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The Future of Cities – Medium
[video (embedded): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xOOWk5yCMMs ]

"Organic Filmmaking and City Re-Imagining

What does “the future of cities” mean? To much of the developing world, it might be as simple as aspiring to having your own toilet, rather than sharing one with over 100 people. To a family in Detroit, it could mean having non-toxic drinking water. For planners and mayors, it’s about a lot of things — sustainability, economy, inclusivity, and resilience. Most of us can hope we can spend a little less time on our commutes to work and a little more time with our families. For a rich white dude up in a 50th floor penthouse, “the future of cities” might mean zipping around in a flying car while a robot jerks you off and a drone delivers your pizza. For many companies, the future of cities is simply about business and money, presented to us as buzzwords like “smart city” and “the city of tomorrow.”

I started shooting the “The Future of a Cities” as a collaboration with the The Nantucket Project, but it really took shape when hundreds of people around the world responded to a scrappy video I made asking for help.

Folks of all ages, from over 75 countries, volunteered their time, thoughts, work, and footage so that I could expand the scope of the piece and connect with more people in more cities. This strategy saved me time and money, but it also clarified the video’s purpose, which inspired me to put more energy into the project in order to get it right. I was reading Jan Gehl, Jane Jacobs, Edward Glaeser, etc. and getting excited about their ideas — after seeing what mattered to the people I met in person and watching contributions from those I didn’t, the video gained focus and perspective.

If I hired a production services outfit to help me film Mumbai, it would actually be a point of professional pride for the employees to deliver the Mumbai they think I want to see. If some young filmmakers offer to show me around their city and shoot with me for a day, we’re operating on another level, and a very different portrait of a city emerges. In the first scenario, my local collaborators get paid and I do my best to squeeze as much work out of the time period paid for as possible. In the second, the crew accepts more responsibility but gains ownership, hopefully leaving the experience feeling more empowered.

Architect and former mayor of Curitiba Jaime Lerner famously said “if you want creativity, take a zero off your budget. If you want sustainability, take off two zeros.” It’s been my experience that this sustainability often goes hand-in-hand with humanity, and part of what I love about working with less resources and money is that it forces you to treat people like human beings. Asking someone to work with less support or equipment, or to contribute more time for less money, requires a mutual understanding between two people. If each person can empathize for the other, it’s been my experience that we’ll feel it in the work — both in the process and on screen.

Organic filmmaking requires you to keep your crew small and your footprint light. You start filming with one idea in mind, but the idea changes each day as elements you could never have anticipated inform the bigger picture. You make adjustments and pursue new storylines. You edit a few scenes, see what’s working and what’s not, then write new scenes. Shoot those, cut them in, then go back and write more. Each part of the process talks to the other. The movie teaches itself to be a better movie. Because organic is complicated, it can be tricky to defend and difficult to scale up, but because it’s cheap and low-resource, it’s easier to experiment. Learning about the self-organizing, living cities that I did on this project informed how we made the video. And looking at poorly planned urban projects reminded me of the broken yet prevailing model for making independent film in the U.S., where so many films are bound to fail — often in a way a filmmaker doesn’t recover from — before they even begin.

Jane Jacobs said that “cities have the capability of providing something for everybody, only because, and only when, they are created by everybody.” I’ve worked on videos for companies, for the guy in the penthouse, for nobody in particular, in the developing world, with rich people and poor people, for me, for my friends, and for artists. I’m so thankful for everybody who allowed me to make this film the way we did, and I hope the parallels between filmmaking and city building — where the stakes are so much higher — aren’t lost on anyone trying to make their city a better place. We should all be involved. The most sustainable future is a future that includes us all.

