recentpopularlog in

robertogreco : autodidacticism   39

"Fleeting pockets of anarchy" Streetwork. The exploding school. | Catherine Burke - Academia.edu
"Colin Ward (1924–2010) was an anarchist and educator who, together with Anthony Fyson, was employed as education officer for the Town and Country Planning Association in the UK during the 1970s. He is best known for his two books about childhood, The Child in the City (1978) and The Child in the Country (1988). The book he co-authored with Fyson, Streetwork. The Exploding School (1973), is discussed in this article as illustrating in practical and theoretical terms Ward’s appreciation of the school as a potential site for extraordinary radical change in relations between pupils and teachers and schools and their localities. The article explores the book alongside the Bulletin of Environmental Education, which Ward edited throughout the 1970s. It argues that the literary and visual images employed in the book and the bulletins contributed to the powerful positive representation of the school as a site of potential radical social change. Finally, it suggests that “fleeting pockets of anarchy” continue to exist in the lives of children through social networking and virtual environments that continue to offer pedagogical possibilities for the imaginative pedagogue."



"Paul Goodman’s work had particular relevance to the development of ideas expressed in Streetwork. Through his fiction, Goodman developed the idea of the “exploding school” which realised the city as an educator. Playing with the notion of the school trip as traditionally envisaged, he created an image of city streets as host to a multitude of small peripatetic groups of young scholars and their adult shepherds. This image was powerfully expressed in Goodman’s 1942 novel, TheGrand Piano; or, The Almanac of Alienation.

Ward quotes extensively from this novel in Streetwork because the imagery and vocabulary so clearly articulate a view of the city and the school that is playfully subversive yet imaginable. In a dialogue between a street urchin and a professor, Goodman has the elder explain:
this city is the only one you’ll ever have and you’ve got to make the best of it. On the other hand, if you want to make the best of it, you’ve got to be able to criticize it and change it and circumvent it . . . Instead of bringing imitation bits of the city into a school building, let’s go at our own pace and get out among the real things. What I envisage is gangs of half a dozen starting at nine or ten years old, roving the Empire City (NY) with a shepherd empowered to protect them, and accumulating experiences tempered to their powers . . . In order to acquire and preserve a habit of freedom, a kid must learn to circumvent it and sabotage it at any needful point as occasion arises . . . if you persist in honest service, you will soon be engaging in sabotage.

Inspired by such envisaged possibilities, Ward came to his own view of anarchism, childhood and education. Sabotage was a function of the transformational nature of education when inculcated by the essential elements of critical pedagogy. In this sense, anarchism was not some future utopian state arrived at through a once-and-for-all, transformative act of revolution; it was rather a present-tense thing, always-already “there” as a thread of social life, subversive by its very nature – one of inhabiting pockets of resistance, questioning, obstructing; its existence traceable through attentive analysis of its myriad ways and forms.

Colin Ward was a classic autodidact who sought connections between fields of knowledge around which academic fences are too often constructed. At the heart of his many enthusiasms was an interest in the meaning and making of space and place, as sites for creativity and learning."



"Fleeting pockets of anarchy and spaces of educational opportunity

The historian of childhood John Gillis has borrowed the notion of the “islanding of children” from Helgar and Hartmut Zeiher as a metaphor to describe how contemporary children relate, or do not relate, to the urban environments that they experience in growing up. Gillis quotes the geographer David Harvey, who has noted that children could even be seen to inhabit islands within islands, while “the internal spatial ordering of the island strictly regulates and controls the possibility of social change and history”. This could so easily be describing the modern school. According to Gillis, “archipelagoes of children provide a reassuring image of stasis for mainlands of adults anxious about change”.

Since the publication of Streetwork, the islanding of childhood has increased, not diminished. Children move – or, more accurately, are moved – from place to place, travelling for the most part sealed within cars. This prevents them encountering the relationships between time and space that Ward believed essential for them to be able to embark on the creation of those fleeting pockets of anarchy that were educational, at least in the urban environment. Meanwhile, the idea of environmental education has lost the urban edge realised fleetingly by Ward and Fyson during the1970s. Environmental education has become closely associated with nature and the values associated with natural elements and forces

