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robertogreco : benfry   4

Frankenfont | Fathom
"An edition of Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein laid out using characters and glyphs from PDF documents obtained through internet searches. The incomplete fonts found in the PDFs were reassembled into the text of Frankenstein based on their frequency of use. The most common characters are employed at the beginning of the book, and the text devolves into less common, more grotesque shapes and forms toward the end.

The beginning of the book is comprised largely of Arial, Helvetica, and the occasional Times New Roman. As you might expect, these are by far the most common fonts used in documents.

By page 46 and 47, things have progressed to a lot of Arial Bold and Times Italic.

In the 200s, commonly used script fonts, as well as much more obscure faces are beginning to appear.

As we reach the end, the book has devolved significantly: non-Roman fonts, highly specialized typefaces, and even pictogram fonts abound.

Process. For each of the 5,483 unique words in the book, we ran a search (using the Yahoo! Search API) that was filtered to just PDF files. We downloaded the top 10 to 15 hits for each word, producing 64,076 PDF files (some were no longer available, others were duplicates). Inside these PDFs were 347,565 subsetted fonts.From those fonts, 55,382 unique glyph shapes were used to fill the 342,889 individual letters found in the Frankenstein text.

PDF Fonts. This project started because of a fascination with the way that PDF files contain incomplete versions of fonts. The shape data is high enough quality to reproduce the original document, however only the necessary characters (and little of the font’s “metrics” that are used for proper typographic layout) are included in the PDF. This prevents others from extracting the fonts to be used for practical purposes, but creates an opportunity for a curious Victor Frankenstein who wants to use these incomplete pieces to create something entirely different."
books  ebooks  fonts  frankenstein  pdf  glyphs  characters  internet  search  maryshelly  frankenfont  srg  benfry  2011  papernet 
january 2014 by robertogreco
openFrameworks
"openFrameworks is an open source C++ toolkit designed to assist the creative process by providing a simple and intuitive framework for experimentation. The toolkit is designed to work as a general purpose glue, and wraps together several commonly used libraries, including:

OpenGL, GLEW, GLUT, libtess2 and cairo for graphics
rtAudio, PortAudio or FMOD and Kiss FFT for audio input, output and analysis
FreeType for fonts
FreeImage for image saving and loading
Quicktime and videoInput for video playback and grabbing
Poco for a variety of utilities
The code is written to be massively cross-compatible. Right now we support five operating systems (Windows, OSX, Linux, iOS, Android) and four IDEs (XCode, Code::Blocks, and Visual Studio and Eclipse). The API is designed to be minimal and easy to grasp.

Simply put, openFrameworks is a tool that makes it much easier to make things with code. We find it super useful, and we hope you do too."
benfry  caseyreas  arturocastro  theodorewatson  zachlieberman  matthewgingold  stevevarga  jeffcrouse  diederickhuijbers  damianstewart  lukaszkarluk  philipwhitfield  joshnoble  christophbuchner  jasonvancleave  kylemcdonald  gregborenstein  jamesgeorge  elliotwoods  open  frameworks  design  software  processing  openframeworks  art  visualization  opensource  c++  programming 
august 2012 by robertogreco
The cost of getting sick : GE
"To gain a deeper understanding of healthcare costs, we've combined the Medical Expenditure Panel Survey (MEPS) with 500K records from GE's proprietary database. By combining MEPS with GE's data, we gain a more complete picture of the costs associated with chronic conditions."
healthcare  datavisualization  infographics  processing  information  visualization  health  benfry  medical  disease  conversation  data  interactive 
november 2009 by robertogreco
the preservation of favoured traces | ben fry
"We often think of scientific ideas, such as Darwin's theory of evolution, as fixed notions that are accepted as finished. In fact, Darwin's On the Origin of Species evolved over the course of several editions he wrote, edited, & updated during his lifetime. The 1st English ed was approximately 150,000 words, the 6th a much larger 190,000. In the changes are refinements & shifts in ideas — whether increasing the weight of a statement, adding details, or even a change in the idea itself. 2nd edition adds a notable “by the Creator” to the closing paragraph, giving greater attribution to a higher power...the phrase “survival of the fittest” — usually considered central to the theory & often attributed to Darwin — instead came from British philosopher Herbert Spencer, & didn't appear until the 5th edition of the text. Using the 6 editions as a guide, we can see the unfolding & clarification of Darwin's ideas as he sought to further develop his theory during his lifetime."
science  history  darwin  complexity  text  benfry  processing  words  visualization  change  writing  evolution  editing  biology  data  animation  infographics  books  charlesdarwin 
september 2009 by robertogreco

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