“The Future of Cities” Reading List

(There’s a longer list I discovered recently from Planetizen HERE but these are the ones I got into on this project — I’m excited to read many more)

The Death and Life of American Cities by Jane Jacobs
The Triumph of the City: How Our Greatest Invention Makes Us Richer, Smarter, Greener, Healthier, and Happier by Edward Glaeser
Cities for People and Life Between Buildings by Jan Gehl
The Well-Tempered City: What Modern Science, Ancient Civilizations, and Human Nature Teach Us About the Future of Urban Life by Jonathan Rose(just came out — incredible)
Walkable City: How Downtown Can Save America, One Step at a Time by Jeff Speck
The City of Tomorrow: Sensors, Networks, Hackers, and the Future of Urban Life by Carlo Ratti and Matthew Claudel
Happy City: Transforming Our Lives Through Urban Design by Charles Montgomery
Dream Cities: Seven Urban Ideas That Shape the World by Wade Graham
Connectography: Mapping The Future of Global Civilization by Parag Khanna
Delirious New York by Rem Koolhaas
Low Life and The Other Paris by Luc Sante
A History of Future Cities by Daniel Brook
Streetfight: Handbook for the Urban Revolution by Janette Sadik-Khan and Seth Solomonow
Tactical Urbanism: Short-term Action for Long-Term Change by Mike Lydon & Anthony Garcia
Living In The Endless City, edited by Ricky Burdett and Deyan Sudjic

“The Future of Cities” Select Interviewees:
David Hertz & Sky Source
Vicky Chan & Avoid Obvious Architects
Carlo Ratti: Director, MIT Senseable City Lab Founding Partner, Carlo Ratti Associati
Edward Glaeser: Fred and Eleanor Glimp Professor of Economics, Harvard University Author of The Triumph of the City
Helle Søholt: Founding Parner & CEO, Gehl Architects
Ricky Burdett: Director, LSE Cities/Urban Age
Lauren Lockwood, Chief Digital Officer, City of Boston
Pablo Viejo: Smart Cities Expert & CTO V&V Innovations, Singapore
Matias Echanove & Urbz, Mumbai
Janette Sadik-Khan: Author, Advisor, & Former NYC DOT Commissioner
Abess Makki: CEO, City Insight
Dr. Parag Khanna: Author of Connectography
Stan Gale: CEO of Gale International, Developer of Songdo IBD
Dr. Jockin Arputham: President, Slum Dwellers International
Morton Kabell: Mayor for Technical & Environmental Affairs, Copenhagen
cities  urban  urbanplanning  urbanism  bikes  biking  cars  singapore  nyc  losangeles  janejacobs  jangehl  edwardglaeser  mumbai  tokyo  regulation  jaimelerner  curitiba  nantucketproject  carloratti  vickchan  davidhertz  hellesøholt  rickyburdett  laurenlockwood  pabloviejo  matiasechanove  urbz  janettesadik-khan  abessmakki  paragkhanna  stangale  jockinarputham  slumdwellersinternational  slums  mortonkabell  urbanization  future  planning  oscarboyson  mikelydon  anthonygarcia  danielbrook  lucsante  remkoolhaas  dayansudjic  rickyburdettsethsolomonow  wadegraham  charlesmontgomery  matthewclaudeljeffspeck  jonathanrose  transportation  publictransit  transit  housing  construction  development  local  small  grassroots  technology  internet  web  online  communications  infrastructure  services  copenhagen  sidewalks  pedestrians  sharing  filmmaking  film  video  taipei  seoul  santiago  aukland  songdo  sydney  london  nairobi  venice  shenzhen  2016  sustainability  environment  population  detroit  making  manufacturing  buildings  economics  commutes  commuting 
december 2016 by robertogreco
being an artist and parent in a city of riches? w/Tim Devin by a-small-lab
"Part of a series of 'art' conversations for summer art, not-school 2016 in and around Mairangi Bay Arts Centre - small-workshop.info/sans2016/

Tim Devin (www.timdevin.com/) is a Boston-based artist, librarian, parent and more. His work supports the need for information and feeling connected that are essential for people having a say in their communities and the world at large. This discussion starts from three points coming out of his project "How to be an Artist and a Parent?" - how to be a "good parent" and also do the other stuff you need to do, the question of what happens to a community life pressures slowly hinder people from being creative, and the fact that both Boston and Auckland are going through huge transformations right now.

