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Inequality - how wealth becomes power (1/2) | (Poverty Richness Documentary) DW Documentary - YouTube
"Germany is one of the world’s richest countries, but inequality is on the rise. The wealthy are pulling ahead, while the poor are falling behind.

For the middle classes, work is no longer a means of advancement. Instead, they are struggling to maintain their position and status. Young people today have less disposable income than previous generations. This documentary explores the question of inequality in Germany, providing both background analysis and statistics. The filmmakers interview leading researchers and experts on the topic. And they accompany Christoph Gröner, one of Germany’s biggest real estate developers, as he goes about his work. "If you have great wealth, you can’t fritter it away through consumption. If you throw money out the window, it comes back in through the front door,” Gröner says. The real estate developer builds multi-family residential units in cities across Germany, sells condominium apartments, and is involved in planning projects that span entire districts. "Entrepreneurs are more powerful than politicians, because we’re more independent,” Gröner concludes. Leading researchers and experts on the topic of inequality also weigh in, including Nobel-prize winning economist Joseph Stiglitz, economist Thomas Piketty, and Brooke Harrington, who carried out extensive field research among investors from the ranks of the international financial elite. Branko Milanović, a former lead economist at the World Bank, says that globalization is playing a role in rising inequality. The losers of globalization are the lower-middle class of affluent countries like Germany. "These people are earning the same today as 20 years ago," Milanović notes. "Just like a century ago, humankind is standing at a crossroads. Will affluent countries allow rising equality to tear apart the fabric of society? Or will they resist this trend?”"

[Part 2: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cYP_wMJsgyg

"Christoph Gröner is one of the richest people in Germany. The son of two teachers, he has worked his way to the top. He believes that many children in Germany grow up without a fair chance and wants to step in. But can this really ease inequality?

Christoph Gröner does everything he can to drum up donations and convince the wealthy auction guests to raise their bids. The more the luxury watch for sale fetches, the more money there will be to pay for a new football field, or some extra tutoring, at a children's home. Christoph Gröner is one of the richest people in Germany - his company is now worth one billion euros, he tells us. For seven months, he let our cameras follow him - into board meetings, onto construction sites, through his daily life, and in his charity work. He knows that someone like him is an absolute exception in Germany. His parents were both teachers, and he still worked his way to the top. He believes that many children in Germany grow up without a fair chance. "What we see here is total failure across the board,” he says. "It starts with parents who just don’t get it and can’t do anything right. And then there’s an education policy that has opened the gates wide to the chaos we are experiencing today." Chistoph Gröner wants to step in where state institutions have failed. But can that really ease inequality?

In Germany, getting ahead depends more on where you come from than in most other industrialized countries, and social mobility is normally quite restricted. Those on top stay on top. The same goes for those at the bottom. A new study shows that Germany’s rich and poor both increasingly stay amongst themselves, without ever intermingling with other social strata. Even the middle class is buckling under the mounting pressure of an unsecure future. "Land of Inequality" searches for answers as to why. We talk to families, an underpaid nurse, as well as leading researchers and analysts such as economic Nobel Prize laureate Joseph Stiglitz, sociologist Jutta Allmendinger or the economist Raj Chetty, who conducted a Stanford investigation into how the middle class is now arming itself to improve their children’s outlooks."]
documentary  germany  capitalism  economics  society  poverty  inequality  christophgröner  thomaspiketty  brookehrrington  josephstiglitz  neoliberalism  latecapitalism  brankomilanović  worldbank  power  influence  policy  politics  education  class  globalization  affluence  schools  schooling  juttaallmendinger  rajchetty  middleclass  parenting  children  access  funding  charity  charitableindustrialcomplex  philanthropy  philanthropicindustrialcomplex  status  work  labor  welfare  2018  geography  cities  urban  urbanism  berlin  immigration  migration  race  racism  essen  socialsegregation  segregation  success  democracy  housing  speculation  paulpiff  achievement  oligarchy  dynasticwealth  ownership  capitalhoarding  injustice  inheritance  charlottebartels  history  myth  prosperity  wageslavery  polarization  insecurity  precarity  socialcontract  revolution  sociology  finance  financialcapitalism  wealthmanagement  assets  financialization  local  markets  privateschools  publicschools  privatization 
january 2019 by robertogreco
Bauhaus bus embarks on world tour to explore the school's global legacy
"A bus that looks like the Bauhaus school in Dessau will travel around the world this year, aiming to "unlearn" the influential school's Eurocentric attitudes.

Called Wohnmaschine, which means "living house", the small-scale Bauhaus bus will travel between four cities in 2019, the school's centenary year.

Designed by Berlin-based architect Van Bo Le-Mentzel, the 15-square-metre mobile building is created in the image of the iconic workshop wing of the Bauhaus school building in Dessau – a building conceived by founding director Walter Gropius and built in 1919, to embody the school's core principles and values.

It features the same gridded glass walls that wrap around the building, as well as the famous lettering down one side.

Inside is an apartment-like space, containing an area to host exhibitions and workshops, plus a reading room filled with books charting the Bauhaus' history and legacy.

The project, called Spinning Triangles, begins in Dessau. From there the bus will travel to Berlin, where the Bauhaus-Archiv is located, before travelling overseas to Kinshasa, in the Democratic Republic of the Congo, and Hong Kong.

Over the 10-month tour, design collective Savvy Contemporary will host a series of symposiums and workshops that attempt to challenge and "unlearn" colonial attitudes towards modernity, to develop a more global interpretation of the school's teachings.

"This school will not be developed by the geopolitical west, but through the accelerated movement between deeply interwoven places," said Savvy Contemporary.

"Design has power. It creates our environments, our interactions, our being in the world," added the organisation. "For too long, practices and narratives from the global south have been kept at the periphery of the design discourse, been ignored altogether, or appropriated."

Open to the public, the installation is beginning with four workshops in Dessau between 4 and 22 January, exploring the relationship between colonialism and modernity.

"We will face the relations of coloniality and design as well as its various visibilities and invisibilities," explained Savvy Contemporary.

The Wohnmaschine will travel to Berlin between 24 and 27 January to coincide with the opening festival 100 Years Bauhaus, before making its way to Kinshasa for workshops between 4 and 12 April.

Here, hired actors will play out the roles of various colonies, to discuss how everyday environments can be used to create a "collective future". The intention is to develop an inclusive modernist manifesto, devoid of Eurocentric views.

Five representatives from the workshops in Kinshasa will travel back to Berlin to share their research with 40 students at Savvy Contemporary's headquarters between 22 July and 18 August. The aim is to show that "it may not be the south that needs development but the north".

"Words and actions aim to challenge and transform Bauhaus traditions and narratives of modernity and modernism," said the organisers.

Finally, the school will move to Hong Kong's Para Site art space, where it will discuss its research further.

The Bauhaus school in Dessau was only in operation from 1919 until 1923, when it was forced to close by the rising Nazi Party. It later moved to Berlin under the steer of third and final director Ludwig Mies van der Rohe, where it occupied a converted factory building.

Today the school operates as a centre for design, research and education, and part of it functions as a hotel. A museum is set open on the campus this year, as the building becomes the centre for the 100 Years Bauhaus festival.

The Bauhaus is the most influential art and design school in history. To mark the centenary of the school's founding, we've created a series of articles exploring the school's key figures and projects."
bauhaus  unlearning  mobile  mobility  nomads  nomadism  learning  education  buses  2019  art  design  vanbole-mentzel  wohnmaschine  berlin  kinshasa  drc  democraticrepublicofthecongo  collective  collectivism  schools  research  architecture  miesvanderrohe 
january 2019 by robertogreco
Making Futures
"Making Futures Bauhaus+ is an action research project that addresses questions of architecture as a collective form and architecture as a resource. Departing from these two perspectives, it operates as an experimental research unit that advances future paths for architectural practice and education. It was initiated in 2018 as a cooperation between raumlabor and the Berlin University of the Arts on the occasion of the Bauhaus’ centenary.

Architecture as a collective form brings together the cultural, the social, the economic and the political. It traverses diverse entities and scales: objects, bodies, buildings, cities; the human and the planetary. It invites us to reflect our built environment beyond obsolete dichotomies such as public and private, living and working, urban and rural.

Primarily driven by fast-paced growth and innovation imperatives, the construction industry is the largest waste producer. There is an unbalance between the energy it consumes and its capacity to repurpose it. Exploring architecture as a resource involves looking at longer-lasting dynamics, such as recuperation and maintenance in the production and reproduction of space.

Leading up to a Summer Academy in September 2019, Making Futures Bauhaus+ devises a public learning program that continuously explores future modes of architectural and urban practice. Spanning over a year and a half, a Plug-In at Floating University Berlin (April-September 2018) and three mobile workshops in Istanbul (September 2018), Palermo (October 2018) and Thüringen (March 2019) constitute the project as an open, reflexive and practice driven format. The Summer Academy in Berlin will explore forms of productive cooperation, exchange, solidarity and living.

Making Futures works towards building up alliances and making transversal connections with people across, disciplines, institutions and territories that transcend the boundaries of the academic world and go beyond the borders of Europe. This is unpinned by the belief that social change cannot be limited to a dispersed few but must instead manifest as part of a wider, synergized system. Making Futures is definitely a pluralistic endeavour, there is not one future, but many.