If the curriculum of the school has become an island, we might in a sense begin to see the laptop or iPad as the latest islanding, or at least fragmenting, device. Ward and Fyson understood the importance of marginal in-between spaces in social life,where they believed creative flourishing was more likely to occur than in the sanctioned institution central spaces reflecting and representing state authority. This was, they thought, inevitable and linked to play, part of what it was to be a child. The teacher’s job was to manage that flourishing as well as possible, by responding to the opportunities continually offered in the marginal spaces between subjects in the curriculum and between school and village, city or town. They believed that such spaces offered educational opportunities that, if enabled to flourish through the suggested pedagogy of Streetwork and the implications of the exploding school, might enrich lives and environments across the generations. It was in the overlooked or apparently uninteresting spaces of the urban environment that teachers, with encouragement, might find a rich curriculum. Today, we might observe such “fleeting pockets of anarchy” in the in-between spaces of social media, which offer as yet unimagined opportunities and challenges for educational planners to expand the parameters of school and continue to define environmental education as radical social and urban practice."
colinward  cityasclassroom  anarchism  tonyfyson  streetwork  2014  catherineburke  education  unschooling  deschooling  1970s  society  theexplodingschool  children  socialnetworking  pedagogy  johngillis  urban  urbanism  islanding  parenting  experience  agesegregation  safety  anarchy  sabotage  subversion  autodidacts  autodidacticism  criticalpedagogy  childhood  learning  paulgoodman  freedom  interdisciplinary  transdisciplinary  cities  resistance  questioning  obstructing  obstruction  revolution  lewismumford  ivanillich  paulofreire  peterkropotkin  patrickgeddes  autodidactism  living  seeing  nationalism  separatism  johnholt  youth  adolescence  everyday  observation  participatory  enironmentaleducation  experientiallearning  place  schools  community  communities  context  bobbray  discovery  discoverylearning  hamescallaghan  blackpapers  teaching  kenjones  radicalism  conformity  control  restrictions  law  legal  culture  government  policy  spontaneity  planning  situationist  cocreation  place-basededucation  place-basedlearning  place-based  place-basedpedagogy 
july 2014 by robertogreco
Being self-taught — vanSchneider Blog
"1. It's about the process. Just do it and start with the first thing that comes to your mind. There is absolutely nothing you can do wrong.

2. Don't listen to other people who're telling you what's right and what's wrong. Those people will always try to keep you small and hold you back. Don't listen to them. People always told me that I'm naive  — and yeah, maybe I was. But I always was optimistic and I knew that I'm doing the right thing. 

3. Surround yourself with people who motivate you and always making you feel good about what you're doing. These personalities are rare - so if you found them, keep them.

4. Help other people. Even if you're at the very beginning of something, use your knowledge to help others. Why? Try it, magical things will happen, I promise.

5. Always surround yourself with people who're "better" than you. That's what Donny Osmond said and I think it's partly true. But try to replace "better" with "crazier" or "different".

6. Break the rules. That's actually one of the most important things at being self-taught. Be a rebel, break the rules and don't be afraid of anything. What if you fail? Get up, try again. If you don't like it? Don't do it, do something else. It's that simple.

7. Stop complaining. I know, that's fcking hard and I'm not really good with this either. But complaining is always the easy route and nothing actually happen when you do it, except you're surrounding yourself with a lot of negative energy."
via:ableparris  autodidacts  autodidactism  self-teaching  self-directedlearning  education  learning  unschooling  deschooling  life  design  tobiasvanschneider  complaining  complaints  rules  breakingrules  self-taught  donnyosmond  georgesteinbrenner  helping  interestedness  curiosity  people  relationships  doing  making  rightandwrong  process  autodidacticism  interested 
january 2013 by robertogreco
Kio Stark » Massive Open Online Classes are getting it wrong.
"What MOOCs should be working toward is more radical—detaching learning from the linear processes of school. That’s not the goal of the designers of MOOCs, but it absolutely should be.

What would this detached model of learning with access to the resources of school look like? It looks like the forms of independent learning I’ve been researching and writing about for Don’t Go Back to School. People getting the resources to learn what they want to learn, in contexts in which that knowledge or skill is necessary to the learner, or something they are passionate to learn."

"MOOCs have other challenges besides ditching linear formats. The most important condition for independent learning reported in my research is learning in the context of a community. MOOC designers make only a token effort to incorporate the social aspect of learning, with giant discussion forums that produce crowds, not learning communities."
udacity  mitx  coursera  learningcommunities  communitites  autodidactism  autodidacts  independentlearning  education  cv  tcsnmy  community  self-directedlearning  deschooling  unschooling  linearity  linearthinking  learning  mooc  moocs  2012  kiostark  autodidacticism  linear 
december 2012 by robertogreco
Casey Neistat - Wikipedia
"Neistat was born and raised in New London Connecticut.[1] He dropped out[2] of Ledyard High School in the 10th grade at age 15 and did not return to school or graduate. At age 17 Neistat had a son, Owen. From age 17 until 20 he lived in a trailer park with his son and son's mother, it was during this time Neistat was on welfare, a detail cited by Neistat when delivering his own biography.

In 2001 Neistat moved to New York City.

Prior to moving to New York City Neistat worked as a dishwasher[3] and short order cook in Mystic Connecticut. His first job in New York City was as a bike messenger.