Provided in collaboration with Mairangi Arts Centre, with support of Creative Communities Scheme"

[Shared on Twitter: "Listening…"
https://twitter.com/rogre/status/686288610660757504

"making some connections to friendships, community, and housing https://tinyletter.com/metafoundry/letters/metafoundry-54-nominative-determinism … + http://www.vox.com/2015/10/28/9622920/housing-adult-friendship … + http://www.theatlantic.com/health/archive/2015/10/how-friendships-change-over-time-in-adulthood/411466/ "
https://twitter.com/rogre/status/686288881134649344 ]
parenting  art  chrisberthelsen  2016  timdevin  community  cities  neighborhoods  somerville  japan  newzealand  realestate  slow  local  politics  housing  zoning  urban  urbanism  activism  friendship  age  aging  education  unschooling  deschooling  aukland  labor  work  gentrification  development  children  creativity  cognitivesurpluss  lcproject  openstudioproject  small  rents  inequality  economics 
january 2016 by robertogreco
Auckland Design Manual
"Designing the world’s most liveable city together

We are all involved in the design of our city - decisions we make about our homes and places of work, shape our streets, our neighbourhoods and our city. Great design comes from people with vision, knowledge and experience.

The Auckland Design Manual (ADM) provides a resource for everyone involved in design, building and development to either share their great design stories with others, or to seek inspiration, tools and best practice advice from those who have already been successful. Auckland's planning rulebook, the Proposed Auckland Unitary Plan (Unitary Plan) will articulate the rules for the future growth, whilst the ADM illustrates how to achieve the quality outcomes sought by the Unitary Plan.

The transformation of Auckland is a joint responsibility, not just council alone. We need the help, support and commitment of every resident to deliver the world's most liveable city.

Why is the design of the built environment important for Auckland?
"Everyone benefits from well-designed buildings, spaces and places. The built environment contributes a great deal to our quality of life and economic success, and delivers enormous value to society. Yet we often take it for granted, without appreciating its effect on our daily lives" (CABE 2005: 3)

Indeed design is often seen as a dirty word, some frivolous addition to the budget that adds little more than some aesthetic preference of those who are paying for it. We should consider design as a verb as well as an outcome. It is a process of constant refinement working with the variables of time, cost and quality to achieve the optimum outcome. Everything within the built environment has been designed and thought about to some degree. However we all know examples where it is obvious that this thinking has stopped early on and we are left with places or buildings that don't work well, not built well or are simply an eyesore. These are generally not great investments, and often need further money spent to rectify them over the longer term.

With Auckland likely to grow substantially over the next thirty years, we need to get more of these decisions right. As your council we are already trying new approaches, for example the Elliot Street shared spaces in the central city, the Transit Oriented Development in New Lynn and the Wynyard Quarter development on the waterfront. However, it is not just the council who builds the city; you do! It is your individual and collective decisions that shape our future – from where you choose to rent to what developments you might undertake.

We want to support the people of Auckland who are interested in the design of their house, their business premises, their street, their park or neighbourhood. So we have created the Auckland Design Manual – a website resource to provide you with inspiration through sharing good examples and some of the more detailed guidance about how to achieve similar great outcomes. We have started the ball rolling, but want to hear from you about your definition of a great project and want you to send us your best examples so we can continue to develop and refine the ADM – because only by sharing the lessons already learnt can we design the world's most liveable city together."

[via: https://twitter.com/anabjain/status/684252668668166144 ]

[See also “Māori Design Whakatairanga Tikanga Māori”

"Understanding and following a Māori design practice is key to delivering design outcomes that help to deepen our sense of place and develop meaningful and durable relationships with Iwi in Tāmaki Makaurau.This hub builds on design processes based upon Te Aranga principles. The content is being developed in partnership with Ngā Aho, a network of Mā​ori design professionals, and other partners. "
http://www.aucklanddesignmanual.co.nz/design-thinking/maori-design ]
via:anabjain  aukland  design  cities  auklanddesignmanual  participatori  maori  newzealand  neighborhoods  democracy  urban  livability  builtenvironment  māori 
january 2016 by robertogreco
Albany Senior High School » Albany Senior High School
[See also: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Albany_Senior_High_School,_Auckland

"Classes

All classes except those which require other resources take place in large open plan areas called 'Learning Commons'. These spaces enable flexibility when planning and delivering classes, including the ability to combine two classes into one for some activities, combining similar curriculum areas, such as physics and mathematics and easy access to technology. Students can utilize mobile devices such as laptops and cellphones to edit Google Docs in real-time together. Students are able to use Gchat in class to ask and answer questions, and students are permitted to perform searches on Google to answer teachers' questions. The teaching periods are 100 minutes long, twice the length of typical periods in New Zealand.

