-making is exercised from within rather than without. You quickly realize that it’s your own laziness, ignorance, and sloppiness, not somebody else’s bad advice, that are getting in your way. No one can write your poem for you. You have to figure out a way to write it yourself. You have to make a something where there was a nothing.

A lot of Rice’s ideas came from the educational philosophy of John Dewey (although the idea that true learning has to come from within goes back to Plato), and Rice was lucky to find an art teacher who had read Dewey and who thought the same way. This was Josef Albers. Albers had not been so lucky. He was an original member of the Bauhaus school, but when Hitler came to power, in 1933, the Bauhaus closed down rather than accept Nazi professors. Albers’s wife, Anni, was from a prominent Jewish family, and they were understandably anxious to get out of Germany. Rice heard about them from the architect Philip Johnson, and he sent a telegram to Albers inviting him and his wife to come teach at Black Mountain. The reply read: “I speak not one word English.” (Albers had read his Dewey in translation.) Rice told him to come anyway. Albers eventually did learn English, and he and Anni, an accomplished and creative weaver, established the mode of art instruction at Black Mountain. Everything would be hands-on, collaborative, materials-based, and experimental.

Bauhaus was all about abolishing distinctions between craft, or design, and fine art, and Black Mountain was one of the places where this aesthetic entered the world of American art. (Another was the Carnegie Institute of Technology, in Pittsburgh, where Andy Warhol went to college.) Albers’s most famous (although probably not his favorite) student at Black Mountain was Robert Rauschenberg, and Rauschenberg is the presiding spirit at the I.C.A. exhibition. Although goofier than most Black Mountain art—there is an earnestness about a lot of the work; this was schoolwork, after all—putting an automobile tire around a stuffed goat is the essence of Black Mountain practice.

Black Mountain College was a holistic learning environment. Teachers and students worked together; people who came to teach (and who stayed—not everyone found the work conditions to their liking) sat in on one another’s classes and ended up learning as much as the students. When a new building needed to be constructed, students and teachers built it themselves, just as, at the old Dewey School, at the University of Chicago, the children grew their own food and cooked their own meals.

It seems as though half the midcentury American avant-garde came through Black Mountain in one capacity or the other. The I.C.A. exhibition includes works by (besides Rauschenberg and the Alberses) Ruth Asawa, John Cage, John Chamberlain, Robert Creeley, Merce Cunningham, Elaine and Willem de Kooning, Robert Duncan, Buckminster Fuller, Shoji Hamada, Lou Harrison, Ray Johnson, Franz Kline, Jacob Lawrence, Robert Motherwell, Kenneth Noland, Charles Olson, Ben Shahn, David Tudor, and Cy Twombly. Black Mountain produced art of almost every kind.

Did it also produce good citizens? That’s an educational outcome everyone embraces but that’s hard to measure. In the case of Black Mountain, the sample size is miniscule, and most students left before graduating. There is also the self-selection issue. People who choose to attend progressive colleges are already progressive-minded, just as people who want a liberal education are usually already liberal (meaning interested in knowledge for its own sake), and people who prefer vocational or pre-professional education are already headed down those roads. College choice tends to confirm prior effects of socialization. But why keep those things separate? Knowing and doing are two sides of the same activity, which is adapting to our environment. That was Dewey’s point.

People who teach in the traditional liberal-arts fields today are sometimes aghast at the avidity with which undergraduates flock to courses in tech fields, like computer science. Maybe those students see dollar signs in coding. Why shouldn’t they? Right now, tech is where value is being created, as they say. But maybe students are also excited to take courses in which knowing and making are part of the same learning process. Those tech courses are hands-on, collaborative, materials-based (well, virtual materials), and experimental—a digital Black Mountain curriculum. The other liberal-arts fields might take notice. Arts practice should be part of everyone’s education, not just in preschool."
blackmountaincollege  bmc  2015  louismenand  johndewey  democracy  practice  experience  education  tcsnmy  progressive  progressivism  art  arts  highered  highereducation  collectivism  learning  unschooling  deschooling  bauhaus  johnandrewrice  making  creativity  josefalbers  annialbers  craft  design  robertrauschenberg  collaboration  ruthasawa  johncage  mercecunningham  buckminsterfuller  willemdekooning  robertduncan  johnchamberlain  robertcreeley  shojihamada  louharrison  rayjohnson  franzkline  jacoblawrence  robertmotherwell  charlesolson  benshahn  davidtudor  cytwombly  kennethnoland  elainedekooning  liberalarts  technology 
november 2015 by robertogreco
CLASS DISMISSED: A ROUNDTABLE ON ART SCHOOL, USC, AND COOPER UNION by Sarah Lehrer-Graiwer, Helen Molesworth, Mike Essl, Jory Rabinovitz, Lee Relvas, Amanda Ross-Ho, Victoria Sobel, Frances Stark, A. L. Steiner, Charlie White - artforum.com / in print
[via: https://twitter.com/CaseyG/status/652215259235807232 ]

"IN AN ERA when creative economies are leading the hypermonetization of every aspect of life, from attention and identity to privacy and time, it’s not surprising that this country’s most progressive models of art education are under attack. In fact, the liberal arts and humanities are besieged across the board, increasingly expected to justify their funding, even their very existence, in universities and beyond. We are witnessing a massive cultural shift when we see the corporatization of higher education—with its top-down power structures, bloated bureaucracies, “synergistic” partnerships with the private sector, relegation of faculty to contingent adjunct labor, and reliance on students as revenue streams—spiking tuition costs and sending student debt ballooning.

All this has come dramatically to a head this past year on both coasts, at the Cooper Union for the Advancement of Science and Art in New York and the University of Southern California’s Roski School of Art and Design in Los Angeles. It is sadly predictable and all the more alarming that the ever-accelerating process of financialization should upend two of the most vital art schools in America, each of which has been based on the endangered premise of a tuition-free or fully funded education. While the specific circumstances and institutional histories make the nature of each crisis distinct, they both betray the wrenching cultural shifts produced by a head-on collision with the technocratic crusaders of contemporary capitalism.

Following its board of directors’ decision to abandon Cooper Union’s tuition-free mandate, which had stood for more than 150 years, the school’s president and five trustees resigned amid an ongoing inquiry into the institution’s finances by the New York State Attorney General. The grassroots Committee to Save Cooper Union has taken legal action to preserve the venerable institution’s founding mission of free education, and to call attention to the fiscal mismanagement and lack of accountability on the part of the school’s board of trustees. [Eds. note: As this issue was going to press, the Attorney General announced that a settlement had been reached and that Cooper Union would work to eventually reinstate free tuition.] At USC Roski, the drastic restructuring and reduction in funding for the school’s renowned graduate program by a new dean’s administration prompted high-profile, tenured faculty to resign in protest and the entire MFA class of 2016 to drop out en masse earlier this year, citing unacceptable changes to funding packages, curriculum, and faculty.

Debates over art education have a long history, of course. A groundbreaking and utopian model that remains relevant today is Black Mountain College, which nurtured cultural and pedagogical innovation at mid-century and which is the subject of a major exhibition at the Institute of Contemporary Art, Boston, opening on October 10. Artforum invited the show’s curator, HELEN MOLESWORTH, to join eight distinguished participants—from Cooper, faculty MIKE ESSL and alumni JORY RABINOVITZ and VICTORIA SOBEL; and from USC Roski, current or former faculty members FRANCES STARK, CHARLIE WHITE, and A. L. STEINER; alumna AMANDA ROSS-HO; and LEE RELVAS, one of the seven class-of-2016 students who dropped out—to discuss the current situation at both institutions and the histories, challenges, and continued promise of art school."



"HELEN MOLESWORTH: We’ve convened today to talk about the current crises at USC and Cooper, both of which are symptoms of larger problems facing the entire concept of art education in this country. And for many schools today, Black Mountain College remains a key model for art education after World War II.

In the face of this crisis, Black Mountain is even more relevant to the current situation than one might think: It was a program born of extraordinary optimism, but it was also born of dissent, born of a firing of tenured faculty, born of a group of teachers and students deciding that they needed to own the means of production themselves and create an institution in which there were no trustees or board of regents, so they could collectively control the college. It had an extraordinary efflorescence and was a wellspring of the American avant-garde; the curriculum at BMC influenced many of the practices that define contemporary studio and liberal-arts programs—group critiques, collaboration, interdisciplinarity. It also failed beautifully and wonderfully and spectacularly at its end: It was short-lived, running only from 1933 to 1957.

Which leads me to the most basic and perhaps the most unanswerable question: Why now? Why are extremely successful, renowned arts-education departments on both coasts under attack in the way that they are at Cooper and USC? Are they—and Black Mountain—anomalies, experiments that could never last? Or are they victims of some of the nastiest tactics of our neoliberal new economy?"



"LEE RELVAS: I’m one of the seven MFA students who just dropped out from USC. We dropped out collectively to protest the school’s reneging on funding and curricular promises made to us, because that funding model and pedagogical model were clearly no longer considered valuable under the new dean’s leadership. But we also wanted to protest publicly the economics of higher education: namely, the normalization of massive student debt.

We range in age from twenty-seven to forty-one years old. So we actually did know what we were getting into as far as the debt that we thought we were going to be taking on, as well as the lack of teaching opportunities, and if we were so lucky to get a teaching job, how little most of those teaching jobs paid.

But we still wanted two years of time and space to be artists and thinkers and to be in close conversation with each other. And outside these flawed institutions, there is little material and cultural support for that."



"HELEN MOLESWORTH: In New York, do you have a similar sense that the faculty and the students at Cooper were unable to articulate the value of free tuition to the board?

MIKE ESSL: I think we did articulate it but we weren’t heard, and it was all the more disturbing to me because of my own personal understanding of that value. My dad is a mechanic and my mom is a bookkeeper. They didn’t go to college and they didn’t save for college, and me going to college was just never on their radar. And Cooper Union gave me permission to go to art school. Without that freedom, without being able to tell my parents essentially to fuck off, I don’t know where I would be now. [Laughter.]

And what that does for, say, a lower-middle-class student, that permission, the way it lowers the risk of art school and allows you to even conceive of going, is something that the board of trustees did not care about at all.

We would hear about how the cost of teaching artists is too expensive and that when artists graduate they don’t donate, and there was really no consideration of the artist as a person in the world at all. And so for those people to be the board members of a school like Cooper Union, I would argue, is criminal. They just refused to hear any arguments.

JORY RABINOVITZ: There was no dialogue, no transparency. There was never any mention of charging tuition while I was at Cooper. I started when the demolition of the Abram S. Hewitt Memorial art building, and the construction of the new Thom Mayne–designed academic center, 41 Cooper Square, in its place, was just beginning. The three-year transition phase completely displaced the art school and literally split it in two, sending half of the classes and studios to a rented building in Long Island City. Since the art school donated the least and protested the most, it really felt like we were being singled out to receive this weird form of punishment or austerity measure. Many of the school’s questionable financial decisions that are currently under investigation happened at the very same time. So when I look at the new building, it’s hard not to see a big perforated smoke screen.

MIKE ESSL: They showed up at the table already having decided that our model was old-fashioned and could no longer be supported. Which is why we have been saying all along that it’s a cultural problem, not an economic one."



"A. L. STEINER: Eighty percent of USC’s faculty is now adjunct and contingent. This is part of an ideology of austerity being embraced at the school, even though its undergraduate program ranks sixteenth in tuition nationwide and the university is one of twenty schools nationwide responsible for one-fifth of the country’s graduate-school student debt. The dean’s thinking came down to a gamble—that the graduate faculty’s interactions, and the program’s funding and curricular promises, were unnecessary. There’s a bigger agenda in play, and it’s intertwined with the value and significance of an arts education in a technocratic regime, in a world where the nonprofit sector exists as a manifestation of the private sector."



