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robertogreco : arttherapy   4

Against a "Life Hack" Approach to Art Education | Claudia Ruitenberg - Academia.edu
"This paper critiques de Botton and Armstrong’s Art as Therapy project (2013-2015), a collaboration with art museums in Canada, the Netherlands, and Australia, in which labels in the gallery, as well a catalogue and website, explain how viewers might use works of art to serve therapeutic purposes in their lives. The paper argues that, instead of making art more accessible to those who, allegedly, do not find access to art on their own, the Art as Therapy project undermines the force and richness of art by first declaring it useless and inaccessible and then repurposing it as therapeutic life hack "



"I commend de Botton and Armstrong for their premise that art is not the exclusive preoccupation of the cultural cognoscenti, but can have a bearing on anyone’s life— as long as we’re willing to let it. I also commend them for highlighting that art is not a purely cerebral affair, that works of art do something to us, and that the emotions are involved in this doing. My main criticisms of their approach are that they predetermine what bearing art can and should have, and that they privilege the therapeutic over the aesthetic value of art.

There is an important difference between a life hack approach in everyday life, where household items are repurposed but also retain their original use-value, and a life-hack approach to art, where the practical utility of “repurposed” works offers redemption for purported uselessness. Life hacks typically repurpose discarded or cheap materials; people don’t turn objects they already value into life hacks. de Botton and Armstrong’s message seems to be that art is useless, but that with the help of their commentaries, these useless works can be turned into something viewers can benefit from.

Whatever else art is and does, it offers an aesthetic experience, which is to say that it intervenes in perception (“aesthetic” is derived from the Greek verb aisthesthai, meaning to perceive, sense). This intervention may have various further effects, including therapeutic ones, but art is not useless if its effects are not therapeutic. Art may make us laugh or cry or leave us indifferent. It may disturb or console us, give us nightmares or fits of giggles. It may do this and a whole host of other things—but it does not inherently need or mean to do any of them. When de Botton and Armstrong cite the “art for art’s sake” credo, they dismiss it as saying that art has no purpose. That, however, is not what the credo says. That art is done for the sake of art suggests that art has no purpose other than to be art —and the latter is quite a bit of purpose."
2016  claudiaruitenberg  alaindebotton  johnarmostring  arttherapy  lifehacks  accessibility  artastherapy  inaccessibility  museumeducation  education  aestheticexperience  experience  interpretation  interpretativefreedom  pedagogy  pedagogicalintervention  intervention  freedom  aesthetics  carelpeeters  uselessness  purpose 
january 2017 by robertogreco
Eyeo 2016 – Patricio Gonzalez Vivo on Vimeo
"What Are The Chances? – This talk investigates the relationships between chaos and chance, cause and effect. It is built from volcanoes, ashes, wind, love, and new life. Along the way Patricio talks about The Book of Shaders, mapping at Mapzen, and other recent collaborations and works in progress.

Many of these slides are interactive: patriciogonzalezvivo.github.io/eyeo16/# "

[The Book of Shaders: http://thebookofshaders.com/ ]
expressivearttherapy  lygiaclark  mapzen  processing  code  coding  arttherapy  psychology  2016  eyeo  eyeo2016  psychoanalysis  freud  carljung  dreams  collectiveunconscious  caseyreas  shaders  nightmares  community  opensource  maps  mapping  openframeworks  fragility  jenlowe  thebookofshaders  mandalas  synchronicity  interconnectedness  patriciogonzalezvivo  edg  raspberrypi  classideas  interconnected  interconnectivity 
august 2016 by robertogreco
Claire Volpe
"My name is Claire Kearney-Volpe. I'm an art therapist, researcher, designer and web developer.

I began my Master's of Interactive Telecommunications in the fall of 2013 and I am currently working on my thesis. I am interested in the research and development of helpful and engaging technologies. I am also a firm believer that technology serves people better when they participate in it's design.

Before coming to New York for school, I was a health policy research coordinator in a bustling hospital think-tank. I began making data visualizations, started tinkering with web development and immediately saw the vast potential for these technologies to communicate rich information and promote civic engagement."

[via: https://processingfoundation.org/fellowships

"Claire Kearney-Volpe is an Art Therapist, Researcher, and Designer interested in accessibility, assistive technology, and participatory design. Claire graduated from NYU’s Interactive Telecommunications Program, and is an Adjunct Professor in the area of assistive tech at NYU and Manager of the the NYU Ability Lab. In addition to mentorship from the Processing Foundation, Claire’s Advisor will be Sara Hendren."]
clairevolpe  clairekearney-volpe  sarahendren  accessibility  via:caseygollan  assistivetechnology  participatory  design  participatorydesign  arttherapy 
march 2016 by robertogreco
Is there an artist in the house? - The Irish Times - Sat, Oct 29, 2011
"It’s not just patients who benefit from paintings: medical students who study art can increase their observational and diagnostic skills. GEMMA TIPTON examines the relationship between art and medicine, and probes a pioneering course at Trinity College Dublin"
art  arttherapy  research  medicine  health  2011  yale  trinitycollegedublin  observation  diagnosis  noticing  via:irasocol 
october 2011 by robertogreco

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