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robertogreco : backchannel   10

of course, there’s the backchannel – Freddie deBoer – Medium
"My position was unpopular, but I was right then, and I’m right now. The situation made no sense. And while I appreciated that people were willing to reach out privately, the failure to speak up publicly can have high stakes. Increasingly I am concerned, in various worlds, with the distance between the public and private. Increasingly I wish that people were willing to say publicly what they now reserve only for all the backchannels out there."



"And that all comes down to a broader reality: on campus and off, even many or most of those who are deeply committed to the cause of social justice and its expression in feminism, anti-racism, and the fight for LGBTQ rights recognize that the culture of social justice is deeply unhealthy. You’ve heard all that from me before. I have been attempting to address that simple fact for years: that there is a difference between a commitment to fighting bigotry and accepting uncritically every argument that is made in the name of that fight. Many people join me in feeling that something has gone deeply wrong in how we prosecute the movement for social justice, but precisely because of the unhealthy conditions of that movement, they feel they can’t say so publicly.

*****

This seems like another one of those moments where what I’m saying is completely obvious, and would be barely worth mentioning if people didn’t react so negatively to actually spelling it out. (All it takes to be a media critic is a willingness to state the obvious.) I mean, it’s not exactly breaking news, right: people say different things privately than they are willing to say publicly. But the very nature of the backchannel makes it impossible to draw out these threads. Some will respond to this post by saying I’m making it all up, and they will be right to object to talking about a phenomenon for which I can’t present specific examples and proof. That’s a constraint I operate under because my very position as a locus of the backchannel requires me to honor the commitment to privacy. (And I always will, don’t worry.) But if you’re in my position, how do you help convince a bunch of disparate, disconnected voices to speak out, when the consequences seem so dire?

The fact remains that I am not making this up. And it remains even if you think I am personally an asshole. What good, progressive, feminist, antiracist people need to be willing to do, if they want to grow this movement so that we can stop losing elections and start acquiring the power to actually make tangible change, is to be willing to say when you think that movement has gone wrong. You must be willing to say, publicly, I am with the cause, but I am not with this. You have to be willing to say, yes, the world is full of offensive things, and yes, I stand with you when someone does something offensive, but this particular claim to offense is not credible. You have to be willing to fight for social justice loudly and passionately and then, when someone takes the language of social justice applies it to ridiculous and illegitimate ends, be one of the people willing to say “enough.”"



"I’ve said it for years: there’s a backlash brewing, against these tactics. People are fed up. Those who live and operate in left discursive spaces are numb and exhausted from living in the constant fear of saying the wrong thing and stepping on a landmine. Over-the-top wokeness is now obligatory in media and academia, which means that much of it is performed in bad faith, with the cynical and the opportunistic now adopting that language and those tactics for their own selfish ends. Meanwhile, decent people who are sincerely committed to the actual ideals that underlie that language are forced to self-censor or else to drop out entirely. This is no way to advance the cause."
freddiedeboer  backchannel  socialjustice  left  2017  progressive  progressivism  academia  debate  wokeness 
may 2017 by robertogreco
It's Totally Normal to Watch Other People Play Video Games - The Atlantic
"I turned to a friend of the family, Aaron Briggs, to help grok Twitch. Briggs is 18, and described himself “mostly as a viewer but also a streamer” of the website. When he was most active as a streamer, he said his feeds had between 500 and 600 live viewers. 

“It’s a really weird happening,” he said of the service. “It’s very strange but also enticing.”

“I grew up with a much older brother. I’ve been watching games since I was really, really young,” Briggs said. And with games, he agreed: “Watching is as important as playing.”

And watching on Twitch can be better than playing. The service exposed him to the more competitive, professional sides of video gaming, “things you’d normally never see,” said Briggs. Some players practice speed runs of certain games, like the original Mario Bros., and then live-stream their attempts at certain records.

But he quickly compared the service to an experience more familiar to Boomers, and, indeed, many Americans. “It’s a lot like going to a Super Bowl party.” It’s a community event gathered around spectating.

Key to that community is Twitch chat, the open chat window next to the viewing screen. Each stream has its own chat window, and streamers respond to questions and jokes in the chat as they’re playing the game.

​“It makes something like watching a video, which would normally seem anti-social” actually social, said Briggs. “You see other people doing it too, and you feel like you’re part of something.”

That phenomenon should be familiar to any media watcher in 2014, even the Boomer-iest: It’s a second screen. Just as Twitter or Facebook can become a running line of gags, comments, and complaints during an awards show or Presidential debate, so does the Twitch chat window. Which is just another reason Amazon can bank on it—it’s a video service (with more primetime viewers than CNN or E!) with its own built-in social network.