"FRANCES STARK: But you have to consider that in context. I was on the search committee for the new dean in the spring of 2013, and the problem of financial sustainability was not explicitly on the table when we were interviewing candidates. The entire process seemed perfunctory: It became clear that the interim dean was the internal candidate they wanted, and who, it was later disclosed, was somehow attached to the $70 million gift from Jimmy Iovine and Dr. Dre to endow a new school of “Art, Technology and the Business of Innovation” at USC. Erica Muhl, who became dean, has zero background in contemporary fine art, design, or art history. She is not conversant with these fields at all. I asked her, “What is your vision for the school?” And she responded, “To be number one.” No joke. OK? She told the graduate students: “The future of art is Mark Zuckerberg… [more]
cooperunion  blackmountaincollege  usc  art  arteducation  education  highered  highereducation  helenmolesworth  mikeessl  joryrabinovitz  leerelvas  amandaross-ho  victoriasobel  francesstark  alsteiner  charliewhite  sarahlehrer-graiwer  via:caseygollan  activism  neoliberalism  capitalism  politics  conversation  proximity  ambiguity  joy  meritocracy  organizations  institutions  bmc  arts  humanities  schools  tcsnmy  progressive  technocracy  artseducation  culture  thinking  optimism  bauhaus  calarts  community  pedagogy  teaching  learning  howweteach  howwelearn 
october 2015 by robertogreco
Beats and Rhymes
"Beats & Rhymes was founded in 2007 at the Nellie Stone Johnson Beacons Center in Minneapolis, Minnesota. Shortly after the program was founded, the YMCA received a grant from Best Buy to fund this new venture. Its purpose was to provide school-age kids the chance to experience making and recording music in a way they could relate to. Each student has to complete their homework in order to participate in the after-school program. It was designed to provide challenging, positive youth and career development opportunities for low income, culturally-diverse youth.

The Beats & Rhymes program has produced and released 8 albums with the various groups it has developed. The NSJ Crew, consisting of just students from Nellie Stone Johnson Community School, was the first group to form. In 2010, the program expanded with the Y.N.RichKids (“Why enrich kids?”) at the North Community YMCA Youth & Teen Enrichment Center where it was able to include kids from many schools around the neighborhood, as well as high school kids. More groups are being developed at Lucy Laney Community School, among many others.

Beats & Rhymes is used as a vehicle to help young people more fully develop their writing, technical, business, academic and social skills. The program uses positive youth development principles and project-based learning to promote leadership skills and cultural tolerance. They teach youth technology skills in the area of music production and engineering.

The mission of Beats & Rhymes is to provide schools and community centers with the knowledge and resources they need to implement their own successful program, and subsequent music group. If you are interested in doing this for your own program, please visit the EDUCATION section."

[See also:

Y.N.RichKids
http://ynrichkids.com/

“My Bike” - Y.N.RichKids
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_rSH5K5LlE8

“Hot Cheetos & Takis” - Y.N.RichKids
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7YLy4j8EZIk

“Khaki Pants” - The NSJ Crew
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rQDN9j_kKV0

“Honor Roll” - The NSJ Crew
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=G8rueZBNkXI

“The Granddaddy” - Y.N.RichKids
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qtft8dGdBlo ]
minneapolis  arts  education  music  writing  lcproject  openstudioproject  youth  technology  minnesota 
april 2015 by robertogreco
VINCIANE DESPRET: Lecture (part 1 of 2) - YouTube
"WHERE ARE WE GOING, WALT WHITMAN?

An ecosophical roadmap for artists and other futurists

Conference -- festival that took place from 12--15 March, 2013 at the Gerrit Rietveld Academie in Amsterdam.

Gabriëlle Schleijpen, head of Studium Generale Rietveld Academie invited Anselm Franke, Binna Choi, Carolyn Christof - Bakargiev, Natasha Ginwala and Vivian Ziherl to each inaugurate a discursive and performative program of one day.

Friday March 15

POIESIS OF WORLDING

Bringing together research, art, and various approaches and concerns relating to ecology, artist Ayreen Anastas, author, researcher, organiser of events and exhibitions, Carolyn Christov-Bakargiev, writer, philosopher and ethologist Vinciane Despret, artist Rene Gabri, artist and rural sociologist Fernando García-Dory and interdisciplinary artist Marcos Lutyens explored collectively what a 'poiesis of worlding' could involve. What could be a process of re-apprehending and re-animating worlds which our current systems of knowledge and understanding exclude? And how do such foreclosures relate to some of the most pressing challenges of our time? Departing from a lecture program by playing with predefined lecture protocols and later opening a space for shared doing-thinking, the day's journey was split into two parts which were sewn together by a collective hypnosis.

http://wherearewegoingwaltwhitman.rietveldacademie.nl/
http://gerritrietveldacademie.nl/en/ "

[part 2: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vD77gU0XjMk]
vincianedespret  animals  storytelling  2013  via:anne  ethology  ecosophy  perspective  science  pov  multispecies  empathy  knowing  waysofknowing  waltwhitman  agency  poiesis  worlding  interdisciplinary  art  arts  ayreenanastas  meaning  meaningmaking  carolynchristov-bakargiev  perception  renegabri  fernandogarcía-dory  marcoslutyens  knowledge  future  futurism  human-animalrelations  human-animalrelationships  worldbuilding  being  feeling  seeing  constructivism  richarddawkins  theselfishgene 
march 2015 by robertogreco
Antennae: The Journal of Nature in Visual Culture
[via Anne Galloway re Spring 2015 issue (#31): Multispecies Intra-action]

"Antennae is a quarterly journal that invites participation in the animal studies debate by reframing mainstream perspectives on animals and humanism.

Antennae: The Journal of Nature in Visual Culture, was founded in September 2006 by Giovanni Aloi, a London-based lecturer in history of art and media studies. The Journal combines a heightened level of academic scrutiny of animals in visual culture, with a less formal and more experimental format designed to cross the boundaries of academic knowledge, in order to appeal to diverse audiences including artists and the general public alike.

Over its eight years of activity, Antennae has become an influential resource of academic relevance within the fast growing field of animal and environmental studies, acting as receiver and amplifier of relevant topics, as expressed by the connections between the subject of nature and the multidisciplinary field of visual culture. It grants wide accessibility to innovative and original academic material, providing a platform for an inclusive dialogue between a range of theorists, practitioners, and international audiences. It provides international exposure to contributors and artists in order to open the dialogue to a broader range of audience, and effectively supports the development of animal and environmental studies networks around the world by capitalising on a vast network of Global Contributors reporting from countries currently underrepresented in the animal and environmental studies debate.

The Journal contributes to raising awareness of the issues involved in the representation of the natural world in visual culture in order to open to reconsideration past and current approaches and methodologies, whilst informing artists’ work and establishing a dialogue between theoretical and practical spheres.



Antennae is currently recruiting a Team of Global Contributors to keep the journal informed with local realities concerning visual cultures and animals from around the world.



Antennae is curating submissions for upcoming issues focusing on the following topics:

• Animals/Nature and Film
• Bacteria
• Art and the Future of
Environmentalism/Conservationism
• Spiders and Animal Structures
• Animals and Sculpture
• Animals and Performance
• Animals and Photography

Submissions are open to visual arts, academic and non-academic texts."
animals  art  arts  nature  journals  multispecies  human-animalrelations  human-animalrelationships  animalstudies  humanism  posthumanism 
march 2015 by robertogreco
FIELD | A Journal of Socially-Engaged Art Criticism
"FIELD: A Journal of Socially-Engaged Art Criticism

We are living through a singular cultural moment in which the conventional relationship between art and the social world, and between artist and viewer, is being questioned and renegotiated. FIELD responds to the remarkable proliferation of new artistic practices devoted to forms of political, social and cultural transformation. Frequently collaborative in nature, this work is being produced by artists and art collectives throughout North, South and Central America, Europe, Africa and Asia. While otherwise quite diverse, it is driven by a common desire to establish new relationships between artistic practice and other fields of knowledge production, from urbanism to environmentalism, from experimental education to participatory design. In many cases it has been inspired by, or affiliated with, new movements for social and economic justice around the globe. Throughout this field of practice we see a persistent engagement with sites of resistance and activism, and a desire to move beyond existing definitions of both art and the political. The title of this journal reflects two main concerns. First, it indicates our interest in a body of artistic production that engages the broadest possible range of social forces, actors, discursive systems and physical conditions operating at a given site. And second, it signals a concern with the questions that these projects raise about the “proper” field of art itself, as it engages with other disciplines and other modes of cultural production.

How do these practices redefine our understanding of aesthetic experience? And how do they challenge preconceived notions of the “work” of art? For many in the mainstream art world this opening out is evidence of a dangerous promiscuity, which threatens to subsume the unique identity of art. As a result this work has been largely ignored by the most visible journals and publications in the field. At the same time, an often-problematic concept of “social engagement” has become increasingly fashionable among many museums and foundations in Europe and the United States. There is clearly a need for a more intelligent and nuanced analysis of this new tendency. However, it has become increasingly clear that the normative theoretical conventions and research methodologies governing contemporary art criticism are ill-equipped to address the questions raised by this work. FIELD is based on the belief that informed analysis of this practice requires the cultivation of new forms of interdisciplinary knowledge, and a willingness to challenge the received wisdom of contemporary art criticism and theory. We seek to open a dialogue among and between artists, activists, historians, curators, and critics, as well as researchers in fields such as philosophy, performance studies, urbanism, ethnography, sociology, political science, and education. To that end the journal’s editorial board will include a diverse range of scholars, artists, historians, curators, activists and researchers. It is our belief that it is only at the intersections of these disciplines that can we develop a deeper understanding of the cultural transformations unfolding around us.

–Grant Kester, founder and editor, FIELD


FIELD Editorial Board

Tania Bruguera is an artist and the founder of Immigrant Movement International. Her most recent project is The Museum of Arte Útil.
Teddy Cruz is Professor of Public Culture and Urbanism in the Visual Arts department at the University of California San Diego, and Director of the UCSD Center for Urban Ecologies.
Tom Finkelpearl is the Commissioner of Cultural Affairs for New York City and the editor of What We Made: Conversations on Art and Social Cooperation (Duke University Press, 2013).
Fonna Forman is Associate Professor of Political Science, founding co-director of the UCSD Center on Global Justice and author of Adam Smith and the Circles of Sympathy: Cosmopolitanism and Moral Theory (Cambridge University Press, 2009).
Dee Hibbert-Jones is Associate Professor of Art and Founder and Co-Director of the Social Practice Research Center at UC Santa Cruz.
Shannon Jackson is the Richard and Rhoda Goldman Chair in the Arts and Humanities at UC Berkeley and author of Social Works: Performing Art, Supporting Publics (Routledge 2011).
Michael Kelly is professor of philosophy at the University of North Carolina, Charlotte, author of A Hunger for Aesthetics: Enacting the Demands of Art (Columbia University Press, 2012) and editor of the Oxford Encyclopedia of Aesthetics.
Grant Kester, Field editor and founder, is professor of art history at UCSD and author of The One and the Many: Contemporary Collaborative Art in a Global Context (Duke University Press, 2011).
Rick Lowe is an artist, founder of Project Row Houses in Houston, and member of the National Council on the Arts.
George Marcus is the Director of the Center for Ethnography and Chancellor’s Professor and chair of the department of anthropology at UC Irvine, and author of Ethnography Through Thick and Thin (Princeton University Press, 1998).
Paul O’Neill is the Director of the Graduate Program, Center for Curatorial Studies, Hessel Museum of Art, Bard College, New York.
Raúl Cárdenas Osuna is an artist, theorist, and the founder of Torolab collective and the Transborder Farmlab in Tijuana, Mexico.
Francesca Polletta is Professor of Sociology at UC Irvine and author of It Was Like a Fever: Storytelling in Protest and Politics (University of Chicago Press, 2006).
Greg Sholette is an activist, artist and professor in the Social Practice Queens program at Queens College and the author of Dark Matter: Art and Politics in the Age of Enterprise Culture (Pluto Press, 2011).
Nato Thompson is Chief Curator, Creative Time, New York City and editor of Living as Form: Socially Engaged Art from 1991-2011 (MIT Press, 2012).