Team
Markus Bader, Artistic Director
Christof Mayer, Artistic Director
Rosario Talevi, Associate Researcher and Project Coordinator
Anna Kokalanova, Associate Researcher
Jöran Mandik, Programme Assistant
Sophia Sundqvist, Programme Assistant
Sabine Hanel, Administration

Contact
Fachgebiet Entwerfen und Gebäudeplanung
studio raumproduktion
institut für architektur und städtebau
universität der künste

hardenbergstr 33, 10623 berlin, deutschland
030/ 31852297

talktous@making-futures.com

making-futures.com
raumlabor.net
udk-berlin.de

facebook + instagram

#makingfuturesbauhaus"
architecture  design  lcproject  openstudioproject  markusbader  christofmayer  rosariotalevi  annakokalanova  jöranmandik  sophiasundqvist  sabinehanel  künste  berlin  makingfutures  bauhaus  collective  education  urban  rural 
december 2018 by robertogreco
Elise Hunchuck en Instagram: “An account of Iceland, an account of Berlin: hardness of water is the amount of calcium and magnesium in the water and is measured in units…”
"An account of Iceland, an account of Berlin: hardness of water is the amount of calcium and magnesium in the water and is measured in units of German hardness [°1dH, where 1dH = (Calcium (mg / l) x2, 497 + Magnesium (mg / l) x4, 116) / 17.9]. The scale runs from 0 and 4°dh (very soft) to 8 to 12° dh (hard) to very hard at greater than 30°dh. The water here in Berlin ranges from 14 to 25 °dH (pretty hard to hard). It is the reason that many people complain about calcified deposits anywhere water flows – from sinks to toilets to showers to espresso machines to our skin and to our hair. You might not notice it as first, but after a while, the deposits make their mark, changing composition and appearance everywhere they’re left. After spending a few weeks out of the country, and some time in Iceland, where the water’s hardness is less than 2, and in the Reykjavik area it is particularly soft between 0.2 and 0.6°dh, I noticed the difference in my skin and, especially, my hair. I washed it and let it dry, on its own, and it finally responded, unencumbered (for the first time in almost two years) by the minerals – that particular heaviness – of Berlin.

A small thing, you might think, until you recall, for example, as Heather Davis so eloquently wrote, “we become the outside through our breath, our food, and our porous skin. We are composed of what surrounds us. We have come into existence with and because of so many others, from carbon to microbes to dogs. And all these creatures and rocks and air molecules and water all exist together, with each other, for each other. To be a human means to be the land and water and air of our surroundings. We are the outside. We are our environment.” So, in a way, one could say I was, for awhile, becoming Iceland. And now, slowly but surely, coming back to Berlin."
berlin  iceland  water  hardness  2018  elisehunchuck  reykjavík  chemistry 
december 2018 by robertogreco
Peer-to-Peer Web
"As incumbent tech platforms face growing scrutiny over their global influence, it is clear that we must envision decentralized, user-owned alternatives to counter the status quo. But how do we build those alternatives? What do their implementations look like, and how do we address their technical and ethical challenges in the face of increasing user adoption?

Peer-to-Peer Web is for those new to the decentralized web, who are curious in exploring the possibilities that lie beyond a centralized internet controlled by platform monopolies. Through a series of presentations and workshops, we examine the social, political, ethical and economic potentials and challenges of the peer-to-peer movement.

Built and published with Enoki
yo@peer-to-peer-web.com "



"It would be inaccurate to say Peer-to-Peer Web is winding down, it’s just time for new things. A year has passed since we began hosting a series of relaxed and informative hangouts for anyone interested in the evolving web.

We leave behind an archive containing hours of talks given by participants at hangouts in Los Angeles, New York City, and Berlin. They range in topic, but have in common a hopeful speculation of possible futures, online, offline, and that liminal space inbetween.

Of course, without the community that grew around these afternoons the last year wouldn’t have been as meaningful; thank you to the hundreds of participants across every city, not only for attending, but for actively contributing towards the ongoing discourse of the distributed web.

This leaves us with the question: what’s next?

Jon-Kyle (Los Angeles) will be active at Whyspace, a non-place for questioning. In this time of solutionism, when there is a technological answer for everything, remember to ask questions. The first event will be at MozFest in London on October 24th.

Louis from (Berlin) has announced a new project at broadcast.sh called “db, a user-owned peer-to-peer broadcasting platform”. Through a growing library of radio shows, DJ sets, interviews, lectures and recorded panels, db shapes itself as an experiment into the independent funding of creative communities and their work using p2p infrastructure.

You can read further about the project at broadcast.sh, and subscribe to the platform’s newsletter for ongoing updates at TinyLetter."
p2p  beakerbrowser  dat  networks  losangeles  nyc  berlin  jon-kylem  web  online  internet  inbetween  liminality  p2ppublishing  decentralizedweb  p2pweb  distributed 
october 2018 by robertogreco
Agora Collective - Center for Collaborative Practices
"The Agora Collective - Berlin-based Center for Contemporary Practices - was originally founded in 2011 by a multidisciplinary team as an independent project space in Mittelweg, 50 Berlin. Since then, Agora expands its mission to be a place to conceive and experiment with models of working together; providing stable spaces for artists to engage within collaborative and community-based practices."

[See also: https://www.instagram.com/agora_collective/ ]

[via: https://www.instagram.com/p/BiOzLvhlgtq/ ]
lcproject  openstudioproject  coworking  berlin  art  collaborative  collaboration  community  via:morgansully 
may 2018 by robertogreco
Is it inspired or irresponsible to call Donald Trump's border wall prototypes ‘art’?
"We reach the intersection of Cuahtémoc Norte and Juventud Oriente, where a small roundabout serves as memorial to those who have died crossing the border. A European curator who is working with Büchel on the prototypes project — but who declines to go on the record — points out the memorial to the group.

I ask her and Diers whether they had ever visited Tijuana before working on Büchel's prototypes project. Neither had.

Within 20 minutes, we are standing in a hilly colonia on the eastern fringes of Tijuana, just before the metal border wall.

On the Mexican side of the dividing line are the junkyards that contend with the overflows of waste generated by Tijuana's maquiladoras, which craft the cheap goods that will ultimately end up in the U.S. On the other — al otro lado — are the looming prototypes.

Just south of the fence sits one of the stone obelisks that marked the border during the late 19th century. Diers notes that the simple presence of the obelisk was once enough to mark the international dividing line: "It was a conceptual border more than a real border."

Since they were completed, the border wall prototypes have turned into architectural celebrities of sorts — debated on the news, filmed by drones and scrutinized by critics. The Times' architecture critic, Christopher Hawthorne, describes them as "banal and startling," a combination of "architectural exhibition and the new nativism rolled into one."

Beyond their political implications, it's easy to see why the structures have drawn so much attention: They are absurd — bloated security theater in a color palette befitting a suburban subdivision. (So many shades of putty.) It was only a matter of time before an enterprising artist horned in on the action.

All the attention has also had the effect of turning this humble settlement into a tourist attraction. A folding ladder is placed near the metal wall, and we each take turns climbing up to get unobstructed pictures of the prototypes.

Soon we are joined by Alexis Franco Santana, an ebullient 22-year-old tijuanense who lives in a small room across from the site. Santana, outfitted in white tank, red headphones and constantly pinging cellphone, says the structures have drawn visitors from all over the world.

He thinks the prototypes are laughable.

"It's like Donald Trump said, 'Go to Toys R Us and bring me all the toys, and I will choose the best one,'" he says. "They can make the wall from here to the sky and we can find a way to get around it. Los mexicanos tienen maña." Mexicans have knack.

His neighbor, Juan Manuel Hernandez Lozano, takes a dimmer view.

Hernandez was born in Mexico but was taken to Los Angeles without papers when he was about 5. He spent almost his entire life in Los Angeles and speaks English laced with the musical cadence of the Eastside. To prove his real-deal L.A.-ness, he shows me a Raiders tattoo.

Nine years ago, he was deported. His family lives in L.A., but he's stuck in Tijuana. In that time, he has missed the funerals of both parents and a brother.

"It's been hard," he says. "I got sick over here. I have cancer. I should have been dead a year ago."

I ask him what he thinks of the idea of turning the prototypes into a national monument.

"It's a racist thing," he replies. "Why would they do something like that? What are they getting out of it?"

When the Manzanar internment camp was designated a national historic site by Congress in the 1990s, it was not without controversy. The camp, in the Owens Valley, had once harbored upward of 11,000 Japanese Americans, who had been interned there during a period of intense anti-Japanese paranoia during World War II.

Japanese American activists — among them, former internees — had called for protection of this contentious site as a way to remember this dark episode in U.S. history. ("A national symbolic step that must go forward," activist Sue Kunitomi Embrey said at the time.)

But some groups fought the designation. In a letter to the National Park Service, which manages the site, one critic described the portrayal of Manzanar as an internment camp as "treason." Others preferred that the camp be depicted as the benevolent provider of wartime "housing" for Japanese Americans.

The efforts to sugarcoat history ultimately failed. Manzanar is today one of the most prominent sites in the U.S. to commemorate the internment of Japanese Americans.

The making of a monument is a messy business. It requires unflagging advocates, inevitable detractors and a majority vote in Congress.

It also requires time.

Manzanar was declared a national historic landmark in 1985, four decades after it was shut down. It became a national historic site seven years later. And it all came as a result of a groundswell of support for the idea that this was history worth commemorating.

In the case of the border, that history is still being written. The border prototypes could become monuments to racist folly or reawakened white supremacy. All of it leads me to wonder what the reaction would have been in 1943 if a European artist had visited Manzanar, and then described the place as a "land art exhibition" in a press release.

Toward the end of the tour, Dier gathers us in a circle and asks what we think of the idea of turning the prototypes into a monument. One person says they could serve as "a monument to hubris." Another says they could be preserved like an American Auschwitz. I suggest that in the spirit of the border, where U.S. goods and ideas are constantly being recycled by Mexico, perhaps we should allow the residents of Tijuana to dismantle the prototypes and use them to build something new.

Members of the group disperse to catch their final snapshots. I ask Santana, who has been hovering in the background, if he's OK with turning the prototypes into art.

Not in their current form, he says. "If it's going to be art, they should paint them. They could put a beach scene on one or a forest on the other. But they need to paint them, otherwise it's not art."