In mid 2001 Neistat and his brother Van began working with the artist Tom Sachs, ultimately making a series of films[4] about the artists sculptures and installations. This was the earliest work done by the brothers as a collective."
caseyneistat  tomsachs  nyc  deschooling  unschooling  autodidacts  autodidactism  filmmaking  film  dropouts  autodidacticism 
november 2012 by robertogreco
Tehching Hsieh - Wikipedia
I did not know this:

"Tehching Hsieh dropped out from high school and started creating art in the form of paintings; he went on to create several performance pieces after finishing his three years of compulsory military service in Taiwan."
performanceart  artists  autodidacts  autodidactism  art  dropouts  tehchinghsieh  autodidacticism 
november 2012 by robertogreco
Ethiopian kids hack OLPCs in 5 months with zero instruction | DVICE
"Just to give you a sense of what these villages in Ethiopia are like, the kids (and most of the adults) there have never seen a word. No books, no newspapers, no street signs, no labels on packaged foods or goods. Nothing. And these villages aren't unique in that respect; there are many of them in Africa where the literacy rate is close to zero. So you might think that if you're going to give out fancy tablet computers, it would be helpful to have someone along to show these people how to use them, right?

But that's not what OLPC did."

"Within five days, they were using 47 apps per child per day. Within two weeks, they were singing ABC songs [in English] in the village. And within five months, they had hacked Android. Some idiot in our organization or in the Media Lab had disabled the camera! And they figured out it had a camera, and they hacked Android."

[See also: http://www.technologyreview.com/news/506466/given-tablets-but-no-teachers-ethiopian-children-teach-themselves/ ]
motorolazoom  motoroloa  android  learning  2012  autodidacts  autodidactism  curiosity  literacy  deschooling  unschooling  education  computers  holeinthewall  ethiopia  africa  olpc  autodidacticism 
october 2012 by robertogreco
patfarenga.com - Young Children as Research Scientists
"…current research that clearly supports John Holt’s ideas about how children learn…

Scientific Thinking in Young Children: Theoretical Advances, Empirical Research, and Policy Implications, Science 28, September 2012: Vol. 337 no. 6102 pp. 1623-1627

By Alison Gopnik

ABSTRACT: New theoretical ideas and empirical research show that very young children’s learning and thinking are strikingly similar to much learning and thinking in science. Preschoolers test hypotheses against data and make causal inferences; they learn from statistics and informal experimentation, and from watching and listening to others. The mathematical framework of probabilistic models and Bayesian inference can describe this learning in precise ways. These discoveries have implications for early childhood education and policy. In particular, they suggest both that early childhood experience is extremely important and that the trend toward more structured and academic early childhood programs is misguided."
lcrpoject  howwelearn  scientificthinking  homeschool  autodidacts  autodidactism  2012  scientificmethod  research  education  learning  unschooling  patfarenga  johnholt  alisongopnik  autodidacticism 
october 2012 by robertogreco
Daily Kos: A Blue-Collar Girl in a White-Collar World
"no matter the exposure to people, places & knowledge, I wasn't willing to give up total ownership of my learning process. It was a tough sell to the people around me, who could not divorce the concept of “learning” from “teacher” & “classroom”. But part of being an autodidact is embracing how you learn best…"

"As I began to interact more and more with these mid-to-late-twenties/early-thirty somethings, I noticed something startling -- the majority of them were in the very same situation that I was. We were all working blue-collar (or more menial white-collar) jobs, trying to launch some kind of artistic or otherwise higher paying career. In the case of my co-workers, who were virtually all college graduates, I (the youngest among them) was their boss."

"the choices I’d made didn’t feel so baseless. It was like I'd gotten the jump on life. While going to college had definitely broadened the intellectual/artistic horizons of many of my peers, practically speaking, I’d come out ahead."
higheredbubble  highereducation  highered  whitecollar  bluecollar  howwelearn  lifeskills  colleges  glvo  edg  srg  universities  careers  autodidactism  autodidacts  life  work  2012  emmazale  education  learning  unschooling  autodidacticism 
august 2012 by robertogreco
The Believer - Interview with Agnès Varda
"Sometimes I say, If I had seen some masterpieces, maybe I wouldn’t have dared start. I started very—not innocent, but naïve in a way. So that’s a big freedom, you know? I didn’t go to school. I didn’t go to film school. I was never an assistant or trainee on a film. I had not seen all those cameras. So I think it gave me a lot of freedom. I see all these students, and I admire them—they’re trying to learn something, they go to school, they do film school, they go on shoots, they help. I’m sure they learn a lot, and some of them, it makes them aware of what they wish to do. I was—that’s the way I was—autodidact."
via:litherland  interviews  2012  agnèsvarda  learning  autodidacts  autodidactism  deschooling  unschooling  education  filmmaking  film  autodidacticism 
august 2012 by robertogreco
Nicholas Negroponte Talks About Learning by Yourselves - OLPC News
"Having heard plenty of talk of the first three points in the past I was most interested in hearing what Negroponte had in mind with regard to the "New Constructionism". Unfortunately most of what was said doesn't really strike me as new at all.

