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Landscape Circuitry – Nick Sowers Architecture
"What happens when you wire up parts of a landscape and amplify its own remixed sounds? This is the next iteration of my series with SEAP : Sonorous Environment Amplification Panel. I have set up this four channel audio installation on the edge of Seaplane Lagoon on the former Naval Air Station in Alameda to explore the sonic textures in magnified detail.

Through live amplification of sounds picked up by a variety of microphones (contact, omnidirectional, shotgun, and hydrophone) I am able to reveal elements of the landscape which may otherwise go unnoticed. The sounds of birds, waves, pebbles, electricity, and wind through a security fence travel through the wires and merge digitally before being projected through the acrylic sound panel.

Even the more visible and audible parts which pass through such as Southwest jets taking off from nearby Oakland Airport are filtered through the sound installation, mixing and resonating with bird sounds and howling wind. We can hear all of this without augmentation, yet the ability to turn the dial up or down on certain sounds gives the observer a new form of participation in the landscape.

The forms of participation enabled by SEAP can be unexpected. One thing that surprised me is how the slight delay between the sounds initially heard and the sounds played back through amplification immediately creates a new atmosphere. The delay is like what you hear in a hard concrete alley, your own footsteps bouncing back to you in a kind of pangy-hollow sound. But you wouldn’t expect to find that echo effect in an open landscape. When a security guard pulled up to ask me what I was doing, his own voice was thrown back to him. He seemed satisfied with my description “Just testing out an art installation” and drove away.

Another unexpected sound comes from this security fence blocking access to the breakwater. I wired up a contact microphone to the galvanized steel post supporting the fence. The wind which slips through the fence is not audible to the naked ear, yet the metal absorbs the sound and can be amplified and mixed in with the rest of the environment. Listen:

In the recording you’ll hear the sounds of birds picked up by this omnidirectional microphone aimed down into the rocks. Crevices contain their own little sonic worlds. The space between rocks shelters a bowl of stiller air. In this placement, the microphone avoids clipping from wind. Tinier sounds like pebbles trickling down and birds whose calls would otherwise be drowned out are easily picked up.

I found myself thinking about artist Jenny Odell‘s practice of observation at the Morcom Amphitheatre of Roses in Oakland, about how this place on the fringes of a former Navy base could be my rose garden. From the perspective of an architect, I’m not doing anything here. I’m not analyzing a site as a precursor to making a building. Yet I am doing more than bird watching or walking or fishing– all fine activities for absorbing the nuances of a place and experiencing the passage of time. SEAP is an evolution of the many years I have walked landscapes and recorded sounds. Now I have an apparatus with which to gauge the subtle textures of a soundscape and add my own interpretation back into it. I expect to return to Seaplane Lagoon with an ever evolving set of processes to fold in between the processes of erosion and construction."
nicksowers  sound  audio  landscape  listening  2019  microphones  jennyodell  oakland  morethanhuman  recording 
16 days ago by robertogreco
Critical Media Practice
"a secondary field for Harvard University graduate students

The Graduate School in Arts and Sciences offers a secondary field in Critical Media Practice (CMP) for Harvard PhD students who wish to integrate media creation into their academic work. CMP reflects changing patterns of knowledge dissemination, especially innovative research that is often conducted or presented using media practices in which written language may only play a part. Audiovisual media have relationships to the world that are distinct from exclusively verbal sign systems and are able to reveal different dimensions of understanding.  They are inherently interdisciplinary and frequently engage a broader audience than the academy alone.

Students interested in creating original interpretive projects in still or moving images, sound, installation, internet applications, or other media in conjunction with their written scholarship may apply to pursue the CMP secondary field. It connects students with courses, workshops, and advising on production of media in different formats. Critical Media Practice is overseen by the Film Study Center."



"In areas across the disciplinary map — from Anthropology to Science Studies, from Sociology, Psychology, and Government to Architecture, Literature, Engineering, and Public Health — a growing number of students and faculty are seeking to integrate media creation into their academic work. The goal of the interdepartmental GSAS secondary field in Critical Media Practice is to offer graduate students across Harvard’s various schools the opportunity to make original interpretive, creative projects in image, sound, and interactive technologies in tandem with their written scholarship.

Our students work across many disciplines and in a variety of media. They span a continuum from those using artistic practices to conduct or present their scholarly research to those whose work finds its place in the art world itself. All share an excitement for art as research. They are furthering Harvard’s prominence as a place where academic inquiry can take compelling forms beyond the written word.

The human subject is constituted by imaging as well as by language and – as C.S. Peirce, Nelson Goodman, and others have demonstrated – language alone cannot be taken as paradigmatic for meaning. Aural and visual experience is as integral to culture and social relations as is language. Recent developments in neuroscience and evolutionary psychology have emphasized that consciousness itself consists of multi-stranded networks of signification that combine fragments of imagery, sensation, and memory alongside language, both propositional and non-propositional in form.

The Critical Media Practice secondary field is designed to take advantage of the fact that audiovisual media have a distinct, unique relationship to the world than exclusively verbal sign systems. It also exploits their inherent interdisciplinarity and their broader reach beyond the academy into the public intellectual sphere.

From stunning anthropological films documenting cultural traditions to interactive databases to installations exploring engineering and design, CMP projects push the boundaries of scholarship.

CMP integrates art-making within the cognitive life of the university, and specifically the graduate curriculum. Because media practice is the central component of CMP, it is distinct from a Ph.D. program in film studies, cultural studies, or any of the particular humanities or social sciences. Instead, CMP is intended to complement — to broaden and enrich — the teaching and research being undertaken in our graduate degree programs."
harvard  criticalmediapractice  sensoryethnographylab  film  interdisciplinary  media  mediacreation  cspeirce  nelsongoodman  meaning  audio  aural  visual  multisensory  multiliteracies  consciousness  sensation  memory  language  audiovisual  srg  luciencastaing-taylor  jeffreyschnapp 
20 days ago by robertogreco
Oceans of Noise: Episode One – Science Weekly podcast | Science | The Guardian
"Contrary to popular belief, and the writings of Jacques Cousteau, life beneath the ocean surface is not a silent world but a dense and rich sonic environment where sound plays a fundamental role in life.

In episode one of this three-part series, pioneering nature sound recordist Chris Watson begins a journey driven by his fascination with recording the songs and signals of life under the ocean surface. He will meet scientists examining the possible impacts of noise pollution, from the likes of shipping noise and seismic explosions used in the search for oil and gas. He will also talk to sound artists trying to raise awareness of the issue through their art.

Watson talks to Dr Lucille Chapuis, a marine biologist from the University of Exeter, who explains why water is such an effective medium for sonic communication, and how different types of marine life take advantage of this. Marine biologist Asha de Vos is an ocean educator, senior TED fellow and pioneer of blue whale research in the northern Indian Ocean. De Vos talks about how the mystery of life under the sea lured her towards an incredible career in conservation. She believes that just as sound is crucial to these majestic creatures, their survival is crucial to us.

Much of what we know about the significance of sound to the marine environment began with the research of Prof Christopher Clark from Cornell University. He takes Watson back to where it all began as he relives the moment where he realised just how important sound is to all life in the sea. But Clark also reveals the gradual realisation of the extent of the threat of sound pollution to marine life."

[Episode 2
"In episode two, the pioneering nature sound recordist Chris Watson and sound artist Jana Winderen meet a team from Norway’s Institute of Marine Research and climb aboard a research vessel setting sail around the Austevoll islands.

Like many countries, Norway benefits economically from oil and gas exploration and shipping. However, the threat of ocean noise pollution and its potential to harm fish stocks has instigated trailblazing research into the impact of sound pollution, in this case on spawning cod. On choppy North Sea waters Watson and Winderen meet scientists Nils Olav Handegard and Karen de Jong who, along with a team of international scientists, are using complex underwater recording techniques to try to capture the sound of reproducing cod.

As the sun sets, Watson and Winderen reflect on the relationship between scientists and sound artists, and ponder the role they can have in helping people understand and appreciate the underwater acoustic environment."

Episode 3
https://www.theguardian.com/science/audio/2019/may/03/oceans-of-noise-episode-three-science-weekly-podcast

"As wildlife recordist Chris Watson looks for solutions to ocean noise pollution, he hears from Tim Gordon, whose long-awaited trip to the Great Barrier Reef became a devastating experience when he heard the eerie silence of a dying coral reef, caused in part by global warming.

But despite the pessimistic tone evident in many environment debates, reduction in ocean noise pollution is one area that could spark optimism. Action is being taken across the world – from policymakers to private companies – to address some of the causes of sonic assaults on the underwater acoustic environment. While more action is needed, the future of marine soundscapes is still very much in play.

Watson calls in Markus Reymann, whose organisation TBA21–Academy uses a state-of-the-art sound recording sea vessel to connect scientists and policymakers with the ocean. Watson also talks to Nicolas Entrup of Oceancare, an organisation attempting to build international consensus on how to address oceanic noise pollution.

Watson also calls again on scientists and ocean conservation advocates, including Asha de Vos and Prof Christopher Clark.

We would like to thank all of our contributors for the series, as well as: Carlos Duarte, Jana Winderen, Knut Korsbrekke at Norway’s Institute of Marine Research, Steve Simpson at the University of Exeter, Marianne Helene, Roger Payne, Michel Andre, Bob Dziak, Ray Fischer and Christ de Jong."]
sound  oceans  audio  chriswatson  ashadevos  animals  nature  2019  janawinderen  markusreymann  multispecies  morethanhuman  noisepollution  hydrophones 
4 weeks ago by robertogreco
The SOUND of Millions of Monarch Butterflies! - YouTube
"How many butterflies does it take to make a noise in the woods? A few million. Watch (and listen!) as these monarchs put on a show at their overwintering site in Mexico.

This was filmed while leading a trip to visit the monarch migration with Atlas Obscura."
sound  multispecies  morethanhuman  butterflies  monarchbutterflies  2019  audio  mexico  nature  insects 
4 weeks ago by robertogreco
Poems of Muslim Faith and Islamic Culture | Poetry Foundation
"A collection of poems, prose, and audio and video recordings that explore Islamic culture.


These poems and features examine Muslim faith and Islamic culture and address important events, holidays, and occasions such as Ramadan. These poets explore a range of spiritual, literary, and political concerns from the 6th century to the present day. Some poets’ voices emerge from the East (Mahmoud Darwish and Saadi Youssef), others from the West (June Jordan and Thomas Merton). Most turn to poetry as the ideal forum to complicate simplistic East-West divisions—learning, questioning, sparking cultural conversation, and speaking from what Nomi Stone calls “[t]his quiet voice that is borrowed or my own.”"
islam  poetry  poems  prose  audio  video 
10 weeks ago by robertogreco
The UX design case of closed captions for everyone // Sebastian Greger
"Are video subtitles really chiefly for users who cannot hear or lack an audio device? A recent Twitter thread on “closed captions for the hearing” triggered a brief qualitative exploration and thought experiment – there may well be a growing group of users being forgotten in the design of closed captions.

Most commonly perceived as an auxiliary means for the hearing impaired, video subtitles, a.k.a. closed captions (CC), have only recently started to be widely considered as an affordance for users in situations with no audio available/possible (think mobile devices in public settings, libraries, shared office spaces); the latter to the extend that contemporary “social media marketing guidelines” strongly recommend subtitling video clips uploaded to Facebook, Twitter et al.

So: subtitles are for those who cannot hear, or with muted devices?

Who else uses closed captions?

I’m personally a great fan of closed captions, for various reasons unrelated to either of the above, and have often noticed certain limitations in their design. Hence, the user researcher inside me just did a somersault as I randomly encountered a Twitter thread [https://twitter.com/jkottke/status/1091338252475396097 ] following Jason Kottke asking his 247.000 followers:
After seeing several photos my (English-speaking, non-deaf) friends have taken of their TV screens over the past week, I’m realizing that many of you watch TV with closed captions (or subtitles) on?! Is this a thing? And if so, why?

The 150+ replies (I guess this qualifies as a reasonable sample for a qualitative analysis of sorts?) are a wonderful example of “accessibility features” benefiting everybody (I wrote about another instance recently [https://sebastiangreger.net/2018/11/twitter-alt-texts-on-db-trains/ ]). The reasons why people watch TV with closed captions on, despite having good hearing abilities and not being constrained by having to watch muted video, are manifold and go far beyond those two most commonly anticipated use cases.

[image: Close-up image of a video with subtitles (caption: "Closed captions are used by people with good hearing and audio playback turned on. An overseen use case?")]

Even applying a rather shallow, ex-tempore categorisation exercise based on the replies on Twitter, I end up with an impressive list to start with:

• Permanent difficulties with audio content
◦ audio processing disorders
◦ short attention span (incl., but not limited to clinical conditions)
◦ hard of hearing, irrespective of age
• Temporary impairments of hearing or perception
◦ watching under the influence of alcohol
◦ noise from eating chips while watching
• Environmental/contextual factors
◦ environment noise from others in the room (or a snoring dog)
◦ distractions and multitasking (working out, child care, web browsing, working, phone calls)
• Reasons related to the media itself
◦ bad audio levels of voice vs. music
• Enabler for improved understanding
◦ easier to follow dialogue
◦ annoyance with missing dialogue
◦ avoidance of misinterpretations
◦ better appreciation of dialogue
• Better access to details
◦ able to take note of titles of songs played
◦ ability to understand song lyrics
◦ re-watching to catch missed details
• Language-related reasons
◦ strong accents
◦ fast talking, mumbling
◦ unable to understand foreign language
◦ insecurity with non-native language
• Educational goals, learning and understanding
◦ language learning
◦ literacy development for children
◦ seeing the spelling of unknown words/names
◦ easier memorability of content read (retainability)
• Social reasons
◦ courtesy to others, either in need for silence or with a need/preference for subtitles
◦ presence of pets or sleeping children
◦ avoiding social conflict over sound level or distractions (“CC = family peace”)
• Media habits
◦ ability to share screen photos with text online
• Personal preferences
◦ preference for reading
◦ acquired habit
• Limitations of technology skills
◦ lack of knowledge of how to turn them off

An attempt at designerly analysis

The reasons range from common sense to surprising, such as the examples of closed captions used to avoid family conflict or the two respondents explicitly mentioning “eating chips” as a source of disturbing noise. Motivations mentioned repeatedly refer to learning and/or understanding, but also such apparently banal reasons like not knowing how to turn them off (a usability issue?). Most importantly, though, it becomes apparent that using CC is more often than not related to choice/preference, rather than to impairment or restraints from using audio.

At the same time, it becomes very clear that not everybody likes them, especially when forced to watch with subtitles by another person. The desire/need of some may negatively affect the experience of others present. A repeat complaint that, particularly with comedy, CC can kill the jokes may also hint at the fact that subtitles and their timing could perhaps be improved by considering them as more than an accessibility aid for those who would not hear the audio? (It appears as if the scenario of audio and CC consumed simultaneously is not something considered when subtitles are created and implemented; are we looking at another case for “exclusive design”?)

And while perceived as distracting when new – this was the starting point of Kottke’s Tweet – many of the comments share the view that it becomes less obtrusive over time; people from countries where TV is not dubbed in particular are so used to it they barely notice it (“becomes second nature”). Yet, there are even such interesting behaviours like people skipping back to re-read a dialogue they only listened to at first, as well as that of skipping back to be able to pay better attention to the picture at second view (e.g. details of expression) after reading the subtitles initially.

Last but not least, it is interesting how people may even feel shame over using CC. Only a conversation like the cited Twitter thread may help them realise that it is much more common than they thought. And most importantly that it has nothing to do with a perceived stigmatisation of being “hard of hearing”.

CC as part of video content design

The phenomenon is obviously not new. Some articles on the topic suggest that it is a generational habit [https://medium.com/s/the-upgrade/why-gen-z-loves-closed-captioning-ec4e44b8d02f ] of generation Z (though Kottke’s little survey proves the contrary), or even sees [https://www.wired.com/story/closed-captions-everywhere/ ] it as paranoid and obsessive-compulsive behaviour of “postmodern completists” as facilitated by new technological possibilities. Research on the benefits of CC for language learning, on the other hand, reaches back [https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/19388078909557984 ] several decades.