The group clambers into the van and we make our way back to the other side — the one where many of us, through accidents of fate, just happened to be born."
carolinamiranda  border  borders  sandiego  tijuana  california  us  mexico  art  2018  donaldtrump  policy  christophbüchel  renéperalta  gelarekhoshgozaran  whitesupremacy  race  racism  xenophobia  politics  history  berlin  berlinwall  manzanar 
february 2018 by robertogreco
Parallel School
"Parallel School offers an open environment for self-education in the broader context of art and design. We want to bring people from different places and backgrounds together to share knowledge, connect and initiate projects, publications, meetings and workshops.

Parallel School belongs to no one.
Parallel School has no location.
Parallel School is not teaching.
Parallel School is learning."



"Parallel School encapsulates the idea of non-institutional, self-organized education in the broader context of Art and Design. The idea is that anyone around the world, whether currently a student or not, can create a new type of school, parallel to existing ones. It serves as a structure to share knowledge, connect with other individuals and initiate projects and workshops. But it can be anything. Self-education and sharing knowledge are possibilities through which we can engage emphatically with one another.

Parallel School originally started as a way for sharing and exchanging ideas and topics (self-education) and organizing workshops across borders, for example in Paris, Berlin and Moscow and was continued in Glasgow, Brno, Leipzig and Lausanne.

The goal is to bring people from different places and different backgrounds, not only from the world of (graphic) design, and work in an autonomous, self-set open structure. The focus will be on topics participants propose themselves around the subject of education. We will invite guests and lecturers from different disciplines to complement the workshop series. In the spirit of self-education every participant holds a short workshop, conducts a discussion or does whatever suits best to share her/his interests or specialties. We believe that inspiring and productive situations can be created without hierarchy.

Spread the word, contribute and be part of Parallel School!"

[via: https://walkerart.org/magazine/never-not-learning-summer-specific-part-1-intro-and-identities ]

[previously: https://pinboard.in/u:robertogreco/b:aecd0852151a ]
alternative  design  education  schools  artschools  altgdp  openstudioproject  lcproject  deschooling  unschooling  self-education  self-directed  self-directedlearning  glasgowbrno  leipzig  lausanne  paris  berlin  moscow  self-organization  art  learning  events  publications  hierarchy  horizontality  workshops  unconferences 
january 2018 by robertogreco
NewSchool
"NewSchool

• state-approved alternative school
• all-day school (secondary education)
• ethical, socio-critical, ecological and sustainable orientated
• inter-year groups
• interdisciplinary
• individualized project plans
• based on students’ needs
• cooking and eating together
• located in an entrepreneurial environment
• very realistic approach
• strong bonds with experts / between experts and NewSchool
• co-operations with companies, institutes, academies ecc.
• social engagement “social service”
• stays in nature on a regular basis

Listen, laugh and learn!

Especially during puberty, for many students going to school means trying to avoid schoolwork and commitments, or trying to escape all the “shoulds” they hear from parents and teachers. It seems like the only goal is getting to the next grade. We founded our school to give young people a chance of a fulfilled, enjoyable school experience that helps them to feel equipped for and to be curious about life.

Our school is a laboratory, a studio where Talents are given the chance to experiment. Each Talent will explore their strengths and find out what drives them. This is done through listening, cooperating, approaching challenges in a curious way, and following unique paths. Emotional intelligence, critical thinking, and problem-solving skills are essential for us at the NewSchool. Everyone learns from everyone else.

That’s why we go out into the real world. We experience nature, visit businesses, and go wherever the action is. We also gain new inspiration through communicating with experts (e.g. via Skype) from all over the world. Entrepreneurs, artists, managers, artisans – all of these experts are welcome at our school, no matter their ethnicity or religion. They provide information and support, or give us an insight about what their real life is like.

In cooperation with teachers, coaches, and experts, Talents develop projects, which they can pursue in a creative, engaged, interdisciplinary way working in inter-year groups. Young people and adults work together equally throughout the process, one that inspires them rather than constricting their ideas. We do learn by doing. It is our actions that spur our desire to engage with issues, groups of people, nature, and ethical questions. Talents get to know their strengths in close collaboration with others, then continue to develop them with passion.

We want to discover new things together, and to be bold in adjusting learning methods to meet today’s changed circumstances. Together, we grow to meet challenges, trust life, and allow learning to begin with the needs of the student. Old school was the past – the future is NewSchool.

NewSchool – It’s my way!"
germany  berlin  schools  education  sfsh  webdev  interdisciplinary  alternative  lcproject  openstudioproject  community  experientiallearning  place-based  middleschool  webdesign 
august 2017 by robertogreco
School of Machines, Making & Make-Believe
"School of Machines, Making & Make-Believe is an organisation dedicated to the imaginative exploration of art, technology, design, and human connection. We’re passionate about interactivity and storytelling. We enjoy learning and playing with tools that make our brains and our dreams come to life! Wanna join us?

We curate experimental formats for learning, a creative work-holiday of sorts. We run several intensive full-time four-week programs in Berlin, Germany, each with well-known instructors and a unique topic and focus.

We've started taking our programs to other cities in Europe and plan to experiment in 2017 with new ways of bringing people together in the form of a machine learning residency, online classes geared towards art, tech, and activism, plus more! Stay tuned!

We invite creative people of all kinds -- artists, teachers, technologists, makers, engineers, designers, the curious, people passionate about learning and creativity, those who secretly desire to create something meaningful -- all are encouraged to participate."

[See also:
https://twitter.com/schoolofmaaa
https://www.instagram.com/schoolofma/ ]
art  diy  education  berlin  making  lcproject  openstudioproject  sfsh  storytelling  interactive  creativity  racheluwa  kathrynzazenski  christiankokott  merediththomas  ritaeperjesi  zolazakiya  schoolofmaaa 
july 2017 by robertogreco
Running Free in Germany’s Outdoor Preschools - The New York Times
"Robin Hood Waldkindergarten, which opened in 2005, is one of more than 1,500 waldkitas, or “forest kindergartens,” in Germany; Berlin alone has about 20. Most have opened in the last 15 years and are usually located in the city’s parks, with a bare-bones structure serving as a sort of home base, but others, like Robin Hood, rely on public transportation to shuttle their charges daily out into the wilderness, where they spend most of the day, regardless of weather. Toys, typically disparaged at waldkitas, are replaced by the imaginative use of sticks, rocks and leaves. A 2003 Ph.D. dissertation by Peter Häfner at Heidelberg University showed that graduates of German forest kindergartens had a “clear advantage” over the graduates of regular kindergartens, performing better in cognitive and physical ability, as well as in creativity and social development.

The American journalist Richard Louv, who coined the term “nature-deficit disorder” in his 2005 book, “Last Child in the Woods,” is cited often by Robin Hood staff, as is “Coyote’s Guide to Connecting With Nature,” by Jon Young, Ellen Haas and Evan McGown. (“Savage Park,” by Amy Fusselman, is another book that chronicles uninhibited play and was inspired by a visit to an adventure playground in Tokyo.) The pedagogical philosophy of waldkitas, which privileges outdoor play and hands-on environmental learning, comes originally from Scandinavia, but, as one teacher put it to me, “they don’t make a big fuss about it like they do here.” The trend’s non-Teutonic origins are somewhat surprising: There might be nothing “more German” than a state-funded preschool based primarily in a forest.

Germany has nearly three times as much protected land as the U.S., proportionate to the countries’ sizes, a nontrivial fact that highlights the way much of the country thinks about nature and its role in the emotional health of its citizens. “It’s terrible that kids today know all about technology but nothing about the little bird outside their window,” Peters said, gesturing out toward the woods and sounding like any number of quotable Germans, from Goethe to Beethoven to Bismarck, all of whom have rhapsodized on the psychic benefits of spending time in the forest. He continued: “In life, bad things happen — you lose your job or your partner or everyone just hates you — but you’ll always have this.”"



"THERE ARE SCATTERINGS of forest kindergartens in the U.S. as well as in the U.K. Even in Japan and South Korea, where education is famously strict, waldkitas are becoming increasingly popular. They have spread mostly through word-of-mouth among parents. And in Germany, it’s not just the wealthy — or the eccentric — who send their children. Like all other preschools in Berlin, tuition at Robin Hood is covered by the government for kids aged 2 through 6 (apart from a 100 euro per month fee because it’s a private school). New York City preschools can cost upward of $40,000 per year."
forestschools  preschool  schools  education  learning  children  germany  parenting  2017  nature  richardlouv  sfsh  amyfusselman  peterhäfner  outdoors  nyc  southkorea  japan  uk  berlin 
may 2017 by robertogreco
9 Artist-Run Restaurants You Need to Know
"In the fall of 1971, the doors of a curious restaurant located at 127 Prince Street opened just south of New York’s Houston Street. Inside, if you were hungry, an artist might ladle you a steaming bowl of caldo gallego from one of three large cauldrons bubbling away over a low stove in the center of the room. Soup in hand, you’d make your way to a table where slices of bread were stacked around a huge heap of butter. Come another night and you might’ve been served the now-famous “bone dinner”—frogs’ legs and roasted marrow bones, among other skeletal dishes—then left with the remnants, rigorously cleaned and given a second life as wearable jewelry.

This was the restaurant and conceptual art project Food, run by artists Carol Goodden, Tina Girouard, and Gordon Matta-Clark, among others. Given a mini-retrospective at Frieze New York’s 2013 fair, involving several of the original chefs, the short-lived project has secured its place as one of the most iconic blurrings of the lines between art and food. The 1970s Soho establishment is far from the only artistic foray into the culinary realm, however, so we checked in on a handful that have been around for years, and a few others that are still taking shape.

Zagreus Projekt
ULRICH KRAUSS
BERLIN

“Food and art were the two elements in my life that were always there,” explains Ulrich Krauss, the founder of the Berlin food project space Zagreus Projekt. “I grew up in a butcher shop and I studied art.” He went on to apprentice as a chef, spending time cooking at a fancy hotel in southern Germany. “When you are in that world, it is so restricted, and you have rules for everything,” Krauss says. “It’s a very narrow world, so I got the feeling I had to escape from that.” Krauss left for Berlin, where he balanced artmaking—mostly performances—with cooking in restaurants. “I have to found a place where I bring things together,” he remembers thinking of his double life. Zagreus Projekt took shape.