The one thing which was quite interesting is the aspect of "Learning to Read by Yourself" which very much ties in with Negroponte's much discussed helicopter deployments which saw its first pre-pilots being launched earlier this year.

He shared that the first 30 tablets with several thousand books on them had been distributed. Not too many other details were revealed and while Negroponte mentioned that "they read themselves" it's not quite clear for example what language these books are in. What is really exciting however is that he mentions a rigorous evaluation of these efforts and working with critics which I believe should make for some interesting results and discussions down the road."
education  learning  deschooling  unschooling  learningbyyourselves  readbyyourself  tablets  newconstructionism  constructionism  connectivity  nocostconnectivity  newconstructivism  2012  autodidacts  autodidactism  reading  literacy  holeinthewall  sugatamitra  nicholasnegroponte  olpc  autodidacticism 
march 2012 by robertogreco
Twitter / @ThisMoiThisMoi: Right after I dropped out ...
"Right after I dropped out of high school I worked at a video store where we got free rentals. Truffaut's were my first ones...

and like any self-respecting "artsy" high school drop out I immediately became obsessed with Antoine Doinel."

[That second half is from here: http://twitter.com/ThisMoiThisMoi/status/166561097753694208 ]
self-directedlearning  autodidactism  autodidacts  learning  2012  françoistruffaut  antoinedoinel  film  dropouts  kartinarichardson  autodidacticism 
february 2012 by robertogreco
PARALLEL SCHOOL: Students as Designers (Norman Potter)
[Wayback: https://web.archive.org/web/20100419063957/http://www.parallel-school.com:80/2010/02/students-as-designers-norman-potter.html ]

"Parallel school of art is a virtual and international school where those who want to self-educate themselves can share what they are doing and thinking about, as well as their interests and projects.

Parallel school wants to generate and spread work emulation through the development of self-initiated projects such as publications, meetings, lectures, workshops, etc.

Parallel school would like to bring together the knowledge, experiences and energy from students all over the world.

Parallel School is an umbrella that is free to use by anyone interested in doing so."
workshops  networkedlearning  sharing  lcproject  projectbasedlearning  via:litherland  parallelschool  design  learning  autodidacts  autodidactism  self-education  education  autodidacticism  pbl 
january 2012 by robertogreco
George Dyson - Looking Backward to Put New Technology in Focus - NYTimes.com
"You left the cocoon of Princeton when you were 16. Why?

I was a rebellious adolescent. It was the ’60s. Everyone was rebellious. I hated high school. When they wouldn’t let me graduate early because I hadn’t taken gym, I quit altogether and went off to BC. It was a time when a lot of kids ran away from home. My father didn’t stop me…Being there was so liberating — getting my own food, making my own living…I did this for about 20 years.

And today you make your living as a historian of science and technology. How does a high school dropout get to do that?

Hey, this is America. You can do what you want! I love this idea that someone who didn’t finish high school can write books that get taken seriously. History is one of the only fields where contributions by amateurs are taken seriously, providing you follow the rules and document your sources. In history, it’s what you write, not what your credentials are."
georgedyson  autodidactism  autodidacts  2011  interviews  dropouts  unschooling  education  history  historyofscience  adolescence  technology  historyoftechnology  amateurism  credentials  autodidacticism 
december 2011 by robertogreco
Don't Go Back to School: A handbook for learning anything by Kio Stark — Kickstarter
"Don’t Go Back to School  is a handbook for independent learning that shows you how to learn almost anything without school. If you’re thinking about going back to school or about the possibility of self-taught learning, read this book first! Don’t Go Back to School will help you figure out if you can do it on your own—and it’ll show you how. It might just save you a gazillion dollars in tuition fees, and spare you the yoke of student loans for years to come."
kiostark  unschooling  deschooling  learning  books  kickstarter  2011  danielsinker  corydoctorow  quinnnorton  selfeducated  self-directedlearning  autodidactism  autodidacts  brepettis  skillshare  dropouts  education  cv  autodidacticism 
november 2011 by robertogreco
Mobility Shifts
"MobilityShifts examines learning with digital media from a global perspective. It will foster diverse discussions about digital fluencies for a mobile world and investigate learning outside the bounds of schools and universities. The summit, comprised of a conference, exhibition, podcast series, workshops and project demos and a theater performance, will add a rich international layer to the existing research about digital learning. Building on disciplinary mobility, the summit will showcase theories, people and projects making connections between self-learning, mobile platforms, and the web.