Every Wednesday, students engage in a 'community based' impact project. This involves performing an act for the community. Impact projects completed include forming a business, organising and performing a 'School of Rock' concert, building a video server and digital signage solution for the school, restoring local waterways, designing, building and programming a robot for the Robocup competition and creating original artworks for the school.

Open source

Albany Senior High School's computer network runs almost in its entirety on open source software. The school's student management system is the only major exception, using a proprietary system due to the unavailability of an open-source system meeting New Zealand requirements. The school won an award for the 'Best Open Source Project in Education' at the New Zealand Open Source Awards 2010. ]
newzealand  schools  via:artichoke  aukland 
august 2014 by robertogreco
Hobsonville Point Secondary School - Wikipedia
"Hobsonville Point Secondary School opened for instruction for the first time on 3 February 2014, initially taking Year 9 students only. The new school buildings were not fully complete at the time, so the school was based at Hobsonville Point Primary School for the first four weeks. The school's opening roll was 122."

[See also: http://www.hpss.school.nz/
http://www.hobsonvillepoint.school.nz/
http://www.teachingandelearning.com/2014/04/hpss-bloggers.html
https://twitter.com/GeoMouldey ]
schools  via:artichoke  newzealand  stevemouldey  aukland 
august 2014 by robertogreco
Making Do
"“Having a conversation with the junk of a City of Riches feels surprisingly cosy.
And inspires intense concentration.

With a makeshift trolley of tools and resources in tow, Xin Cheng, Chris Berthelsen and companions become hypnotized by the fine-grain of Auckland’s native wetlands, urban industrial zones and sub/urban deathtraps. Over a series of walks they begin to work out how to come to terms with the Super City in a pragmatic, generative, and non-goal-oriented manner.”

making do by Xin Cheng, Chris Berthelsen and companions might concern: circumstances and eddies, niches and leftovers, material intrigue, spontaneous constructions and rearrangements, sustenance and pleasures of the senses.
at least.

A sketchbook of the project can be found at http://making-do.tumblr.com "
xincheng  chrisberthelsen  walking  conversation  makingdo  aukland  newzealand  wetlands  urban  urbanism  supercity  senses  generative 
april 2014 by robertogreco
Xin Cheng
"Xin Cheng enjoys tramping and Manuka tea, and would like to be a nomad. Studied at the University of Auckland: BFA(Hons), 2011; BA/BSc, 2005. Volunteered in Cambodia (2013) and Codfish Island (2006) on nature conservation projects. Former co-director of RM project and gallery (2007-2012). Regular at S/F.

Recent projects: From the Northeast, performance at Stazione di Topolò_Postaja Topolove, Italy; Propositions, Freedom Farmers, Auckland Art Gallery; Improvising, ongoing and everywhere."



"making do [http://making-do.a-small-lab.com/ ] with Chris Berthelsen, supported by Artspace NZ

vernacular Cambodia [http://vernacular.xin-cheng.info/ ] with Sa Sa Art Project, Phnom Penh, supported by Asia New Zealand Foundation"



"Xin Cheng and I spent several days in conversation - about personal politics, aesthetics, and a philosophy of art. The most significant moments however were actually pretty poetic in simple terms: the texture of a chicken heart bought from a street vendor; the echo of a rock bouncing off the green-tiled-rooftop on which we played; a dog wandering through a garden in the ruins; running from security with spray paint on our fingers.