Its first iteration found a home in the backroom of Galerie Markus Richter, a space for conceptual and minimal art that shuttered in 2005. Since then, Zagreus Projekt, which Krauss is careful to point out is not a gallery, has relocated to the elegant Mitte district. Artists bring ideas for exhibitions that in some way relate back to food, and a collaboration ensues to devise a menu that matches. FOOD ART, a collaboration that launches April 8th, pairs the talents of the artist-turned-chef with a Swiss-German artist couple, Hendrikje Kühne and Beat Klein, who make elaborate, three-dimensional collage sculptures, often including images of food and fragments of advertising and newspapers. “With every exhibition we do here, we have a different point of view on food or on the situation of eating, and that is the most important thing,” Krauss explains. But the demands of the project, 16 years on, are not without their toll. “I don’t see myself as an artist anymore,” says Krauss. “I see myself as a chef.”

Pharmacy 2
DAMIEN HIRST
NEWPORT STREET GALLERY, LONDON

Damien Hirst, dispenser of hand-painted pills and shark vitrines, blends two environments to unusual effect in his newest restaurant endeavor, Pharmacy 2, which opened at his Newport Street Gallery several weeks ago. After taking in vibrant work by John Hoyland, one of Britain’s key abstract painters, a Hirst devotee can round out the experience in the new spot. Uniquely crafted pills dot the marble floor, and a clinically cool neon sign that reads “prescriptions” hangs over the bar in view of works from Hirst’s “Medicine Cabinets” and “Kaleidescope paintings.”

Diners enjoy chef-collaborator Mark Hix’s cooking, which eschews pharmaceuticals for fresh ingredients and a British-inflected menu of European classics, including crispy squid with green chilis or Hix’s riff on the traditional German apples-and-potatoes side “Heaven and Earth.” “Damien designed a formaldehyde ‘Cock and Bull’ for my restaurant Tramshed, so it makes sense for me to exchange my skills,” the chef explains.

[restaurant not yet named]
RAPHAEL LYON
NEW YORK

“There is a long-running joke in the food industry that most artists are unrealized chefs,” the artist Raphael Lyon, who grows sculptures using geologic processes, tells me. “Which is just a way of saying that huge numbers of self-identified artists may have turned to art only because they wanted to be respected for working creatively with their hands, and that maybe they would have been more fulfilled in a kitchen rather than a studio.” Together with partner Arley Marks, Lyon is opening a restaurant off the Jefferson Street stop of New York City’s L train in the coming weeks. He also owns Enlightenment Wines, where he works as a “mazer,” fermenting honey and herbs into a wine-like beverage. “This will be something like a public home for that research,” he explains.

Lyon also hopes it will be “a place of sincere curiosity—whether it’s for a dry mead made out of Christmas trees and gold flake or just rethinking the pickled egg.” The artist’s deep knowledge of food and wine yields unusual revelations. “What interests me about winemaking, and more generally the American food scene writ large, is how until very recently discourse around it was obsessed with really awkward notions of authenticity,” Lyon observes. He suggests there’s a link between this approach to thinking about food and how people talked about European painting before Modernism. “A good part of the development of art in the last century was a move away from validity based on authentic regional expression to validity based on ideas,” he continues. “That’s happening in the food world, particularly in New York.”

ZAX Restaurant
WILL STEWART
BROOKLYN

“Generally, the stereotype of ‘starving artist’ isn’t far off the mark in New York,” says Will Stewart, an artist in the city whose work engages the environment and the architecture of space. “You’ve got people living in strange shared spaces, and everybody’s out running around every night doing something.” It’s a city that Stewart thinks “operates as a pressure cooker.” A year and a half ago, he started wondering about setting up a makeshift restaurant. “There’re how many hundreds of thousands of people?” Stewart says, retracing the thoughts that led him to set up ZAX—his fixed-price, vegetarian-only supper club in a vacant space adjacent to his studio. “There will always be at least 20 people who are going to want to come by and have dinner.”

ZAX’s December “Fertility Meal,” put together by artists/guest chefs Maia Ruth Lee and Violet Dennison, included “Estrogen Seeds” (an appetizer made with anise and sugar crystals) and “New Mother Nourishment Soup” (seaweed, daikon, enoki mushrooms, shishito peppers, miso, and fingerling potatoes), among other peculiar dishes and libations. For a few extra dollars, heat acupuncture was also part of the meal. Though Stewart has put his restaurant-in-a-studio on hold, he plans to bring it back in Greenpoint sometime in April.

Conflict Kitchen
DAWN WELESKI & JON RUBIN
PITTSBURGH

“What you choose to eat every day is a creative moment,” says Dawn Weleski, who, together with Jon Rubin, directs the Pittsburgh eatery Conflict Kitchen. “We provide an outlet for that creative expression.” The two artists work to address thorny social issues through food. “We were always thinking about how to re-envision the city, how to make it the city we wanted to live in,” Weleski, a Pittsburgh native, observes.

A simple but powerful premise guides their restaurant: Serve cuisines from countries with which the United States is in conflict. In its six years of operation, hungry residents who might not have given much thought to the social implications of U.S. foreign policy have filled up on Afghan, Cuban, Venezuelan, Palestinian, North Korean, and, most recently, Iranian cuisine. “We were trying to think of ways with which to engage the politics of the city, and to get people to have conversations in public spaces that weren’t typically had in Pittsburgh, let alone in the rest of America,” Weleski explains.

Currency Exchange Café
THEASTER GATES
CHICAGO

It’s difficult to pinpoint the exact moment at which Theaster Gates’s expansive approach to artmaking came to include food. One starting point was the artist’s frequent dinners, at which guests ate soul food while discussing its origins and cultural importance. Another was getting the Currency Exchange Café, decorated with materials salvaged from the currency exchange that used to occupy the space, off the ground serving breakfast and lunch to residents of Chicago’s south side Washington Park neighborhood (ample shelves stocked with books line the walls and there are plans for a 35mm slide collection). With projects like these as well as the establishment of his Rebuild Foundation behind him, Gates is at work on ArtHouse: A Social Kitchen, taking shape just across the border in Gary, Indiana.

The project joins the Gary barbecue-and-soul-food fixture Mama Pearl’s, which is and will remain in the space, as a tenant in a large building being transformed into a multi-use facility boasting a commercial kitchen for training, an incubator for culinary businesses, a pop-up café with a menu that changes based on input from incubator participants, and even an exhibition space for art. The ambitious project is sewing the first seeds of what the rustbelt city hopes will be a leap toward fostering a cultural district, bringing to its residents a place where they can come together over a meal and admire the many talents of their neighbors.

Thank You For Coming
LAURA NOGUERA, JONATHAN ROBERT, JENN SU TAOHAN, AND CYNTHIA SU TAOPIN
LOS ANGELES

Thank You For Coming is an experimental space that pairs a permanent restaurant serving simple weekend brunches with a series of creative residencies, as well as playing host… [more]
berlin  losangeles  sanfrancisco  art  artists  coffee  food  restaurants  gordonmatta-clark  2016  london  nyc  brooklyn  chicago  pittsburgh  brettwalker  lauranoguera  jonathanrobert  jennsutaohan  cynthiasutaopin  theastergates  dawnweleski  jonrubin  conflictkitchen  willstewart  raphaellyon  damienhirst  ulrichkrauss  127princestreet  carolgoodden  tinagirouard  cafes  openstudioproject  coffeeshops  matta-clark 
may 2017 by robertogreco
In Conversation With Eike König – iGNANT.de
"‘Hort’ is an old German word for Kindergarten. What does the word’s meaning say about the values of the collective, and what would you say have been its keys to success?

Yes, ‘Hort’ is a super old word for the place kids go after school. Where I grew up, in Frankfurt – where the Green party was founded – there were lots of independently-organised ‘Horts’. I think the idea of this free space is really interesting, because our lives seem to be so well organised, really structured. You go to school, you sit your exams, you go to uni, you graduate, you start working… you follow this linear path, try to organize your life around this structure, although life is actually constantly in flux, in motion – there are no real moments of graduation, only constructed ones. Having a degree doesn’t really signify anything. It’s just an example of one of the anchors to which we attach ourselves. Of course, we need goals, but these goals don’t give us (a) any satisfaction, because the process is permanent, and (b) they don’t guarantee any success. They don’t have a meaning for me. I studied, but I didn’t complete my course. I dropped out close to the end because I was offered a job as the art director for this label. You don’t get offers like that every day. For my parents, that decision was a little harder to swallow. They told me, “You can’t just not finish something.” They were scared I’d never make anything of myself.

But today it doesn’t work like that. I don’t care if someone hasn’t finished their degree. I’m interested in their personality, and what that person does, and how they share their work with me. And I always looked for a place where I could just be, and keep learning, and make mistakes – sure, you have to keep the business running, but learning and development is such an important part of life. And simply to exercise the skills I already have – that gets tired after a while. After a year, it gets really boring. It just keeps you in my comfort zone, to only use the strategies I already have to become successful. In a traditionally agency context, mistakes are avoided. But actually, for the sake of development, it’s the most important motor. To have the courage to try new things. Sometimes they work, others they don’t. To have the room to be able to take risks is super important to me.

So I thought to myself, why don’t I open my own ‘Hort’, a kind of place where older children – so not-quite adults – can go ‘after school’ – after uni. A safe space where kids from different backgrounds come together, feel safe, start to play, play with the highest level of creative energy possible, socialize, learn, grow, do things together: At its core, I find this idea really beautiful, really positive as a way to be together.