MobilityShifts is grouped around three major themes:

Digital Fluencies for a Mobile World
DIY U: Learning Without a School?
Learning from Digital Learning Projects Globally"
education  learning  technology  mobile  socialmedia  phones  mobilityshifts  mobility  teaching  pedagogy  nyc  newschool  mimiito  henryjenkins  cathydavidson  michaelwesch  rolfhapel  johnwillinsky  katiesalen  jonathanzittrain  saskiasassen  kenwark  fredturner  alexandergalloway  tizzianaterranova  digitalmedia  events  conferences  togo  digitalfluencies  diyu  unschooling  deschooling  autodidacts  autodidactism  digitalliteracy  digitallearning  self-directedlearning  self-learning  self-directed  multidisciplinary  interdisciplinary  crossdisciplinary  informallearning  information  global  autodidacticism 
april 2011 by robertogreco
Generation Z will revolutionize education | Penelope Trunk
"1. A huge wave of homeschooling will create a more self-directed workforce…Gen X is more comfortable working outside system than Baby Boomers…

2. Homeschooling as kids will become unschooling as adults…school does not prepare people for work…Gen Y has been very vocal about this problem…

3. The college degree will return to its bourgeois roots; entrepreneurship will rule. The homeschooling movement will prepare Gen Y to skip college, & Gen X is out-of-the-box enough in their parenting to support that…

Baby Boomers are too competitive to risk pulling college rug out from under kids. Gen Y are rule followers—if adults tell them to go to college, they will. Gen X is very practical…1st gen in US history to have less money than parents…makes sense that Gen X would be generation to tell kids to forget about college.

90% of Gen Y say they want to be entrepreneurs, but only very small % of them will ever launch full-fledged business, because Generation Y are not really risk takers."

[Via (see response): http://www.odonnellweb.com/?p=9206 AND http://radiofreeschool.blogspot.com/2011/04/revolutionizing-education-were-doing-it.html ]
education  homeschool  generations  genx  geny  babyboomers  boomers  generationy  generationx  risk  risktaking  unschooling  deschooling  culture  learning  change  entrepreneurship  2011  colleges  college  universities  schools  schooliness  rules  rulefollowing  competitiveness  lcproject  debt  tuition  freeuniversities  doing  making  trying  generationz  genz  strauss&howe  gamechanging  generationalstrife  autodidacts  autodidactism  self-directedlearning  self-directed  selflearners  self-education  penelopetrunk  autodidacticism 
april 2011 by robertogreco
Independence Day: Developing Self-Directed Learning Projects - NYTimes.com
"What would schools look like if students developed their own curriculum? How would education and the experience of being in school differ for students if they had more power to direct their learning? In this lesson, students consider an experiment in public education in which a small group of high school students planned and executed a model for their own learning. They then develop and implement their own self-directed projects and reflect on the results." [See also: http://www.nytimes.com/2011/03/15/opinion/15engel.html AND http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MTmH1wS2NJY ]
pedagogy  education  learning  tcsnmy  lcproject  unschooling  deschooling  independentproject  schools  studentdirected  self-directed  self-directedlearning  projectbasedlearning  projects  curriculum  lifeskills  standards  collaboration  problemsolving  criticalthinking  self-regulation  leadership  individualization  theindependentproject  freedom  independence  cv  freeschools  democraticschools  autodidacts  autodidactism  student-led  autodidacticism  pbl 
march 2011 by robertogreco
Let Kids Rule the School - NYTimes.com
"Schools everywhere could initiate an Independent Project. All it takes are serious, committed students and a supportive faculty. These projects might not be exactly alike: students might apportion their time differently, or add another discipline to the mix. But if the Independent Project students are any indication, participants will end up more accomplished, more engaged and more knowledgeable than they would have been taking regular courses.

We have tried making the school day longer and blanketing students with standardized tests. But perhaps children don’t need another reform imposed on them. Instead, they need to be the authors of their own education."

[See also: http://learning.blogs.nytimes.com/2011/03/21/independence-day-developing-self-directed-learning-projects/ AND http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MTmH1wS2NJY ]
education  innovation  change  tcsnmy  lcproject  democratic  schools  unschooling  deschooling  howwework  choice  collaboration  curriculum  emergentcurriculum  studentdirected  cv  democraticschools  freeschools  independentproject  plp  inquiry-basedlearning  learning  freedom  independence  responsibility  theindependentproject  self-directed  self-directedlearning  autodidacts  autodidactism  student-led  autodidacticism 
march 2011 by robertogreco
PhotonQ-Connecting with Nicholas Negroponte | Flickr - Photo Sharing!
"child becomes agent of change, as opposed to object of change"

"If you have to measure (result), it's not big enough." (Answering question, how do you measure success of the OLPC ?)"

“Computing is not about computers any more. It is about living.”

“Paper books will not exist in 5 years. The argument against books as paper objects turns out to be the developing world.”