FIELD Editorial Collective

Paloma Checa-Gismero
Alex Kershaw
Noni Brynjolson
Stephanie Sherman
Julia Fernandez
Michael Ano

Thanks

FIELD would like to acknowledge the generous support of the University of California Institute for Research in the Arts (UCIRA), the UCSD Division of Arts and Humanities, and the UCSD Visual Arts department."
ucsd  art  criticism  artcriticism  grantkester  taniabruguera  teddycruz  tomfinkelpearl  fonnaforman  deehibbert-jones  shannonjackson  michaelkelly  ricklowe  georgemarcus  paulo'neill  raúlcárdenasosuna  francescapolletta  gregsholette  natothompson  palomacheca-gismero  alexkershaw  nonibrynjolson  stephaniesherman  juliafernandez  michaelano  ucira  socialpracticeart  knowledgeproduction  urbanism  environmentalism  2015  education  alterative  experimental  participatorydesign  design  participatory  glvo  via:javierarbona  politics  arts  culturalproduction  aesthetics  socialengagement  museums  interdisciplinary  ethnography  sociology  philosophy 
march 2015 by robertogreco
PAWA254 | ArtRising
"PAWA254 is Nairobi's unique social enterprise through which innovative professionals from diverse artistic fields exploit their creative genius to foster social change. Among the creatives who collaborate in this dynamic space are photographers, graphic artists, journalists, musicians and poets. Significantly, promising youths are invited, both to make their contribution in this informal powerhouse and to receive mentorship from the experts. The end result of the PAWA254 collaborative effort is work that is as inspiring as it is far-reaching simply, work of unparalleled social impact. The PAWA254 hub houses, fosters, and catalyzes creative and community-driven projects for social change across Kenya. It is the first of its kind in Africa.

The Message

Used together as PAWA254, the words convey the message Power Kenya, and symbolize national strength and unity in a context of devotion to Kenya, a once-peaceful nation that almost went to ruin with the post-2007 election-related violence. But there is an interesting twist to the PAWA254 story: usage of the slang term Pawa captures the colloquial, informal nature of the limited company PAWA254 which seeks innovation in a casual and relaxed creative office environment. Here, there is little room left for the usual, stiff formalities of a traditional office setting.

The two-wing PAWA254 hub facilitates use of visual and graphic arts, independent and citizen journalism, documentary film and photography, as well as digital and social media as means of civic expression and social action.

To meet its objectives, the hub facility brings together established and aspiring photographers, cartoonists, animators, creative designers, videographers and filmmakers, as well as entrepreneurs and activists, to work, learn, and share in an environment that inspires creativity and innovative effort, the ultimate aim being to facilitate social change.

How It Works

PAWA254′s community of like-minded and active professionals meets and works daily in its flexible co-working space. This space also serves as an open resource for a range of collaborative youth meetings and efforts, and as an exhibition centre for photography and journalism, among other artistic endeavours.

The space is a haven for investors and others seeking to support social change in Kenya. Regular programmes and training sessions foster skill-sharing and empower a new generation of young professionals and disadvantaged youth to effect social change through tangible, innovative projects.

Primary programmatic focus is on photography and visual arts, documentary and mixed media, traditional and citizen journalism, as well as community organizing. Regular training programmes, workshops, clinics, and photography salons at the space are free of charge and are open to the public. The space is also available for rental to entrepreneurial creatives who seek state-of-the-art conferencing facilities in an atmosphere that is easy and amazingly hospitable.

Pawa254 Programs and Events

A principal part of Pawa254’s mission has been to make the space and its resources accessible to persons at the grassroots level. Besides building a strong community in-house, PAWA254 has engaged more than 100,000 youths since its inception. This has been achieved through training sessions and diverse outreach programs. We continue to recruit, train, and equip a new generation of bold creative’s whose outlook will help reshape the media landscape in Kenya, the aim of impacting society positively through the arts. At the heart of the PAWA254 undertaking is improvement of the socioeconomic situation of youth from underprivileged backgrounds. Also, for self-motivated youths, participation in our training sessions and workshops leads to professional employment, and can be a spur to fruitful self-employment. Here is an inventory of the programs hosted at the PAWA254 hub:"

[See also: https://www.youtube.com/user/PAWA254TV/ ]
pawa254  kenya  nairobi  africa  socialchange  lcproject  openstudioproject  mentoring  collaboration  community  communities  creativity  art  arts  photography  journalism  bonifacemwangi  coworking 
january 2015 by robertogreco
- High school never worked very well….We’ve got...
"High school never worked very well… We’ve got overripe young people confined in an artificial, age-segregated environment without sufficient employment or stimulation. Adolescence is the time when students could and should be excited about and engaged by the arts, music, books, ideas, and meaningful work—and yet that is not happening. The important thing is that they should be engaged in serious, meaningful activity that would be more connected to real life and to adults of different ages than is the ‘sealed-off’ world of high school"
- @Leon Botstein
highschool  agesegregation  adolescence  2014  leonbotstein  education  employment  music  arts  meaning  meaningmaking 
december 2014 by robertogreco
THE CHAGALL POSITION: Tidy Words & the End of the World: LeRoi Jones Reads a New Yorker Poem
"Baraka nails the essential quality of the New Yorker poem in a compact formulation: a carefully put-together exercise published as high poetic art. And when it comes to literary standards nothing has changed in the half century plus since the poet shed tears over that alienating poem – New Yorker still puts a premium on carefully put-together exercises that it publishes as high poetic art. This is just as true of the magazine’s fiction, which represents the “quality” apogee of the MFA cookie-cutter “epiphany story.” Wrapped up in tidy packages of psychological realism, these stories reflect the spurious “humanism” of the liberal professional-managerial class that is really a form of fatuous, self-congratulatory narcissism and an apologetics for a racist, imperialist, and exploitative status quo. Such work is “well-crafted,” meticulous, careful, “clean,” and absolutely risk free – the literary equivalent of a gentrified neighborhood. It’s a neighborhood (Baraka even calls it, perceptively, a “place”) where people like the aspiring Black writer are not welcome, where they are the excluded Other.

In the yearning for social mobility that painfully inflects his response, the young poet of the autobiography implicitly realizes how this “high poetic art” functions as a marker of status, what Pierre Bourdieu calls “distinction.” New Yorker verse and fiction are indeed high-end consumer commodities, of a piece with the tailored clothes, pricey jewelry, and haute cuisine dining spots that share its pages. It’s a cultural “address”, but – as commentators such as Sharon Zukin and David Harvey have shown – one that is eminently available to be cross-mapped onto real space, in urban neighborhoods across the US and around the globe.


One way that this type of “cultural address” manifests itself in the contemporary urban arena is the phenomenon of “cultural districts,” specially designated clusters of arts and humanities venues which then become the focus of public-private investment partnerships. There are many such districts in Massachusetts already, including two here in Boston, the Fenway Cultural District and the new Boston Literary District. According to the Massachusetts Cultural Council, the state body that awards such designations, the ultimate goal of cultural districts is “enhancing property values and making communities more attractive” – i.e., gentrification."



"Social exclusion and symbolic violence inflict real damage and pain, the pain of marginality, invisibility, and muteness – cultural apartheid. It is precisely the type of pain that Amiri Baraka’s younger self experienced while reading that New Yorker poem. The passage from Baraka’s autobiography struck me because I encountered it at the very time I was writing about the Boston Book Festival’s failure, for the fifth year in a row, to select a local African American or Latina/o author for their flagship “One City One Story” program. One of the “Executive Partners” in organizing the Boston Literary District, the BBF states that this citywide “Big Read” event is supposed to promote literacy and “create a community around a shared reading experience.” Yet what kind of community are they creating? Boston is at least 42% Black and Latina/o, but in the 5 years of One City One Story’s existence they’ve chosen 4 white authors and 1 Asian-American author. The stories themselves, moreover, are very much of the same “carefully constructed exercises” (white and uptight) that continue to be published “as high poetic art” in the New Yorker.

I wonder how many minority youth in Dorchester, Roxbury, and Mattapan were assigned the book festival’s 2014 offering, Jennifer Haigh’s “Sublimation,” in their high school English classes. No doubt they were exhorted that they were participating in civic life, and that the story’s values and outlook were somehow “universal” and relevant to their own experience. And no doubt that many of them felt the same confusion and shame and anger that LeRoi Jones felt reading that New Yorker poem in San Juan over a half century ago.

I hope none of them shed tears over it, though – the story wasn’t worth it."

[via: http://botpoet.tumblr.com/post/103457338970/wrapped-up-in-tidy-packages-of-psychological ]
amiribaraka  leroijones  newyorker  mfa  writing  realism  narcissism  racism  imperialism  statusquo  gentrification  literature  edmondcaldwell  socialmobility  commodities  consumerism  mainstream  elitism  culture  sharonzukin  davidharvey  arts  art  humanities  marginality  invisibility  muteness  culturalapartheid  race  homogeneity  2014 
november 2014 by robertogreco
Arts Online
"Arts Online is the key communication network and quality resource portal for New Zealand arts education."

[Visual arts: http://artsonline.tki.org.nz/Visual-Arts ]
nezealand  arteducation  education  arts  art  teaching  schools 
august 2014 by robertogreco
How we teach the arts is as important as the fact we're doing it | Zurich School Competition | Guardian Professional
"I think we should be cautious about the claims we make for the arts in education. We need to make sure that how we do the art is as important as the fact that we're doing it. After all, it's quite possible to do arts in education in ways which, say, undermine children. For instance, it's quite possible to be authoritarian and dictatorial while doing the arts – and more often than not this will teach children that they should just obey orders or that the arts are about being bossy or snooty.

For practitioners of all kinds, I've sketched out a checklist, as much for myself as others, to keep in mind how best to ensure that arts in education is worthwhile for all.

Children and young people involved in the arts should:

1) have a sense of ownership and control in the process;

2) have a sense of possibility, transformation and change – that the process is not closed with pre-planned outcomes;

3) feel safe in the process, and know that no matter what they do, they will not be exposed to ridicule, relentless testing, or the fear of being wrong;

4) feel the process can be individual, co-operative or both;

5) feel there is a flow between the arts, that they are not boxed off from each other;

6) feel they are working in an environment that welcomes their home cultures, backgrounds, heritages and languages;

7) feel that what they are making or doing matters – that the activity has status within the school and beyond;

8) be encouraged and enabled to find audiences for their work;

9) be exposed to the best practice and the best practitioners possible;

10) be encouraged to think of the arts as including or involving investigation, invention, discovery, play and co-operation and to think that these happen within the actual doing, but also in the talk, commentary and critical dialogue that goes on around the activity itself.

As young people work, they will find their minds, bodies and materials changing. As agents of that change, they will inevitably change themselves. They will find out things about themselves as individuals – where they come from, how they co-exist with people and places around them – and they will pick up (or create) clues about where they are heading. They will also find new ways to talk about the arts. Demystifying them, if you like.