No matter what – the phenomenon in itself is interesting enough to make this a theme for deeper consideration in any design project that contains video material. Because, after all, one thing is for sure: closed captions are not for those with hearing impairments or with muted devices alone – and to deliver great UX, these users should be considered as well."

[See also: https://kottke.org/19/04/why-everyone-is-watching-tv-with-closed-captioning-on-these-days ]
closedcaptioning  subtitles  closedcaptions  text  reading  genz  generationz  audio  video  tv  film  dialogue  listening  howweread  2019  sebastiangreger  literacy  language  languages  ux  ui  television  ocd  attention  adhd  languagelearning  learning  howwelearn  processing  hearing  sound  environment  parenting  media  multimedia  clarity  accents  memory  memorization  children  distractions  technology  classideas 
11 weeks ago by robertogreco
Why Gen Z Loves Closed Captioning – The Upgrade – Medium
"Old technology finds a surprising new application

“Everyone does it.”

These were the words from my college-aged daughter when I caught her lounging on our couch, streaming Friends with 24-point closed captioning on. She has no hearing impairment, and I wanted to know what she was up to.

Does “everyone” do it? My wife and I turned to Facebook and a private, nationwide group for parents with near-adult children. “Anyone else’s college student (without a hearing disability) watch TV with the closed captioning on and insist that everyone does it?” my wife posted. Seven hundred responses (and counting) later, we had our answer.

“It helps me with my ADHD: I can focus on the words, I catch things I missed, and I never have to go back.”
Many parents expressed similar confusion with the TV-watching habits of their millennial and Gen Z children, often followed with, “I thought it was just us.”

I returned to my daughter, who had now switched to the creepy Lifetime import You.

“Why do you have captions on?” I asked.

“It helps me with my ADHD: I can focus on the words, I catch things I missed, and I never have to go back,” she replied. “And I can text while I watch.”

My multitasking daughter used to watch TV while working on her laptop and texting or FaceTiming on her phone. She kept rewinding the DVR to catch the last few minutes she’d missed because she either zoned out or was distracted by another screen.

Her response turned out to be even more insightful than I realized at first. A number of mental health experts I spoke with — and even one study I found — supported the notion that watching with closed captioning serves a valuable role for those who struggle with focus and listening.

“I do see this a lot in my practice,” said Dr. Andrew Kent, an adolescent psychiatrist practicing in New York and Medical Director of New York START, Long Island. “I believe auditory processing is more easily impacted upon by distractions, and that they need to read [captions] to stay focused.”

Closed captioning is a relatively recent development in the history of broadcasting, and it was designed with the hearing impaired in mind. According to a useful history on the National Captioning Institute’s (NCI) website, the technology dates back to the early 1970s, when Julia Child’s The French Chef “made history as the first television program accessible to deaf and hard-of-hearing viewers.” Real-time captioning arrived later, with stenographers typing at a blazing 250 words-per-minute to keep up with live news and sporting events.

They use captions to focus more intently on the content.
If it wasn’t for the Twenty-First Century Communications and Video Accessibility Act of 2010 and additional rules adopted by the FCC in 2012, it’s unlikely my daughter’s IP-based Netflix streaming content would even have closed captioning options today.

While the NCI doesn’t explicitly acknowledge the growing use of closed captioning by those without hearing impairments, it does note that “closed captioning has grown from an experimental service intended only for people who are deaf to a truly global communications service that touches the lives of millions of people every day in vital ways.”

It’s certainly not just a phenomenon for young people. There are many people my age who admit to using them because they have some middle-aged hearing loss or simply need help understanding what the characters on Luther or Peaky Blinders are saying. They use captions to focus more intently on the content.

The need to read captions for what you can hear might even have a biological base. According to Dr. Sudeepta Varma, a psychiatrist at New York University’s Langone Medical Center, some people may have trouble processing the audio from television.

“I believe that there are a number of individuals who have ADHD who may also suffer from undiagnosed auditory processing disorder (APD), and for these individuals… this may be very helpful,” Dr. Varma told me via email. Closed captioning can provide the visual cues that APD sufferers need to overcome their issues with listening and comprehension, she added.

APD refers to how the brain processes auditory information, and though it supposedly only affects around 5 percent of school-age children, there’s reportedly been a significant uptick in overall awareness. As Dr. Varma pointed out, there may be a lot of people who don’t realize they have APD, but are aware of some of the symptoms, which include being bothered by loud noises, difficulty focusing in loud environments, and forgetfulness.

There may be applications in the classroom, too. In a 2015 study of 2,800 college-age students on the impact of closed captioning on video learning, 75 percent of respondents mentioned that they struggle with paying attention in class. “The most common reasons students used captions… was to help them focus,” Dr. Katie Linder, the research director at Oregon State University who led the study, told me.

And even four years ago, there were hints that the use of closed captioning as a focusing tool would bleed outside the classroom.

As a report on the study put it, “Several people in this study also mentioned that they use captions all the time, not just for their learning experience. Captions with Netflix was mentioned multiple times. So, we know that students are engaging with them outside of the classroom.”

When the NCI first co-developed closed captioning technology some 50 years ago, they called it “words worth watching,” and it did transform millions of lives. Today, we may be witnessing — or reading — a similar revolution."
closedcaptioning  subtitles  closedcaptions  text  reading  genz  generationz  audio  video  tv  film  dialogue  listening  howweread  2019  lanceulnoff  television  adhd  attention  classideas 
11 weeks ago by robertogreco
▶︎ Xièxie | Celer
[See also:
http://williamthomaslong.com/releases/xiexie/ ]

[via:
https://www.are.na/block/3545019 ]

"Phonetic script: Xièxie
Chinese characters: 谢谢
谢谢 ( xiexie / xièxie ) is composed of these characters: 谢 (xie) , 谢 (xie)
English translation: thank you, thanks
to say | to thank | literally means 'thanks'. 'Thank you' in Chinese would be xièxie nĭ (if you thank an individual), or xièxie nĭmen (to say thank you to a group of people).

- Chinese -> English Dictionary

A week before leaving, I bought a dictionary and phrasebook.

Covered in rain, during the days and even the nights, Shanghai was lit in a glow, a mist turning to a constant grey fog. Buildings lined with neon and lcd screens flashed, and from around corners and behind buildings, the night was illuminated much the same as the day. Cars separated the classes, their horns voices punctuating the streets, as pedestrians in groups loosely scattered the streets, talking and walking on speakerphone.

Standing by the metro escalators, there in the square with the overhanging trees of a park, there is construction all around. The buildings seem to be climbing into the darkness at this very moment. Leaving behind and moving forward. We seem to know everything already, our illusion of experience. I imagine taking your hand, I imagined taking your hand, and the lights in the subway flicker as we go deeper. Transit bookmarks each experience, every daydream, and in the end they're interchangeable and indistinguishable between reality and imagination. Try to remember which is real.

To Hangzhou the maglev reached 303 km/h, the towering apartment buildings hunch under construction, passing by in blurs on the flat farmland landscape. I fell asleep, as you were dancing but to no music. The lilies on the lake nodded in the rain, dipping into the water. There was a Wal-Mart near the hotel where I won a pink bunny from a claw machine. I remember the beauty of the architecture of Hangzhou station, birds swirling around the pillars near the top, the echoes of the deep station interior, and the laughing at being lost. There at least we have each other, that memory, or that daydream.

Everything moves faster than we can control. Days are just flashes, moments are mixed up but burned on film, and all of the places and times are out of order. If it could only be us, only ours. If it was ours, if it was us. Sometimes everything goes faster than you can control and you can't stop, much less understand where you are. I bought a dictionary and phrasebook, but "xièxie" was the only word I ever got to use.

- Will Long, January 2019

Preorder note: Expected arrival date: June, 2019
Track lengths may differ between formats.

released January 24, 2019

Xièxie is available as a 2LP edition of 300 copies, 150 silver and 150 black, a 2CD, 6 panel package edition of 500 copies, and a 2CS oversized slipcase edition of 150 copies.

Download includes bonus 2-track, uncut version of the full album.

Design by Rutger Zuydervelt
Mastered by Stephan Mathieu"

[See also:
http://www.celer.jp/
http://williamthomaslong.com/
https://www.instagram.com/willlong_8/
https://soundcloud.com/two_acorns ]
sound  audio  ambient  williamthomaslong  shanghai  2019 
february 2019 by robertogreco
The 'Future Book' Is Here, but It's Not What We Expected | WIRED
"THE FUTURE BOOK was meant to be interactive, moving, alive. Its pages were supposed to be lush with whirling doodads, responsive, hands-on. The old paperback Zork choose-your-own-adventures were just the start. The Future Book would change depending on where you were, how you were feeling. It would incorporate your very environment into its story—the name of the coffee shop you were sitting at, your best friend’s birthday. It would be sly, maybe a little creepy. Definitely programmable. Ulysses would extend indefinitely in any direction you wanted to explore; just tap and some unique, mega-mind-blowing sui generis path of Joycean machine-learned words would wend itself out before your very eyes.

Prognostications about how technology would affect the form of paper books have been with us for centuries. Each new medium was poised to deform or murder the book: newspapers, photography, radio, movies, television, videogames, the internet.

Some viewed the intersection of books and technology more positively: In 1945, Vannevar Bush wrote in The Atlantic: “Wholly new forms of encyclopedias will appear, ready made with a mesh of associative trails running through them, ready to be dropped into the memex and there amplified.”

Researcher Alan Kay created a cardboard prototype of a tablet-like device in 1968. He called it the "Dynabook," saying, “We created a new kind of medium for boosting human thought, for amplifying human intellectual endeavor. We thought it could be as significant as Gutenberg’s invention of the printing press 500 years ago.”

In the 1990s, Future Bookism hit a kind of beautiful fever pitch. We were so close. Brown University professor Robert Coover, in a 1992 New York Times op-ed titled “The End of Books,” wrote of the future of writing: “Fluidity, contingency, indeterminacy, plurality, discontinuity are the hypertext buzzwords of the day, and they seem to be fast becoming principles, in the same way that relativity not so long ago displaced the falling apple.” And then, more broadly: “The print medium is a doomed and outdated technology, a mere curiosity of bygone days destined soon to be consigned forever to those dusty unattended museums we now call libraries.”

Normal books? Bo-ring. Future Books? Awesome—indeterminate—and we were almost there! The Voyager Company built its "expanded books" platform on Hypercard, launching with three titles at MacWorld 1992. Microsoft launched Encarta on CD-ROM.

But … by the mid-2000s, there still were no real digital books. The Rocket eBook was too little, too early. Sony launched the eink-based Librie platform in 2004 to little uptake. Interactive CD-ROMs had dropped off the map. We had Wikipedia, blogs, and the internet, but the mythological Future Book—some electric slab that would somehow both be like and not like the quartos of yore—had yet to materialize. Peter Meirs, head of technology at Time, hedged his bets perfectly, proclaiming: “Ultimately, there will be some sort of device!”

And then there was. Several devices, actually. The iPhone launched in June 2007, the Kindle that November. Then, in 2010, the iPad arrived. High-resolution screens were suddenly in everyone’s hands and bags. And for a brief moment during the early 2010s, it seemed like it might finally be here: the glorious Future Book."



"Yet here’s the surprise: We were looking for the Future Book in the wrong place. It’s not the form, necessarily, that needed to evolve—I think we can agree that, in an age of infinite distraction, one of the strongest assets of a “book” as a book is its singular, sustained, distraction-free, blissfully immutable voice. Instead, technology changed everything that enables a book, fomenting a quiet revolution. Funding, printing, fulfillment, community-building—everything leading up to and supporting a book has shifted meaningfully, even if the containers haven’t. Perhaps the form and interactivity of what we consider a “standard book” will change in the future, as screens become as cheap and durable as paper. But the books made today, held in our hands, digital or print, are Future Books, unfuturistic and inert may they seem."

[sections on self-publishing, crowdfunding, email newsletters, social media, audiobooks and podcasts, etc.]



"It turns out smartphones aren’t the best digital book reading devices (too many seductions, real-time travesties, notifications just behind the words), but they make excellent audiobook players, stowed away in pockets while commuting. Top-tier podcasts like Serial, S-Town, and Homecoming have normalized listening to audio or (nonfiction) booklike productions on smartphones."



"Last August, a box arrived on my doorstep that seemed to embody the apotheosis of contemporary publishing. The Voyager Golden Record: 40th Anniversary Edition was published via a crowdfunding campaign. The edition includes a book of images, three records, and a small poster packaged in an exquisite box set with supplementary online material. When I held it, I didn’t think about how futuristic it felt, nor did I lament the lack of digital paper or interactivity. I thought: What a strange miracle to be able to publish an object like this today. Something independently produced, complex and beautiful, with foil stamping and thick pages, full-color, in multiple volumes, made into a box set, with an accompanying record and other shimmering artifacts, for a weirdly niche audience, funded by geeks like me who are turned on by the romance of space.

We have arrived to the once imagined Future Book in piecemeal truths.

Moving images were often espoused to be a core part of our Future Book. While rarely found inside of an iBooks or Kindle book, they are here. If you want to learn the ukulele, you don’t search Amazon for a Kindle how-to book, you go to YouTube and binge on hours of lessons, stopping when you need to, rewinding as necessary, learning at your own pace.

Vannevar Bush's “Memex” essentially described Wikipedia built into a desk.

The "Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy" in The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy is an iPhone.

In The Book of Sand, Borges wrote of an infinite book: "It was then that the stranger told me: 'Study the page well. You will never see it again.'" Describing in many ways what it feels like to browse the internet or peek at Twitter.

Our Future Book is composed of email, tweets, YouTube videos, mailing lists, crowdfunding campaigns, PDF to .mobi converters, Amazon warehouses, and a surge of hyper-affordable offset printers in places like Hong Kong.

For a “book” is just the endpoint of a latticework of complex infrastructure, made increasingly accessible. Even if the endpoint stays stubbornly the same—either as an unchanging Kindle edition or simple paperback—the universe that produces, breathes life into, and supports books is changing in positive, inclusive ways, year by year. The Future Book is here and continues to evolve. You’re holding it. It’s exciting. It’s boring. It’s more important than it has ever been.

But temper some of those flight-of-fancy expectations. In many ways, it’s still a potato."
craigmod  ebooks  reading  howweread  2018  kindle  eink  print  publishing  selfpublishing  blurb  lulu  amazon  ibooks  apple  digital  bookfuturism  hypertext  hypercard  history  vannevarbush  borges  twitter  animation  video  newsletters  email  pdf  mobi  epub  infrastructure  systems  economics  goldenrecord  voyager  audio  audiobooks  smarthphones  connectivity  ereaders  podcasts  socialmedia  kevinkelly  benthompson  robinsloan  mailchimp  timbuktulabs  elenafavilli  francescacavallo  jackcheng  funding  kickstarter  crowdfunding  blogs  blogging  wikipedia  internet  web  online  writing  howwewrite  self-publishing  youtube 
january 2019 by robertogreco
Opinion | Is Listening to a Book the Same Thing as Reading It? - The New York Times
"A few years ago, when people heard I was a reading researcher, they might ask about their child’s dyslexia or how to get their teenager to read more. But today the question I get most often is, “Is it cheating if I listen to an audiobook for my book club?”

Audiobook sales have doubled in the last five years while print and e-book sales are flat. These trends might lead us to fear that audiobooks will do to reading what keyboarding has done to handwriting — rendered it a skill that seems quaint and whose value is open to debate. But examining how we read and how we listen shows that each is best suited to different purposes, and neither is superior.

In fact, they overlap considerably. Consider why audiobooks are a good workaround for people with dyslexia: They allow listeners to get the meaning while skirting the work of decoding, that is, the translation of print on the page to words in the mind. Although decoding is serious work for beginning readers, it’s automatic by high school, and no more effortful or error prone than listening. Once you’ve identified the words (whether by listening or reading), the same mental process comprehends the sentences and paragraphs they form.

Writing is less than 6,000 years old, insufficient time for the evolution of specialized mental processes devoted to reading. We use the mental mechanism that evolved to understand oral language to support the comprehension of written language. Indeed, research shows that adults get nearly identical scores on a reading test if they listen to the passages instead of reading them.