"Every time the project is carried out, children all over the developing world ‘swim like fish’ in the digital environment …Ironically while often seen as a damaging distraction to western kids, ownership & use of a personal laptop in deprived areas is a huge advantage. Perhaps it’s because we have so much that we’re so bored & cynical.

…to own a networked laptop w/ access to internet means you’ve got access to the global conversation. You’re part of what’s happening all over world & can have digital presence as influential & dynamic as any kid in SF. OLPC machines are inspiring some interesting behaviour too…"

[See also: http://tedxbrussels.eu/blog/2010/12/01/430/ ]
nicholasnegroponte  olpc  education  outdoctrination  learning  global  deschooling  autodidacts  autodidactism  leapfrogging  cynicism  xo  behavior  society  internet  web  computing  lcproject  unschooling  autodidacticism 
december 2010 by robertogreco
the conversation that never happens « Underbellie
"Keeping one's children out of school & not imposing home-curriculum is a fringe choice…Given that, I think part of the reason this conversation doesn't happen is many of us prefer to think of fringe people as being wrong. When we see their choices working out well it's a bit uncomfortable. Thus it's much easier to think of my kids or myself as some kind of an exception…The kids are either "bright", or I am a super-hard working mama administrating organized curriculum & have extraordinary "patience" to spend so much of my time w/ my own children (why children are assumed to be such a horrible group of people to be forced to mingle w/ is subject of another article)…

unschoolers know exactly where B went next…"How long are you planning on keeping them out of school?"…

if we were to admit that autodidactic children in a loving & secure environment perform very well in aggregate (given nearly any marker of success), we'd have to then question the many tenets of the school model"

[via: http://www.unschoolinglifestyle.com/2010/08/taboo-of-unschooling-success.html ]
glvo  unschooling  deschooling  perception  misconception  fringe  exceptions  education  cv  learning  homeschool  children  parenting  inmyexperience  autodidacts  autodidactism  autodidacticism 
november 2010 by robertogreco
more than 95 theses [A quote from Dwight MacDonald on the force-feeding of culture from the perspective of a "conservative anarchist"]
"“Well, I say, being an anarchist, that I don’t believe in taking people by the hand and force-feeding them culture. I think they should make their own decisions. If they want to go to museums and concerts, that’s fine, but they shouldn’t be seduced into doing it or shamed into doing it.”

— Dwight MacDonald, who called himself a “conservative anarchist.” This is an important idea in my forthcoming book The Pleasures of Reading in an Age of Distraction."
anarchism  distraction  reading  museums  culture  society  unschooling  deschooling  self-directedlearning  self-directed  autodidacts  autodidactism  learning  intrinsicmotivation  motivation  forcefeeding  decisions  glvo  indoctrination  autodidacticism 
october 2010 by robertogreco
correct me if i’m wrong: » The Paradox of Self-Education
"The paradox of self-education is that there are intellectually stimulating endeavors which don’t have a direct impact in the job market or in school. While learning is generally a valued skill, and the knowledge attained by it sought after, there is a limitation of the desire to learn (and by extension, produce) due to these systematic social constructs...

It seems that perhaps the only way to fulfill the quest of self-education is to have a flexible job that teaches you one specific area, and thus allows you to utilize your free time for the remaining ones. I believe that’s how Da Vinci did it as a painter. Did other polymaths do the same? What happened to the Renaissance Man? As the human race advances, will it become more difficult to become a generalist?"

[Continues and a great comments thread follows, including this: http://raamdev.com/the-pursuit-of-knowledge ]
education  self-education  society  learning  paradox  genius  renaissancemen  generalists  unschooling  deschooling  life  work  livetowork  worktolive  cv  knowledge  crossdisciplinary  crosspollination  capitalism  infooverload  storyofmylife  retirement  sabbaticals  yearoff  via:cervus  frugality  simplicity  culture  peace  mindset  counterculture  interdisciplinary  multidisciplinary  autodidacts  autodidactism  autonomy  autodidacticism 
june 2010 by robertogreco
The Pursuit of Knowledge
[Response to: http://www.adambossy.com/blog/2009/02/19/the-paradox-of-self-education/ ] [Very close to my concept of taking retirement every few years as creative sabbaticals rather than in a lump sum at the end of my career.]

"My goal now is to live frugally so I can set aside big enough bucket of money to get me through year w/out work. Then...I’ll spend a year learning something of interest, possibly making small amounts of money on side. When needed, I’ll start working & hopefully keep repeating this process. If something I do makes me tons of money, great. If not…well it’s not about money.

pursuit of knowledge is more important than money...Sure, money would make that pursuit easier, but life isn’t easy. This is where society gets it wrong. We put money & status 1st & education & knowledge 2nd, using latter to obtain former. Imagine a society where pursuit of knowledge defined our standards of living...