Earlier, we did a lot of playful projects, and today we work on more conceptual stuff, but when we get a brief, we don’t try to take the easiest path, the path we’ve already taken, but we look at the individual circumstances surrounding each brief, and we ask what we can learn from it too. This path always takes more energy, needs more discussion with our clients. Clients often expect ideas or concepts they’ve already seen before, or can picture in their minds. When someone says, “Nothing that you see in our portfolio will be like the concept you get,” you need to trust them. I prefer the path of the new: Let’s think differently about it and try to convey our position. So ‘Hort’ is a good idea. It’s also a nice name, has nice phonetics, and no other really clear meaning for others. Americans wouldn’t know what Hort is, say, though in Spanish it’s related to horticulture – landscape gardening, growing – there’s a lot of positive in there. All of us in the office can relate to that."



"As well as being the founder and creative director of Hort, you’re a Professor of Graphic Design at the University of Arts in Offenbach. What kinds of things are your students teaching you these days?

The role of the teacher has changed from being the professor-as-keeper-of-all-knowledge – the one that knows better than everyone else, and decides between right and wrong. Formerly, education was about repeating what others have already done. I was always a bit sceptical about this model, because the things we know and don’t yet know don’t necessarily impact on truth or falsehood – they are simply part of our biographies, the things we have taken to be true. But those things will be different for the person standing next to me.

Everything that I experienced during my studies and that I was critical of – I try to do those things differently. Today I teach in a University of the Arts – so there are separate disciplines, but they all run parallel to fine arts: painting, sculpture, etc. I’m in this warehouse section of the school, together with the painters and sculptors and the electronic artists and spacial designers. I have a very close-knit relationship with my colleagues in these fields, and I want to offer a research- and development-based approach to my teaching in design, graphics and illustration. I’m really intrigued by this apparent distinction between practical art and fine art. There’s a really interesting overlap between the disciplines.

I want to help my students to probe into this. Each of them is distinctly individual. No-one works like I do, and that’s important – I don’t want clones of myself. Of course they’ll be influenced by me as their teacher, but I try to focus on imparting and discussing ideas as opposed to the formal elements. My students include classic graphic designers, classic illustrators, but also those who do drawing, photography, painting – it’s super diverse, just like in the [Hort] office. Everyone is following the questions they’re personally interested in. I only provide space to do this, guide the group with questions – and draw upon my network to provide them with opportunities like showing their work in a gallery in Düsseldorf, or travelling to Tokyo to exchange their work with artists there, or bring in artists for talks, and introduce them to people to share their portfolio. Not to say, “this is my knowledge base and I will now impart it to you.” Working in this way is exciting, because everyone’s doing their own thing, developing along their own path side by side. We spend most of our time talking, actually. Which is a total inspiration for me too. I learn so much from our discourse.

And it keeps me young! If you work with young people, you can’t grow old. Pokémon Go? Five of my students had it. So of course I needed to see what it was, to keep up to date. I have one class where we just speak about contemporary graphic design. We don’t make anything – we just spend the whole lesson talking about things we’ve seen that inspire us. I want these students to develop their own interests – not to copy what others have done, but to find a form that relates to them, and develop a self-confidence to work on things that might not get 1000 likes on Tumblr, but actually mean something to them. Not to be pushed into the direction of self-promotion, but to find themselves first. You don’t need 1000 likes. Create something that’s relevant and interesting in real life. My teaching focus is on developing the personalities of my students, not on passing on knowledge. It’s super exciting. This daily work with people – whether my students or my colleagues at the office – is my biggest inspiration."
eikekönig  design  education  learning  howwelearn  hort  graphicdesign  art  graphics  berlin  via:jarrettfuller  teaching  howweteach  unschooling  dropouts  deschooling  play  youth  tumblr  socialmedia  discussion  conversation  interviews 
august 2016 by robertogreco
Against Infographics - Art Journal Open
"When design is excellent, graphics reveal data, writes the infographics guru Edward Tufte.1 Good information graphics allow the reader to see relationships not apparent in data without visual form. In principle, such graphics do not impose interpretations but, by showing relationships, make interpretations possible. In Tufte’s oft-quoted phrase: “Good design is clear thinking made visual.”2 Things become considerably more difficult, however, if, pace Tufte, your analytic goal is to complicate rather than to simplify, to open multiple avenues of inquiry, and, most important, to challenge the stability of underlying data, in fact or in principle.

All of these complexities are probed intensely in Depictions, an ongoing print series by the Dutch artist Gert Jan Kocken (b. 1971). Depictions consists of room-size maps of European cities during the Second World War—Rome, Vienna, Munich, and Berlin along the north-south axis of fascism; London, Rotterdam, Amsterdam, Łódź, Warsaw, and Stalingrad along the east-west corridor of conflict—each built up in layers from dozens of source maps unearthed in archives. Kocken’s three-by-four meter Depictions of Berlin, 1933–1945 (2010), for example, is constructed from 104 historical maps, which the artist scanned, georectified, layered into a single digital image, and rendered as a C-print. The resulting composite is a welter of information representing the breakneck change, contradictory claims, and massive data production of the Second World War.

Visually, Kocken’s Depictions are both familiar and strange. Anyone who knows Berlin, particularly the internal borders drawn in 1945 and ossified in the Berlin Wall that remain central to the city’s identity, will easily recognize the terrain of Depictions of Berlin. But other cartographic ghosts visible in the work are invisible on the ground. In Kocken’s map, along with the outlines of the wall, we see the process of ethnic cleansing as registered in contemporary reports, the footprint of Germania, the megacity with which Hitler intended to replace Berlin, and the view from Allied bombers. At once, the Depictions series draws on the data-rich tradition of monumental history painting, as seen, for example, in Albrecht Altdorfer’s The Battle of Alexander at Issus (1529), and on the defocalizing, allover paintings of Jackson Pollock, Lee Krasner, and other artists working in the 1940s and 1950s. Kocken’s Depictions are simultaneously narrative and aleatory."



"For infographic purposes, there are a number of more obvious ways to deal with historical maps than Kocken’s approach. In the first place, we have the computer interface. Clearly, this is a resource available to Kocken, as his maps all pass through digital mediation on their way to their final printed form. One can easily imagine, for example, a mapping application that allows users to pick and choose among the 104 maps that constitute Kocken’s Depictions of Berlin, selecting display options such as color, opacity, and so forth. And, indeed, many such engines exist. Moreover, with the right approach, even Kocken’s print artifact could be rendered more legible. Kocken chose a different angle, allowing competing stories to conflict visually as well as epistemologically. In places, this conflict produces illegibility not unlike what we find in the dark regions of the Ypres map; in other places, coherences and transparencies are themselves a surprise.

In an age of infographics, we tend to forget that infographics age and the foreignness of old graphics matters to our understanding of them. Kocken’s Depictions show us that information graphics are always historical and conveying their opacity is as much a part of the historical project as is translating them into a contemporary visual language."
via:shannon_mattern  ambiguity  cartography  epistemology  complexity  art  maps  mapping  gertjankocken  danielrosenberg  2016  edwardtufte  visualization  infographics  berlin  amsterdam  rotterdam 
march 2016 by robertogreco
Berlin's New Rent Control Laws Are Already Working - CityLab
"The “rental price brake,” introduced on June 1st, is the city’s most comprehensive tool to date for keeping rent affordable."
berlin  housing  rentcontrol  2015  economics  policy 
july 2015 by robertogreco
HYPERMORGEN - Forschungslabor Zukunft
"We believe that long-term success results, on one hand, from anticipating future developments to make better decisions today. On the other, it is crucial to understand the unforeseeable to make strategies robust against future shocks.

We do not only work with traditional methods of Futures Research to distinguish the likely from the unforeseeable – we also work on creating Foresight Tools for the 21st Century. Combining those with our database of influential change drivers, we can help you to understand and use Foresight as long-term pillars for your strategy."

[See also: http://futurescope.co/

"This website is the blue background noise of Rene Schäfer, Frederik Eichelbaum and Jörg Schatzmann, three Berlin/Rhein-Main-Area based futurists who research and write about emerging trends, possible futures and bold visions.

We are particularly interested in complexity management and have a strong passion to bring state-of-the-art foresight methods to the information age.

Hypermorgen is an interdisciplinary research laboratory for futures, striving to continuously improve futures research methods. We help organisations identify future risks, face change and explore upcoming opportunities. Our core expertise is the identification and monitoring of key factors of change, (collaborative) forecasts and perspectives. We also develop scenarios depicting possible and likely futures and create design fiction.

// None of the images, work or art displayed here are our own, and we are really thankful to all of you who have created and represented personal and professional works. If there is something you do not wish to have here! please send us a message and we will gladly take it down!"]
reneschäfer  frederikeichelbaum  jörgschatzmann  tumblrs  futurism  hypermorgen  berlin 
april 2015 by robertogreco
Berlin Is the ‘Post-Tourist’ Capital of Europe -- Next
"Irritating as this may be, this blurring between the local and non-local is likely to continue shaping the future of Berlin – and the future of tourism itself. Johannes Novy, an urbanist at BTU Cottbus-Senftenberg, one of the country's top technical universities, argues that Berlin has become a test case for what some academics and journalists are calling post-tourism. “Many of the tourists we see here don’t fit the conventional image we have of tourists in Rome or Paris,” he says.

Novy has reservations about the term, but here's the idea: “Post-tourists” tend to avoid staying in hotels, they aren’t as interested in major tourist attractions, they combine work with travel, they’re looking for unconventional experiences, and they prefer to hang out in residential neighborhoods. Because Berlin is cheap, fun, and accessible, it's attracted an unusually high number of these types of visitors, who can spend months here before moving on."



"In many ways, the debate about post-tourism in Berlin echoes the one about gentrification everywhere else. In both cases, formerly sleepy neighborhoods become more upscale and exciting, while long-term residents and businesses are forced out and replaced with laptop-filled coffee shops. But in Berlin it also taps into a host of other resentments — about American entitlement, about being required to speak English, about a calm neighborhood being hijacked for the sake of someone else’s cliché idea of Berlin hedonism. “Berlin is the kind of place where people go if they want somewhere that is messy and complicated in ways that aren’t messy and complicated,” says Jason Clampet, the co-founder of Skift, a travel news site. “You can go to the orgy, but on the way home people will still wait for the light to change.”"