I believe that if we set out the stall for the arts in this way, we won't find ourselves trying to advocate a particular art form – say, painting – for what are deemed to be its intrinsic civilising qualities. Instead, we will be calling for a set of humane and democratic educational practices for which the arts provide an amenable home."
art  arts  arteducation  pedagogy  curriculum  teaching  howweteach  michaelrosen  2014  investigation  invention  discovery  play  cooperation  freedom  autonomy  ownership  process  control  education 
july 2014 by robertogreco
Donna Haraway, "Anthropocene, Capitalocene, Chthulucene: Staying with the Trouble", 5/9/14 on Vimeo
[transcript: http://opentranscripts.org/transcript/anthropocene-capitalocene-chthulucene/ ]

"Anthropocene, Capitalocene, Chthulucene: Staying with the Trouble

Sympoiesis, not autopoiesis, threads the string figure game played by Terran critters. Always many-stranded, SF is spun from science fact, speculative fabulation, science fiction, and, in French, soin de ficelles (care of/for the threads). The sciences of the mid-20th-century “new evolutionary synthesis” shaped approaches to human-induced mass extinctions and reworldings later named the Anthropocene. Rooted in units and relations, especially competitive relations, these sciences have a hard time with three key biological domains: embryology and development, symbiosis and collaborative entanglements, and the vast worlds of microbes. Approaches tuned to “multi-species becoming with” better sustain us in staying with the trouble on Terra. An emerging “new new synthesis” in trans-disciplinary biologies and arts proposes string figures tying together human and nonhuman ecologies, evolution, development, history, technology, and more. Corals, microbes, robotic and fleshly geese, artists, and scientists are the dramatis personae in this talk’s SF game."
donnaharaway  2014  anthropocene  capitalocene  chthulucene  lichen  ursulaleguin  sciencefiction  multispecies  symbiosis  life  biology  collaboration  reworlding  speculativefiction  soindeficelles  sympoiesis  autopoiesis  synthesus  transdisciplinary  art  arts  glvo  ecologies  ecology  evolution  development  history  technology  humans  coral  corals  microbes  robots  animals  scottgilbert 
july 2014 by robertogreco
Theaster Gates Sessions now posted onto New School’s YouTube channel
"as promised, we finally got all of the clearances to post the sessions and forums pertaining to Theaster Gates’ residency.

Here is a short Highlight clip: http://youtu.be/xCnDtYMuAUw

And here are the remaining YouTube links:

Session 1 – http://youtu.be/ZtQVNsy2630
Session 2 – http://youtu.be/tyiEaQex4XA
Session 3 – http://youtu.be/BvCO1ybgZ-Q
Session 4 – http://youtu.be/PFrEWOKTGdA

Day 2, Part 1 – http://youtu.be/jtEcOg8ciIU
Day 2, Part 2 – http://youtu.be/NxmDSAumvqQ "
theastergates  shannonmattern  2013  art  community  rehabilitation  arts  chicago  urban  urbanism  migration  socialpracticeart  spirituality  belief  howwework 
july 2014 by robertogreco
Mark Allen Artist Lecture on Vimeo
"The LA Times writes that Mark Allen is “Nikola Tesla by way of P.T. Barnum, with a dash of ‘The Anarchist Cookbook.’” Come hear a talk by Machine Project founder Mark Allen at the Frank-Ratchye STUDIO for Creative Inquiry: Step right up!

Mark Allen is an artist, educator and curator based in Los Angeles. He is the founder and executive director of Machine Project, a non-profit performance and installation space investigating art, technology, natural history, science, music, literature, and food in an informal storefront in the Echo Park neighborhood of Los Angeles. Machine Project also operates as a loose confederacy of artists producing shows at locations ranging from beaches to museums to parking lots. Under his direction Machine has produced shows with the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, the Museum of Contemporary Art in Denver, the Contemporary Art Museum St Louis, and the Walker Museum in Minneapolis. He has produced over 500 events in Los Angeles at the Machine Project storefront space, and recently concluded a year long artist residency addressing topics of public engagement at the Hammer Museum.

Machine Project events emphasize intersections between fields and practices, particularly where the arts and sciences meet. In a 2006 LA Weekly article, writer Gendy Alimurung described Machine Project as, “Nikola Tesla by way of P.T. Barnum, with a dash of ‘The Anarchist Cookbook.’ “[2] Machine Project facilitates conversations between poets, technicians, artists, scientists, and obscure hobbyists and supports work that arises out of unusual combinations of interests. Past activities have included urban plant foraging and needlepoint therapy based on classic oil paintings. Machine Project prioritizes accessibility, explicitly courting amateur practitioners and curious locals. Workshops are regularly offered in sewing electronics, soldering, Arduino and Processing for artists.

In addition to weekly events held in the storefront gallery space in Echo Park, Machine Project operates as a gathering place for local and visiting artists to produce shows at various cultural institutions and events in Los Angeles. Frequent collaborators include Brody Condon, Liz Glynn, Kamau Patton, Corey Fogel, Jason Torchinsky, Chris Kallmyer, and Adam Overton. Machine Project has curated performances at the Glow Festival at Santa Monica Pier and at several art museums. Through their Artist in Residence program, Machine Project invites previous collaborators to develop larger projects that generally include a pedagogical element in addition to performances and exhibitions.

This lecture is co-sponsored by the Frank-Ratchye STUDIO for Creative Inquiry and the CMU School of Art."
markallen  collaboration  participatoryart  2013  poetry  art  lcproject  openstudioproject  capitalism  machineproject  events  learning  education  museums  howwelearn  arts  audience  process  howwework  experimentation  gender  curiosity  identity  titles  ambiguity  adaptability  makerspaces  hackerspaces  community  communitycenters  collectives  horizontality  organizations  flexibility  accessibility  humor  riskaversion  risk  institutions  failure  risktaking  curation 
july 2014 by robertogreco
STUDIO for Creative Inquiry
"The Frank-Ratchye STUDIO for Creative Inquiry at Carnegie Mellon University is a laboratory for atypical, anti-disciplinary, and inter-institutional research at the intersections of arts, science, technology and culture."



"The Frank-Ratchye STUDIO for Creative Inquiry is a flexible laboratory for new modes of arts research, production and presentation. Founded in 1989 within the College of Fine Arts at Carnegie Mellon University (CMU), the STUDIO serves as a locus for hybrid enterprises on the CMU campus, the Pittsburgh region, and internationally. Our current emphasis on new-media arts builds on more than two decades of experience hosting interdisciplinary artists in an environment enriched by world-class science and engineering departments. Through our residencies and outreach programs, the STUDIO provides opportunities for learning, dialogue and research that lead to innovative breakthroughs, new policies, and the redefinition of the role of artists in a quickly changing world."
carnegiemelon  antidisciplinary  culture  education  lcproject  openstudioproject  art  science  arts  technology 
july 2014 by robertogreco
‘Getting In On the Act’: Exploring Participatory Arts Practice | Art Museum Teaching
"A recent study published by the James Irvine Foundation (October 2011) entitled Getting In On the Act: How Arts Groups are Creating Opportunities for Active Participation draws insights from nonprofit arts groups and experts to explore a new model for understanding and supporting participatory arts practices, a growing trend here in the United States as well as across the globe. Here is how the reports’ authors begin to frame this “siesmic shift” towards a participatory arts culture:
“Technology has fundamentally changed the way people interact, learn, and think about culture. Contemporary notions of creativity, shaped by Web 2.0, center on shared construction of cultural identity and an ethos of participatory experience…. The open, free and instantaneous exchange of digital content affords people the resources to control their own creative experiences and make their own meaning. Interactive experiences of all sorts are now an expected norm.” (6)

But, then the report got a lot more interesting to me…
“This shift is about more than just technology. People are thinking about the experience of culture differently than in the past, placing value on a more immersive and interactive experience than is possible through mere observation…. Americans are activating their own creativity in new and unusual ways … [as] part of a larger ‘participatory economy’ in which social connection eclipses consumption. Americans want to meet the people who make our products, share in the work of the makers, and make things ourselves.” (6)

The report’s human-centered focus brings much-needed attention to the ability of the arts (and arts institutions) to connect people, to create shared experiences, and to contribute to the cultural fabric of the communities in which we live and work.

For art museums (and museum educators, especially), the report provides an extremely meaningful tool for reflecting on how we involve audiences in shaping their own experiences and making their own meaning. The report’s “Audience Involvement Spectrum” provides a nice, workable model for audience engagement, from “receptive” involvement (the type of spectating and educational enrichment occurring in the vast majority of arts museums) to increasingly “participatory” involvement (the types of crowd-sourcing, co-creation, and public artistic experiences that more and more art museums are slowly striving toward).

The report is worth a close read. It asks some essential questions about arts programming in the 21st century, and I think art museums would have much to gain by thinking more about how they fit into this new landscape of active arts participation. As museum educators, we have our hands on the wheel when it comes to programs — and the Irvine report clearly and strongly states that “attracting the next generation of audiences and visitors will require a transformation in programming” (11). At the core of this transformation is both thinking outside the box (‘the box’ in this case being the rigid walls and traditions of art museums) and letting go of institutional and curatorial authority so that visitors can feel comfortable and empowered to shape their own creative experiences.

If you have a chance to peruse the Irvine Foundation’s report, I’d love to hear how your institution’s programs (or your own teaching philosophies) fit on their spectrum of audience involvement. Has your institution embraced any of these aspects of participatory arts practice? Do you value these types of creative, artistic experiences when you visit art museums yourself (or do you shy away from them for more passive types of engagement)?"
art  arts  mikemurawski  2012  education  museums  participatory  participation  openstudioproject  technology  learning  learningbydoing  irvinefoundation  audienceinvolvement  teaching  arteducation  museumeducation  creativity 
june 2014 by robertogreco
Lab Rats: Welcome to New Orleans—America’s urban education laboratory | EduShyster
"Do you dream of being part of our nation’s greatest experiment in urban education? I know I do—which is why I was thrilled to be the recipient of a recent Google ad inviting me to Teach, Live and Love New Orleans. Welcome to NOLA, reader, where you’ll find plenty of *that je ne sais quoi, that elan, that bon temps* but absolutely pas d’excuses. In other words, it’s time for us to button up our lab coats and get busy. We’ve got <strike>a city to colonize</strike> an achievement gap to crush.

Whiter and brighter (and an outsider)
The first thing you’ll notice about our laboratory of innovation is that most of the other lab technicians are, to use a bons mots, whiter than a lab coat. That’s because while NOLA, as we’ll insist upon calling it, abounds in *locavore markets and stores,* you won’t find many locavore teachers here these days. Nor will you find many African American teachers, despite the fact that New Orleans remains a majority/minority city. Both are long gone, fired (illegally, as it turns out) in the wake of Hurricane Katrina, leaving nothing behind but low expectations and *historic homes at attainable prices.*

Pas d’excuses
Look closely at the brighter, whiter, outsiders working as lab technicians and you’ll notice something else: they’re all performing the exact same experiment. *School choice abounds,* it’s just that all of the schools offer the same choice. Take the seven charter management organizations that are behind the Teach, Live and Love New Orleans teacher recruitment campaign, for example. While the badges on the lab coats may be different, they share a single working hypothesis: for students to achieve they must first be taught to submit to adult authority, no excuses. As for emerging evidence that such an approach causes students to distrust and disparage themselves, may I remind you that *every student can have lifelong success and achievement, regardless of their socio-economic status or zipcode*?

New schools, old theories
I’m guessing that, unless you are Arne Duncan, you did not attend school in a laboratory. And yet, even if some of the bold urban education innovations in NOLA, like silent recess, lunch at *Level Zero* (also silent), or cool hand gestures used by students to indicate that they need to go to the bathroom, are new to you, I’m betting that you’re familiar with the theory behind these innovations. Remember that Psych 101 class you took where you learned about B.F. Skinner and his brand of behavioral psychology? If you were the kind of college-ready student who actually attended class, you may even recall something called *operant conditioning.* Want to teach a pigeon to turn in a circle to the left? Just give it a reward for any small movement it makes in that direction. Soon, the pigeon will catch on and begin making larger movements, garnering more rewards, until finally the bird completes the full circle. And as for that bit in Psych 101 about Skinner-style behaviorism being rejected decades ago, who learns anything in college anyway?

Laissez les bons temps rouler (after testing season)
You know what else is great about NOLA? All of the art and music, which you will find just about everywhere in this city, except for in the schools. In fact, kids have 88 charter choices to choose from, but just one has an arts and music focus. Which is sort of an interesting experiment, when you think about it. From whence will the city’s future musicians come from now that the Big Easy is the undisputed capital of no excuses?