If we’re willing to sacrifice high-strung lifestyle for ability to spend time learning & increasing knowledge...can accomplish amazing things, both individually & as society. A world pursuing money & status has reason to fight & start wars, but world pursuing knowledge & advancement...peace."
education  self-education  society  learning  paradox  genius  renaissancemen  generalists  unschooling  deschooling  work  livetowork  worktolive  cv  life  knowledge  crossdisciplinary  crosspollination  capitalism  infooverload  storyofmylife  retirement  sabbaticals  yearoff  via:cervus  frugality  simplicity  culture  peace  mindset  counterculture  interdisciplinary  multidisciplinary  autodidacts  autodidactism  autonomy  autodidacticism 
june 2010 by robertogreco
Raghava KK: Five lives of an artist | Video on TED.com
"With endearing honesty and vulnerability, Raghava KK tells the colorful tale of how art has taken his life to new places, and how life experiences in turn have driven his multiple reincarnations as an artist -- from cartoonist to painter, media darling to social outcast, and son to father."
art  raghavakk  ted  creativity  reinvention  autodidacts  unschooling  autodidactism  learning  evolution  change  gamechanging  lifelonglearning  glvo  children  painting  caricatures  life  wisdom  belief  experience  autodidacticism 
february 2010 by robertogreco
School's Out: Get ready for the new age of individualized education - Reason Magazine
"The Homogenizing Hopper...The Home-Schooling Revolution...Free Agent Teaching...The End of High School...A renaissance of apprenticeships...A flowering of teenage entrepreneurship...A greater diversity of academic courses...A boom of national service...A backlash against standards...The Unschooling of Adults...The devaluation of degrees...Older students...Free agent teaching...Big trouble for elite colleges...Learning groupies"
danielpink  education  learning  2001  freedom  unschooling  deschooling  schools  schooling  tcsnmy  autodidactism  future  homeschool  reform  curriculum  motivation  choice  change  gamechanging  freelance  freelanceteaching  freelanceeducation  freelancing  colleges  universities  economics  history  demographics  work  careers  entrepreneurship  apprenticeships  lcproject  standards  testing  alternative  autodidacticism  autodidacts 
september 2009 by robertogreco
Favela Chic education | Beyond The Beyond
"*...I don’t understand why these online educationaly enterprises even need to *pretend* to be a “college.” If we’re really looking at Clayton Christensen style “disruption,” we ought to be abandoning the whole idea of “education,” of degrees, schooling, grades, papers, publishing, theses, doctorates, any of that. *You just get on line and you start messing with stuff. At some point, the other practitioners notice you and start linking to you. And they buy stuff from you, or they praise you for what you are doing. And then you know that you know it. And that’s an end to it. *Maybe somebody could invent some formal tests for you, if they were all worried about it. Otherwise, what the heck: bring on the rocket-science and the brain surgery! Got all the instructables you can eat! *...we’re not “formally educated,” but...who cares about that? You can’t *make us* care. You are Main Stream Education and you are so over."