"According to Novy, the notion of “post-tourism” doesn’t represent a change in the way we travel so much as a change in the way we think about travel – and it primarily shows the extent to which technology and heightened mobility have helped obliterate categories like “work” and “vacation,” “local” and “visitor.” “The idea of this new tourism puts into question a lot of fundamental things about the kinds of lives people live these days,” he says. “We are in a world of endless mobility, and so we are all tourists all of the time.” Although many of these post-tourists come to Berlin looking for an “authentic” Berlin experience, that experience may never have existed in the first place, outside of their imagination."
post-tourism  tourism  berlin  travel  2015  cities  gentrification  messiness  johannesnovy  mobility 
march 2015 by robertogreco
selfiecity
"Investigating the style of self-portraits (selfies) in five cities across the world.

Selfiecity investigates selfies using a mix of theoretic, artistic and quantitative methods:

We present our findings about the demographics of people taking selfies, their poses and expressions.

Rich media visualizations (imageplots) assemble thousands of photos to reveal interesting patterns.

The interactive selfiexploratory allows you to navigate the whole set of 3200 photos.

Finally, theoretical essays discuss selfies in the history of photography, the functions of images in social media, and methods and dataset."
selfies  visualization  photography  data  bankok  berlin  nyc  moscow  sãopaulo 
january 2015 by robertogreco
A PAREDE ツ hello[at]a-pare.de
"Oh Hai! We are A Parede, a brazilian design research practice in Berlin.
Our research interests are in Speculative and Critical Design, Gender and Sound Studies."
luizaprado  pedrooliveira  criticaldesign  speculativedesign  designresearch  gender  sound  berlin  brazil  brasil  aparede  designfiction 
july 2014 by robertogreco
doisedois
"Luiza Prado
Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, 1985.
Currently living in Berlin, Germany.

I'm a designer, researcher, artist and all-around curious person interested in the intersections of feminism, critical and speculative design, technology and our perceptions of our bodies and identities. I am currently a Design Research PhD candidate at the Universität der Künste Berlin; the working title for my dissertation is "Body extensions and the politics of designed artifacts". If you're curious you can check out my dissertation-related rants and reflections here.

Inquiries, stories, questions and general friendliness are always welcome! Say hi: hello@doisedois.net "

[via https://medium.com/designing-the-future/5a355cac2ca4 via @annegalloway]
luizaprado  design  criticaldesign  brasil  feminism  art  speculativedesign  designfiction  bodies  identity  body  berlin  research  brazil 
february 2014 by robertogreco
Berlin's housing bubble and the backlash against hipster tourists | Jochen Hung | Comment is free | guardian.co.uk
"Skyrocketing housing costs in Berlin can't be blamed on an influx of 'foreigners', but are in fact fuelled by the global financial crisis"

[Video referenced and embedded within: https://vimeo.com/16116523 ]
immigration  2012  cities  germany  economics  gentrification  berlin 
september 2012 by robertogreco
General Assembly
"General Assembly is a global network of campuses for individuals seeking opportunity and education in technology, business, and design."

"We offer a wide variety of learning opportunities, from 90-minute classes to long-form courses. With new options added daily, your only limit is scroll speed."

"A whole may be greater than the sum of its parts, but it's our parts that make us great. From members and instructors to knowledge-seekers and partners, our community defines what we are: collaborative learning advocates, forward-thinking envelope-pushers, and capri-pant enthusiasts.

We're excited to serve as a base for so many creative, innovative, and passionate thinkers and makers. Here are some of the Member Startups in our Community: [list]"
schooldesign  learning  classes  coding  philadelphia  sanfrancisco  boston  berlin  sydney  toronto  london  coworking  nyc  startups  openstudioproject  lcproject  sharedspace  technology  design  entrepreneurship  education  generalassembly 
september 2012 by robertogreco
Low-residency MFA & PhD Photography, Painting, Performance, New Media, Fine & Visual Arts
"Transart Institute offers an international low-residency MFA and a practice-based PhD program for working artists in a highly individualized format. The innovative MFA program consists of three intensive summer residencies with lectures, workshops, critiques, seminars, performances and exhibitions in Europe and two fall or spring residencies in New York. In the four semesters between residencies, students create their own course of study realizing individual art and research projects with the support of faculty and self-chosen artist mentors wherever they work and live. The MPhil/PhD is a three to four year full time degree program with an average work commitment of 30 hours per week. The Degree is only offered for practice-based research (creative work) accompanied by a written thesis that contextualizes the work."
transartinstitute  transart  self-directedlearning  phd  nyc  berlin  credentialing  unschooling  glvo  lowresidency  altgdp  education  art  mfa  low-residency 
august 2012 by robertogreco
Agora
"…a multi-disciplinary gathering space of professionals, driven by the urge to explore new ways of interaction in today’s context. Seeking the balance between individuality & collectiveness. Individuals practicing and sharing their skills, providing to the collective a network, where connections are highly encouraged and facilitated resulting in a meaningful proactive community."

"…part of an artistic enterprise; a platform for the encounter of multi disciplinary projects, driven by urge to explore new ways of working & relating to projects & ideas in the actual context.

A space, a host for ideas in constant change agora provides space for artists, entrepreneurs, designers, bloggers, academics, programmers, accountants, performers, journalists, photographers, video makers, collaborators, writers, doers & dreamers.

Agora is a mix of individual initiatives & collective projects. Individuals exploring & creating a collective platform where connections & encounters are facilitated."
community  glvo  via:cervus  agoracollective  design  art  coworking  berlin 
july 2012 by robertogreco
Agora
"AFFECT is a self-organized program where the participants share their projects in order to challenge themselves within the inputs of other artists – the process is facilitated by Agora Collective.

7 artists from different backgrounds are placed in the same space to affect each others work.

PURPOSE to challenge artistic projects within a collaborative context

PRINCIPLES AFFECT is a skill-sharing program based on collaborative artistic practices developed by and for young professionals who want to challenge a specific project

CONCEPT 7 artists from different backgrounds are placed in the same space to affect each other’s work.

STRUCTURE Period of 4 weeks Art Space at Agora’s top floor – 120 sq. meter in a industrial building in Neukölln Berlin 7 artists are selected through open call 4 variety of interventions with 2/3 facilitators per week…"
agoracollective  art  via:cervus  glvo  2012  residencies  berlin 
july 2012 by robertogreco
raumlabor berlin
"yes we do love the great ideas of the 60s 70s & the optimism which is inherent in changing the world at the stroke of a pen to the better. but we strongly believe that complexity is real & good & our society today does need a more substantial approach. therefore our spacial proposals are small scale & deeply rooted in the local condition…. BYE BYE UTOPIA!"

"There was once a society that believed the future would bring better living conditions to everyone. There were people, utopian thinkers, who thought about the big questions of the city. Today only a feeling remains, half desire, half melancholy, reminiscing of those architects who wanted to live in a better society and who had dreamed of better places. Such an era is now over. Here begins my work.

raumlaborberlin is a network, a collective of 8 trained architects who have come together in a collaborative work-structure. We work at the intersection of architecture, city planning, art and urban intervention…"
crossdisciplinary  multidisciplinary  interdisciplinary  interdisciplinarity  activism  history  transformation  experimentalarchitecture  experimental  adaptability  change  adaptation  dynamic  masterplanning  meaningmaking  place  research-baseddesign  urbaninterventions  complexity  urbanplanning  cityplanning  collaboration  cities  architects  art  design  urbanism  urban  architecture  berlin  raumlabor  local  small 
april 2012 by robertogreco
Hypercities
"Built on the idea that every past is a place, HyperCities is a digital research and educational platform for exploring, learning about, & interacting with the layered histories of city and global spaces. Developed though collaboration between UCLA & USC, the fundamental idea behind HyperCities is that all stories take place somewhere and sometime; they become meaningful when they interact and intersect with other stories. Using Google Maps & Google Earth, HyperCities essentially allows users to go back in time to create and explore the historical layers of city spaces in an interactive, hypermedia environment.

A HyperCity is a real city overlaid with a rich array of geo-temporal information, ranging from urban cartographies and media representations to family genealogies and the stories of the people and diverse communities who live and lived there. We are currently developing content for: Los Angeles, NYC, Chicago, Rome, Lima, Ollantaytambo, Berlin, Tel Aviv, Tehran, Saigon, Toyko…"
seoul  shanghai  tokyo  saigon  telaviv  berlin  ollantaytambo  lima  rome  chicago  nyc  losangeles  storytelling  googleearth  googlemaps  usc  ucla  atemporality  timetravel  hypercities  visualization  research  history  geography  maps  mapping  cities  urban 
april 2012 by robertogreco
'GOING FRAGILE'. BERLIN. JANUARY 18 - 22. 2010 [.pdf]
"A workshop organised by Howard Slater, Anthony Davies, Nils Norman and the School of Walls and Space

A READER

What follows is a group of texts and excerpts that we are pooling together as a semi-prompter or sub-guideline for what will or will not happen in Basso Berlin. In presenting these texts and themes we are not pre-empting any collective decision as to how the week will progress. I think all of us hope that there could be something unusual, stimulating or forward-leaning that could come from this week; something that comes from a collective pooling of our future-anterior experiences, desires and fragilities. There can be no experts if we are aiming for the urgent creation of co-meaning!"

[See also: http://www.kunstakademiet.dk/images/uploads/GF2_mini-reader.pdf ]
anthonydavies  howardslater  berlin  freeform  structure  guydebord  reader  toread  2010  theschoolofwallsandspace  nilsnorman 
april 2012 by robertogreco
Museum of the Near Future 1 - Anni Puolakka, Jenna Sutela, Anna Mikkola (Eds.) - ourpress
"Museum of the Near Future (MNF) is an apparatus for looking sideways at and intervening in urban situations and institutions. It presents itself as social installations—such as literary circles or other temporary communities—which are set up on museum premises. Producing space for imagination and discourse, these parasitic installations attempt to destabilize perceptions of what is possible, and desirable, between the now and the next in a given area.