Exit ticket
NOLA’s bold experiment in urban education may be a mere decade old, reader, but there’s one conclusion of which we can be certain. Teaching in an *urban education laboratory* is exhausting—hence the fiercely urgent need for fresh talent as yesterday’s technicians hang up their lab coats and move on to less punishing work. Which is why Teach, Live and Love New Orleans wants you—and me—to work in an amazing city where *we all teach, live, and love.* *We love to live here, and you can too.*"
education  neworleans  policy  inequality  segregation  2014  jenniferberkshire  teaching  ecucation  burnout  arts  bfskinner  behaviorism  nola  charterschools 
june 2014 by robertogreco
Inspirations from Iceland: Reflections on the USA | Linda F. Nathan
"Imagine a land where pre-school education is guaranteed. Think of music teachers in most elementary schools and choirs in most secondary schools. Imagine a noticeable cleanliness of the hallways and classrooms. In many schools shoes aren’t worn inside because the staff doesn’t want the raw winter weather ruining the floors and making everything filthy. Imagine Iceland.

This Scandinavian country’s educators are thinking constructively about student engagement—through the arts and vocational education. Iceland, like the rest of Scandinavia, is not obsessed with standardized testing."
iceland  education  finland  schools  publicschools  2014  teaching  learning  standardizedtesting  testing  arts  art  vocationaleducation  us 
april 2014 by robertogreco
Nelson Goodman: Ways of Worldmaking (1978–) [EN, ES, CZ, CR] — Monoskop Log
“A major thesis of this book is that the arts must be taken no less seriously than the sciences as modes of discovery, creation, and enlargement of knowledge in the broad sense of advancement of the understanding, and thus that the philosophy of art should be conceived as an integral part of metaphysics and epistemology.”
books  art  arts  nelsongoodman  1978  epistemology  arttheory  aesthetics  science  knowledge  discovery  creation  metaphysics 
march 2014 by robertogreco
Finnish Education Chief: 'We Created a School System Based on Equality' - Christine Gross-Loh - The Atlantic
"We used to have a system which was really unequal. My parents never had a real possibility to study and have a higher education. We decided in the 1960s that we would provide a free quality education to all. Even universities are free of charge. Equal means that we support everyone and we’re not going to waste anyone’s skills. We don’t know what our kids will turn out like—we can’t know if one first-grader will become a famous composer, or another a famous scientist. Regardless of a person’s gender, background, or social welfare status, everyone should have an equal chance to make the most of their skills. It’s important because we are raising the potential of the entire human capital in Finland. Even if we don’t have oil or minerals or any other natural resources, well, we think human capital is also a valuable resource."



"We created a school system based on equality to make sure we can develop everyone’s potential. Now we can see how well it’s been working. Last year the OECD tested adults from 24 countries measuring the skill levels of adults aged 16-65, on a survey called the PIAAC (Programme for International Assessment of Adult Competencies), which tests skills in literacy, numeracy, and problem solving in technology-rich environments. Finland scored at or near the top on all measures. But there were differences between age groups. The test showed that all younger Finns who had had a chance to go to compulsory basic school after the reforms had extremely high knowledge; those who were older, and who were educated before the reforms, had average know-how. So, our educational system is creating people who have extremely good skills and strong know-how—a know-how which is created by investing into education. We have small class sizes and everyone is put in the same class, but we support struggling students more than others, because those individuals need more help. This helps us to be able to make sure we can use/develop everyone’s skills and potential."



"Academics isn’t all kids need. Kids need so much more. School should be where we teach the meaning of life; where kids learn they are needed; where they can learn community skills. We like to think that school is also important for developing a good self-image, a strong sensitivity to other people’s feelings … and understanding it matters to take care of others. We definitely want to incorporate all those things in education.

I also believe that breaking up the school day with different school subjects is very important. We offer a variety of subjects during the school day. We’re also testing out what it’s like to have breaks in the middle of the school day for elementary school students. At a few elementary schools recently we’ve been offering sports, handcrafts, or school clubs during the middle of the school day, rather than just in the morning or after school as we already do. This is to help kids to think of something else, and do something different and more creative during the day. "
finland  education  schools  poverty  professionaldevelopment  2014  kristakiuru  vocationaltraining  arts  autonomy  teaching  learning  policy  equality  equity  publicschools  howwelearn  howweteach 
march 2014 by robertogreco
Sensate Journal Front Page » Sensate Journal
"A Journal for Experiments in Critical Media Practice"



"Welcome to Sensate, a peer-reviewed, open-access, media-based journal for the creation, presentation, and critique of innovative projects in the arts, humanities, and sciences.

Our mission is to provide a scholarly and artistic forum for experiments in critical media practices that expand academic discourse by taking us beyond the margins of the printed page. Fundamental to this expansion is a re-imagining of what constitutes a work of scholarship or art. To that end, Sensate accepts and encourages non-traditional submissions such as audiovisual ethnographic research, multimedia mash-ups, experiments in media archaeology, time-based media, participatory media projects, or digitized collections of archival media, artifacts, or maps. Sensate accepts submissions of finished projects, proposals, and reviews of works (monographs, films, exhibitions, etc).

As an issueless journal, Sensate avoids the rigid structures of chronology and provides readers with the opportunity to explore the content in networked and associative ways, offering a rich, intuitive experience. Users can sort the content by clicking on the media icons, selecting one of our Special Collections (curated by Guest Editors), or through advanced search queries.

Sensate uses Zeega, an interactive storytelling platform, to provide a unique tool for non-linear, open-source, multi-media publishing. Zeega allows contributors to seamlessly integrate audio, video, text, and maps from across the Internet, and will be made available to the public in August, 2012. Sign up here for updates and to receive a Zeega account. Projects, proposals, and reviews that do not use Zeega are also welcome and encouraged.

All works featured in Sensate are published under a Creative Commons 3.0 Attribution license. For more information on licensing and copyright, please see our Terms of Use.

The staff of Sensate would like to express our sincere appreciation for the support and guidance provided to us by our colleagues at the Berkman Center for the Internet and Society, The Film Study Center, metaLAB@Harvard, the Sensory Ethnography Lab, as well as our associates at Zeega. Thank You!"

[via: http://designculturelab.org/2014/03/07/on-dogs-and-design-ethnography/
Example: http://sensatejournal.com/2011/12/malavika-reddy-and-taylor-lowe-story-of-story-of-tongdaeng/ ]
sensoryethnographylab  newmedia  anthropology  glvo  classideas  metalab  zeega  sensate  berkmancenter  criticalmedia  multimedia  digitalhumanities  storytelling  arts  humanities  sciences  associative  howwethink  thinking  communication 
march 2014 by robertogreco
Adopt the Arts Foundation
"It is the mission of Adopt the Arts Foundation to bring together well-known artists, public figures, entrepreneurs, policy makers, and the general public to save the arts in America's public schools. We believe that it is morally and ethically incumbent upon us to foster the creativity, dreams, hopes, and imaginations of our children."
arts  art  losangeles  schools  education  publischools 
february 2014 by robertogreco
His Teacher Decided He's Not Worth the Effort - Teacher in a Strange Land - Education Week Teacher
"This blog is about the redemptive power of things that are less valued by schools, legislatures and the Business Roundtable. Things like singing beautifully in church on Christmas Eve, bringing tears to the eyes of parishioners. Or figure-skating, drawing cartoons, deer-hunting to fill the family freezer, being the family videographer--and on and on.

In a recent article in The Guardian, Steve McQueen, the acclaimed film director whose work on 12 Years a Slave has been earning international praise, told a story about being labeled "3C2"--likely to be a manual laborer, based on his grades.
When he went back to present some achievement awards 15 years later, the new head admitted to him that the school had been institutionally racist. This did not come as news to McQueen. "It was horrible. It was disgusting, the system, it was absolutely disgusting. It's divisive and it was hurtful. It was awful. School was painful because I just think that loads of people, so many beautiful people, didn't achieve what they could achieve because no one believed in them, or gave them a chance, or invested any time in them. A lot of beautiful boys, talented people, were put by the wayside. School was scary for me, because no one cared, and I wasn't good at it because no one cared. At 13 years old, you are marked, you are dead, that's your future."


How did McQueen reclaim his future and build a brilliant career? Art--and getting into art school on the strength of his portfolio, in spite of poor tests and teacher evaluations.

Way too much of what is said about the value of the arts in a public school education is related to achievement data, growth of brain connections, or the utility of music studies in strengthening other subjects or skills, like memory, reading and math. There is a body of good reasons to study and participate in the arts (as well as family and community activities), but being more successful in school is only a small fraction of that."
2014  education  intangibles  teaching  howweteach  schools  learning  children  art  arts  unschooling  deschooling  music  schooliness 
january 2014 by robertogreco
Are the Humanities in Crisis? - To the Point on KCRW 89.9 FM | Internet Public Radio Station Streaming Live Independent Music & NPR News Online from Los Angeles, CA
Half as many college students major in the humanities as did 50 years ago. Is this cause for concern? What's college for? Guest host Barbara Bogaev looks at what's at stake when higher education becomes more career focused and fewer students study the humanities. Also, a  new court decision calls NSA surveillance legal, and more men on the job are taking advantage of paternity leave. It turns out the time off for men can have far-reaching benefits for women, including helping to close the gender pay gap and shatter the glass ceiling.



Are the Humanities in Crisis? (1:07PM)
Only about 12% of all college students major in the humanities, a big change from just 50 years ago, when there were twice as many. Only about 7% major in subjects like English, Music or Art. The cost of college and concerns about employment are funneling more students into business and technology degrees, and we certainly need engineers, scientists and blue collar laborers, but at what price to American culture? Are we raising a generation of Americans that doesn't know enough about the humanities? What does it take to create a well-rounded society? What's at stake in education and society when our curricula become more career-focused and less aimed at creating well-rounded individuals?

Guests:
Anthony Carnevale: Georgetown University
Heidi Tworek: Harvard University, @HeidiTworek
Lee Siegel: writer and author
Gary Gutting: University of Notre Dame

Links:
Tworek on the real reason the humanities are in crisis
http://www.theatlantic.com/education/archive/2013/12/the-real-reason-the-humanities-are-in-crisis/282441/

Siegel on who ruined the humanities
http://online.wsj.com/news/articles/SB10001424127887323823004578595803296798048

Siegel on whether literature should be useful
http://www.newyorker.com/online/blogs/books/2013/11/should-literature-be-useful.html

Gutting on the real humanities crisis
http://opinionator.blogs.nytimes.com/2013/11/30/the-real-humanities-crisis/ "
humanities  highered  highereducation  2013  anthonycarnevale  heiditworek  leesiegel  garygutting  colleges  universities  employment  history  arts  education  society  generalists  literature  whauden  barbarabogaev  paternityleave  parenting  stem  economics  curriculum  generaleducation  us 
december 2013 by robertogreco
Expensive cities are killing creativity - Opinion - Al Jazeera English
"Today, creative industries are structured to minimise the diversity of their participants - economically, racially and ideologically. Credentialism, not creativity, is the passport to entry.

Over the past decade, as digital media made it possible for anyone, anywhere, to share their ideas and works, barriers to professional entry tightened and geographical proximity became valued. Fields where advanced degrees were once a rarity - art, creative writing - now view them as a requirement. Unpaid internships and unpaid labour are rampant, blocking off industry access for those who cannot work without pay in the world's most expensive cities.

Yet to discuss it, as artist Molly Crabapple notes in her brilliant essay "Filthy Lucre", is verboten. Recalling her years as a struggling artist, she remembers being told by a fellow artist - a successful man living off his inherited money - that a "real artist" must live in poverty.

"What the artist was pretending he didn't know is that money is the passport to success," she writes. "We may be free beings, but we are constrained by an economic system rigged against us. What ladders we have, are being yanked away. Some of us will succeed. The possibility of success is used to call the majority of people failures."

Failure, in an economy of extreme inequalities, is a source of fear. To fail in an expensive city is not to fall but to plummet. In expensive cities, the career ladder comes with a drop-off to hell, where the fiscal punishment for risk gone wrong is more than the average person can endure. As a result, innovation is stifled, conformity encouraged. The creative class becomes the leisure class - or they work to serve their needs, or they abandon their fields entirely."