[in reference to: http://www.washingtonmonthly.com/college_guide/feature/college_for_99_a_month.php ]
brucesterling  futurism  highered  education  learning  disruption  disruptive  online  unschooling  deschooling  credentials  degrees  schooling  gamechanging  publishing  colleges  universities  mainstream  future  web  internet  autodidacts  autodidactism  testing  autodidacticism 
september 2009 by robertogreco
Artworld Salon » Blog Archive » What’s wrong with ‘professionalization’?
"What are we really criticizing when we deride the graduates of MFA and PhD programs for nothing more than simply having done what one would expect them to do, which is to go and learn about the enterprise in which they are interested? I suspect that lurking behind such statements lies a romanticized and outmoded notion of the artistic subject—which is to say, of the kind of subjectivity (autodidactic, at odds with decorum and the status quo, sometimes tortured, often difficult, always independent—i.e. an ideal of bourgeois bohemianism) that continues to cling to the definition of the “artist” today like some itchy fungus." + response in comments which begins: "Just as the marriage of poststructuralism and the invasion of academe by the baby-boomer generation produced political correctness and decades of right thinking by a neutered liberal establishment, many MFA programs...often promote less a canon of critical ideas than an effective art world catechism..."
via:regine  art  academia  mfa  professionalism  autodidacts  autodidactism  academics  glvo  autodidacticism 
june 2009 by robertogreco
Bre Pettis | I Make Things - My Talk at 25c3 - Rapid Prototype Your Life
Around the 39:00 mark, when discussing hacker collectives Pettis says that he thinks "school is basically dead. What can replace school is this idea of communities that care enough about learning that they're willing to figure stuff things out and then share what they've learned and document it. I don't know exactly what this is called, but I really like it better than schools." via: http://www.boingboing.net/2009/01/07/bre-pettiss-rapid-pr.html video at: http://dewy.fem.tu-ilmenau.de/CCC/25C3/video_h264_720x576/25c3-3015-en-rapid_prototype_your_life.mp4
brepettis  education  autodidactism  autodidacts  machineproject  lcproject  unschooling  deschooling  hacking  make  making  diy  community  hacks  grassroots  techlabs  collective  hackercollective  technology  prototyping  fabbing  rapidprototyping  sharing  creativity  culture  future  autodidacticism 
january 2009 by robertogreco
The Education Revolution
"The Alternative Education Resource Organization (AERO) was founded in 1989 by Jerry Mintz. AERO is a branch of the School of Living, a non-profit organization founded in 1934 by Ralph Borsodi. AERO's goal is to advance student-driven, learner-centered approaches to education. AERO is considered by many to be the primary hub of communications and support for educational alternatives around the world. Education Alternatives include, but are not limited to, Montessori, Waldorf (Steiner) Choice, Democratic, Homeschool, Open, Charter, Free, Sudbury, Holistic, Virtual, Magnet, Early Childhood, Reggio Emilia, Indigo, Krishnamurti, Quaker, Libertarian, Independent, Progressive, Community, Cooperative, and Unschooling. One of AERO's areas of expertise is democratic process and democratic education, but equally important is the networking of all forms of educational alternatives. It is through our work and mission that we hope to create an education revolution."
education  homeschool  learning  children  unschooling  deschooling  alternative  lcproject  books  nonprofit  pedagogy  research  schools  culture  future  teaching  resources  autodidacts  autodidactism  autodidacticism  nonprofits 
january 2009 by robertogreco
Alfred North Whitehead - Wikipedia
"Whitehead's address The Aims of Education (1916) pointedly criticized the formalistic approach of modern British teachers who do not care about culture and self-education of their disciples: "Culture is activity of thought, and receptiveness to beauty and humane feeling. Scraps of information have nothing to do with it.""
alfrednorthwhitehead  education  learning  deschooling  unschooling  autodidactism  culture  mathematics  philosophy  logic  sociology  religion  theology  science  autodidacticism  autodidacts 
january 2009 by robertogreco
Cool Tools: DIY language learning
"This handbook teaches you how to learn any language on your own, in the language's home turf, by teaching a native speaker to be your teacher. The trick is to instruct your local agent to teach you something he/she is hardly aware of -- the structure of their language. You will supply the plan and so are teaching yourself through them. Comprende? It's done slowly, naturally, and playfully - the way you learned English. Your assistant doesn't even have to speak your language."
books  languages  learning  autodidactism  diy  howto  language  autodidacticism  autodidacts 
january 2009 by robertogreco
Laurent Haug’s blog » Hole in the wall
"Philippe was so impressed by Sugata Mitra’s presentation of his hole in the wall project (which received more than 25′000 views on liftconference.com and ended up being published on TED talks) that he flew to India to shoot street kids experimenting with self-education."

[see also: http://www.flickr.com/photos/phitar/sets/72157609414016354/ ]
photography  self-education  autodidactism  autodidacts  sugatamitra  learning  education  india  computers  lcproject  unschooling  deschooling  outdoctrination  holeinthewall  autodidacticism 
december 2008 by robertogreco
In search of a beautiful mind - The Boston Globe
"He was long a jewel of the MIT faculty. Now, after a devastating brain injury, mathematician Seymour Papert is struggling bravely to learn again how to think like, speak like, be like the man of genius he was."
genius  learning  neuroscience  mit  seymourpapert  biography  brain  health  science  autodidacts  autodidactism  lego  olpc  education  children  mind  mindstorms  constructivism  unschooling  deschooling  recovery  rehabilitation  autodidacticism 
august 2008 by robertogreco
Creating Learning Communities
"We are a group of people, who have dedicated ourselves to the promotion of a new educational system with the student in the center. Thirty odd members have written a book which was published in August 2000. This book is the core theme of our home page. B
autodidacts  autodidactism  community  constructivism  criticalthinking  education  lcproject  unschooling  deschooling  homeschool  learning  online  resources  autodidacticism 
june 2008 by robertogreco
Self Made Scholar
"This blog is going to be all about self-education - people learning what they want to know
education  free  reference  books  learning  autodidacts  autodidactism  audiobooks  tutorials  opencourseware  howto  deschooling  unschooling  lessons  homeschool  autodidacticism 
june 2008 by robertogreco
Sit and Listen: On new report called Learning 2.0 from the CIM (Chartered Institute of Marketing)
"big need for change when it comes to professional development. Individuals need to do more to take the initiative, since they’re ultimately in it for themselves...employers need to open up their definitions of training and learning"
professionaldevelopment  learning  future  learning2.0  education  administration  management  leadership  training  work  careers  gamechanging  change  reform  teaching  schools  autodidactism  informal  informallearning  unschooling  deschooling  autodidacticism  autodidacts 
february 2008 by robertogreco

Copy this bookmark:





to read