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robertogreco : avatars   13

Improving Reality | Joanne McNeil
"My talk was concerned with the strangely malleable qualities of time.

What if a digital photograph taken several years from now looks exactly like an image taken today? Digital content appears with minimal visual language distinguishing yesterday from tomorrow and today. Now habits have emerged in which we communicate with the past and even mistake it for the present. Is time itself something mutable on the web, available to us to reimagine and remix?"



"Google privileges the relevant over the new — and our search habits on the web work the same. Why might I have guessed that after sitting there abandoned for thirty years, it would be gone just as I had the chance to see it? I made the mistake the people using that Haiti image had done — confused the past for the present.

I went out anyway, to see for myself, see the place in context, see if there was anything left. I stood there looking at my iPhone with Google Earth satellites telling me I should be in the middle of this fantastic place. But I was only standing in the pieces of what used to be.

The web has changed the way we think of time. We see examples of contemporary culture remixing the past, present, and future in celebrity holograms, instagram filters, WW2 in real time tweets.

We can communicate with the past online. Here you see, on an actress’s IMDB page. This conversation went on from 2007 to just recently. Who knows how long people will discuss “does she have a boyfriend or husband?” Until she’s in a confirmed committed relationship? Until she dies? Until the end of IMDB? We’ve never had anything like this before. Messages in the bottle or bathroom graffiti never had a lifespan, accessibility, and community like this.

The mutability of time as its represented online isn’t a cause for alarm. It’s something we can play with, have a little fun —

Early last year, I logged in Friendster after many years of leaving it inactive. And it occurred to me…all these photos of me were old, my favorite movies, books, nothing related to the way I am today. Most of these “friends” I’d lost touch with long ago….it was all frozen in time from the last time I used it, about 2006.

And I began to wish there were a rewind button. That I could look at its first iteration. What I was like when I signed up for the service, my favorite books, my friends then.

So, for a laugh, I created a brand new profile. One as I would have created it a decade before. And I asked my friends — my new friends — to come join me there. These are people I didn’t know then. I got to share my history in an unusual way — show what I used to be like. I would post status updates complaining about my job as a waitress or bragging about reading Ursula LeGuin….
via:litherland  2012  joannemcneil  time  change  internet  web  profiles  avatars  friendster  photography  digital  images  memory  memories  reality  storytelling  howwechange  identity  mallealility  future  past  present 
september 2014 by robertogreco
New Degrees of Freedom
"Did cyberspace mix up your circadian rhythm? Have you lost your mind to the global brain? Do you energetically perpetuate an economy of boundaryless social and working life? Experiencing an “investiture crisis”? The physical world looks different against the landscape of the Internet. Immeasurable digital choices mark our bodies; frustrates them. Can we live our online projections? Have you ever considered “power dressing” by means of a real-life avatar?

--

Throughout time, from wheel to book to clothing, humans have created mediating technologies to extend their physical or mental faculties.

Early Internet mediums reached out for autonomous space and flexible identity. In these virtual confines, one could present oneself as one imagined oneself to be; projection and representation became flattened. One could be many things and in many places at the same time.

Such affordances, or cyber-body freedom, have gradually disappeared as cyberspace has shifted away from a text-based environment dominated by user-generated role-playing and chat environments where anonymity and invented identities prevailed. The space has now become a visual arena where we are subject to constant imaging, surveillance, and the workings of information economy.

In effect, every new link between one’s online and offline identities removes a “degree of freedom”—each connection subsequently severs a limb from one’s Internet avatar. Multiple simultaneous lives, accelerated to Internet speed, incrementally meet their deaths; minds, metamorphosed into a global brain, are disconnected.

In the computer room, one finds oneself with a single body whose functional capacity exists in one point in space and time. And while humans are typically seen as psychophysical entities, limited by the frame of the body, this condition no longer seizes us in our self-understanding.

If the body cannot be emancipated online—indeed the Internet has proved to be not virtual enough—let us imagine new modes of existence in the physical world. Perhaps we should stretch out from the confines of what has become a normative space and start a process of self-actualization (again) inside human bodies. For this, we need a series of aberrant identifications beyond social essences—ones connected to us by way of names, titles, and degrees. We need to use bodily production and exchange beyond our structural limits, determining new zones within known space.

It is time to assume physical formlessness.

--

Like amoebas or acrobats, real-life avatars strive for autonomy in time and space by means of shape shifting. They demonstrate new ways of living in bodies—such as lending one’s body to another, being nebulously anywhere, or constantly reassembling—thus augmenting the presence of those that they represent.