"Creativity is sometimes described as thinking outside the box. Today the box is a gilded cage. In a climate of careerist conformity, cheap cities with bad reputations - where, as art critic James McAnalley notes, "no one knows whether it is possible for one to pursue a career" - may have their own advantage. "In the absence of hype, ideas gather, connections build, jagged at first, inarticulate," McAnalley writes of St Louis. "Then, all of a sudden, worlds emerge."

Perhaps it is time to reject the "gated citadels" - the cities powered by the exploitation of ambition, the cities where so much rides on so little opportunity. Reject their prescribed and purchased paths, as Smith implored, for cheaper and more fertile terrain. Reject the places where you cannot speak out, and create, and think, and fail. Open your eyes to where you are, and see where you can go."
arts  art  creativity  cities  housing  london  nyc  paris  failure  success  inequality  2013  sarahkendzior  credentialism  economics  risk  risktaking  meritocracy  inheritance  conformity  careers  ambition  opportunity  us  costofliving 
december 2013 by robertogreco
Beta-Local
"Beta-Local es una organización sin fines de lucro dedicada a apoyar y promover la práctica y el pensamiento estético a través de varios programas:

La Práctica, una programa post-académico centrado el pensamiento estético y la producción artística mediante el cual becarios de diversas disciplinas llevan un proyecto desde conceptualización hasta presentación mediante procesos abiertos y frecuentemente colaborativos.

The Harbor, un programa de residencias artísticas, a través del cual artistas, arquitectos y otros hacedores residen en Beta-Loca y desarrollan proyectos o talleres.

La Ivan Illich, una plataforma mediante la cual cualquier persona puede proponer una clase que puede ofrece o que quiere tomar,

y un nutrido programa público de exhibicions, charlas, Pin-ups (críticas abiertas), muestras, exhibiciones y publicaciones.

Nuestra biblioteca de consulta, La Esquina está abierta al público un día a la semana y por cita."

[video (in English): http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZXEfZ3rxEck ]

"Beta-Local is a non-profit organization dedicated to supporting and promoting aesthetic thought and practice through various programs:

La Práctica, a post-academic study and production program, through which Fellows coming from diverse disciplines take a project from concept to production.

The Harbor: a residency program for visiting international artists, architects, designers and other cultural producers. Visitors to Beta-Local, develop projects, workshops and offer lectures on a variety of subjects related to art and other creative disciplines to the general public and to La Práctica Fellows.

La Ivan Illich, an open experimental school through which the participating public suggests, requests and creates courses and workshops.

and a full schedule of public programming which includes exhibitions, lectures, Pin-ups (open critiques), screenings and publications.

We also have a small reference library, La Esquina, focused on art and designopen once a week to the general public."
puertorico  ivanillich  education  art  arts  learning  colearning  via:javierarbona  studios  residencies  lcproject  freeschools  artmaking  materials  society  research  workinginpublic  tonycruz  pabloguardiola  michymaxuach  toolsforconviviality  conviviality  bosqueauxiliar  tooltotool  collaboration  socialpracticeart  walking  politics  beta-local 
december 2013 by robertogreco
The Awesome Foundation
"We are an ever-growing, worldwide network of people devoted to forwarding the interest of awesomeness in the universe. Created in the long hot summer days of 2009 in Boston, the Foundation distributes a series of monthly $1,000 grants to projects and their creators. The money is pooled together from the coffers of ten or so self-organizing “micro-trustees” and given upfront in cash, check, or gold doubloons. The chapters are autonomous and organized by the trustees around geographic areas or topics of interest.

The Foundation provides these grants with no strings attached and claims no ownership over the projects it supports. It is, in the words of one of our trustees, a micro-genius grant for flashes of micro-brilliance.

Since its humble beginnings, many Awesome Foundation chapters have sprung up globally to conserve, sustain, and support the worldwide ecosystem of awesomeness. Projects have included efforts in a wide range of areas including technology, arts, social good, and beyond.

We’re still waiting for something with dinosaurs (hint, hint)."
art  funding  grants  awesomefoundation  crowdfunding  glvo  arts 
december 2013 by robertogreco
Report Paints Grim Picture of Arts, Culture Economy After Recession
"Pretty much every sector of the economy was battered during the great recession, but the artistic and creative community suffered more than most. And, at least as of two years ago, there was little sign of recovery.

That distressing news is contained in a report released this morning by the U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis and the National Endowment for the Arts. It finds that, for 2011, “the value added from arts and cultural production accounted for nearly 3.2 percent, or $504 billion,” of the nation’s Gross Domestic Product (GDP), a common gauge of economic activity.

That figure was in the 3.5 to 3.7 percent range in the first half of the 2000s. It dipped to 3.2 percent in 2009, and has been stuck there ever since.

That still represents a significant slice of the overall economy. In 2011, two million Americans were employed in the arts and culture category, including 310,000 in the motion-picture industry, and 100,000 each for museums and the performing arts.

But employment levels in this sector took a real dive in 2009—much greater than the economy as a whole—and had yet to fully recover as of 2011. Employment in cultural production (as broadly defined by the federal government) declined roughly one percent from 2010 to 2011—a much smaller figure than the previous few years, but still on the negative side of the ledger.

The total gross output of “arts and cultural goods and services” in 2011 was just under $916 billion. The advertising industry generated the biggest slice of that total: nearly $200 billion. Arts education, including fine arts schools and college and university fine arts and performing arts departments, placed second, at just under $104 billion.

Close behind were cable television production and distribution ($100 billion); motion pictures and video ($83 billion); independent artists and the performing arts ($49 billion); and book, newspaper, and magazine publishing ($41 billion).

In case you were wondering, the advertising-industry figure is limited to the creative side. To put it in Mad Men terms, Don Draper and Peggy Olson’s salaries are included; Pete Campbell’s is not.

So NEA senior deputy chairman Joan Shigekawa is correct to note that, beyond its "contributions of ideas and creativity to the nation's economy," the output of artists, writers, and other creative types is economically significant in itself. But its impact is significantly smaller than it was in 2000 or 2005. Even if there has been an upturn in the past two years, it will likely have a long way to go to reach its pre-recession levels."

[Also posted here: http://www.salon.com/2013/12/08/how_the_recession_killed_culture_partner/ ]
economics  culture  art  arts  advertising  nea  greatrecession  us  2013 
december 2013 by robertogreco
Art Makes You Smart - NYTimes.com
"FOR many education advocates, the arts are a panacea: They supposedly increase test scores, generate social responsibility and turn around failing schools. Most of the supporting evidence, though, does little more than establish correlations between exposure to the arts and certain outcomes. Research that demonstrates a causal relationship has been virtually nonexistent.

A few years ago, however, we had a rare opportunity to explore such relationships when the Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art opened in Bentonville, Ark. Through a large-scale, random-assignment study of school tours to the museum, we were able to determine that strong causal relationships do in fact exist between arts education and a range of desirable outcomes.

Students who, by lottery, were selected to visit the museum on a field trip demonstrated stronger critical thinking skills, displayed higher levels of social tolerance, exhibited greater historical empathy and developed a taste for art museums and cultural institutions."



"Further research is needed to determine what exactly about the museum-going experience determines the strength of the outcomes. How important is the structure of the tour? The size of the group? The type of art presented?

Clearly, however, we can conclude that visiting an art museum exposes students to a diversity of ideas that challenge them with different perspectives on the human condition. Expanding access to art, whether through programs in schools or through visits to area museums and galleries, should be a central part of any school’s curriculum."
art  education  openstudioproject  2013  arts  criticalthinking  tolerance  empathy  briankisida  jaygreene  danielbowen 
november 2013 by robertogreco
4th Floor | Chattanooga Public Library
"Our Vision: The 4th floor is a public laboratory and educational facility with a focus on information, design, technology, and the applied arts. The 14,000 sq foot space hosts equipment, expertise, programs, events, and meetings that work within this scope. While traditional library spaces support the consumption of knowledge by offering access to media, the 4th floor is unique because it supports the production, connection, and sharing of knowledge by offering access to tools and instruction."

[via: https://twitter.com/shannonmattern/status/397082628106780672 ]
via:shannon_mattern  libraries  chattanooga  openstudioproject  lcproject  makerspaces  arts  tools  appliedarts  technology  natehill 
november 2013 by robertogreco
Oregon College of Art and Craft
"Oregon College of Art and Craft (OCAC), a principal center for education, dialogue, and the mastery of contemporary Craft, is dedicated to excellence in teaching art through Craft. Founded in 1907 by Julia Hoffman as the Arts and Crafts Society to educate the public on the value of art and craft in daily life, OCAC today is committed to studio practice as making with materials in a sophisticated conceptual framework.

OCAC is a private, independent, non-profit college offering the Master of Fine Arts degree, the Bachelor of Fine Arts degree, and two certificate programs in Craft, as well as continuing education for adults and classes and workshops for youth. An integral part of the Portland ethos of the hand-made and sustainable, the OCAC campus, nestled in the West Hills, features the new LEED Silver Jean Vollum Drawing, Painting and Photography and Bonnie Laing-Malcolmson Thesis Buildings as the result of a $14.7 million dollar capital and endowment campaign. For more than three decades, OCAC has attracted nationally and internationally recognized artists, makers and thinkers to Portland through the robust and diverse Artists-in–Residence program, annual lecture series, and Hoffman Gallery exhibitions."
oregon  portland  art  education  residencies  glvo  ocac  craft  crafts  arts 
august 2013 by robertogreco
College grads in theater and arts landing jobs ahead of tech grads
"Recent graduates with tech degrees face higher unemployment rates after the Great Recession."



"Here's a surprise for college students: Recent graduates with technology degrees are having a tougher time finding a job than their peers in the arts.

The unemployment rate for recent grads with a degree in information systems is more than double that of drama and theater majors, at 14.7% vs. 6.4%, according to a recent Georgetown University study. Even for computer science majors, the jobless rate for recent grads nears 9%.

Anthony Carnevale, director of Georgetown's Center on Education and the Workforce, said the statistics reflect the recession that officially ended in 2009. Certain job markets, like IT, are inherently cyclical, and are more affected by dips in the economy, Carnevale explained.

"During the recessions, those people lose their jobs," he said. "They're not computer scientists or programmers or people who understand the innards of computers; they're people who use computer information at their job," such as workers at a bank's customer service desk.

Drama and theater jobs, on the other hand, are not heavily affected by the recession, and tend to have lower unemployment rates because there are fewer graduates in these fields, Carnevale added."

[See also: https://www.openforum.com/articles/why-english-majors-are-the-hot-new-hires/ ]
art  arts  humanities  employment  2013  trends  anthonycarnevale  technology 
july 2013 by robertogreco
Why English Majors are the Hot New Hires | The New OPEN Forum
"Years ago while interviewing an English major, I mentioned that—for many reasons—I liked hiring individuals who have a degree in the humanities. When I finished speaking, I noticed that the applicant was slightly choked up. He said, "You are the only person who has made me feel good about my degree." It's not uncommon for English majors—or anyone majoring in the humanities for that matter—to get a bad rap. Even Marc Andreessen, founder of Netscape, not too long ago said that people should get math-oriented degrees; otherwise, they will end up working in shoe stores.

We place a great value on a STEM education (degrees in science, technology, engineering and mathematics). But are the tables turning? Are hiring managers beginning to see the value that a liberal arts education—and an English major in particular—brings to the workplace? Recently, some high-profile businesspeople came out in favor of hiring English majors. Bestselling author and small-business expert Steve Strauss, for example, has admitted that "English majors are my employee of choice." And Bracken Darrell, CEO of Logitech, had this to say: "When I look at where our business is going, I think, boy, you do need to have a good technical understanding somewhere in there, to be relevant. But you’re really differentiated if you understand humanities.""