Nevertheless, there are differences between print and audio, notably prosody. That’s the pitch, tempo and stress of spoken words. “What a great party” can be a sincere compliment or sarcastic put-down, but they look identical on the page. Although writing lacks symbols for prosody, experienced readers infer it as they go. In one experiment, subjects listened to a recording of someone’s voice who either spoke quickly or slowly. Next, everyone silently read the same text, purportedly written by the person whose voice they had just heard. Those hearing the quick talker read the text faster than those hearing the slow talker.

But the inferences can go wrong, and hearing the audio version — and therefore the correct prosody — can aid comprehension. For example, today’s student who reads “Wherefore art thou Romeo?” often assumes that Juliet is asking where Romeo is, and so infers that the word art would be stressed. In a performance, an actress will likely stress Romeo, which will help a listener realize she’s musing about his name, not wondering about his location.

It sounds as if comprehension should be easier when listening than reading, but that’s not always true. For example, one study compared how well students learned about a scientific subject from a 22-minute podcast versus a printed article. Although students spent equivalent time with each format, on a written quiz two days later the readers scored 81 percent and the listeners 59 percent.

What happened? Note that the subject matter was difficult, and the goal wasn’t pleasure but learning. Both factors make us read differently. When we focus, we slow down. We reread the hard bits. We stop and think. Each is easier with print than with a podcast.

Print also supports readers through difficult content via signals to organization like paragraphs and headings, conventions missing from audio. Experiments show readers actually take longer to read the first sentence of a paragraph because they know it probably contains the foundational idea for what’s to come.

So although one core process of comprehension serves both listening and reading, difficult texts demand additional mental strategies. Print makes those strategies easier to use. Consistent with that interpretation, researchers find that people’s listening and reading abilities are more similar for simple narratives than for expository prose. Stories tend to be more predictable and employ familiar ideas, and expository essays more likely include unfamiliar content and require more strategic reading.

This conclusion — equivalence for easy texts and an advantage to print for hard ones — is open to changes in the future. As audiobooks become more common, listeners will gain experience in comprehending them and may improve, and publishers may develop ways of signaling organization auditorily.

But even with those changes, audiobooks won’t replace print because we use them differently. Eighty-one percent of audiobook listeners say they like to drive, work out or otherwise multitask while they listen. The human mind is not designed for doing two things simultaneously, so if we multitask, we’ll get gist, not subtleties.

Still, that’s no reason for print devotees to sniff. I can’t hold a book while I mop or commute. Print may be best for lingering over words or ideas, but audiobooks add literacy to moments where there would otherwise be none.

So no, listening to a book club selection is not cheating. It’s not even cheating to listen while you’re at your child’s soccer game (at least not as far as the book is concerned). You’ll just get different things out of the experience. And different books invite different ways that you want to read them: As the audio format grows more popular, authors are writing more works specifically meant to be heard.

Our richest experiences will come not from treating print and audio interchangeably, but from understanding the differences between them and figuring out how to use them to our advantage — all in the service of hearing what writers are actually trying to tell us."
danilwillingham  howweread  reading  audiobooks  literacy  print  audio  listening 
december 2018 by robertogreco
Studying Humpback Whales to Better Communicate with Aliens
"In this video, a pair of scientists talk about their work in studying the communication patterns of humpback whales to learn more about how we might someday communicate with a possible extraterrestrial intelligence. No, this isn’t Star Trek IV. For one thing, whales have tailored their communication style to long distances, when it may take hours to received a reply, an analog of the length of possible interplanetary & interstellar communications. The scientists are also using Claude Shannon’s information theory to study the complexity of the whales’ language and eventually hope to use their findings to better detect the level of intelligence in alien messages and perhaps even the social structure of the alien civilization itself."

[video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-CIcIZzz8B4 ]
animals  biology  communication  whales  2018  multispecies  morethanhuman  sound  audio  via:lukeneff  intelligence  informationtheory  seti  complexity  language  languages  structure  anthropology  social 
november 2018 by robertogreco
Fonografia Collective
[via: https://clockshop.org/project/south-of-fletcher-fonografia-collective/ ]

"Fonografia Collective believes in empathetic and culturally-sensitive documentary storytelling about everyday people around the world. We find and craft compelling stories about human rights, politics, the environment, and social issues (or any combination thereof) and share them with the general public using radio, oral histories, photography, the printed word, multimedia, public installations, gatherings and events.

Since 2005, we've been working together to advance our vision of a more inclusive and diverse approach to nonfiction storytelling, focusing on communities across the U.S. and Latin America that are often underrepresented or misunderstood by the mainstream media or the public. As consultants with a variety of institutions, nonprofits, and individuals, we strive to do the same. We also run Story Tellers, a social media platform connecting storytellers from around the world to gigs, funding, collaboration opportunities, and to one another.

We are producers and board members of Homelands Productions, a 25 year-old independent documentary journalism cooperative. Until Spring 2017, we collaborated with public radio station KCRW on a year-long multimedia storytelling series about aging called "Going Gray in LA." At present, we are developing a storytelling project about the Bowtie in conjunction with Clockshop, an arts organization in Los Angeles, and California State Parks.

*******

Bios

Ruxandra Guidi has been telling nonfiction stories for almost two decades. Her reporting for public radio, magazines, and various multimedia and multidisciplinary outlets has taken her throughout the United States, the Caribbean, South and Central America, as well as Mexico and the U.S.-Mexico border region.

After earning a Master’s degree in journalism from U.C. Berkeley in 2002, she assisted independent producers The Kitchen Sisters; then worked as a reporter, editor, and producer for NPR's Latino USA, the BBC daily news program, The World, the CPB-funded Fronteras Desk in San Diego-Tijuana, and KPCC Public Radio's Immigration and Emerging Communities beat in Los Angeles. She's also worked extensively throughout South America, having been a freelance foreign correspondent based in Bolivia (2007-2009) and in Ecuador (2014-2016). Currently, she is the president of the board of Homelands Productions, a journalism nonprofit cooperative founded in 1989. She is a contributing editor for the 48 year-old nonprofit magazine High Country News, and she also consults regularly as a writer, editor, translator and teacher for a variety of clients in the U.S. and Latin America. In 2018, she was awarded the Susan Tifft Fellowship for women in documentary and journalism by the Center for Documentary Studies at Duke University.

Throughout her career, Guidi has collaborated extensively and across different media to produce in-depth magazine features, essays, and radio documentaries for the BBC World Service, BBC Mundo, The World, National Public Radio, Marketplace, Canadian Broadcasting Corporation, Orion Magazine, The Walrus Magazine, Guernica Magazine, The Christian Science Monitor, National Geographic NewsWatch, The New York Times, The Guardian, Virginia Quarterly Review, and The Atlantic, among others. She’s a native of Caracas, Venezuela.

*

Bear Guerra is a photographer whose work explores the human impact of globalization, development, and social and environmental justice issues in communities typically underrepresented in the media.

In addition to editorial assignments, he is consistently working on long-term projects, and collaborates with media, non-profit, and arts organizations, as well as other insititutions. His photo essays and images have been published and exhibited widely, both in the United States and abroad.

He was a Ted Scripps Fellow in Environmental Journalism for the 2013-2014 academic year at the University of Colorado - Boulder; a 2014 Mongabay Special Reporting Initiative Fellow; as well as a 2014 International Reporting Project Health and Development Reporting Fellow. In 2012, he was chosen as a Blue Earth Alliance project photographer for his ongoing project "La Carretera: Life Along Peru's Interoceanic Highway". Other recognitions have included being selected for publication in American Photography (2005, 2015, 2016) and Latin American Fotografía (2014, 2016, 2017); an honorable mention in the 2012 Photocrati Fund competition for the same project. Bear has also been a finalist for a National Magazine Award in Photojournalism (2010).

A native of San Antonio, TX, Bear is currently based in Los Angeles.

For more information, a CV, or to order exhibition quality prints please contact Bear directly.

Editorial clients/publications (partial list): The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, Bloomberg BusinessWeek, Le Monde, The Atlantic, Orion Magazine, The Boston Globe Magazine, Virginia Quarterly Review, OnEarth, ProPublica, National Public Radio, BBC's The World, California Watch, High Country News, Quiet Pictures, Texas Monthly, Time.com, Earth Island Journal, O Magazine, Glamour, Ms. Magazine, NACLA Magazine, Yes! Magazine, SEED Magazine, The Sun, The Walrus, Guernica, and others.

Nonprofit/NGO clients & other collaborators: International Rescue Committee, Doctors Without Borders, Lambi Fund of Haiti, Children's Environmental Health Institute, Community Water Center, Environmental Water Caucus, Collective Roots, Other Worlds Are Possible, Immigration Justice Project/American Bar Association, Fundacion Nueva Cultura del Agua (Spain), Chinatown Community for Equitable Development, St. Barnabas Senior Services, Jumpstart, Global Oneness Project, Quiet Pictures."
bearguerra  ruxandraguidi  radio  photography  audio  storytelling  everyday  documentary  humanrights  politics  environment  society  socialissues  print  multimedia  oralhistory  art  installation  gatherings  events  inclusion  inclusivity  diversity  nonfiction  latinamerica  us  media  losangeles  kcrw  fronterasdesk  sandiego  tijuana  kpcc  globalization  sanantonio  fonografiacollective  srg  photojournalism 
september 2018 by robertogreco
Listening for Silence With the Headphones Off | Pitchfork
"After years of escaping into music, writer Mark Richardson finds out what it feels like to hear no sound at all."



"As I sat in the anechoic chamber, I thought about that other life that I once wanted, one in which I was able to master the numbers and bring hi-fi to the world, and I thought about everything that led me from there to here and all that had happened since. I looked around the room and counted my breaths for a moment, and then I tried to see what else I could hear. I sensed what sounded like ticking, and then I realized that it was my heart, and the sound seemed to be coming from a vein in my neck. I could only remember experiencing my heartbeat as a thud, but in here, it sounded uncannily like a faint mechanical watch.

I thought about silence as a metaphor for death, what it means to not be able to hear the voice of someone you love. I thought about Mike Watt still gleaning lessons from D. Boon, and Mother Teresa and God listening to each other. And then, being generally claustrophobic and wanting to scare myself a little, I closed my eyes and imagined what it would be like to be in a coffin. With my eyes shut underneath the bright light, I saw red and orange instead of black—there was still blood moving through my eyelids. I sat for a few minutes like that, seeing if I could hear more if listened harder, but the tick of my heart was it. It didn’t feel like death. It was quite the opposite. I thought about writing it all down. I opened my eyes and blinked and stood up and took one last look around, then I knocked on the door."
silence  attention  audio  music  2018  markrichardson  anechoicchambers  death 
august 2018 by robertogreco
Ode to the Foghorn: The Sound of the Sea | KQED News
"San Francisco residents Andy MacKinnon and Jen Liu live in the Sunset District near Ocean Beach.

From their apartment, MacKinnon says, "We can see the fog rolling in off the ocean and creeping up the street until our house is completely engulfed by fog. And shortly after that happens, we start hearing foghorns."

MacKinnon and Liu have a boatload of questions about the sounds that help vessels navigate safely through the water. They want to know:

Where are these foghorns?
How many of them are there?
Why do we still use them despite technologies like radar and GPS?
Who or what turns them on?

For those answers, hit that listen button at the top of this post, or read Foghorns: Who Presses The Play Button? [https://www.kqed.org/news/11272504/foghorns-who-presses-the-play-button ]"
sanfrancisco  sound  foghorns  2018  sounds  audio 
august 2018 by robertogreco
RWM - RWM
"RWM is a nonprofit online radio project for popular education.

We have done everything in our power to identify the copyright owners of the works we present. Any and all accidental errors and omissions that RWM is notified of in writing will be corrected as soon as possible. For a list of authors, see the details of each program.

Available under a Creative Commons license the following contents.

Part of our programme is possible through Re-Imagine Europe, a four-year project presented by ten cultural organisations from across Europe, funded by Creative Europe.

Re-Imagine Europe is initiated by Sonic Acts (NL) and coordinated by Paradiso (NL) in collaboration with Elevate Festival (AT), Lighthouse (UK), Ina GRM (FR), Student Centre Zagreb / Izlog Festival (HR), Landmark / Bergen Kunsthall (NO), A4 (SK), SPEKTRUM (DE) and Ràdio Web MACBA (ES).

Online interview on the project.
[http://www.perfomap.de/map3/kapitel4/ramos ]

Follow us on Twitter @Radio_Web_MACBA

Contact us: rwm(at)macba.cat"



"sonia: Magnitude that expresses the level of sonorous sensation produced by an intense sound.

The RWM emits SON[I]A, its first program, since May 2 2006.

SON[I]A aims to be an alternative way to receive the information produced during Museum activities; audio information brought to us by characters who take part in activities in and around the MACBA.

This series is produced by: Dolores Acebal, David Armengol, Bani Brusadin, Lúa Coderch, André Chêdas, Lucrecia Dalt, Ricardo Duque, Sonia Fernández Pan, Jaume Ferrete, Antonio Gagliano, Carlos Gómez, Roc Jiménez de Cisneros, Raül Hinojosa, Arnau Horta, Yolanda Jolis, Sònia López, Lluís Nacenta, Enric Puig Punyet, Quim Pujol, Mario Quelart, Anna Ramos and Matías Rossi."



"RWM es un proyecto de radio online con vocación divulgativa y sin ánimo de lucro.

Se han hecho todas las gestiones para identificar a los propietarios de los derechos de autor. Cualquier error u omisión accidental tendrá que ser notificado por escrito a RWM y será corregido en la medida de lo posible. Para consultar el listado de autores, ver detalle de cada programa.

Disponible bajo licencia Creative Commons Creative Commons los contenidos enlazados aquí.

Parte de nuestra programación es posible a través de Re-Imagine Europe, un proyecto de cuatro años que agrupa diez organizaciones culturales europeas, financiado por Creative Europe.

Re-Imagine Europe ha sido iniciado por Sonic Acts (NL) y coordinado a través de Paradiso (NL) en colaboración con Elevate Festival (AT), Lighthouse (UK), Ina GRM (FR), Student Centre Zagreb / Izlog Festival (HR), Landmark / Bergen Kunsthall (NO), A4 (SK), SPEKTRUM (DE) y Ràdio Web MACBA (ES).

Entrevista online sobre las líneas discursivas del proyecto.

Síguenos en Twitter @Radio_Web_MACBA

Contacto: rwm(at)macba.cat"



"sonía: Magnitud que expresa el nivel de sensación sonora producida por un sonido de intensidad.

SON[I]A fue el primer programa de la plataforma RWM y se emite desde el 2 de mayo de 2006.

El SON[I]A se presenta como una alternativa de consumo de la información que produce la actividad del Museo, aprovechando sinergias que se generan a partir de la presencia de personajes, actividades y sonidos que transcurren por el MACBA.

Esta serie está producida por: Dolores Acebal, David Armengol, Bani Brusadin, André Chêdas, Lúa Coderch, Lucrecia Dalt, Ricardo Duque, Sonia Fernández Pan, Jaume Ferrete, Antonio Gagliano, Carlos Gómez, Roc Jiménez de Cisneros, Raül Hinojosa, Arnau Horta, Yolanda Jolis, Sònia López, Lluís Nacenta, Enric Puig Punyet, Quim Pujol, Mario Quelart, Anna Ramos y Matías Rossi."



[via: https://twitter.com/Radio_Web_MACBA/status/1014437790359138304

"🔊 Most listened podcast this June 🔊
1/ @Jenn1fer_A https://rwm.macba.cat/en/sonia/jennifer-lucy-allan/capsula
2/ PROBES by Chris Cutler https://rwm.macba.cat/en/probes_tag
3/ Griselda Pollock https://rwm.macba.cat/en/sonia/griselda-pollock-main/capsula
4/ Domènec https://rwm.macba.cat/es/sonia/domenec-main/capsula
5/ val flores https://rwm.macba.cat/es/sonia/val-flores-main/capsula "]
audio  podcasts  tolisten  sound  sounds  rwm  macba  barcelona  radio 
july 2018 by robertogreco
RWM - SON[I]A: #261 Jennifer Lucy Allan 01.06.2018 (46' 34'')
"#261
Jennifer Lucy Allan
01.06.2018 (46' 34'')

This podcast is part of Re-Imagine Europe, co-funded by the Creative Europe programme of the European Union.

Sound production commissioned to Tiago Pina. Editing by Matias Rossi.