The first iteration of Museum of the Near Future took place at the Museum of Finnish Architecture’s dormant villa in Helsinki during autumn 2011 and in collaboration with Berlin-based Motto Distribution. MNF I explored micro-political and experimental modes of participation in Helsinki, a city undergoing grand urban transformations, such as its rapid expansion to centrally located former harbour areas or the recent identity-defining missions. Composed of a thematic book society/shop in an underused institutional facility, & involving…"
annamikkola  annipuolakka  jennasutela  pop-upmuseums  pop-upgalleries  situationist  urbanism  urban  lcproject  glvo  social  pop-ups  temporary  participatory  installations  parasiticinstallations  installation  2012  mottodistribution  helsinki  berlin  finland  books  okdo  museumofthenearfuture  museums 
february 2012 by robertogreco
Twitter / @ablerism: Love Berlin. Human scale o ...
"Love Berlin. Human scale of Boston, sophistication of Brooklyn. And way cheaper, even in 2012. Wish I could share it w/ @bjford, @infrathin."
nyc  2012  comparison  sarahendren  cities  brooklyn  boston  berlin 
february 2012 by robertogreco
Tina Brown's Must-Reads: Dictators : NPR
[1] "Johnson suggests even in private, North Koreans cannot tell the truth — that everything in their lives is fictionalized to one degree or another — & Brown says that's part of why his book is so original.

"Their own biographies are captured and rewritten and made to be the thing that you imbibe and live through, and that's why the freedom of the rower becomes such a haunting thing to Jun Do," Brown says."

[2] ""[York] writes about 'dictator chic,' which has now taken over as the fall of all these dictators from the Arab Spring brings all this flight money into Europe, & invades us with their taste," Brown says. According to York, 'despot decor' is increasing in certain spots around the world."

[3] "Murphy suggests that the Inquisition, rather than being a relic of the past, is a harbinger of modern times. Brown says that the sustained ability to create a system of fear, maintain records, & monitor people through communication systems & law reminds her of more modern examples."
toread  cullenmurphy  fear  control  architecture  inquisition  stasimuseum  berlin  eastgermany  despotdecor  dictatorchic  peteryork  northkorea  literature  fiction  identity  adamjohnson  2012  longform  books  tinabrown 
february 2012 by robertogreco
Institut für Raumexperimente
"The Institut für Raumexperimente (Institute for Spatial Experiments) is an educational research project by Prof. Olafur Eliasson, affiliated to the College of Fine Arts at the Berlin University of the Arts (UdK) and supported by the Senate for Education, Science and Research in Berlin. The program of the Institut für Raumexperimente including lectures, workshops and experiments is a part of the curriculum of the professor's class."
experimentation  spatialexperiments  via:sarahhendren  InstitutfürRaumexperimente  art  berlin  olafureliasson 
january 2012 by robertogreco
Hip Cities That Think About How They Work - NYTimes.com
"The story of young people, full of ambition, energy, skill and talent, moving to enticing cities that call to them like a siren’s song is as old as modern civilization. And in a world where national borders are easier to traverse, where more countries are joining the prosperous global middle class and where the cost of a one-way plane ticket is more affordable, young professionals probably have more cities to choose from than ever before.

This survey is not based solely on quality of life, number of trees or the cost of a month’s rent. Instead, we examine some cities that aim to be both smart and well managed, yet have an undeniably hip vibe. Our pick of cities that are, in a phrase, both great and good:

Aukland, Berlin, Barcelona, Cape Town, Copenhagen, Curitiba, Montreal, Santiago, Shanghai, Vilnus"
via:gpe  cities  aukland  newzealand  berlin  germany  barcelona  spain  españa  capetown  southafrica  copenhagen  denmark  curitiba  brasil  montreal  Quebec  canada  santiago  chile  shanghai  china  vilnus  lithuania  planning  urbanplanning  livability  glvo  urban  urbandesign  policy  transit  masstransit  publictransit  sustainability  smartcities  environment  design  brazil 
november 2011 by robertogreco
Stadtblind » The Colors of Berlin
"The Colors of Berlin is for tourists and Berliners. The book is a unique tool for urban exploration, serving both as inspiration for a personal vision and documentation of the city. It is a declaration of love to Berlin. It helps the flaneur and the city-lover see and experience the urban landscape in a new way. Stadtblind’s aim is to create a distance from that which is familiar, to re-frame the familiar in such a way that it becomes fresh, worthy of attention and affection. We present the everyday spaces, objects and surfaces of contemporary Berlin ina manner that provides a new means of perceiving cities. It is precisely the everyday aspects of our lives that are most often overlooked; and it is precisely the everyday that most constitutes our lived experience of cities."

[via: http://youarehere2011.wordpress.com/suggested-reading/ ]
berlin  travel  psychogeography  derive  2005  cities  cityguides  exploration  urban  urbanism  flaneur  situationist  dérive 
november 2011 by robertogreco
house of rethinking | until we see new land
"it’s not only a place to host our innovation camps: We think of it as an inspiring space where all sorts of people get together, encourage each other to think different and put ideas into action. The permanent “House of Rethinking” should be established for living and working together, for reflecting and rethinking."

In addition to the hosting of innovation camps the “House of Rethinking” will be open to different uses: from a “living-topics library” to a cultural venue, from an inspiration hostel to a retreat center for management groups much is conceivable and feasible. At the same time a “residency” program for dedicated creative people from all over the world will “fuel” the “House of Rethinking”."
houseofrethinking  berlin  lcproject  unschooling  deschooling  culture  thirdspaces  glvo  livework  community 
november 2011 by robertogreco
Nokia: Teddy Bears and Talking Drums -- A Connecting People film - YouTube
"From Rio to Nairobi, Berlin to Mumbai, and everywhere in between, mobile technology continues to change our world in exciting and unpredictable ways. People all over are embracing the possibilities that are emerging from this ongoing revolution, shaping -- and being shaped -- by it in the process. At Nokia, this is what gets us out of bed in the morning."
nokia  technology  mobile  communication  2011  riodejaneiro  brasil  berlin  mumbai  smartphones  personaldevices  change  adaptation  instabiity  identity  socialnetworking  global  local  socialmedia  africa  self  instability  brazil 
november 2011 by robertogreco
Detroit: The Death of Manhattanism - Op-Ed - Domus
"As far as the similarities from one urban circumstance to another, there is a case to be made for the emergence of a global typology and the slow transformation of American cities toward a global model. White flight, the demographic phenomenon that defined American cities in the 2nd half of the twentieth century, is finally unwinding itself. Witness the rise of the "hipster," which is really just a polite and racially sublimated way of talking about white culture as urban culture. Alongside this, we are witnessing the rise of the black and immigrant suburbs. American cities are moving in the direction of operating more like European and South American cities. The latter part of the twentieth century in this country was an anomaly compared to global urban and suburban development, and that historical moment is over."
detroit  brooklyn  berlin  cities  mitchmcewen  urban  hipsterism  globalcities  transformation  hipsters  gentrification  us  urbanism  2011  suburbs  innercities  diversity  segregation  nola  neworleans 
august 2011 by robertogreco
Berlin: Europe's hottest startup hub - Aug. 9, 2011
"Berlin, known for its creative vibe & underground music & art scenes, has been an ideal backdrop for a venture looking to make sound a shared experience.

Ljung describes the city itself as startup: ever-changing & innovative, creative with a bit of an anti-establishment attitude.

"It has a tradition of the counterculture & wanting to do things a different way," he says. "You go back to why people start startups — they want to do things differently."

Berlin's current air of artistic & entrepreneurial freedom is linked to its tumultuous history. Walk though the city & you'll pass structures and monuments that have been destroyed & rebuilt, only to be destroyed & rebuilt again during World War II. Buildings punctured with bullet holes are a constant reminder of Nazi Germany & the city's post-war struggle.

But since the Berlin Wall fell in 1989, the city has let its hair down — pivoting yet again to become a center for all things creative: technology, design, fashion, music."
via:cervus  berlin  cities  startups  soundcloud  history  entrepreneurship  creativity  reinvention 
august 2011 by robertogreco
Postcards from Berlin BETA
"There are 32 places in America named Berlin. We are collecting true stories about these Berlins in the form of video, text and images. The idea is to create a space for collaborative storytelling, in which participants can share their stories as well as contribute perspective to the stories of others. Our plan is to pick your 12 most interesting stories and make an episodic feature film!In the mean time, we hope this website becomes an inspiring and fascinating territory for personal narrative. Along the way we’ll be announcing new ways to get involved, as well as sharing stories from our friends and project partners in Berlin, Germany. It’s a chance for Americans and Germans to learn about one another in a new way."
storytelling  berlin  us  germany  via:cervus  film  exchange  classideas 
july 2011 by robertogreco
Anarchy Culture (Berlin) « Kaoru Tozaki Wang
"I’m in East Berlin till the 26th and have lots to update. Having tons of fun here. An amazing culture has arisen after the infamous fall of the Berlin wall. After its fall the city was abandoned, anarchy ensued and a new culture blossomed. Lots of creatives here doing their own thing. Yes, I’ve met my fair share of “entrepre-tenders”(another term I’ve heard is ego-preneur) but still- it’s bubbling with creativity. After shooting 3 months at the democratic school “Brooklyn Free School” (some would call it edu-punk), Berlin is sorta perfect."
kaorutozakiwang  berlin  eastberlin  brooklynfreeschool  creativity  entrepreneurship  edupunk  anarchism  anarchy  culture  freedom  unschooling  tabularasa  blankslates  reinvention  deschooling  entrepre-tenders  eog-preneurs  innovation  democraticschools  democracy  2011 
july 2011 by robertogreco
Robot Flâneur: Exploring Google Street View
"Robot Flâneur is an explorer for Google Street View. Select a city to start exploring.