[Related: http://www.usatoday.com/story/money/personalfinance/2013/07/30/tech-job-unemployment/2595669/ ]
englishmajors  humanities  education  hiring  work  employment  trends  careers  2013  brunamartinuzzi  stem  stevestrauss  brackendarrell  communication  writing  research  empathy  janerobbins  davidboyes  ideo  jobs  highereducation  highered  arts  art  theater 
july 2013 by robertogreco
Arts & Democracy [Project]
"The Arts & Democracy Project builds the momentum of a growing movement that links arts and culture, participatory democracy, and social justice. We support cultural organizing and cross-sector collaborations, raise the visibility of transformative work, cross-pollinate cultural practitioners with activists, organizers, and policymakers, and create spaces for reflection."
art  arts  democracy  activism  policy  reflection  lcproject  openstudioproject  culture  ncmideas 
july 2013 by robertogreco
ARTS | A REASON TO SURVIVE
"A Reason To Survive (ARTS) is a nationally recognized organization that believes in the power of the arts and creativity to literally transform lives – especially those of kids. We believe in the therapeutic powers of the arts, but we are not clinical art therapists. We use all forms of art as a vehicle to create positive, long-lasting change and transformation in children and youth facing major life challenges. By providing a sequential program model of therapeutic arts programs, arts education, and college & career preparation, we provide a one-stop-shop for youth to move from crisis to college or career. We provide Direct Services to youth, Support Services to like-minded individuals and organizations, and Advocacy to community stakeholders and leaders about the importance of arts programming for youth."

MISSION

A Reason To Survive is dedicated to providing, supporting, and advocating for arts programs that heal, inspire, and empower youth facing adversity."

VALUES

ARTS Values are the guiding force for our culture: how we act & behave, make decisions, treat one another (staff, volunteers, kid’s, donors, vendors, and stakeholders), and keep ourselves accountable. It’s our internal compass to ensure we are on the right path.

Kids First – Always put what’s best for the kids first

Creativity – Infuse creativity in everything we do; being innovative in our approaches and open to new ideas. Take risks and try new things. Don’t be afraid to make mistakes and grow.

Flexibility – Be able to adapt in a changing environment – whether it’s a kids art project and or an organizational growth strategy. Don’t fear change – Embrace it, drive it and be able to capitalize on it.

Positivity and Fun – Work hard, play hard as a close knit family. Whether you are a student, volunteer, staff, vendor, or donor – all of us are working together towards a very positive goal – to transform kids lives through the arts. In doing so, we should have fun along the way and create an environment that is not only positive, safe, nurturing and supportive for kids – but for anyone who comes in touch with the organization.

Strong Relationships Built on Communication – All strong relationships are built on trust. We believe that trust is built on great communication. For us great communication is: Open, honest, clear, direct, respectful, and inclusive. Part of creating this type of communication and trust is to develop emotional connections and meaningful relationships. It’s important to always act with integrity in your relationships, to be compassionate, friendly, loyal, and to make sure that you do the right thing and treat your relationships well. The hardest thing to do is to build trust, but if the trust exists, you can accomplish so much more.

Resource Responsibility – Although we may work in a creative, flexible, fun and positive environment – we are extremely focused and serious when it comes to our operations and resource management. We truly value the financial resources our donors entrust in us and run our organization in the most cost efficient and effective way possible. We are committed to being responsible stewards of both the financial and human resources given to us, and strive to make every individual and dollar count.

Accountability – We believe that a large part of success is brought about by being accountable. Saying what we’ll do, doing what we say and supporting others to do the same. If we fall short, we are humble enough to admit it, learn, and grow. Leadership does not have a title – everyone takes personal responsibility and leadership for themselves and their work. We also strongly believe in recognizing and celebrating everyone’s efforts and achievements. Trying your hardest with passion, commitment, and dedication will always be celebrated!"
areasontosurvive  sandiego  nationalcity  education  art  arts  learning  lcproject  openstudioproject  therapy 
june 2013 by robertogreco
ARTLAB+
"ARTLAB+ is a radically inclusive digital media studio for local teens. Our programs give youth access to professional technology and art, connecting them to artist mentors who build a community of young creators. We develop critical thinkers and engaged citizens who have the marketable technological skills needed to lead the next generation of innovators."
lcproject  artlab+  washingtondc  hirschhorn  media  openstudioproject  art  arts  technology  smithsonian  dc 
may 2013 by robertogreco
DreamYard Project
"Dreamyard uses project-based arts learning to ignite the transformative spirit in youth, public schools and communities.

MISSION
DreamYard uses the arts to inspire youth, public schools and communities. DreamYard programs develop artistic voice, nurture young peoples’ desire to make change and cultivate the skills necessary to reach positive goals. By committing to sustained learning opportunities along an educational pathway, DreamYard supports young people as they work toward higher learning, meaningful careers and social action. We believe that young people in the Bronx need a continuous set of supports to help them towards positive outcomes as they navigate their educational pathway. We have every expectation that through offering sustained and meaningful supports our youth will develop the tools to become creative and engaged citizens, life-long learners and the leaders and innovators of the 21st century."
dreamyard  nyc  bronx  openstudiproject  lcproject  projectbasedlearning  creativity  art  arts  youth  socialaction  community  pbl 
may 2013 by robertogreco
CoTA
"CoTA is a professional development program that tackles the possibilities of making the arts a lively, essential, and ongoing aspect of elementary school education. CoTA is based on the belief that integrating the visual and performing arts into other content areas promotes engagement, accessibility, and relevance for students. Since its inception in 1998, CoTA has collaborated with 500 teachers and more than 13,500 students at 26 schools throughout San Diego County."
arts  education  art  sandiego  professionaldevelopment 
march 2013 by robertogreco
Rural and Proud | Epicenter
"The Epicenter is a community design center in Green River Utah focused on affordable housing, economic development, and the arts. We are committed to providing opportunities and connecting Green River residents to resources. A passionate, multidisciplinary team, we engage, collaborate with, and learn from our community."

"The Epicenter is a community resource organization that serves the town of Green River, Utah (pop. 953). We are committed to creating positive change locally by providing resources to homeowners, renters, small businesses, and through active involvement in our community.

In 2009, the Epicenter was founded by Auburn University Architecture Graduates Jack Forinash, Maria Sykes, and Rand Pinson. At that time, the designers worked as AmeriCorps Volunteers In Service to America (VISTA) focused on providing affordable housing assistance, exploring economic development solutions, and improving communications and resources within Green River. Through a United States Department of Agriculture Rural Business Enterprise Grant, Jack, Maria, and Rand purchased a historic building in downtown Green River, redesigned the space, and renovated the structure. Today from that building, Jack and Maria co-direct the Epicenter and remain dedicated to its mission. Hayley Crooks moved to Green River in December 0f 2010 as a VISTA through the Green River Community Center, and remains a part of Epicenter working as designer. Chris Lezama joined the Epicrew in August of 2011 as a VISTA through United Way of Eastern Utah, and he remains on the team as Community Development Specialist. Ashley Ross originally came on as an intern during the summer of 2012, and shortly after she became a year-long VISTA focused on the arts, culture, and community development programs of Epicenter. Armando Rios joins Epicenter from August 2012 through July 2013 as a VISTA focused on affordable housing and business resources. At Epicenter, we nurture local businesses, entrepreneurs, and ideas. We’re dedicated to the town of Green River where we strive to provide local solutions to universal design problems.

The Epicenter is part of the larger effort to create positive change in Green River. We belong to a local non-profit parent organization called the Positive Action Community Team (PACT) which serves the town with affordable rental housing, a Boys & Girls Club, a food pantry, and a thrift store. In addition to PACT, Epicenter works closely with USDA Rural Development of Utah, University of Utah (College of Architecture and Planning), United Way of Eastern Utah, City of Green River, Green River Chamber of Commerce, Habitat for Humanity of Castle Country, and Green River CHEER Coalition."

[via: http://blog.sincerelyinterested.com/post/41490823385/what-is-this ]
utah  rural  art  arts  community  greenriver  housing  development  chrislezama  jackforinash  mariasykes  randpinson  americorps  vista  hayleycrooks  ashelyross  armandorios  epicenter  openstudioproject  lcproject 
march 2013 by robertogreco
The Organist
"The Organist is a monthly experimental arts-and-culture program produced and distributed by KCRW. The editors of the award-winning monthly magazine the Believer, published in San Francisco by McSweeney’s, produce ten annual episodes of the podcast, which includes reported stories, interviews, comic radio drama, reviews, and more. The scope of the podcast reflects that of the print edition: its contributors take a thoughtful approach to pop culture, along with an irreverent attitude toward the highbrow. From philosophy to daytime TV, from poetry to martial arts, the show scrutinizes and interrogates the world with an affectionate and rigorous intelligence. Pieces from the podcast grow out of stories in the magazine, and vice versa. Weaving together the voices of its contributors, which include the brightest talents in literature and the arts, the Organist is an elegant, impressionistic, funny, and sharp cultural magazine that itself becomes an object of inquiry, discussion, and wonder."
theorganist  thebeliever  kcrw  mcsweenys  literature  poetry  film  music  culture  podcasts  via:maxfenton  interviews  stories  storytelling  arts 
february 2013 by robertogreco
Wieden+Kennedy » W+K Announces New Joint Venture Led by John C Jay, W+K Garage
"In an all-agency meeting today, Jay described W+K Garage as focusing on “expanding the definition of what a modern agency can do, and should do.” He said it will be “a strategic and entrepreneurial shop that will concept, create and invest in innovative products, experiences, content and technology that will help to redefine the idea of what a modern, global brand is.”
He added: “Simply, I want to make things. Not to make meetings, but make in new ways. Make new products, digital and analogue. I want to make new businesses. I want to make new experiences–interactive or physical, in business and in culture.”

Jay described the intersection of technology, culture, arts, science and business in our everyday lives, and noted the importance of being able to think, communicate and act globally. “We’re living in the greatest creative moment in history,” he said.

Jay also emphasized the importance of humanity and beauty to making an idea “great”.

On his decision to join W+K in 1993, he said, “I told myself, go where you can do the best work of your life–no asterisks.” In the meeting, he described W+K as a place that encourages each of its employees to become their best possible selves, leading to their best work, and said that this new venture was an opportunity to not only help W+K, but to help W+Kers achieve their creative potential, too."
wk  wieden+kennedy  2013  lcproject  openstudioproject  johnjay  technology  culture  arts  science  business  everyday  everydaylife  w+kgarage  making  meetings 
january 2013 by robertogreco
Creative Collaborations - Helsinki Design Lab
"Truly creative collaborations are ones that result in unexpected outcomes. Working on projects like this require all participants to step outside of their normal routines and entertain new ideas.

To provide some guidance in these situations Sitra commissioned Marc Downie, Shelley Eshkar, and Paul Kaiser, who together comprise the OpenEndedGroup. They've honed the practice of working with others during decades of multi-disciplinary arts projects.

The result is this book, Creative Collaborations, which is useful before beginning something like an HDL Studio or any other collaborative project. It's a slim volume that lays out 19 rules of thumb and is intended to be quickly digestible, short enough to be read before a cup of tea gets cold."

[See also: http://www.helsinkidesignlab.org/blog/announcing-creative-collaborations ]

[Project page: http://www.helsinkidesignlab.org/pages/creative-collaborations ]
creativecollaborations  cv  glvo  arts  art  multidisciplinary  openendedgroup  openendedness  paulkaiser  shelleyeshkar  marcdownie  collaboration  creative  helsinkidesignlab  2012 
november 2012 by robertogreco
LDBA ART SCHOOL by Sara Moffat — Kickstarter
"I want to start a school where adults and children can take classes taught by professional artists, musicians, and innovators."