The foghorn is a sonic marker used in conditions of low visibility to alert vessels of hidden navigational hazards. Part of the coastal landscape since its invention in the nineteenth century, foghorns became obsolete with the rise of automatic alert systems or simpler devices such as compressed air horns.

In 2013, the British writer and research Jennifer Lucy Allan, co-director of the record label Arc Light Editions, covered a performance of the 'Foghorn Requiem', a composition that marks the passing of the foghorn from the British coastal landscape. In her review she wrote: 'The foghorn symbolises the sound of industry, the hollering of an age of engines, machines and power, and also a sound that is intensely nostalgic. It suggests loneliness and isolation, but is simultaneously a wordless reassurance to those out at sea that there’s a human presence nearby.' The experience made such a strong impression on her that she ended up dedicating her doctoral thesis to researching the social and cultural history of foghorns, 'a sound that’s lost and not lost at the same time.'

In this podcast we talk to Jennifer Lucy Allan about metereology and aurality, about volumes, distance and communities, about sounds disconnected from their function, holes in YouTube and holes in official archives, and amateur archivists. And about the making of sensory records before the end of the twentieth century and how this archival memory can be interpreted.

Timeline
02:35 A 100-120 decibel steam powered horn on a coastline: how did that happen?
05:02 “Foghorn Requiem”, a starting point
08:45 A massive sound
13:32 Holes in official archives
21:01 Archivists: the invisible heroes
23:10 How it got foggy: the fallibility of archives, memory and sound
26:40 An individual character for every foghorn
28:28 Types of foghorns
30:26 A sound disconnected from its function
34:17 A sound that is lost and not lost at the same time
37:22 Meteorology and aurality
39:23 Music and foghorns: Ingram Marshall’s 'Fog Tropes'
40:39 Music and foghorns: Alvin Curran’s 'Maritime Rites'
43:34 Sensory experiences, language and documentation"
sound  audio  foghorns  podcasts  jenniferlucyallan  music  shipping  uk  aurality  2018  rwm 
july 2018 by robertogreco
Kauai 'O'o - YouTube
[See also: Kauaʻi ʻōʻō on Wikipedia
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kaua%CA%BBi_%CA%BB%C5%8D%CA%BB%C5%8D

[via: https://twitter.com/Rainmaker1973/status/1011873160273317889

"The Kauaʻi ʻōʻō was a bird common in the subtropical forests of Hawaii until the early twentieth century, when its decline began. This is its last song that was last heard in 1987: it is now probably extinct"

via: https://twitter.com/somebadideas/status/1012093976021749760

"Memories in the anthropocene: loss at something impossibly beautiful you never knew of."]
birds  foreden  animals  nature  anthropocene  wildlfide  multispecies  extinction  audio  hawaii  sounds  sounf  birdsong  kauai 
june 2018 by robertogreco
xeno-canto :: Sharing bird sounds from around the world
"What is xeno-canto?
xeno-canto is a website dedicated to sharing bird sounds from all over the world. Whether you are a research scientist, a birder, or simply curious about a sound that you heard out your kitchen window, we invite you to listen, download, and explore the bird sound recordings in the collection.

But xeno-canto is more than just a collection of recordings. It is also a collaborative project. We invite you to share your own bird recordings, help identify mystery recordings, or share your expertise in the forums. Welcome!"

[via: https://twitter.com/RobGMacfarlane/status/1010604840416894978

"In case you don't already know it, Xeno-Canto is an astonishing resource: more than 400,000 recordings of wild bird song & sounds from almost 10,000 different species worldwide, freely available & explorable by region, taxonomy etc Remarkable. Listen here: https://www.xeno-canto.org/ "]
birds  sounds  birdsongs  birding  nature  foreden  audio  recordings  sound 
june 2018 by robertogreco
Ernst Karel | EAR ROOM
"Ernst Karel is an artist and researcher active in the fields of electroacoustic improvisation and composition, location recording, sound for nonfiction vilm, and solo and collaborative sound installations. Karel is currently lab manager for the Sensory Ethnography Lab (SEL) at Harvard University, where as lecturer on Anthropology, he teaches a course in sonic ethnography. For comprehensive information please visit: http://ek.klingt.org "
sensoryethnographylab  anthropology  art  audio  ethnography  sound  sense  sensoryethnography  ernstkarel  interviews 
may 2018 by robertogreco
Austin Kleon on Twitter: "I think a lot about how the phone call — hearing the sound of a real human voice — is becoming a more intimate, meaningful option in the face of 24/7 text/image connection… https://t.co/dDx24gJ62v"
"I think a lot about how the phone call — hearing the sound of a real human voice — is becoming a more intimate, meaningful option in the face of 24/7 text/image connection

There’s a really interesting part of @dada_drummer’s THE NEW ANALOG, where he talks about how different phone calls became when they went digital — background noise was reduced, and so the sense of distance https://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/1620971976/

He points out that the iPhone has 3 microphones, but they're not used to capture extra sound, they're for noise-cancelling — they're used to isolate signal from noise [image]

On the iPhone, “*what* is being said is very clear — but *how* the message is delivered is lost. Is the voice loud or soft? Are we being addressed intimately or publicly? Can we hear hints of other meanings in the speaker’s voice, or does the delivery match the words exactly?”

There’s a “cell yell” that @dada_drummer points out: when we're out in the world on the phone, we tend towards shouting — even though we can be clearly heard in a noisy environ thanks to noise cancellation — b/c the phone doesn't feed our voice back to us, so we can’t regulate it

"essay idea: how the rise of podcasts corresponds to the decline of (personal) phone calls for millennials"
[https://twitter.com/popespeed/status/971940280709603328 ]

This is an interesting point. When I do podcast interviews, I have an extremely good USB mic and headphones to monitor my voice, so I can move closer to the mic, speak softer,

Maybe people like podcasts so much because they replicate more of what a real world or analog telephone conversation sounds like? Something to ponder!

Oh, I’m reminded now: @cordjefferson told a beautiful story at @PopUpMag about a voicemail message his mother left him, and how it changed the way he thought about phone calls. (I don’t think it exists online, or I’d link to it.)"
austinkleon  audio  microphones  mobile  phones  telephones  intimacy  voice  sound  recording  noise  noisecancellation  analog  conversation  phonecalls  humans  connection  2018  digital  iphone  podcasts 
april 2018 by robertogreco
The best audiobooks for kids
"When they were younger, my kids spent a lot of time in the car on long trips. Unwilling to give them an iPad to watch a movie or play games, we would often spend a big portion of these trips listening to audiobooks. Some of our favorites were Cricket in Times Square, Matilda, Charlotte’s Web, Charlie and the Chocolate Factory, and The Wonderful Wizard of Oz.

But my personal favorite The Trumpet of the Swan, wonderfully narrated by E.B. White himself! We’ve probably listened to it four or five times at least. The other day the kids and I were discussing the system of Latin names for species and when I asked if they knew any of them besides homo sapiens, Ollie shouted “Cygnus buccinator!” (The only one I could come up with off the top of my head was Rattus rattus.)

I’ve also heard good things about Jim Dale’s narration of all seven Harry Potter books, some of the other Roald Dahl stories like Danny the Champion of the World, Hidden Figures Young Readers’ Edition, Chitty Chitty Bang Bang, and The Hobbit.

I’m also curious about See You in the Cosmos. I’m reading it aloud to my kids right now in book form but given how the story is told, the audiobook might be even better.

Thanks to Lexi Mainland at Cup of Jo for the inspiration for this post."
classideas  audio  audiobooks  parenting  books 
february 2018 by robertogreco
BBC Blogs - Academy - How to improve your mojo skills by sacrificing a latte
"A journalist using only the pre-installed apps on their smartphone is like someone driving a Ferrari in first gear. At the risk of stretching the metaphor to breaking point, you can get your phone purring along in fifth with the addition of just a few well-chosen apps. But you’ll have to buy them – yes, by spending actual money.

Before I highlight some of my personal favourites and explain how they could improve your mojo (mobile journalism) output, here’s a quick question: how often do you buy a coffee during the day? Perhaps once on the way to work to get yourself going and again later to counter that mid-afternoon slump? Anecdotally from my face-to-face training for the BBC Academy, many people don't think twice about spending £3 for a triple decaf caramel dry latte (extra nutmeg) once or twice a day.

Yet ask those same people when they last spent a comparable sum on an app to soup up their smartphones and I find that it’s rarely within the last month. More often it is "never".

But if the money on just one coffee a week went instead towards an app, within a few months that smartphone would have acquired new powers (and you might even have lost a few pounds from your waistline).

The apps I’m writing about here are established favourites within the growing global mojo community - that is, producers and reporters who cover news stories and create related content using just their smartphones plus a few gadgets and gizmos like a tripod, a lens, a microphone and a spare battery.

You can also find an entire level of high end apps which stray more into cinematography than video for news and journalism, but I won't be dealing with those here."
smartphones  phones  mobile  journalism  reporting  applications  ios  iphone  video  audio  howto  tutorials  cinematography  editing  onlinetoolkit 
february 2018 by robertogreco
Hear the Otherworldly Sounds of Skating on Thin Ice | National Geographic - YouTube
"This small lake outside Stockholm, Sweden, emits otherworldly sounds as Mårten Ajne skates over its precariously thin, black ice. “Wild ice skating,” or “Nordic skating,” is both an art and a science. A skater seeks out the thinnest, most pristine black ice possible—both for its smoothness, and for its high-pitched, laser-like sounds."
sound  sounds  audio  ice  sweden  iceskating  2018 
february 2018 by robertogreco
Indepth Sound Design (@indepthsounddesign) • Fotos y vídeos de Instagram
"Indepth Sound Design a treasure trove of educational sound deconstruction, audio stem breakdowns, and other aural inspiration. based in los angeles, ca"
sound  audio  instagrams 
february 2018 by robertogreco
FIELD KIT - Electroacoustic Workstation by KOMA Elektronik GmbH — Kickstarter
"The new KOMA Elektronik Field Kit is the perfect tool for everyone who would like to experiment with electroacoustic sound. Use everyday objects, amplify them and use them to make sound, like our heroes John Cage and David Tudor used to do! 

The Field Kit is optimized to process signals from microphones, contact microphones, electromagnetic pickups and able to run DC motors and solenoids. On top of that it can receive radio signals and convert signals from switches and sensors into control voltage!"



"The Field Kit boasts 7 separate functional blocks all focussed on receiving or generating all types of signals. They are designed to operate together as a coherent electroacoustic workstation or alternatively together with other pieces of music electronics with the ability to use control voltage signals.

The Field Kit is capable of doing a lot of different things! Let us run your through its functions, first there is the Four Channel Mixer:

The Four Channel Mixer is the beating heart of the Field Kit, providing a fully functional mixer with individual Gain, Mix Level and Tone control over each channel and individual Master- and Aux sub-mixes.

The level of the Master and Aux Channels can be set with the Master Volume and Aux Volume controls and the channels being sent to the Aux sub-mix can be set with dedicated Aux Select-buttons. The Aux sub-mix is pre-fader.

For the noise heads amongst you: the mixer can be used very well for feedback mixing and no-input mixing as well; there is plenty of Gain to play with and the Tone control is a passive Low/Hi Pass filter drastically changing the sound.

AM/FM/SW Radio with CV Search function

The CV Radio is a CV-controllable radio receiver capable of receiving radio frequencies on AM/FM and SW bands. Additionally it provides the ability to catch electromagnetic waves for further processing inside the Field Kit. The frequency of the radio can be set with a dedicated multifunctional Search-control which acts both as a manual CV-source and as an input attenuator for a CV-signal.

The Field Kit comes with three connectors to attach needed antenna's for both FM and SW bands and a loop antenna connector for AM signals.

Envelope Follower with CV and Gate Out

The Envelope Follower in the Field Kit applies two functions to the waveform you send to the input: full-wave rectification (mirroring of negative portions of the waveform) and low-pass filtering (averaging). It can also be used for frequency doubling of a signal, which is a great tool to have in the electroacoustic domain.

In addition to the Envelope Out, the Envelope Follower inside the Field Kit also gives out a gate signal whenever the level of the input signal is high enough. The input signal level can be set with a dedicated Attenuation-control.

Low Frequency Oscillator (LFO)

The Low Frequency Oscillator generates periodically varying voltages to be used as control signals. The output waveform can be set with a three-position Waveform-control and gives out either a Square-, Triangle- or a mix of Square and Triangle waveforms.

The frequency of the LFO can be set together with a dedicated Frequency-control and a three-position Range-control. With the higher range-settings, the frequency of the LFO reaches into the audio-range so the LFO can also be used as a simple drone sound source, send this is into a delay effect and you can make trippy sounds for hours!

DC Interface

A very cool function of the Field Kit is the DC Interface. You can use its output voltages to run little motors, fans, solenoids, buzzers and control them with control voltage signals. You can pick up the vibrations and electromagnetic waves with the contact microphones and electromagnetic pickup.

The DC Interface can be used together with PWM (Pulse Width Modulation)- or Pulse-controlled devices. An example of a PWM-controlled device is a DC-motor of which the rotation speed can be set by varying the pulse width. A Pulse-controlled device can be a solenoid-motor whose impulse strength/distance can be set with the length of the control pulse. Other devices that can be used together with the DC Interface could be computer fans, LEDs, relay switches, etc.

Here are a few things you can use with the DC Interface:

The operation mode of the DC Interface can be set with a two-position Mode-switch and there is a multifunctional Intensity-control and a CV/Trigger-input whose functions are dependent on the mode of use and whether a jack is present at the CV/Trigger-input.

The Field Kit Expansion Pack comes with both a prepared DC-motor and a prepared solenoid-motor ready to be used together with the DC Interface or alternatively the user can prepare devices on his/her own.

Signal Interface

The Signal Interface is a nifty toolset to transform the raw signals of a wide variety of sensors and switches into signals that can be used with the Field Kit or other gear. This means you can trigger or control sound by light, heat, humidity, distance, speed, acceleration, proximity, pressure, force, level, all depending on what type of switch or sensor you are using! Ideal for sound installations!

The Signal Interface consists of two parts, the Switch and the Sensor Interface.

The Switch Interface transforms signals from different switches like buttons, ball- or tilt-switches etc. into four different types of gate signals. It can output gates, inverted gates, ramp or sawtooth triggers of adjustable length (1ms to 1s). It has two outputs that can be used at the same time, so you could drive a motor and scan the CV Radio with the same switch! The output-voltage spans a range from 0V to about 8V.

The Sensor Interface is made to manipulate the output voltage of analog sensors, like light-, heat- or distance-sensors and convert their signals into control voltage. It can amplify or attenuate the incoming signal and add a DC-offset, so you can for instance set the motor to a constant speed and make it run faster by outputting a higher voltage from the sensor.

The maximum output-voltage is about 8V. It provides enough current to power an Arduino!"
audio  sound  hardware  electroacousticsound  electronics 
january 2018 by robertogreco
Andre Louis - FreakyFwoof Shorts - AudioPlayer
"FreakyFwoof Shorts is your one-stop-shop for producers, podcasters, media students, radio stations and hardcore enthusiasts looking for high-quality intros, outros, sweeps and stings for your projects."
sounds  free  audio  music 
november 2017 by robertogreco
Nicole L'Huillier | Space is the place
"Research Assistant MIT Media Lab - PhD in Media Arts & Sciences

Hola! I am a Chilean interdisciplinary artist, musician and architect based in Boston. I am currently based at the MIT Media Lab as a PhD researcher in the Opera of The Future group. My work explores spatial experience, perception and the relationship between sound & space. I work at the intersection of art, music, architecture, science, and technology in order to build new experiences that reconnect us with our sense of awe and wonder, while modeling and re-shaping human cognition. I am also an experimental musician, drummer, singer, synth lover and one-half of the space pop duo Breaking Forms. I am currently creating multi-sensory immersive environments, to open questions about possible futures, redefine how we perceive our world, and most importantly: trigger connection and empathy between human and non-human agents. My work is based on the idea of sound as a spatial fact, and architecture as a medium not for a purpose but for an effect. I’ve been invited to exhibit work, perform, give talks and do projects for the ACADIA 2017, 13th Media Arts Bienal Chile 2017, meConvention SXSW 2017, Venice Biennale Architettura 2016, MFA Museum Boston, SXSW Festival 2016, Festival FIIS 2016, NEWINC. New Museum NYC, Guggenheim Museum NYC, Sónar Sound Festival Santiago, XII Media Arts Biennial Chile 2015, XIX Architecture Biennial Chile 2015, XIII Architecture Biennial Sao Paulo 2013, Lollapalooza Festival, Centro Cultura GAM Santiago, Festival Primavera Fauna, Museo Arte Precolombino Santiago, Parque Bicentenario Santiago, among others."