Follow the instructions or just go full screen for an urban screensaver of your choice."
photography  cities  urban  maps  mapping  jamesbridle  robotflaneur  london  sanfrancisco  manhattan  nyc  sãopaulo  paris  johannesburg  tokyo  mexicodf  df  berlin  exploration  screensavers  mexicocity 
june 2011 by robertogreco
Eikongraphia » Tempelhof Mountain 1
"What do to with Tempelhof Airport? After the airfield has been closed last October the city of Berlin has asked the ‘Berliners’ just that. One of the ideas that were sent to the municipality (and directly put aside) is the idea by architect Jakob Tigges. He proposes to construct a 1,000 meter tall mountain on the former airfield."
art  architecture  landscape  berlin  germany  templehofmountain  2009 
may 2011 by robertogreco
HORT
"HORT began its inhabitance back in 1994, under the previous stage name of EIKES GRAFISCHER HORT. Who the hell is Eike? Eike is the creator of HORT. HORT - a direct translation of the studio's mission. A creative playground. A place where 'work and play' can be said in the same sentence. An unconventional working environment. Once a household name in the music industry. Now, a multi-disciplinary creative hub. Not just a studio space, but an institution devoted to making ideas come to life. A place to learn, a place to grow, and a place that is still growing. Not a client execution tool. HORT has been known to draw inspiration from things other than design.

It is encouraged that you don't see the work displayed on this website as a library of ideas and visual styles to pick and choose from, but a showcase of our capabilities and achievements. HORT are willing to give most things a go. I mean how are you supposed to learn if you don't try. Right?"

[See also: http://vimeo.com/20949186 ]
hort  design  lcproject  learning  tcsnmy  studios  studioclassroom  learningenvironments  illustration  germany  berlin  creativity  curiosity  play  eikekönig  cv  multidisciplinary  crossdisciplinary  interdisciplinary  collaboration  children  safety  work  howwework  sharing  systems  education  unschooling  deschooling  growing  uncertainty  failure  risk  risktaking  schooldesign  freedom  autonomy  revolution 
april 2011 by robertogreco
PLATOON.cultural development | BERLIN · MISSING WEIWEI!
"yesterday we started sticking this MISSING posters all over Berlin Mitte. after seeing your great appreciation we decided to make the PDF available for everyone who wants to get active and do the same.

you can download it HERE... however, if you are in the area just come to pick them up at our berlin headquarter and SPREAD THEM EVERYWHERE!!!

arresting people wont silence them, it will make their voices even louder!"

[Flickr set here: http://www.flickr.com/photos/platoon/sets/72157626324210795/ ]
aiweiwei  china  berlin  protest  2011  humanrights  streetart 
april 2011 by robertogreco
Evangelische Schule Berlin Zentrum [Evangelical School Berlin Center]
"The Evangelical School Berlin Center was founded with the goal of a reform school with a radical change in the culture of learning. As an evangelical school is the Christian faith standard for learning and action . As a private school, we wish to be crucial in view of sustainable development. We hope you find our site, what do you want our school know about and look forward to your comments."

[Basti knows head of school Margret Rasfeld:  http://www.ev-schule-zentrum.de/683.0.html ]
margretrasfeld  via:cervus  teaching  learning  schools  berlin  germany  education  progressive  alternative  privateschools 
april 2011 by robertogreco
How Berlin Became the Coolest City on the Planet - The Hollywood Reporter
""New York in the '80s." "London at the height of Britpop." "Paris in the '30s."

Berlin now.

If you believe the hype, and you really should, Berlin is the coolest city on the planet."
berlin  hype  cities  trends  world  via:cervus  yearoff  germany  art  film 
february 2011 by robertogreco
David Galbraith’s Blog » How to Solve Berlin’s Gentrification War.
"Berlin’s slow-burn emergence as Europe’s cultural capital has resulted in a deep rooted creative scene, but that is being threatened. Berlin’s artists are now rebelling against a Yuppy invasion.

One of the problems with gentrification is that the people that originally make an area more desirable (artists) don’t gain and the people that gain (yuppies), often make it less desirable. The reason for this is that creatives rent and can’t buy, and yuppies buy but don’t create.

But imagine a property fund that was based on a simple rule - follow the artists, it would make a fortune. It should be possible then to fund the arts through some mechanism that capitalizes on this.

An arts fund that created artists mortgages with the expectation that they increase the value of properties without normally benefiting (as happened in Shoreditch) could really help mitigate this kind of change, without any external subsidy…"
davidgalbraith  berlin  art  artists  realestate  housing  renting  gentrification  yuppies  money  finance 
january 2011 by robertogreco
Why is Berlin the place to be? - Berlin Meeting of Connections 2010
"When thinking about moving I asked myself: Which is the city that inspires me most? Where are the people who dare to live their life in their very own personal way? The people who don’t care about what “the matrix says”. The people for whom money-making is a consequence of following their heart & way of living…

Frankfurt in my opinion is more about maximizing everything. It’s more about moving things forward w/in structures, along the lines. It’s not about questioning structures or creating something new.

But choosing Berlin in the end wasn’t only a decision between Frankfurt & Berlin. I’ve also lived in Hamburg & Munich. I chose Berlin because it is so different to any other city. Elsewhere life is much more structured: You have to adapt to lots of rules & live up to somebody else’s expectations. In Berlin, you just do it, whatever that may be. & you do it the way you want to do it."
berlin  via:cervus  cities  creativity  glvo  independence  possibility  expectations  structure  rules  adaptation 
october 2010 by robertogreco
Palomar5 The Movie
"It is impossible to really capture what happened in the roundabout 65.000 minutes during the Palomar5 camp in 2009 in something like a movie. Nevertheless, we want everyone to experience at least a glimpse of it - within 60 minutes.

Thanks to our filmmaker and editor Patricia Günther, who accompanied great parts of the camp and made this movie possible."
berlin  conferences  palomar5  workshops  camps  collaborative 
april 2010 by robertogreco
Palomar5
"Palomar5 is a network-organisation experimenting with new environments for creating positive innovations, and empowering individuals to create and realize new ideas. The topics and projects encompass the imaginations and talents of our community – and beyond -, ranging from global free internet, to giant artistic displays, from deep philosophical exploration, to hands on play and experimentation. Trust, love and respect, built upon common experience is the glue that bonds our community. Palomar 5 is looking for collaborators that can benefit from our collective output and participate in the creation of new experiences, exploring the space between living rooms and corporations, professional and amateur, reality and utopia."
berlin  change  collaboration  collective  entrepreneurship  conferences  coworking  germany  technology  network  initiatives  ideas  creativity  culture  design  do  innovation  community  tcsnmy 
april 2010 by robertogreco
click opera - Worldwide Berlinification!
"Since it's a global recession, I also like to think Berlin has now become a sort of template for cities all over the world. Whereas we might once have looked like a museum of crusty subcultures past their sell-by date, this city now looks like the future of Tokyo, the future of London, and the future of New York. We're your best-case scenario, guys, your optimal recessionary outcome. Everything else is dystopia, Escape-From-New-York stuff.

If the major cities of the world all become "Berlins", though, I can't guarantee I'd stay in the actual Berlin, the black flagship, the Big Squat itself. If Tokyo, for instance, got as cheap and cheerfully creative as Berlin -- if it became the kind of city you could simply occupy without having to scuttle around pointlessly making rent -- I'd be there in a flash. Secretly, what I'm doing here in Berlin is waiting for Tokyo to Berlinify."
momus  berlin  squatting  recession  housing  economics  art  society 
april 2009 by robertogreco
SPIEGEL Interview With Danish Artist Olafur Eliasson: 'Museums Are Too Elitist' - International - SPIEGEL ONLINE - News
"Celebrated Danish artist Olafur Eliasson talks about his love-hate relationship with his adopted home city, Berlin, his gigantic waterfall spectacle on the East River in New York, which is expected to attract millions of viewers, and the pitfalls of succ
olafureliasson  museums  art  berlin 
april 2008 by robertogreco
Generator.x » Generator.x 2.0: Beyond the Screen
"Generator.x in collaboration with Club Transmediale and [DAM] presents Generator.x 2.0: Beyond the screen, a workshop and exhibition about digital fabrication and generative systems."
berlin  fabbing  events  jaredtarbell  3d  fabrication  lasercutting 
november 2007 by robertogreco
Place In Place Of: Berlin
"BERLIN.placeinplaceof.net is a web-based project which uses the weblog format to present concurrent and collaborative investigations and interpretations of Berlin, from Then and Now."
berlin  cities  history  now  blogs 
november 2007 by robertogreco
From Brooklyn to Berlin: New York Artists Escape to Germany - International - SPIEGEL ONLINE - News
Leonard Cohen famously sang "First we'll take Manhattan, then we'll take Berlin." Now many New York artists are doing just that, turning their backs on excessive rents and the stifling conservativism of the post-9/11 city to carve out a niche for themselv
art  artists  berlin  nyc  money  economics  politics  trends  international 
september 2007 by robertogreco
Berlin's art scene, once wild and free, is increasingly commercialized - Los Angeles Times
"The do-anything spirit that burst forth in post-Communist Berlin is being overwhelmed by market-mindedness."
berlin  art  germany 
july 2007 by robertogreco
steak zombies - fashion research - rare and well done!----welcome!
"Steak Zombies' field of work embraces formats such as graphic characters, plush-dolls and accessories, stage-outfits and theatre costumes as well as character- based real-life-costumes. In a series of Live-Sewing and Clothes Customizing Performances in c
berlin  characters  performance  toys  plush  sewing  glvo  design  fashion  typography 
may 2007 by robertogreco
WorldChanging: Tools, Models and Ideas for Building a Bright Green Future: Earth Day Voices: Michael LaFond
"I would like to describe a culture of sustainable urban development being explored in Berlin through the initiative experimentcity, which I coordinate with a wide range of partners."
community  local  reference  worldchanging  cities  berlin  germany  design  urban  urbanism  housing  cohousing  sustainability  future 
april 2007 by robertogreco

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