When I met Xin I was working in Taiwan, teaching children English. Xin had just left Cambodia where she had spent months building an educational nature trail. Both of us had been, in a way, redefining our own approach to things through trying to be useful in the world. Yet we were still connected to our obsessions: Xin to making and I to words. Working in us was the electricity of continually rediscovering life that comes with being in a new place; the freedom of new ways of seeing, the smoothness and unrestrained energy of what Deleuze and Guattari call ‘nomad thought’. And Xin in her gentle, organised and cataloguing way is one of the truest nomads I have ever met.

We wandered the streets and rooftops of Taichung, taking in things as they were, without much in the way of preconceptions or pretence. We talked nonstop, punctuated by Xin pausing to admire the texture of a patch on a wall, photographing a water bottle that hung from a storefront awning by a string as it swayed in the wind like an apple on a branch, marvelling at a chair made out of spare parts. In these memories Xin is like a gardener, and as we walked, a crumbling city street became a flourishing garden of objects under her gaze, each with their own unique ripeness of meaning and beauty… the flows of time and process revealing narratives about the organic inventiveness of necessity, about how things are not permanently one thing. There is something radical in this. She would harvest these ideas through observation, without interfering. Her approach could be likened to her interest in ecology and permaculture farming, in which the found objects that show up her work – the readymades – are refreshingly free from petrifying irony; instead, demonstrating a process of life and living.

Perpetually engaged like children, we spoke in English while the signs around us were in Chinese, but the objects of her fascination were mostly freed from the trouble of language. And in our time together my way of observing was changed by her; her attentiveness to process and understanding of how the small flaws in things are instructive as to their making, and agency in the breathing world - things that I sometimes forget.

Nick Yeck-Stauffer

September 2013"
xincheng  newzealand  aukland  art  artists  chrisberthelsen  walking  tramping  nickyeck-stauffer 
april 2014 by robertogreco
Colab | Creative Technologies at AUT
"Colab is the collaboratory for Design and Creative Technologies at the Auckland University of Technology (AUT), New Zealand.

Our aim is to encourage researchers, students and stakeholders to imagine, construct, articulate and navigate rapidly changing social, economic, technological and career environments.

We are a diverse community of creative people, working together in an environment from which new ideas emerge on a daily basis. Colab researchers come from a range of backgrounds, including art, design, computer science, animation, game design, engineering, mechatronics, architecture, business and organisational development.

Colab has also established a Faculty Labs Network within AUT, to manage and develop a number of high-end technology facilities, researching subjects ranging from textile design and production, 3D printing, to motion capture, interactive technologies and virtual worlds.

We pride ourselves on having great relationships with industry and organisational bodies throughout Auckland and abroad, and welcome the opportunity to collaborate with researchers, organisational partners, creative-thinkers, and entrepreneurs. Perhaps, even you?"
newzealand  aukland  openstudioproject  lcproject  via:chrisberthelsen  aut  art  design  compsci  computerscience  animation  gamedesign  architecture  research  makerspaces 
february 2014 by robertogreco
Hip Cities That Think About How They Work - NYTimes.com
"The story of young people, full of ambition, energy, skill and talent, moving to enticing cities that call to them like a siren’s song is as old as modern civilization. And in a world where national borders are easier to traverse, where more countries are joining the prosperous global middle class and where the cost of a one-way plane ticket is more affordable, young professionals probably have more cities to choose from than ever before.

This survey is not based solely on quality of life, number of trees or the cost of a month’s rent. Instead, we examine some cities that aim to be both smart and well managed, yet have an undeniably hip vibe. Our pick of cities that are, in a phrase, both great and good:

Aukland, Berlin, Barcelona, Cape Town, Copenhagen, Curitiba, Montreal, Santiago, Shanghai, Vilnus"
via:gpe  cities  aukland  newzealand  berlin  germany  barcelona  spain  españa  capetown  southafrica  copenhagen  denmark  curitiba  brasil  montreal  Quebec  canada  santiago  chile  shanghai  china  vilnus  lithuania  planning  urbanplanning  livability  glvo  urban  urbandesign  policy  transit  masstransit  publictransit  sustainability  smartcities  environment  design  brazil 
november 2011 by robertogreco

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