[See also:
https://soundcloud.com/nicole-lhuillier
https://twitter.com/nikita_lh
https://www.instagram.com/nico_lh/
https://www.media.mit.edu/people/nicolelh/overview/
https://musesmilk.tumblr.com/post/131649881720/nicole-lhuillier

https://breakingforms.bandcamp.com/
https://www.instagram.com/breakingforms/
https://twitter.com/BreakingForms
https://twitter.com/juanneco
https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCVSXoBV0ZtIOHtXVKrmeryQ ]

[via:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vzEcVEFdIHs
https://soundcloud.com/nicole-lhuillier/ephemeral-urbanism-cities-in-constant-flux ]
nicolel'huillier  sound  audio  chile  art  artists  music  breakingforms 
october 2017 by robertogreco
NOTHING | but the textures of my body de Nicole L'Huillier
"*These songs are composed for headphones.

[https://soundcloud.com/nicole-lhuillier/sets/things

1 NOTHING | but the textures of my body
2 SOMETHING | mindscapes
3 EVERYTHING | the space we share ]

THINGS is my first solo album. It consists of three tracks, and each one contains a different scale of sonic spatial scenario. This way, THINGS is constructed by 1. NOTHING (but the textures of my body), this track alludes to the nonexistent and constructed idea of the perception of silence by presenting a composition of the ever-present bodily textures. 2. SOMETHING (mindscapes) exposes the capacity of roaming from one mental space to another. To do so, the 5 different parts of this track are composed of frequencies that can stimuli different brain waves. The last track 3. EVERYTHING (the space we share) builds a sonic portrait of the place I grew up and the common sonic scenarios we all share in our culture. This piece gathers field recordings done during my last visit to Chile, my country of origin.

THINGS was released as a sound installation at the me Convention, SXSW, Frankfurt, September 2017. The installation was done using the radio as a spatial medium and was diffused in 3 different radio channels that could be tuned in with radios and headphones provided for the assistants. This way, THINGS presents different scales or layers of spaces by using in its physical form the radio as a mobile space and a transversal sonic architecture."
sound  audio  nicolel'huillier  chile  binaural  soundscapes  2017  silence  binauralrecording 
october 2017 by robertogreco
Zoom H1 Tutorial - YouTube
"Audio settings:
- WAV
- 48/16
- Auto level OFF
- Lo cut OFF"
zoomh1  howto  audio  recording  2013 
september 2017 by robertogreco
Oral History Summer School
"Oral History Summer School was established in Hudson, New York, in 2012, as a rigorous training program to help students from varied fields––writers, social workers, radio producers, artists, teachers, human rights workers––make use of oral history as an ethical interview practice in their lives and work (Read More: What is Oral History?).

Spanning the realms of scholarship, advocacy, media-making, and art, OHSS is a hands-on program, which means that students conduct interviews, design projects, produce radio documentary, and archive their recordings while learning the theoretical underpinnings of the field. We also offer advanced training in the form of focused workshops including those on memory loss, mixed ability interviewing, oral history-based documentary film, ethnomusicology, family history, and trauma. We're a cross-disciplinary program with a strong belief that the field is best defined and explored with the guidance of instructors from the field of oral history and from adjacent fields/pursuits: social work, disability studies, ethnomusicology, trauma studies, grassroots organizing, medicine, documentary film, and more.

Our students have come from Italy, Australia, Germany, Switzerland, China, Canada, Spain, Turkey, Brazil, Panama, and all over the United States. OHSS alumni have gone on to apply their oral history training to exhibitions, policy work, branding, art projects, and research, as well as collaborations with community organizations, institutions, and schools. You can read more about our alumni network and their accomplishments, here, and in OHSS Alumni newsletters I (2014) and II (2016).

In summer 2016, we will will offer our first workshop in Chicago, with the Studs Terkel Radio Archive and Chicago Torture Justice Memorials. Our first online class will be offered in 2016 and Oral History Winter School will return to Hudson in January 2017. Read more about our workshops, here."
oralhistory  storytelling  training  sfsh  professionaldevelopment  classideas  writing  humanrights  ethnomusicology  traumastudies  grassroots  organizing  documentary  film  audio  radio  squarespace 
july 2017 by robertogreco
BBC World Service - The Compass, Where Are You Going?, Where Are You Going: Reykjavik
[via: "Simple conceit, great radio. 'Where are you going?'"
https://twitter.com/justinpickard/status/878376504064790529 ]

"Where Are You Going: Reykjavik
The Compass, Where Are You Going? Episode 2 of 3"

In the world’s northernmost capital, Reykjavik, Catherine Carr talks to a swimmer bequeathed a poignant request from a friend, to the shopkeeper who makes beautiful handbags out of fish skin; from the sister who makes an apology to a sibling with fresh pastries, to the roller derby girls walking on thin ice. These portraits capture something of the city’s DNA, its sense of isolation, mythical beauty and rugged adventure."

[See also:

"Where Are You Going: Hong Kong
The Compass, Where Are You Going? Episode 3 of 3"
http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p055v3d4

In a city where East meets West and old meets new, Catherine randomly approaches a man in a taxi queue to ask him about where he is going. A funny conversation about the parcel he is taking to a friend soon leads to a riveting account of his near-death experience. Such is the currency of this series where strangers reveal unexpected details about their lives. Catherine also chats to an exhausted Philippine maid enjoying downtime with her friends, meets the “Lolita Goths” who want to feel like princesses and the devoted gay couple who wooed each other with love letters.

These snapshots of people’ lives, mixed with an evocative soundscape of the city create an audio collage which is an unpredictable and poetic listen.



"Where Are You Going: Brussels
The Compass, Where Are You Going? Episode 1 of 3"
http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p054gp23

An interrupted journey is like a portal into somebody else’s life. Catherine Carr interrupts strangers on everyday journeys asks them where they are going. The encounters which follow reveal funny, poignant and sometimes astonishing details about the lives of others.

In cosmopolitan Brussels, she meets a multilingual Bulgarian translator who is mad about dancing and whose wife thinks he’s “a little bit weird” – not least because he is openly gay. In a freezing park, we bump into a choreographer who is doing his best to help a vulnerable young Romanian man. And on the cobbled streets of the European capital, a young couple on a mini-break are starting to realise they are in love."]
classideas  radio  audio  people  cities  reykjavík  hongkong  brussels  2017  catherinecarr  iceland  swimming  swimmingpools 
june 2017 by robertogreco
xeno-canto :: Sharing bird sounds from around the world
"xeno-canto is a website dedicated to sharing bird sounds from all over the world. Whether you are a research scientist, a birder, or simply curious about a sound that you heard out your kitchen window, we invite you to listen, download, and explore the bird sound recordings in the collection.

But xeno-canto is more than just a collection of recordings. It is also a collaborative project. We invite you to share your own bird recordings, help identify mystery recordings, or share your expertise in the forums. Welcome!"
audio  birds  nature  sound  animals 
june 2017 by robertogreco
Radio Garden
"About Radio Garden

By bringing distant voices close, radio connects people and places. Radio Garden allows listeners to explore processes of broadcasting and hearing identities across the entire globe. From its very beginning, radio signals have crossed borders. Radio makers and listeners have imagined both connecting with distant cultures, as well as re-connecting with people from ‘home’ from thousands of miles away – or using local community radio to make and enrich new homes.

In the section Live, you can explore a world or radio as it is happening right now. Tune into any place on the globe: what sounds familiar? What sounds foreign? Where would you like to travel and what sounds like ‘home’?

In the section on History you can tune into clips from throughout radio history that show how radio has tried to cross borders. How have people tried to translate their nations into the airwaves? What did they say to the world? How do they engage in conversation across linguistic and geographical barriers?

Click over to Jingles for a world-wide crash course in station identification. How do stations signal within a fraction of a second what kind of programmes you are likely to hear? How do they project being joyful, trustworthy, or up to the minute?

Then stop and listen to radio Stories where listeners past and present tell how they listen beyond their walls. How do they imagine the voices and sounds from around the globe? How do they use radio to make themselves at home in the world?

Radio Garden incorporates results from the international research project Transnational Radio Encounters directed by Golo Föllmer at Martin-Luther University Halle, in co-operation with the Universities of Copenhagen and Aarhus in Denmark, London Metropolitan and the University of Sunderland in the UK, and Utrecht University in the Netherlands. The project was funded by HERA (Humanities in the European Research Area) from 2013-2016.

Concept & Production by Studio Puckey in collaboration with Moniker.

Technology & live section by Studio Puckey.

Design, UI & UX by Studio Puckey in collaboration with Phillip Bührer.

Radio Garden is developed in co-ordination with the Netherlands Institute for Sound and Vision.

Enquiries:
Mail contact@puckey.studio
Twitter @studiopuckey

If you want to submit your radio station to Radio Garden, please fill in the station submission form.

If you to make a change to an existing station on Radio Garden, please contact us at submissions@radio.garden."
radio  classideas  music  maps  mapping  via:davidtedu  languages  studiopuckey  sound  audio 
january 2017 by robertogreco
Audm on the App Store
"Audm presents the world's best long-form journalism, read aloud word-for-word by celebrated audiobook narrators.

Listen to hours' worth of new stories every week, from publications including:

* The Atlantic
* Foreign Policy
* The New York Review of Books
* Outside Magazine
* ProPublica
* London Review of Books
* Aeon
* Epic Magazine
* Pacific Standard
* Guernica
* World Policy Journal
* The Bitter Southerner
* The Marshall Project
* The Millions
* The American Scholar
* The Morning News

Add stories to your playlist to download them, then listen on the go -- even with no Internet connection. Within a story, jump to any paragraph by tapping on it. Choose the narration speed you like best.

If you enjoy your free trial, subscribe for continued access. You will be charged $6.99/month for access to the entire Audm catalogue, to which new stories are being added all the time. Payment will be handled through your iTunes account. The first charge will occur upon confirmation of purchase. Your subscription will automatically renew 24 hours before the end of each subscription period. You may cancel your subscription by going to iOS Settings > iTunes & App Stores > Apple ID > View Apple ID > Subscriptions > Manage. If you cancel in the middle of a subscription period, your cancelation will become effective at the end of that period, and you will forfeit access to the Audm service for the remainder of that period.

Terms of use and privacy policy: http://www.audm.com/tos.html "
longform  applications  ios  via:ablerism  audio  iphone  application 
january 2017 by robertogreco
Listening to Jupiter on a DIY Radio | Hackaday
"By Jove, he built a radio!

If you want to get started with radio astronomy, Jupiter is one of the easiest celestial objects to hear from Earth. [Vasily Ivanenko] wanted to listen, and decided to build a modular radio receiver for the task. So far he’s written up six of the eight planned blog posts.

The system uses an LNA, a direct conversion receiver block, and provides audio output to a speaker, output to a PC soundcard, and a processed connection for an analog to digital converter. The modules are well-documented and would be moderately challenging to reproduce.

NASA maintains a list of receivers suitable for Jovian listening, although you can use basically any receiver that covers the right frequency band. If you want to hear what the giant planet sounds like, check out the video, below.

If you are interested in a cheap way to listen to some of our other cosmic neighbors, you might think about converting a satellite dish. Or, you can try something smaller."
audio  jupiter  planets  space  radio  howto  classideas  astronomy 
november 2016 by robertogreco
An Evening with Lawrence Abu Hamdan | MoMA
"MoMA presents the US premiere of an “audio essay” by Beirut-based Jordanian-British artist Lawrence Abu Hamdan, whose work attempts to trace and highlight the relationship between the act of listening and politics, human rights, international law and borders, testimony, and truth. Using audio documentaries and essays, as well as audiovisual installations, Abu Hamdan expresses his fascination with different types of listening at work in today’s legal and political forums. MoMA has recently acquired three important works dealing with similar themes: The Whole Truth, Conflicted Phonemes, and The Aural Contract Audio Archive.

In this new audio essay (a term the artist prefers to “lecture-performance”), he focuses on Saydnaya prison, near Damascus. Working with Forensic Architecture, Amnesty International, and the survivors of Saydnaya, Abu Hamdan captures “ear-witness accounts,” as detainees reconstruct events and the architecture of the prison they experienced through sound. The work raises pivotal questions about the politics of the field known as “forensic listening.”

The artist will be joined for a conversation by Ana Janevski, Associate Curator, Department of Media and Performance Art.

Lawrence Abu Hamdan is a 2015–17 Vera List Center Fellow."

[Casey says:

"he’s… just about the smartest person ever… Super dense speaking/listening/visuals on secret prisons, gunshots, birds.

Precedent for the kind of surveillance we’re dealing with, he argued, isn’t ~the Panopticon~, but Cage’s 4’33 (Silence).

(Listening to foley reconstructions of military prison torture sounds for 2 hrs…"]

[See also:
"What Now? 2015: The Politics of Listening - Keynote presentation by Lawrence Abu Hamdan"
https://vimeo.com/129018344

What Now? 2015: The Politics of Listening
April 24 - 25, 2015
The New School, Anna-Maria & Stephen Kellen Auditorium
66 Fifth Avenue, New York City

What Now? 2015 is a two-day annual symposium, organized by Art in General in collaboration with the Vera List Center for Art and Politics, which investigates critical and timely issues in contemporary art. Dedicated to the topic of “The Politics of Listening,” the 2015 symposium comprises four panel discussions spanning Friday and Saturday, a keynote delivered by Lawrence Abu Hamdan, and a program of sound installations, audio works, film screenings, and performances.

For more information on What Now? 2015: The Politics of Listening, visit:
artingeneral.org/exhibitions/592

Lawrence Abu Hamdan is a multi-media artist with a background in DIY music. In 2015, he was the Armory Show commissioned artist and participated in the New Museum Triennial. The artist’s forensic audio investigations are made as part of the Forensic Architecture research project at Goldsmiths College, University of London, where he is also a PhD candidate and associate lecturer. Recent exhibitions include solo shows at institutions such as The Showroom, London; Casco, Utrecht; Beirut, Cairo; and forthcoming at Kunsthalle St Gallen and the Museum of Modern Art, New York.]

[See also:
"LAWRENCE ABU HAMDAN: Introduction"
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=B8UAwxoeIi8

"VOICE ~ CREATURE OF TRANSITION

“[…] the voice is elusive, always changing, becoming, elapsing, with unclear contours […]“ – Mladen Dolar in: A Voice And Nothing More (2006)

Conference- festival that took place from 20-23 March, 2014 at De Brakke Grond, a theater space located in the heart of Amsterdam’s old city center.

Gabriëlle Schleijpen, head of Studium Generale Rietveld Academie invited  Lawrence Abu Hamdan, If I Can’t Dance I Don’t Want To Be Part Of Your Revolution, Ruth Noack and Mark Beasley to each inaugurate a discursive and performative program of one day.

Thursday March 20

The Right To Silence, curated and presented by Lawrence Abu Hamdan

A daylong exploration of how voices are both heard and silenced; listening itself will be interpreted in its many forms and affects, allowing us to understand both the frontiers of the voice and the tireless battle to govern and contain it.

With contributions by Noah Angell, Ali Kaviani (Silent University), Anna Kipervaser, Maha Mamoun and Haytham El-Wardany, Kobe Matthys (Agence), Niall Moore, James Parker and Tom Rice."]