[See also: http://www.ldbabrooklyn.com/xoxo/ ]

"Although there are many components to LDBA, the concept is simple:

WE PROVIDE TOOLS, TECHNIQUES AND MATERIALS TO ALLOW PEOPLE TO EXCEL IN THEIR MEDIUM."
craft  arts  art  agesegregation  adults  children  saramoffat  2012  schools  education  learning  openstudioproject  lcproject  brooklyn  nyc 
november 2012 by robertogreco
The Invisible Dog Art Center
"The Invisible Dog Art Center opened in October, 2009, a raw space in a vast converted factory building with a charmed history and an open-ended mission: to create, from the ground up, a new kind of interdisciplinary arts center. Over the last two years, over 50,000 people have attended our events: visual art exhibits; dance, theater, and music performances; film screenings; literary arts and poetry readings; lectures; community events; and more.

Long-term collaborations with artists are integral to The Invisible Dog’s mission, which is to create not only a new kind of art center, but also a new kind of artistic community.

The Invisible Dog brings together artists of all career stages, offering them unique opportunities for involvement. Over the last two years, the art center has evolved organically, developing with and alongside its diverse roster of collaborators… "
interdisciplinary  art  invisibledog  glvo  nyc  studios  coworking  arts  brooklyn 
october 2012 by robertogreco
Outstanding Video About Modern Knowledge Construction
"I shot this amateur video at the Constructionism 2012 Conference in Athens, Greece. It is a recording of Dr. Mike Eisenberg‘s remarkable plenary address based on his paper, “Constructionism: New Technologies, New Purposes.”

Anyone interested in learning, emerging technology, creativity, the arts, science or craft would be wise to watch this terrific presentation."

[Direct link to video: https://vimeo.com/49891132 ]
anthropology  bedrooms  economics  displays  hangouts  traditions  rituals  interest  passion  misfits  weirdos  schooldesign  design  settings  setting  popularity  uptonsinclair  vannevarbush  arts  art  craft  doing  making  deschooling  unschooling  science  projectbasedlearning  arduino  3dprinting  spaces  meaningmaking  purpose  agency  networks  activities  openstudioproject  lcproject  environment  srg  edg  glvo  education  technology  learning  children  constructionist  constructionism  2012  mikeeisenberg  pbl  ritual 
september 2012 by robertogreco
The Fall of the Creative Class
"“Life is totally clear cut. It’s exactly what the research is. All the research says go live with your friends and fam­ily. Oth­er­wise, you have to look at why you’re not doing that. If you want to look at a city that’s best for your career, it’s New York, San Fran­cisco or Lon­don. If you’re not look­ing for your career, it doesn’t really mat­ter. There’s no dif­fer­ence. It’s split­ting hairs. The whole con­ver­sa­tion about where to live is bullshit.”"

"“Even as an arts advo­cate,” said Mel Gray, “I want to do it for the right rea­sons.” The right rea­son, we can now say, is that these things are good in them­selves. They have intrin­sic value. They make the place we live more inter­est­ing, live­lier, health­ier and more humane. They make it better.

They do not make it more profitable."

>>>> "I know you could go down it for­ever and never quite arrive. And I know now that it may be wiser to try to cre­ate the place you want to live, rather than to keep try­ing to find it."
community  families  creativity  arts  economics  sociology  pseudoscience  oregon  portland  madison  society  grassisgreener  place  cities  living  life  2012  richardflorida  creativeclass 
june 2012 by robertogreco
XOXO Festival by Andy Baio — Kickstarter
"Hey Kickstarter! We're organizing XOXO, an arts and technology festival in Portland, Oregon this September 13-16th.

XOXO is a celebration of disruptive creativity. We want to take all the independent artists using the Internet to make a living doing what they love — the makers, craftspeople, musicians, filmmakers, comic book artists, game designers, hardware hackers — and bring them together with the technologists building the platforms that make it possible. If you have an audience and a good idea, nothing’s standing in your way.

XOXO is in three parts:

Conference (Saturday – Sunday). Talks from artists and creative technologists around the country that are breaking new ground.
Market (Saturday – Sunday). A large marketplace with a tightly-curated list of the best of Portland's arts and tech scenes, sharing and selling their work, with food supplied by the best of our thriving food cart scene…"
via:caseygollan  togo  oregon  interdisciplinary  multidisciplinary  crosspollination  crossdisciplinary  technology  arts  collaboration  hackerspaces  hackers  hardware  design  2012  events  andybaio  kickstarter  disruption  disruptive  conferences  portland  xoxo 
may 2012 by robertogreco
Public Books
"Public Books is a forthcoming website devoted to “real-time debate about serious non-fiction books, literary fiction, and emergent cultural trends as evidenced in current media and the arts, including digital arts.”

In developing the site we had two core goals:

A reading experience you can lose yourself in. Long texts are often tedious to read on the screen, so we built a format that’s a delight to read at length.

A comment system that encourages dialogue. Public Books places as much of an emphasis on the public as on the books. Reader responses are placed on equal footing with the original reviews, interviews, and essays.

Below are selected screens from our proposal. If you have any questions, feel free to email us. To take part in the conversation about this and other proposed designs, visit the Public Culture site."
media  towatch  rumorsstudio  reading  digitalarts  arts  culture  books  publicculture  publicbooks 
january 2012 by robertogreco
Library as Incubator Project
"…created by Erinn Batykefer, Laura Damon-Moore, & Christina Endres, 3 grad students at the UW-Madison School of Library & Information Studies.

The Project highlights the ways that libraries & artists can work together & features:
*Visual artists, performing artists, and writers who use libraries in their communities for inspiration, information, and as gallery space
*Collections, libraries and library staff that incubate the arts, and the ways that artists can use them effectively
*Free-to-share resources for librarians looking to incubate the arts at their libraries
*Ideas for artists looking to connect with their communities through library programming

At a time in which both libraries & arts organizations are often having to do more with less, it makes sense for these two parts of our culture to support each other…"
libraryasincubator  libraries  arts  openstudioproject  lcproject  glvo  nextstep  artists  incubator  erinnbatykefer  lauradamon-moore  christinaendres  uwmadison 
november 2011 by robertogreco
The Gopher Hole | Popular Culture Across Borders
"A collaboration between aberrant architecture and Beatrice Galilee, our agenda is to explore new ways of curating ideas in popular culture and to provide a forum for critical debate on the arts and society"
lcproject  thegopherhole  aberrantarchitecture  design  education  galleries  glvo  curating  art  london  uk  beatricegalilee  popculture  discourse  debate  society  arts  interdisciplinary  crossdisciplinary  multidisciplinary 
october 2011 by robertogreco
Quality of Place + Quality of Opportunity = ArtPlace « Art Works
"The old approach to economic development was to send the team out to bag the buffalo and drag it back home. It was all about relocation. But that game has just about played itself out. Do enough of it and there are no buffaloes left to bag—or they are all headed to Vietnam.

What we know now is that economic development emerges from local assets. From the conditions that develop, attract and retain talent. From conditions that encourage creativity and connections. From conditions that encourage diversity of people and ideas and the mash-up of those ideas.

That’s what creative placemaking is really about…putting your local assets to work fully…"
carolcoletta  artplace  place  local  art  glvo  grants  funding  economics  nationalendowmentforthearts  economicdevelopment  development  lcproject  placemaking  arts  community 
october 2011 by robertogreco
ArtPlace
"ArtPlace is a collaboration of top national foundations, the National Endowment for the Arts and various federal agencies to accelerate creative placemaking across the U.S.…

ArtPlace believes that art, culture and creativity expressed powerfully through place can create vibrant communities, thus increasing the desire and the economic opportunity for people to thrive in place. It is all about the local.

ArtPlace periodically awards grants to organizations doing groundbreaking work in creative placemaking."
art  nea  nationalendowmentforthearts  funding  grants  lcproject  place  placemaking  local  livability  arts  economics  glvo  community  artplace 
october 2011 by robertogreco
Bless the toolmakers « Snarkmarket
So much here in Robin's post and the comments that I'm not going to quote anything. Lots to think about.
tools  apple  pixar  arts  art  robinsloan  snarkmarket  creativity  creation  media  freemandyson  roolmaking  liberalarts  lasting  building  software  design  writing  timcarmody 
september 2011 by robertogreco
Caldera
"…started as a summer camp in the mountains. The idea was to bring kids w/ limited opportunities, both from the city & country, together to make art. Turns out it was a pretty good idea. Kids who said they couldn’t draw found out they were artists. Students who were at risk of dropping out of school kept w/ it, graduated from high school, won college scholarships & came back to work at Caldera.The artists who worked w/ the kids found the experience made them better artists, so we invited them back during the winter to work on their own projects. & because art isn’t just for summertime, we started working w/ students every week, expanding our activities into their schools & communities in Portland & Central Oregon. Today, we work year-round w/ thousands of students, & we invite artists from all over the world for month long residencies at our arts center near Sisters. Caldera’s mission is to be a catalyst for transformation through innovative art & environmental programs."
residencies  oregon  portland  sisters  wk  wieden+kennedy  lcproject  education  art  writing  youth  teens  srg  edg  glvo  caldera  creativity  arts  expression  learning  apprenticeships  mentorships  danwieden  mentorship 
august 2011 by robertogreco
Children's Museum Exec Resigning - voiceofsandiego.org:
"Rachel Teagle, the executive director of The New Children's Museum in downtown San Diego, announced today she will resign this fall after more than four years at the helm. The museum, which originally launched in La Jolla in the early 1980s and then moved downtown, hires contemporary artists to make work that is more approachable to kids and families.

"It has been a difficult and very personal decision to find the ‘right' time for my family to move on," she said in a statement.

Teagle said she will remain the executive director at the museum through this fall, opening a new long-term exhibition called "TRASH." She also said she will help the museum find her replacement…"
rachelteagle  ncmsd  sandiego  arts  children  museums  2011 
july 2011 by robertogreco
Between the By-Road and the Main Road: An Alternative to High School: Humanities High School
"There are three concepts that frame the thinking in the development of Humanities High School (HHS): equity, leveraging learning everywhere, and rhizomatic learning…

At HHS, learners, teachers, and community-based mentors work collaboratively to provide students with the occasion to compose a cohesive liberal arts education that privileges the arts, humanities, problem solving and problem finding. HHS is committed to preparing students to be global citizens positioned for career and college choices."
maryannreilly  education  lcproject  alternativeeducation  teaching  learning  unschooling  deschooling  schools  schooldesign  2011  tcsnmy  globalcitizens  arts  humanities  community  mentoring  mentorships  problemsolving  rhizomaticlearning  learningeverywhere  humanitieshighschool  hhs  gillesdeleuze  guattari  deleuze  vygostgy  davecormier  mentorship  félixguattari 
june 2011 by robertogreco
OCHSA: Passion for performing builds toward school finale - latimes.com
"OCHSA's 1,550-plus student body is like a map of Southern California, from Temecula to Manhattan Beach, and 11 specialties are offered, including commercial dance, creative writing and classical music.

Enrollment is booming. Last year, applications nearly doubled, to 1,856. This spring, the school, which hosts grades seven to 12, received 3,798 applications for about 450 spots, mirroring a national trend. Of course, it's no small measure of pride that "Glee" star Matthew Morrison graduated from this Santa Ana charter school in 1997.

"What we're seeing is our enrollment is going through the ceiling," says Ralph Opacic, who founded OCHSA in 1987.

It's the same at performing arts schools across the country."
performingarts  schools  education  trends  teaching  learning  creativity  2011  ochsa  arts  art  arteducation  tcsnmy 
june 2011 by robertogreco
Unfinished Spaces - 2011 Los Angeles Film Festival
"In 1961, in the heady first days of the Cuban Revolution, Fidel Castro asked three visionary architects to build the Cuban National Arts Schools on what had been the golf course of a country club. Before construction was completed, the Revolution became Sovietized, and suddenly the project was denounced as bourgeoise and counter-revolutionary. The story has many more fascinating twists and turns, as these radical, magnificent buildings become a prism through which we see the turbulent, ever-shifting history of Castro's Cuba and follow the fates of the three architects, now in their 80s, who would get a second chance to revitalize their utopian project."
architecture  arts  cuba  via:javierarbona  history  fidelcastro  education 
may 2011 by robertogreco
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