And that may be just the kind of new twist this old custom needed."
twitch  robinsonmeyer  amazon  2014  spectators  videogames  games  gaming  backchannel  conversation  social  media  video  livestreaming  web  online  internet 
september 2014 by robertogreco
keynotetweet - A simple Applescript Application for automatically sending tweets from Apple Keynote during a presentation - Google Project Hosting
"This simple piece provides the capacity for speaker or presenter to to participate in the backchannel of a talk or conference session by integrating live 'tweets' into an Apple Keynote presentation. Simply add text inside the tags [twitter] and [/twitter] in the presenter notes section of a slide and when that slide comes up in the presentation the script will grab that text and send it to Twitter on your behalf."
via:derrickschultz  backchannel  presentations  applescript  presentation  keynote  twitter 
february 2012 by robertogreco
Future Perfect » The 3 Audiences
"There are 3 audiences to every presentation: the people in the room; the people tuning in online in real or close to real time; and history. The presenter needs to consider all three.

‘History’ is increasingly the digital memory of event – it starts with the conversations leading up to, during and after the event – it’s the photos posted online, the retweeted quotes, the barbs, the likes, the references, the downloads. The presenter can’t control history but she can nudge it in the right direction.

For any given presentation what artifacts do you leave behind? Where are they linked from? How can they be repurposed, reused? And what is the thread that links them back to you and what you’ve done?

Who is the gatekeeper of your history?

What is their motivation both now and in the future?"

[Related: http://snarkmarket.com/2009/4056 AND http://snarkmarket.com/2010/5979 ]
presentations  janchipchase  history  events  generativeevents  backchannel  reuse  ideas  momentum  artifacts  conversation  audience  trends  live  digitalmemory  digitalhistory  digitalartifacts  generativewebevent  media  memory  sharing  generativewebevents 
november 2010 by robertogreco
Lanyrd | the social conference directory
"* Find great conferences to attend: See what your friends are going to or speaking at, find conferences near you or browse conferences by topic.

*Discover what's hot while it's on: Track what's going on during the conference, even if you aren't there. Who is tweeting what, what links are doing the rounds. Use our useful mobile version to decide what to go to next.

*Catch up on anything you missed: Easily discover slides, video and podcasts from conferences you attended or tracked. If you spoke at an event you can build up your speaker portfolio of talks you gave."
conferences  twitter  socialmedia  social  events  tools  onlinetoolkit  calendar  directory  tcsnmy  backchannel  conversation  unconferences 
september 2010 by robertogreco
SpeEdChange: Classroom Changers
"School (in North America and Europe) is starting soon. So I just wanted to offer five quick "classroom changing" solutions... 1. The Backchannel… 2. Text-To-Speech… 3. Spellchecking for the rest of us… 4. Speech Recognition… 5. Do Not Disturb" [Bookmarked mostly for the tools that it points to. I've used many of these approaches before (often with other tools), all great advice.]
irasocol  edtech  classideas  texttospeech  backchannel  spellcheck  speechrecognition  teaching  tcsnmy  resources  specialed 
august 2010 by robertogreco
TodaysMeet
"TodaysMeet helps you embrace the backchannel and connect with your audience in realtime.

Encourage the room to use the live stream to make comments, ask questions, and use that feedback to tailor your presentation, sharpen your points, and address audience needs."
backchannel  twitter  onlinetoolkit  classideas  conferences  meetings  teaching  presentations  discussion  collaboration  communication  technology  chatroom  backchanneling  todaysmeet 
august 2010 by robertogreco
apophenia: I want my cyborg life
"I have become a "bad student." I can no longer wander an art museum without asking a bazillion questions that the docent doesn't know or won't answer or desperately wanting access to information that goes beyond what's on the brochure...I can't pay attention in a lecture without looking up relevant content. &, in my world, every meeting & talk is enhanced through a backchannel of communication. This isn't simply a generational issue. In some ways, it's a matter of approach...Am I learning what the speaker wants me to learn? Perhaps not. But I am learning & thinking & engaging. I'm 31 years old. I've been online since I was a teen. I've grown up with this medium & I embrace each new device that brings me closer to being a cyborg. I want information at my fingertips now & always...What will it take for us to see technology as a tool for information enhancement? At the very least, how can we embrace those who learn best when they have an outlet for their questions & thoughts?"
danahboyd  attention  backchannel  speakers  socialmedia  learning  distraction  teaching  twitter  wikipedia  conferences  technology  culture  society  information  add  lectures  tcsnmy 
july 2009 by robertogreco
Anatomy of a Mob: The Lacy/Zuckerberg Interview - TechnoSocial
"As citizens of the online world, we have a responsibility to step forward when we see people misbehaving. It doesn't take much to tone things down. People need to be reminded that the target of their frustrations is a real person."
sxsw  twitter  mobs  social  crowds  facebook  sarahlacy  statistics  visualization  community  relationships  psychology  keynote  socialmedia  society  etiquette  technology  alwayson  communication  analysis  casestudy  web  internet  online  howardrheingold  backchannel  via:hrheingold 
march 2008 by robertogreco

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