[And more:

"Artist Lawrence Abu Hamdan Demands the Right to Stay Silent"
http://www.vice.com/read/artist-lawrence-abu-hamdan-demands-the-right-to-stay-silent-981

"THE RIGHT TO SILENCE: An event series in three parts"
http://www.electra-productions.com/projects/2012/silence/overview.shtml

"Lawrence Abu Hamdan on Contra Diction: Speech Against Itself"
http://www.newmuseum.org/calendar/view/452/lawrence-abu-hamdan-s-contra-diction-speech-against-itself

"LAWRENCE ABU HAMDAN: THE POLITICAL IMPLICATIONS OF SOUND AND SILENCE"
http://www.digicult.it/articles/lawrence-abu-hamdan-the-political-implications-of-sound-and-silence/

"The Right To Silence I"
http://www.theshowroom.org/events/the-right-to-silence-i

"The Right To Silence II"
http://www.theshowroom.org/events/the-right-to-silence-ii

"Lawrence Abu Hamdan: Aural Contract: The Freedom of Speech Itself"
http://www.theshowroom.org/exhibitions/lawrence-abu-hamdan-aural-contract-the-freedom-of-speech-itself
http://sound-art-text.com/post/34633829824/lawrence-abu-hamdan-aural-contract-the-freedom ]
via:caseygollan  lawrenceabuhamdan  listening  politcs  humanrights  tolisten  borders  law  internationallaw  testimony  truth  audio  politics  saysnayaprison  damascus  syria  amnestyinternational  forensiclistening  gunshots  birds  soundscapes  classideas  earwitnesses  hearing  anajanecski 
november 2016 by robertogreco
The sounds in your backyard are unique, go record them - The Verge
"Pristine soundscapes are so important that the National Park Service works to preserve wilderness sounds in many natural parks. There's even federal legislation in the US, like the 1987 National Park Overflights Act, that aims to keep noise from airplanes out of the lands below. Of course, it's impossible to escape noise where I live in New York City, but recently I've been inspired to look for quieter pastures.

After reading Bernie Krause’s The Great Animal Orchestra, I took the first chance I had to get out of the city for the weekend and head up to my hometown in Connecticut to listen and record soundscapes from a less industrialized environment. As an audio engineer I was well-prepared for these kind of projects, since I have to record outside frequently.

But you don't have to be an audio engineer to capture your own favorite natural soundscapes. Here are some basic gadgets, tools, and tips for recording soundscapes in your own backyard. I’m a big fan of recording in stereo and I think you get a fuller and more immersive sound this way so here’s some ways you can do that."
soundscapes  nature  2016  audio  sound  recording 
november 2016 by robertogreco
K.T. Billey: Utmost Import: Instagram & the Future of the Icelandic Language - Guernica / A Magazine of Art & Politics
[about: https://www.instagram.com/everysinglewordinicelandic/

"Futbol vikings, moonbeams, Björk—Iceland has long-since captured the global imagination, often capitalizing on foreign fascination. Tourism has been essential to the country’s post-crash economic recovery and guerrilla activities in the form of social media have emerged as a complement to ad campaigns and travel initiatives. Put simply, the posted image is the new word of mouth and Iceland is Instagrammer heaven. When cabin porn is a noun-ed phenomenon, Grade-A bragging visuals have brought hordes of visitors and money to the Nordic island. However, the influx has not been without anxiety. One Instagram account embodies the bane and boon of tourism for contemporary Icelandic identity.

Every Single Word in Icelandic, @everysinglewordinicelandic, is one of the most charming mini-galleries around. The concept is simple: pictographs break down the etymology of Icelandic words, illustrating cultural personality and the magic of language while teaching interested followers a thing or two.

Created by Eunsan Huh, a graphic designer who began learning Icelandic in New York City, many Every Single Word entries are Icelandic symbology: wool sweater, hot dog, whale (peysa, pylsa, hvalur). Others reflect Iceland’s absorption of new practices. In a shepherding country, chopsticks are called matprjónar or “food knitting needles.” Idioms also pop up—in Icelandic a tough cookie could be called a harðjaxl, a “hard molar.” The ranks of the account’s followers has steadily grown. Particularly in terms of nature and ‘folk’ attitudes, we seem collectively predisposed to being amused by Iceland the way audiences at comedy shows come ready to laugh.

The interest in Icelandic is certainly welcome. A language spoken by about 300 000 people must work to preserve itself. Reliance on importation and a history of Danish rule make Iceland no stranger to fears of foreign influence. A vital function of the Icelandic Language Council is to establish Icelandic words for new inventions. Drawing on Old Norse and Icelandic roots, the goal is to prevent an influx of loanwords—once Danish, now English—from taking over. Some borrowed words have taken hold—the use of banani far surpasses bjúgaldin “sausage fruit”—but preservation efforts have paid off in terms of language survival and intrigue. The word for television is a popular example that reminds us of how strange tv was upon its invention, as well as of the beauty of the English word. Sjónvarp breaks down into “vision caster.” Tele-vision. It may seem obvious, augljós, (auga<, eye, + ljós, light), but is there anything we take more for granted?

Perhaps one thing. The internet, whose here-to-eternity English poses an unprecedented threat to Iceland’s notoriously difficult, poetic, and odd tongue. Icelandic schooling has long included English, Danish, Latin, and various other languages, but English is particularly alluring for young people looking to participate in global arenas. Not just the online, but in technology use in general. As the Icelandic writer Sjón put it in an interview I conducted with him for Asymptote International Literary Journal,“When the day comes that we have to speak to our refrigerators in English (which I believe is not far in the future), Icelandic will retreat very fast.”

Former President of Iceland Vigdis Finnbogadóttir drew an oft-repeated distinction: Icelandic is not a ‘small language’ but rather ‘a language spoken by few.’ According to Finnbogadóttir, an active linguistic advocate (and the world’s first elected woman head of state—fewer speakers often boast when they can), there are no small languages. This rings true to anyone who has been mouth-baffled in a land of extensive compound words. It is not a numbers game, but hundreds of years of Nordic literature—an immeasurable contribution to world culture and mythology—is contingent on linguistic knowledge."



"Tomorrow’s folk tale might be a cautionary yarn about the Pokémon hunter who fell into Goðafoss. Purists might cringe at the notion, romantics might refuse to read it—or watch the trailer. There is much to bemoan about the evolving tension between technology and our physical and social lives: bodily detachment, fractured attention, intimate dis-ease. Worries about Icelandic are well-founded, but its speakers are aware. Gerður Kristný responded to the ‘why not write in English’ question by explaining that language has so much to do with Icelandic independence and identity, she will always write in Icelandic. It is her language. Technology looms, but pride and artistry is made of different stuff. Human obstinacy is a phenomenon unto itself.

The fate of Icelandic and other languages spoken by few remains to be seen, read, and heard. For now, as with anything, we can take the mixed bag, if we believe we have a choice. Absorbing positive resonance when we can is a coping skill as venerable as sagas. Marveling at inventions creates space for thought about how to use them well.

Rarity may protect languages via the kind of cult interest Icelandic enjoys. Print was supposed to be dead by now, or the realm of fetishized art objects and eccentric collectors. Yet book-devices haven’t supplanted books themselves. There are simply more ways to read. The internet is akin to Borges’ Babel in both threat and potential—it cultivates a browsing attitude that eats its children but also offers a place to be intentionally communicative. Never have we had such a grand chance to self-define or such an audience for our own terms.

“Orchestra” is a pertinent Every Single Word in Icelandic entry. Hljómsveit, literally “sound team.” The ancient chorus persists, in one form or another, and it is what we make of it."

[See also: http://grapevine.is/author/eunsan-huh/
https://www.behance.net/gallery/28612451/Every-Single-Word-In-Icelandic ]
iceland  icelandic  language  languages  instagram  ktbilley  eunsanhuh  symbols  symbology  history  linguistics  audio  pronunciation  translation  english  illustration  via:tealtan  instagrams 
august 2016 by robertogreco
An Actual Playable Tortilla Record Etched with a Laser Cutter - YouTube
"After a certain video went viral with someone "playing" a tortilla with some piped-in music, I wanted to see if I could make an actual working tortilla record."
tortillas  food  vinyl  music  audio  humor  2016 
august 2016 by robertogreco
Song Exploder
"Song Exploder is a podcast where musicians take apart their songs, and piece by piece, tell the story of how they were made. Each episode is produced and edited by host and creator Hrishikesh Hirway in Los Angeles. Using the isolated, individual tracks from a recording, Hrishikesh asks artists to delve into the specific decisions that went into creating their work. Hrishikesh edits the interviews, removing his side of the conversation and condensing the story to be tightly focused on how the artists brought their songs to life. Past guests include Björk, U2, Iggy Pop, and Carly Rae Jepsen, among many others. In 2016 the Sydney Opera House hosted Song Exploder as an artist-in-residence. The show has been featured at the Sundance Film Festival and SXSW.

Song Exploder is a proud member of Radiotopia, from PRX, a curated network of extraordinary, story-driven shows. Learn more at radiotopia.fm.

Some press for the show:

“Song Exploder is probably the best use of the podcast format ever.” — Vulture

“It is possibly the most perfect podcast, really.” — Quartz

“You’ll never listen to their music the same way again.” — Entertainment Weekly

“Everything a podcast should be…this is mandatory listening for music fans.” — The AV Club

[links to more with the following]

– Vice
– Spin
– The Guardian
– The AV Club
– The Atlantic
– LA Weekly (Best of Los Angeles, 2015)

Song Exploder is on Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram. For booking Song Exploder live events, please contact Andrew Morgan at Billions.

You can send a message using the form below, or via email. I’m not currently looking for song submissions for the show. Thanks!"
podcasts  music  audio  art  hrishikeshhirway 
july 2016 by robertogreco
Notes on Blindness is one of the most eye-opening documentaries you'll see all year - review
"Directors: James Spinney and Peter Middleton. U cert; 90 mins

John Hull, a professor of religious education at Birmingham University, went blind in 1983, and spent much of that decade compiling detailed thoughts on the experience of sight loss – a condition he grieved at first, before finding in it much of philosophical value.

His book Touching the Rock, considered a masterpiece by no less an authority than the neurologist Oliver Sacks, is a collection of excerpts from the audio-cassette journal that John began to compile as a newly blind person, attempting to map out the strange new world confronting him. Now those same recordings, a treasure trove of frontier thought on the subject, have formed the basis for Notes on Blindness, a fascinating documentary from the first-timer team of James Spinney and Peter Middleton.

The pair have gradually assembled this project through a series of stepping stone short films, including the award-winning Rainfall (2013), which visualises one of Hull’s most powerful passages, about the enhanced geography that heavy rain provides to someone only relying on sound for their perception of a landscape.

“Rain has a way of bringing out the contours of everything,” Hull wrote. “[I]t throws a coloured blanket over previously invisible things; instead of an intermittent and thus fragmented world, the steadily falling rain creates a continuity of acoustic experience.”

The once-familiar surroundings of Hull’s garden in Birmingham are brought vividly back into focus by a downpour. And when he goes a step farther, wishing “if only rain could fall inside a room”, the filmmakers oblige, imagining the textured patter of drops on a beloved armchair and every other surface indoors.

Marvellous in short form, this section remains the standout part of their feature, and could hardly fail to – in the very act of staging this deluge behind closed doors, they’ve created the instructive soundscape of John’s dreams. But they’ve creatively woven this, and all of their other ideas, into a seamless patchwork of reminiscences, tracing John’s voyage into darkness with an astute and sensitive cinematic imagination.

The actor Dan Skinner, playing John behind a thick black beard and with his eyes typically closed, plays John by lip-synching passages of his testimony – an eerie, slightly other-worldly effect. Since this is not actually John, it puts us in mind of a blind person imperfectly imagining the impression they might be making on the world, just as he describes.

Hull’s wife Marilyn, also present on many of the recordings and with her own perspective to contribute, is played just as memorably by Simone Kirby, who does expressive things with thoughtful silence, not just the words she’s given. John’s anxieties about the quality of life any blind person will be made to sacrifice are hugely poignant, needless to say – he never has any visual reference point for his newly born son, for instance, or the physical changes in his children as they grow up.

But his determination grows, over the course of the film, to grasp the specifics of his disability as an opportunity, not just a setback. In lacking one sense, all the others gain value inestimably; and thanks to one person explaining what the loss of sight entails, many others, listening in, are able to appreciate and ponder more fully what seeing means.

The closing title card, about sighted and blind people needing each other, is a citation from John which typifies his achievement as a kind of intellectual explorer; a cartographer of the encroaching night, whose findings tell us just as much about the world we recognise by day.

Notes on Blindness is out now in cinemas, and On Demand from July 1 via Amazon Instant Video, Google Play and Talk Talk TV Store"
blindness  sight  film  documentary  2016  jamesspinney  petermiddleton  johnhull  oliversacks  landscape  audio  sound  via:subtopes 
july 2016 by robertogreco
Phone Stories – Pop-Up Magazine
"Every other Sunday, Pop-Up Magazine will release a new, very short story for a specific moment of your life. When you’re making coffee. Or when you’re looking up into the night sky. Or when you’re waiting in a line."
phonestories  pop-upmagazine  stories  audio  classideas  podcasts  writing 
june 2016 by robertogreco
Border Cantos - Richard Misrach | Guillermo Galindo
"Border Cantos presents a unique collaboration between photographer Richard Misrach and composer Guillermo Galindo. Misrach has been photographing the two-thousand-mile border between the U.S. and Mexico since 2004, with increased focus starting in 2009—resulting in a distinct melding of the artist as documentarian and interpreter. The latest installation in Misrach’s ongoing Desert Cantos series, this project includes eight suites of photographs—some made with a large-format camera and others that have been captured with an iPhone. Misrach and Galindo have worked together to create pieces that both report on and transform the artifacts of migration: water bottles, clothing, backpacks, Border Patrol “drag tires,” spent shotgun shells, ladders, and sections of the Border Wall itself, which Galindo then fashions into instruments to be performed as unique sound-generating devices; video clips of those performances can be seen on this site. He also imagines graphic musical scores, many of which use Misrach’s photographs as points of departure."

[See also: https://newrepublic.com/article/132220/requiem-border-wall ]
richardmisrach  guillermogalindo  sound  audio  border  borders  us  mexico  photography  migration  music  musicalinstruments  art 
may 2016 by robertogreco
Mapping Boston’s soundscape – News – Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health
"Erica Walker, SD ’17, biked around Boston to take the measure of a city’s noise and its effects on residents.

Hot coffee dripping. Steamed milk hissing. Muzak droning. Keyboards clacking. Patrons murmuring: Erica Walker’s soft voice was almost drowned out by the ambient noise in a Starbucks. It was an ironic touch, considering that Walker has spent the past five years intently tuned in to Boston’s cacophonous urban soundscape.

The 36-year-old researcher, who will receive her doctorate in environmental health next year from the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, has pedaled nearly every inch of the city on a purple commuter bike—hauling a bulky sound monitor, a boom microphone, and a camera in her backpack—all in the service of plotting sound levels in 400 separate locations and collecting residents’ subjective responses to the aural onslaught.

Most people have approached her with curiosity and, on learning her mission, gratitude. A few, alarmed by the paraphernalia of her sonic surveillance, have reported her to the police.

It’s all in a day’s research for Walker, a former artist who was compelled to undertake the study after suffering her own noise nightmare. The children living in the apartment above hers “ran across the floor literally 24 hours a day, and it drove me crazy,” says the Mississippi native. Plagued with headaches and sleeplessness, she sent out an impromptu Craigslist survey asking about annoying footstep sounds and was flooded with responses. She began to suspect her auditory torment was not isolated.

SIGNATURE SOUNDS

Walker has discovered that each Boston neighborhood carries a unique acoustic signature. The dominant note of Dorchester, for example, is transportation. “You have planes, you have trains, you have automobiles,” Walker says. But Dorchester’s rich cultural diversity also lends evocative countermelodies

to the main theme. “Something I hadn’t planned on is people standing outside and yelling across the street to each other, or sitting on their porches talking really loud—that human element,” Walker laughs. She wonders: “If people are part of that cultural landscape, is it ‘noise’ or just ‘sound’?”

By contrast, East Boston, which abuts Logan International Airport, is perpetually assaulted by the din of low-flying jets. In a community survey that Walker created, one resident called the commotion “a regular horror.” Another lamented, “Everybody is walking around looking wrung out, some are getting nasty, kids are crying more, kids with behavioral issues are out of control. People don’t know what to do.”

THE MISMEASURE OF NOISE

Most formal surveys of sound gauge what are known as “A- weighted decibel levels,” or dB(A)—sounds that are perceptible by the human ear. Boston’s noise ordinance defines “unreasonable or excessive noise” as that in excess of 50 dB(A) between 11 p.m. and 7 a.m., or in excess of 70 dB(A) at other hours. To put this in context, normal human speech at about 3 feet apart takes place at between 55 and 65 dB(A).

