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robertogreco : auklanddesignmanual   1

Auckland Design Manual
"Designing the world’s most liveable city together

We are all involved in the design of our city - decisions we make about our homes and places of work, shape our streets, our neighbourhoods and our city. Great design comes from people with vision, knowledge and experience.

The Auckland Design Manual (ADM) provides a resource for everyone involved in design, building and development to either share their great design stories with others, or to seek inspiration, tools and best practice advice from those who have already been successful. Auckland's planning rulebook, the Proposed Auckland Unitary Plan (Unitary Plan) will articulate the rules for the future growth, whilst the ADM illustrates how to achieve the quality outcomes sought by the Unitary Plan.

The transformation of Auckland is a joint responsibility, not just council alone. We need the help, support and commitment of every resident to deliver the world's most liveable city.

Why is the design of the built environment important for Auckland?
"Everyone benefits from well-designed buildings, spaces and places. The built environment contributes a great deal to our quality of life and economic success, and delivers enormous value to society. Yet we often take it for granted, without appreciating its effect on our daily lives" (CABE 2005: 3)

Indeed design is often seen as a dirty word, some frivolous addition to the budget that adds little more than some aesthetic preference of those who are paying for it. We should consider design as a verb as well as an outcome. It is a process of constant refinement working with the variables of time, cost and quality to achieve the optimum outcome. Everything within the built environment has been designed and thought about to some degree. However we all know examples where it is obvious that this thinking has stopped early on and we are left with places or buildings that don't work well, not built well or are simply an eyesore. These are generally not great investments, and often need further money spent to rectify them over the longer term.

With Auckland likely to grow substantially over the next thirty years, we need to get more of these decisions right. As your council we are already trying new approaches, for example the Elliot Street shared spaces in the central city, the Transit Oriented Development in New Lynn and the Wynyard Quarter development on the waterfront. However, it is not just the council who builds the city; you do! It is your individual and collective decisions that shape our future – from where you choose to rent to what developments you might undertake.

We want to support the people of Auckland who are interested in the design of their house, their business premises, their street, their park or neighbourhood. So we have created the Auckland Design Manual – a website resource to provide you with inspiration through sharing good examples and some of the more detailed guidance about how to achieve similar great outcomes. We have started the ball rolling, but want to hear from you about your definition of a great project and want you to send us your best examples so we can continue to develop and refine the ADM – because only by sharing the lessons already learnt can we design the world's most liveable city together."

[via: https://twitter.com/anabjain/status/684252668668166144 ]

[See also “Māori Design Whakatairanga Tikanga Māori”

"Understanding and following a Māori design practice is key to delivering design outcomes that help to deepen our sense of place and develop meaningful and durable relationships with Iwi in Tāmaki Makaurau.This hub builds on design processes based upon Te Aranga principles. The content is being developed in partnership with Ngā Aho, a network of Mā​ori design professionals, and other partners. "
http://www.aucklanddesignmanual.co.nz/design-thinking/maori-design ]
via:anabjain  aukland  design  cities  auklanddesignmanual  participatori  maori  newzealand  neighborhoods  democracy  urban  livability  builtenvironment  māori 
january 2016 by robertogreco

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