The project of the real-life avatars operates twofold. On the one hand, they represent a precarious social and working life made of flesh—a critical illustration, exaggerating existing power relations through to their logical end point. On the other hand, they reappropriate the means of immaterial production, connecting bodies and minds in subversive ways—a means to self-actualize, or take time off, offline, off time.

--

New Degrees of Freedom is a media project by Jenna Sutela, with graphic designer Johanna Lundberg and collaborators."

[See also: http://www.twinfactory.co.uk/index.php/jenna-sutela-space-time-and-the-body/ ]
jennasutela  johannalundberg  internet  identity  freedom  art  avatars  movement  dance  newmedia  multimedia  offline  online  2013  form  formlessness  circadianrythms  cyberspace  immaterialproduction 
september 2013 by robertogreco
Totems and City Avatars – Blog – BERG
At one point during City Tracking, I commented that I still felt a connection to London during my time in San Francisco through the bike-key on my keyring (above)…

The bike-key has no functionality without the service: it’s just an RFID tag inside a piece of plastic. The service itself is unavoidably located in London. The computer systems that run it do not have to be, but the bikes themselves – the critical hardware within the service – cannot be located anywhere else.

The city and the service are tied together.

And so, for me, that keyfob that I pass through my fingers when I pick my keys up, or fidget with them in my pocket, is not just a service avatar; it’s an avatar for a city…

On my keyring, everywhere I go, I carry a piece of London."
tomarmitage  berg  berglondon  avatars  cities  london  inception  memory  totems  objects  socialobjects  memoryobjects  keyfobs  connections  physical  representation 
february 2011 by robertogreco
Dress codes for avatars? ~ Stephen's Web ~ by Stephen Downes
"OK, I can see the point about not wanting to have the company represented by scantily clad avatars. But is something to be address with a code, or with common sense? (Yes, those are the only two choices.)"
management  leadership  administration  tcsnmy  commonsense  dress  dresscodes  avatars 
october 2009 by robertogreco
weblin
"weblin makes you and others on the Web visible as small avatars. There are others on the same page you are on right now.weblin opens a new and exiting world on every web site."
avatars  browser  browsing  chat  communication  community  networking  internet  web  online  social  browsers 
december 2007 by robertogreco
JEANSNOW.NET -- REC YOU
"REC YOU is a new online campaign for the latest SONY Walkman — it uses the One Seg function, popular these days on mobile phones. It looks like you can send a portrait — you’ll find more details at the REC YOU site — which will then be used later
animation  photography  japanese  sony  technology  avatars  webdesign  interactive  3d  media  music  ad  branding  promotion  projectors  interface  webdev 
october 2007 by robertogreco
mypictr - we make your profile picture
"mypictr provides a free picture resizing service, which allows you to create a custom profile avatar for your favorite social network. You don't need to install any programs, plug-ins or any other software, just upload your picture, resize it online and
avatars  onlinetoolkit  photography  icons  web2.0  tools  identity  imaging  images  socialnetworks  socialsoftware  converter  generator 
october 2007 by robertogreco
Weekend Feature: The How of Habbo Hotel « GigaOM
"Sulka Haro of Sulake Labs ... explain[s] how the teen-oriented, Shockwave-driven Habbo Hotel has grown from a tiny 2.5D space of two rooms into a massive place that last year made an estimated $77 million in annual revenue."
habbo  habbohotel  social  socialnetworks  socialsoftware  statistics  business  avatars  advertising  tweens  teens  trends  kids  innovation  gaming  games  gamedesign  community  webdev  web  virtual  internet  online  MMO  webdesign 
september 2007 by robertogreco
In Certain Circles, Two Is a Crowd - New York Times
"Communications scholars began studying personal space and people’s perception of it decades ago, in a field known as proxemics."
avatars  community  culture  life  psychology  social  society  space  behavior  mmog 
november 2006 by robertogreco
Meez: Home
make and animate a free 3D avatar
make  online  tools  fun  web  internet  socialsoftware  free  avatars 
september 2006 by robertogreco
Click opera - Want to think? Get a mask.
"the masked ball nature of the internet -- it's anonymous and largely risk-free -- has led us towards a persona-type creativity rather than a brainstorming-type creativity. Brainstorming and "freewheeling" may have been hot in 1953 (freewheeling was still
creativity  innovation  business  organizations  productivity  work  identity  online  internet  web  avatars  society  risk 
march 2006 by robertogreco

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