Walker found that the city’s ordinance thresholds are rou- tinely flouted. Boston’s two loudest enclaves—East Boston, with the roar of jet engines, and Savin Hill, awash in jangling nightclub noise from across Marina Bay—average 80 dB(A). Passing ambulances clock in at 105 decibels. Construction site jackhammers reach 112. Even those neighborly conversations between porches can hit 85 decibels.

And these numbers don’t tell the whole story. Walker
is also measuring a type of low-frequency noise called “infrasound.” Although vibrations at this level are not picked up by the ear, our bodies still register them. “Infrasound is totally inaudible; we don’t hear it, we just feel it, such as when a bus passes by or a plane takes off,” Walker says.

In nature, low-frequency vibrations take the form of thunder, earthquakes, volcanoes, or nearby herds of wild animals. Such vibrations signal approaching danger—a clue to the toll they may take on mental and physical health in modern urban environments. “Maybe our body is processing these vibrations and we don’t know it,” Walker suggests. Making matters worse, infrasound is not only highly prevalent in cities but also persistent, hard to mitigate, and it travels long distances.

What Walker wants to know is: Are these low-frequency noises, which are rife in urban environments but not included in standard A-weighted decibel measurements, exacting a hidden public health toll?

NOISE AND HEALTH

To find out, Walker, along with her adviser, Francine Laden, MS ’93, SD ’98, professor of environmental epidemiology, will map audible and infrasound noise levels across Boston’s neighborhoods, using color gradients to denote areas of higher or lower average sound intensity. Walker will also catalog residents’ perceptions of noise levels, using the Greater Boston Neighborhood Noise Survey, an instrument she developed that is being translated into Spanish, Simple Chinese, Vietnamese, and Haitian Creole. The survey, Walkers says, “will put a human face on community noise.” Eventually, Walker will correlate soundscape metrics with data from established health studies conducted in Boston to learn if any type of noise is linked to cardiovascular and mental health outcomes.

Walker’s research takes place in the midst of a heated discussion about airplane noise—much of it low-frequency—in Greater Boston. In December 2015, U.S. Rep. Stephen Lynch, who lives in South Boston, hosted a forum with Federal Aviation Administration officials, during which residents from across the region furiously recounted tales of babies constantly woken, rising asthma rates in families living beneath flight paths, and spouses sleeping in basements to escape the racket of Logan’s traffic. According to Lynch’s office, aircraft noise complaints in Greater Boston have worsened since the installation of a new GPS-based navigation system that directs planes on the most efficient route.

Francesca Dominici, professor of biostatistics at Harvard Chan, co-authored a 2013 study published in the British Medical Journal, which found that elderly individuals living on the noisiest flight paths near airports have a 3.5 percent increase in cardiovascular hospitalization for every 10-decibel increase in airport-related noise. She also found a strong association between noise exposure and cardiovascular hospitalizations in ZIP codes with noise exposures greater than 55 decibels.

For her part, Walker will be posting Boston sound maps and updates on her project’s progress at www.noiseandthecity.org. She has been biking Boston’s clamorous streets long enough to know that the most anguished complaints are about airplanes, construction, booming bass tones from car stereos, and barking dogs.

She can sympathize. “People don’t have a place to voice their noise issues,” Walker says. “They’re just kind of stuck here, suffering. And the city has no idea what’s bothering them.”"
noice  sound  boston  audio  soundscapes  2016  ericawalker  health  airports  maps  mapping  recordings  acoustics 
april 2016 by robertogreco
Escuchatorio | UN ESPACIO QUE REPOSICIONA LA ESCUCHA COMO EJERCICIO POLÍTICO UN FLUJO SONORO DESDE EL CUAL TU ERES LA FUENTE MANDA TU SONIDO Y LO EMITIREMOS
"Este es un llamado a los caminantes, a sus pies y a sus oídos.

Caminar como acto de resistencia.
Caminar para perderse, para reencontrarse.
Caminar es estar alejándose de algo.
Caminar también como encuentro con la incertidumbre.
Caminar hacia el futuro y de regreso.
Caminar más lento, tomarse el tiempo, reducir el paso hasta detenerse.

Graba el sonido que hacen tus pasos.
Graba un camino imaginario, el cotidiano, el diferente.
Graba un paisaje sonoro de tu andar.
Tu grabación es un recorrido.

Manda tu sonido antes del 30 de abril. Todos los audios recibidos se difundirán en las radios y espacios participantes.

transmisión: 1 de mayo de 2016.

Escuchatorio #Camina se emitirá en una jornada de sol a sol de 7:09 a las 19:59 (12h 50m de duración) desde la Ciudad de México.

Moverse no es suficiente hay que caminar…"

[See also:
https://soundcloud.com/escuchatorio
https://www.instagram.com/escuchatorio/
https://twitter.com/escuchatorio ]
mexico  mexicodf  walking  resistance  via:felixblume  audio  sound  radio  df  mexicocity 
april 2016 by robertogreco
Drifter - Mitchell Whitelaw
[via: https://twitter.com/vruba/status/717891312683356160
https://twitter.com/mtchl/status/717907711459872770
https://twitter.com/vruba/status/717917873969102849
https://twitter.com/mtchl/status/717919016463896576
https://twitter.com/vruba/status/717920437041168384 ]

"Drifter is a multilayered portrait of the Murrumbidgee river system, made out of data. Historic images, newspaper articles, scientific observations and digital maps; tens of thousands of data points come together in three ever-changing views.

Map uses digital newspaper articles to trace fragments of the river's (white) history, from everyday life to large-scale interventions. Alongside these human stories, thousands of scientific observations reveal some of the nonhuman life of the river.

Sifter transforms text into texture, drifting through text snippets from newspaper articles discussing the Murrumbidgee and its tributaries, piecing together the names of some of the living things that go unmentioned in these accounts.

Compositor combines historic images from library and archive collections with contemporary images from fieldwork monitoring the health of the river's wetland ecology.

About

Drifter is a work by Mitchell Whitelaw, created for exhibition at the Wagga Wagga Art Gallery in conjunction with the Land Dialogues conference. A big-screen, non-interactive version is on show there until June 2016.

This web version works best with a modern browser and a big-ish screen.

Drifter is part of a research project on combining digital scientific and cultural heritage materials to create rich representations of landscape. It builds on the speculative, generative approaches to digital heritage developed in Succession.

Sources

Geospatial data sources

• US Geological Service HydroSHEDS River network
• Digital Chart of the World water areas
• Open Street Map towns and rivers
• Australian Department of the Environment, Interim Classification of Aquatic Ecosystems in the Murray Darling Basin based on the Australian National Aquatic Ecosystems (ANAE) Classification Framework - Wetlands

Newspaper articles: Trove, National Library of Australia

Frog observations: Atlas of Living Australia

Frog audio

• Amphibiaweb
• Australian National Botanic Gardens
• Frogwatch ACT - recordings by Ederic Slater
• Museum Victoria Biodiversity Snapshots
• North Central Catchment Management Authority Frogwatch resources - recordings by Murray Littlejohn

Images from the National Library of Australia and Flickr Commons where credited.

Wetland fieldwork images courtesy of Dr Skye Wassens and her team, Institute for Land Water and Society, Charles Sturt University.

Built With

• The Trove API
• The Atlas of Living Australia API
• Leaflet.js
• jQuery
• howler.js"
maps  mapping  osm  openstreetmap  drifter  murrumbidgeeriver  australia  audio  nature  mitchellwhitelaw  waggawaggaartgallery  landdialogues  lansdscape  sound  soundscapes  webdev  gis  frogs  webdesign 
april 2016 by robertogreco
Boris Anthony on Instagram: “I hate linear narratives. My life, and mind, is made of hyper dimensional networks.”
"I hate linear narratives. My life, and mind, is made of hyper dimensional networks. And yet ALL out media is still linear. Text, video, audio, slide decks… The tyranny of a belief in linear time. But you know what isn't linear? Culture, high-context conversation, the Web…"
linear  linearity  borisanthony  howwethink  cv  texts  text  video  audio  slidedecks  time  tyranny  hyperdimensional  hypertext  reading  howweread  thinking  narrative  culture  conversation 
february 2016 by robertogreco
The Listen Tree Project | MIT – Docubase
"ListenTree is an audio-haptic display meant to be embedded in the natural environment. A visitor to the installation notices a faint sound appearing to emerge from a tree, and might feel a slight vibration under their feet as they approach. By resting their head against the tree, they are able to hear sounds through bone conduction. To create this effect, an audio exciter-transducer is weatherproofed and attached to the tree trunk underground, transforming the tree into a living speaker that channels audio through its branches. The apparatus, set up underground at the base of a tree, transforms the tree into a loudspeaker. The exhibit also uses Raspberry Pi to connect to WiFi, which enables one tree to communicate with other trees, other sound sources, or other transducers.

While the initial intent of the producers was to create an audio installation, they have also found other uses cases for ListenTree as a platform for other stories, given that any source of sound can be played through the tree, including pre-recorded or live tracks. For example, during an installation in Mexico City, ListenTree was used to play pre-recorded audio of poems by Mexican poets at a Dia de los Muertos (Day of the Dead) event. Glorianna Davenport, who oversees a project called The Living Observatory, which tracks the recovery of the wetlands at Tidmarsh Farms, has also used ListenTree as a platform to play audio recorded at Tidmarsh. This particular installation of the ListenTree can be found at the MIT Museum. “A very important benefit of [the interaction] is the juxtaposition of physically being here and connecting to a remote site,” remarks Davenport. The ListenTree can also be expanded to include multiple trees in a single installation, for which Davenport sees much potential: “It is important that the basic idea is later expanded.  If you look at the installation in Mexico,  it is clear that having many trees, and having the installation outdoors at events that had large audiences changes the dynamic.”

Storytellers and documentarians might conceive of other ways to sonify stories through ListenTree, which is able to play sounds collected remotely through a local, natural interface; combine the interaction between a story and its medium to aid in meaning construction; and reconcile the immateriality of digital media with a materiality of a physical exhibit."
listentree  haptics  trees  lilybui  edwinaportocarro  sound  audio  classideas  storytelling 
february 2016 by robertogreco
What it's like to hear through a broken eardrum - Home | Spark with Nora Young | CBC Radio
"Imagine pressure, slowly, painfully, building inside your ear, until... POP!

...a burst eardrum.

It's not nice, but it's not uncommon, and the results can be pretty significant hearing loss, at least in the short term.

For Wesley Goatley, a sound artist and researcher in Brighton, England, a burst eardrum had a major impact on his work. A lot of Wesley's art has to do with conveying data (especially from digital sources) through sound.

During a bad cold over Christmas, Wesley got an ear infection in his left ear, causing a rupture. Although it meant that Wesley had to quickly spin on the spot to hear anything in stereo, it also allowed him to hear sound in ways he hadn't before.

Using his good ear as a reference, he found that the sound heard through the puncture was similar to an effect called downsampling. Think of the crunchy sound of a poor quality MP3. He also noted a significant drop it volume, and a change in tone... "like a drum skin with a hole in it, or a drum skin that has been loosened off."

Using his experience and his knowledge of sound production, Wesley created a program called "Life in Mono", which aims to simulate the experience of hearing with a punctured eardrum.

With Life in Mono, Wesley hopes that it will allow people to hear in a new way, but also help people to empathize with people who have experienced hearing loss."
hearing  sound  wesleygoatley  audio  2016  music  eardrums 
february 2016 by robertogreco
An Xiao Mina at Biased Data - An Xiao Mina - Open Transcripts
"Just to close, as we think about the role of lan­guage on the Internet, it really biases our expe­ri­ence, and there are a lot of risks and chal­lenges there, espe­cially as peo­ple from the Global South are com­ing online. The abil­ity for them to access con­tent and for them to con­tribute to impor­tant con­ver­sa­tions online will be severely lim­ited. It’ll look more like this, and I think some of the most impor­tant work we can do in tech is to bring it out into lan­guages that they can under­stand."
anxiaomina  language  languages  internet  online  web  2016  mikemcdandless  translation  blacklivesmatter  umbrellamovement  crowdsourcing  machinetranslation  sarahkendzior  russian  uzbek  opentranslationproject  aiweiwei  meedan  inequity  socialjustice  wechat  audio  chinese  china  bias  experience 
february 2016 by robertogreco
Williams Gibson: On Technophobia and the Power of Film | Literary Hub
"In part one [http://lithub.com/william-gibson-on-phones-fiction-and-the-end-of-the-world/ + https://soundcloud.com/lithub/william-gibson-part-one/s-0Jwns ] of Paul Holdengraber’s phone call with William Gibson, topics included dystopias, the universal screenwriter, and the disruption of the telephone. In part two,

[https://soundcloud.com/lithub/william-gibson-part-two/s-my54E ]

William Gibson on the availability of culture…

If you had never heard recorded music and you didn’t have it as a category of experience—if it simply never existed for you—I think that your concept of what music is would be fantastically different. Something that’s happened, a change that’s occurred over the course of my own life that I think somewhat puts this vague claim I’m making into perspective, is the way in which seeing a film used to be something that was so dependent on so many factors that it made it largely unrepeatable. You could see the film on its theatrical release, but unless you lived in, say, New York, there were no repertory cinemas. So people saw a film once and then lived with it in memory, there was no television, there were no videotapes of films. Film existed primarily in memory, and the experience of actually seeing it was very intense.

William Gibson on Chris Marker…

I first saw Chris Marker’s La Jetée in a film history course when I was an undergraduate at the University of British Columbia. I had been vaguely aware of it earlier because it is, you know, technically a science fiction film even though it’s a short avant-garde French film. I had had in my life no opportunity to see any avant-garde French film, so I had no idea what to expect. I wasn’t really expecting very much. It had this extraordinarily profound effect on me, and it’s very, very brief. I actually left the lecture hall feeling uneasily that I had somehow—that something had happened, that I’d experienced some sort of transformation, and I didn’t know what it was.

William Gibson on technophobia…

I’m dubious about ranking… I’m not sure about ranking. I’ve long suspected that what our descendants will find quaintest about us it that we made distinctions of that sort. That they’ll be looking back and they’ll be going, So strange they didn’t think Facebook was “real.” There’s a wonderful, weird book, the title of which I will probably be unable to remember, but it’s a collection of first-person accounts of Victorians encountering new technologies. It’s taken from diaries and letters—it’s not famous people, just ordinary people. The one that always struck me was an Anglican clergyman who went to a garden party, heard an Edison phonograph talking, and went home and wrote this completely terrifying description of this demonic, satanic, mechanical voice speaking to the children in the garden, and how this probably presaged the end of the world. He was just writing for himself, so he wasn’t exaggerating, and I thought, Oh, wow. He had this absolutely intense experience, but I don’t think I could say that what it caused him to fear came to pass."
williamgibson  technophobia  film  chrismarker  lajetee  culture  2016  television  tv  paulholdengraber  interviews  experience  memory  recordings  music  audio  listening  nostalgia  lajetée 
january 2016 by robertogreco
52-Blue
"​​52-Blue is a collaboration between architect Nick Sowers and artist Bryan Finoki. They have been working together in the San Francisco Bay Area since 2010, and decided to launch a new studio in 2015 to explore different ways spatial experiences are able to be shaped through sound. Their collaboration brings together a collective knowledge of how sound can be used as both an architectural medium and a narrative platform. The studio is guided by the philosophy: to listen is to listen to ‘listening’ itself. Their work embodies this both as a form of practice and an experience, and seeks to animate the unheard, make the inaudible audible, and give voice to the materials of the built environment so other stories can be told and heard."
nicksowers  bryanfinoki  sound  art  architecture  52-blue  space  audio 
january 2016 by robertogreco
moDernisT_v1 on Vimeo
""moDernisT" was created by salvaging the sounds and images lost to compression via the mp3 and mp4 codecs. the audio is comprised of lost mp3 compression material from the song "Tom's Diner", famously used as one of the main controls in the listening tests to develop the MP3 encoding algorithm.

Here we find the form of the song intact, but the details are just remnants of the original. the video was created by takahiro suzuki in response to the audio track and then run through a similar algorithm after being compressed to mp4. thus, both audio and video are the "ghosts" of their respective compression codecs. version one.

theGhostInTheMP3.com "

[via: http://isomorphism.es/post/137731242826/the-sounds-and-images-lost-to-compression-via-the ]
mp3  mp4  encoding  codecs  degradation  music  images  sound  audio  video 
january 2016 by robertogreco
Dear Architects: Sound Matters - The New York Times
"A room sounds very different when a window is open. Sound defines, animates and enlarges the architecture."
sound  architecture  acoustics  noise  environment  cities  2015  design  audio 
december 2015 by robertogreco
Recordings for Someone | This American Life
"All the stories in this week's show center on personal recordings that one person made for just one other person."



"Act One: Buddy Picture.

Producer Jonathan Goldstein with a story about friendship, mothers and sons, and what some have called the greatest phone message in the world—it circulated at Columbia University in New York City, and had something to do with the Little Mermaid. (19 minutes)"

[Rest of episode: http://www.thisamericanlife.org/radio-archives/episode/203/recordings-for-someone ]
audio  recordings  humor  answeringmachines  2002  via:austinkleon  phones  phonemessages  messages  littlemermaid 
december 2015 by robertogreco
The amplification of audio storytelling » Nieman Journalism Lab
“What are the stories that are going to break through the noise? Which topics would inspire engagement and build community?”



"In 2016, we should expect to see — or perhaps it’s hear — more podcasts as more newsrooms find success with audio content.

The popularity of Serial has proven that, in the age of video, there is indeed an appetite for nonfiction audio storytelling.

This year, be on the lookout for more viral audio that focuses on interesting sound produced for social web, like NPR’s clips of an erupting volcano or inside a hurricane; investigative pieces, like the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel’s seven-part podcast about a 40-year murder mystery; and cultural conversations, like BuzzFeed’s Another Round.

Whether they’re short takes or longform, podcasts’ growth will be fueled by their capacity to create personal, intimate, enlightening, captivating experiences for listeners. Powerful podcasts amplify unique narratives and diverse voices. They also attract new followers — a boon to any media outlet.

As newsrooms seek to integrate podcasting into their editorial strategy in 2016, consider the following:

• What are the stories that are going to break through the noise?
• Which topics would inspire engagement and build community?
• What tools and training will you need to produce stellar audio?
• How can you fit into your audience’s on-the-go, on-demand lifestyles?"
miralowe  2015  journalism  audio  storytelling  podcasts  buzzfeed 
december 2015 by robertogreco
Our (Bare) Shelves, Our Selves - The New York Times
"When I was 13, in the early 1990s, I dug through my parents’ cache of vinyl records from the ’60s and ’70s. We still had a phonograph, so I played some of them, concentrating on the Beatles. Their bigger hits were inescapably familiar, but a number of their songs were new to me.

Were I a teenager in 2015, I may not have found “Lovely Rita” or acquired an early taste at all for the Liverpudlian lads. The albums stacked up next to the record player, in plain sight for years, would be invisible MP3s on a computer or phone that I didn’t own. Their proximal existence could have been altogether unknown to me"



"There are several big upsides to growing up with streaming audio, one of which is accessibility: assuming I was interested enough, I could have explored, for free, the Beatles’ catalog on the Internet far beyond the scope of my parents’ collection.

But in our digital conversion of media (perhaps buttressed by application of the popular KonMari method of decluttering), physical objects have been expunged at a cost. Aside from the disappearance of record crates and CD towers, the loss of print books and periodicals can have significant repercussions on children’s intellectual development.

Perhaps the strongest case for a household full of print books came from a 2014 study published in the sociology journal Social Forces. Researchers measured the impact of the size of home libraries on the reading level of 15-year-old students across 42 nations, controlling for wealth, parents’ education and occupations, gender and the country’s gross national product.

After G.N.P., the quantity of books in one’s home was the most important predictor of reading performance. The greatest effect was seen in libraries of about 100 books, which resulted in approximately 1.5 extra years of grade-level reading performance. (Diminishing returns kick in at about 500 books, which is the equivalent of about 2.2 extra years of education.)

Libraries matter even more than money; in the United States, with the size of libraries being equal, students coming from the top 10 percent of wealthiest families performed at just one extra grade level over students from the poorest 10 percent.

The implications are clear: Owning books in the home is one of the best things you can do for your children academically. It helps, of course, if parents are reading to their children and reading themselves, not simply buying books by the yard as décor.

“It is a big question of whether it’s the books themselves or the parental scholarly culture that matters — we’re guessing it’s somewhere in between,” said Mariah Evans, one of the study’s authors and an associate professor of sociology at the University of Nevada, Reno. “The books partly reflect intelligence.”

Although the study did not account for e-books, as they’re not yet available in enough countries, Dr. Evans said in theory they could be just as effective as print books in encouraging literacy.

“But what about the casual atmosphere of living in a bookish world, and being intrigued to pull something off the shelf to see what it’s like?” she asked. “I think that will depend partly on the seamless integration of our electronic devices in the future.”"



"Digital media trains us to be high-bandwidth consumers rather than meditative thinkers. We download or stream a song, article, book or movie instantly, get through it (if we’re not waylaid by the infinite inventory also offered) and advance to the next immaterial thing.

Poking through physical artifacts, as I did with those Beatles records, is archival and curatorial; it forces you to examine each object slowly, perhaps sample it and come across a serendipitous discovery.

Scrolling through file names on a device, on the other hand, is what we do all day long, often mindlessly, in our quest to find whatever it is we’re already looking for as rapidly as possible. To see “The Beatles” in a list of hundreds of artists in an iTunes database is not nearly as arresting as holding the album cover for “Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band.”

Consider the difference between listening to music digitally versus on a record player or CD. On the former, you’re more likely to download or stream only the singles you want to hear from an album. The latter requires enough of an investment — of acquiring it, but also of energy in playing it — that you stand a better chance of committing and listening to the entire album.

If I’d merely clicked on the first MP3 track of “Sgt. Pepper’s” rather than removed the record from its sleeve, placed it in the phonograph and carefully set the needle over it, I may have become distracted and clicked elsewhere long before the B-side “Lovely Rita” played.

And what of sentiment? Jeff Bezos himself would have a hard time defending the nostalgic capacity of a Kindle. azw file over that of a tattered paperback. Data files can’t replicate the lived-in feel of a piece of beloved art. To a child, a parent’s dog-eared book is a sign of a mind at work and of the personal significance of that volume.

A crisp JPEG of the cover design on a virtual shelf, however, looks the same whether it’s been reread 10 times or not at all. If, that is, it’s ever even seen."
books  digital  analog  music  browsing  2015  streaming  collections  visibility  sharing  children  learning  reading  literacy  cds  audio  patina  beausage  ebooks  data  teddywayne 
december 2015 by robertogreco
Someone Put Giant Megaphones in the Woods So You Can Listen to the Forest «TwistedSifter
"51% of Estonia is covered with forests and according to author Valdur Mikita, ‘Estonian culture is intertwined and imbued with forests’. In September, students from the Interior Architecture Department at the Estonian Academy of Arts installed three gigantic wooden megaphones that let you listen to naturally amplified sounds of the surrounding forest.

The student project was executed in collaboration with the Estonian Forest Management Centre and the multi-purpose megaphones also double as a sitting and resting area as well as a stage for small events.

Most of the installation was built in Tallinn at the end of August and then shipped to Võrumaa, Pähni Nature Centre—not far from Latvian border—where it has been installed and opened to the public as of September 18th.

The project was led by Birgit Õigus, with the rest of her coursemates Mariann Drell, Ardo Hiiuväin, Lennart Lind, Henri Kaarel Luht, Mariette Nõmm, Johanna Sepp, Kertti Soots and Sabine Suuster helping out with the building process.

You can find dropbox folders of the building process and transport/installation and visit the project page for more information."

[See also:
https://www.dropbox.com/sh/jpqt1lpc4mcueqn/AABmt1Pf1uYjpfb1ZL3N-TVAa?dl=0
https://www.dropbox.com/sh/59doqwq0u6qngyx/AAAr7a1V2il_zW8REbVCPPwla?dl=0

and

"Unplugged Kingsize Megaphones Help Nature Explorers Hear the Forests"
http://www.artun.ee/en/unplugged-kingsize-megaphones-help-nature-explorers-to-listen-to-the-forests-2/
estonia  listening  forests  sounds  megaphones  audio  sound  trees 
november 2015 by robertogreco
Mad Generation Loss - parker higgins dot net
"Mad Generation Loss is a project exploring media encoding and the ways in which imperfect copies can descend into a kind of digital madness. It takes an audio file—here, a recording of Allen Ginsberg reading an excerpt from his seminal poem “Howl”—and adds another layer of mp3 encoding to each second of the sound. That is to say, the first second is encoded directly from the original, the next second is re-encoded from that first lossy copy, and the third encoded again.

[ https://soundcloud.com/thisisparker/mad-generation-loss ]

That sort of re-encoding from lossy originals, known as transcoding, is supposed to be avoided. The generation loss builds on itself, and the quality degrades quickly. That effect is exaggerated here by its second-by-second compounding. By the end of the 3:18 recording, Ginsberg’s voice is nearly impossible to pick out among the background noise.

The last seconds of the recording have been transcoded nearly 200 times. All together, the recording represents nearly 20,000 individual mp3 encodes.

Ginsberg, glitchedThis project takes inspiration from earlier efforts to explore generation loss. “I Am Sitting In A Room” (1969) by Alvin Lucier was perhaps the earliest, and featured a 4-sentence narration recorded on taped, and re-recorded over and over to hear the tape loss. As the narration notes, that process “smooths out” the irregularities of speech, reflecting instead the rhythm and resonant frequencies of the room of the recording.

More recently, an artist named Canzona documented the process of downloading and re-uploading a video to YouTube 1000 times, and the effect of its compound video encoding. He described that project as a tribute to Alvin Lucier.

Unlike those projects, Mad Generation Loss shows the effect of transcoding and loss on a linear recording, not a repeated phrase. The degredation is apparent not from comparing identical inputs and diminished outputs, but from hearing the creep of the telltale white noise and the regular pulse of the mp3s getting stitched together.

The code to create the Mad Generation Loss audio is freely available under the GPLv3. It is written in Ruby and depends on free software like lame, mp3splt, and mp3wrap. Thanks are due to Eric Mill and Ben Gleitzman for technical assistance (though please do not attribute my sloppy code on them), and to Caroline Sinders and Ethan Chiel for their encouragement."
2015  degradation  sound  via:audreywatters  audio  allenginsberg  alvinlucier  canzona  videoencoding  encoding  compression  parkerhiggins  mp3  howl  art 
november 2015 by robertogreco
Generation loss - Wikipedia
"Generation loss refers to the loss of quality between subsequent copies or transcodes of data. Anything that reduces the quality of the representation when copying, and would cause further reduction in quality on making a copy of the copy, can be considered a form of generation loss. File size increases are a common result of generation loss, as the introduction of artifacts may actually increase the entropy of the data through each generation."
degradation  audio  video  photography  photocopies  analog  digital  compression 
october 2015 by robertogreco
Aloha Miscreant!: The Ultimate Beastie Boys Sample Source Collection
"Many years ago (more than I care to remember), I began a quest to personally track down every record and song that had ever been sampled by the Beastie Boys. I was inspired by the classic Ultimate Breaks & Beats series as it introduced me to songs that I had only heard in sampled form, and needless to say, hearing these tracks in their entirety as opposed to a quick snippet, stab, scratch, or loop opened my mind to a whole new musical experience. While digging in the bins at Uncle Sam's Records back in 1996, I discovered the white-label/bootleg pressing of B-Boy Breaks:12 Original Tunes as Sampled By The Beastie Boys:

[image]

Despite only twelve tracks (one of which was incorrect), it was a great start, but hardly scratched the surface as there were hundreds of other samples that needed to be sourced and tracked down. By 1998, the internet was becoming more robust and though various boards and fan sites, I was able to start compiling a list of all the samples that were used on a per-album basis. By this point, I had only tracked down a handful of records, CDs, and tapes, but it wasn't long before I was trading digital tracks with like minded sample-nerds that I had met online. Then, in 2005, I released the prototype of what would become the Beastie Boys Sample Source Collection. With less than seventy tracks, it definitely needed some serious work, and to make things even worse, the quality of the tracks that I had personally ripped from vinyl or cassette were less than stellar, in most cases, around 128kbps. Likewise, many the digital tracks which I had acquired online were just as bad, if not worse ranging in quality from mediocre to piss poor. From that point forward, I made quality a much higher priority and implemented a more efficient process for ripping vinyl/cassettes (better cartridges, better deck, better software, and interface). I also made it a point to only trade/acquire high quality audio and fully avoid the dreaded web-rips which were usually around 64 to 96kbps. Thanks to Soulseek, Discogs, eBay, and a bunch of really cool cats that I've met over time, the project continued to move forward and it wasn't long before all of the ducks were in a row and it was time to release the beast(ie)! In 2007, I posted the first official version of the compilation, and continued to make updates throughout the next few years as additional samples were sourced and found.

After a several year hunt, I finally acquired a vinyl copy of Modern Dynamic Physical Fitness Activities which was sampled in Body Movin', and for all intents and purposes; it was my holy grail and the final addition to the collection. Obviously not every sample or drum break can or ever will be identified, but this is about as close as it's gonna get! With the completion of this eighteen year long ongoing project, I want to personally thank each and every single person out there that has lent insight, shared knowledge, or provided me with any of the tracks that were used to compile this amazing piece of history. It goes without saying that much love, gratitude, and respect is owed to the Beastie Boys for introducing me (and you) to some amazing music via sampling that may otherwise not be heard, let alone acknowledged in this light.

If you've downloaded this collection prior to December 1st, 2014, it should be deleted immediately, and replaced with this version as the quality and content has increased tenfold. As it stands, it's 286 full-length tracks which equates to just over 22 hours worth of amazing music which was sampled by the Beastie Boys from Licensed to Ill up until To The 5 Boroughs. If you're a stickler for quality, you'll be happy to know that all of the tracks are encoded between 256kbps and 320kbps, with a hefty majority being the latter.

At the present time, the files are being hosted via MEGA, Uploadable, and Uploaded, but I will try to add more mirrors as time passes. As is always the case, I strongly suggest grabbing these as quickly as possible because I don't foresee them being available very long. If anybody experiences any difficulty downloading from any of these hosting sites or if the links are dead, please contact me via email and I will directly link you with the files.

Enjoy!"
beastieboys  sampling  remixing  music  history  audio  sound 
october 2015 by robertogreco
ML: Macaulay Library
[via: "World’s largest natural sound archive now fully digital and fully online.
“In terms of speed and the breadth of material now accessible to anyone in the world, this is really revolutionary,” says audio curator Greg Budney, describing a major milestone just achieved by the Macaulay Library archive at the Cornell Lab of Ornithology. All archived analog recordings in the collection, going back to 1929, have now been digitized and can be heard at www.MacaulayLibrary.org"
http://cornelluniversity.tumblr.com/post/40770771576/worlds-largest-natural-sound-archive-now-fully

and

"The Macaulay Library uploaded 150,000 recordings documenting the sounds of 9,000 species. It's fully listenable and fully searchable.

The Macaulay Library at Cornell University, home of the world's largest and oldest collection of nature recordings, just uploaded the whole, totally searchable, archive online for free. 9,000 species from across the world are documented in 150,000 audio recordings, totalling 10 terabytes and a run time of 7,513 hours.

The library has been building its holdings since 1929, amassing recordings from 75% of the world's bird species (it operates within the Cornell Lab of Ornithology after all) and a growing collection of insect, fish, frog, and mammal recordings as well. It took the archivists a dozen years to digitize the whole kit and caboodle.

This represents just a small fraction of the estimated 8.7 million species living on earth, and still, it's far and away the best catalogue detailing what life on earth sounds like. Our favourite? The Curl-crested Manucode, a bird-of-paradise from Papua New Guinea, sounds like an alien landing. But also, who knew walruses sound like a shitty drum machine?

Producers, get sampling."
http://www.chartattack.com/news/2015/08/06/worlds-largest-natural-sound-archive/ ]
sound  nature  audio  archives  libraries 
october 2015 by robertogreco
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