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robertogreco : bible   30

Teju Cole en Instagram: “⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ Brushing my teeth last night, on the cusp of the hour-stutter, I asked myself how evil came into the world. Pandora, the one who…”
"Brushing my teeth last night, on the cusp of the hour-stutter, I asked myself how evil came into the world. Pandora, the one who bears all gifts, is first named in Hesiod’s “Works and Days.” A century or so later, in the 6th century BCE, unknown Hebrew authors write “Genesis,” probably while in Babylonian exile, likely influenced by the Greek story.
⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
Pandora opens the jar. Eve eats the fruit. The misogyny in the narratives is one parallel; another is that evil enters the world through too much knowledge. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
The Tree of the Knowledge of Good and Evil, no less than Pandora’s Jar, is a device. The lid that is sprung, the knowledge that comes streaming out like arterial blood, the one-way torrent of pain that cannot be reversed or undone. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
The one who bears all gifts... ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
Too much knowledge...
⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
And no going back..."
tejucole  pandora  evil  knowledge  2018  ancientgreece  greekmyths  myths  religion  bible  babylonia  misogyny 
november 2018 by robertogreco
OCCULTURE: 66. Gordon White in “Breaking Kayfabe” // Ursula Le Guin, Dragons & the Story Shape of the 21st Century
"If ya hit the ol’ play button on this one, it’s probably because of the name in the title. Gordon White is in the house. Mr. White as he’s known in the metafiction that is our current cultural narrative. But Mr. White is no reservoir dog in this story. He’s the Humphrey Bogart of High Magic, the main mage behind the oh-so-popular Rune Soup blog and podcast. You’ve read it, you’ve heard it. And if ya haven’t, well, you’re in for quite the trip on this here starship.

Gordon’s mind is a cabinet of curiosities and we pull out quite a bit of them here, including how we can rearrange our reality, the magic of fiction, artistic impulses, Game of Thrones, a game of tomes, and if ya ever wanted to hear Gordon White speak in pro wrestling terminology, well, there’s a bit of that too.

So let’s do this damn thing already and cast this pod off deep into the primordial chaos, where the protocols of the elder scrolls read more like a legend on a map of Middle Earth than they do a plan of global domination."
gordonwhite  fiction  fantasy  novels  art  makingart  magic  myth  mythology  belief  creativity  ryanpeverly  nonfiction  stories  storytelling  change  homer  bible  truth  ursulaleguin  2018  occulture  westernthought  carljung  josephcampbell  starwars  culture  biology  nature  reality  heroesjourney  potency  archetypes  dragons  odyssey  anthropology  ernestodimartino  religion  christianity  flow  taoism  artmagic  artasmagic  magicofart  permaculture  plants  housemagic  love  death 
february 2018 by robertogreco
Ecclesiastes
"For National Novel Generation Month, a superposition of ten translations of a book of the Bible: http://hypotext.co/bible "
https://twitter.com/hypotext/status/934484306675855361

"On refresh, each sentence of the supertranslation is drawn randomly from one of ten translations of Ecclesiastes. It's very likely that no two people will read the same book!

Put differently, this book is sampled from a distribution over possible understandings of Ecclesiastes, like a more random Septuagint.

The code and corpus can be found here: https://github.com/hypotext/hyperbible
h/t @tinysubversions for starting NaNoGenMo!"

[from https://github.com/hypotext/hyperbible :

"The new revised international KJV-ASV-DRB-DBT-ERV-WBT-WEB-YET-AKJV-WNT version of Ecclesiastes.

Each sentence in this translation of Ecclesiastes is drawn uniformly at random from one of ten translations of the Bible on every refresh. Study the text. Learn it. Love it. Live it. Refresh the page and you'll never see it again.

Put slightly differently: this book is sampled from the distributions of possible understandings of Ecclesiastes, like a more systematic Septuagint. You haven't really understood the text until you've studied the nuances of each of its variations.

Made for National Novel Generation Month 2017, Ecclesiastes (KJV-ASV-DRB-DBT-ERV-WBT-WEB-YET-AKJV-WNT) runs to 10k words per translation, but as it draws its strength by consuming ten (slightly) different translations of the Bible, the hyperobject weighs in at well above the threshold of 50k.

Much thanks to the King James Bible, American Standard Version, Douay-Rheims Bible, Darby Bible Translation, English Revised Version, Webster Bible Translation, World English Bible, Young's Literal Translation, American KJV, and Weymouth New Testament.

Different translations are optimized for different qualities, such as "thought-for-thought" or "word-for-word." Here are three comparisons (1, 2, 3) and a page on the Douay-Rheims Bible.

I'd be curious to see a quantitative study on the qualities of the translations, such as where the mean words lie in an embedding space."]
via:robinsloan  ecclesiates  bible  translation  nanogenmo 
november 2017 by robertogreco
Notes + Links / Casey A. Gollan — At once something like scales fell from the eyes....
"At once something like scales fell from the eyes. All at once something like scales fell from the eyes. Immediately something like scales fell from the eyes. Immediately something like fish scales fell from the eyes. And immediately something like scales fell from the eyes. And immediately some things that were like scales fell from the eyes. And immediately there fell from the eyes as it had been scales. And immediately there fell from the eyes as it were scales. And immediately there fell from the eyes as it had been scales. And immediately there fell from the eyes something like scales. And straightway there fell from the eyes as it were scales. Instantly something like scales fell from the eyes. Instantly there dropped from the eyes what seemed to be scales."
translation  interpretation  bible 
august 2017 by robertogreco
The Good Thief by Ian Caldwell | On Being
"I lasted two or three months on my college team before the lesson took full root: I was not the one. I stayed on the varsity squad just long enough to attend one particular team meeting, overseen by the head coach in one of the training rooms by the pool, that turned out to be a proselytizing session by a campus Christian group, Athletes in Action. At the end of it, we were asked to sign up for Bible study. We freshmen, in the spirit of compliance, agreed.

I had arrived at Princeton a confident atheist. Now, twice a week, I was visited by a former college wrestler named Brian, who came to my dorm room with Bible in hand to discuss scripture in an Evangelical framework, teasing the sense from passages in Paul and then recommending books by C.S. Lewis that would help me understand the general thrust. All of this was odious in a way I couldn’t quite put my finger on. To be mistaken for a person who would commit so deeply to something so dubious, on the basis of conversations so superficial, seemed patronizing, except that it was obviously the honest mistake of someone who happened to be such a person himself. Out of fellowship and charity, Brian was offering to me what had meant so much to him. He was capable of looking at me and seeing a younger version of himself.

This was my first taste of the loss. My demotion from student-athlete to mere student came with a great sense of abandonment. So many years, so much struggle and sacrifice: How could it now be invisible? What I had done in the swimming pool, year after year, was surely one of the most important testaments I had written about myself, and, even if it had ended, it remained a guidepost to more invisible, more abiding qualities in me. I felt angry and afraid that a fellow athlete — who must have understood what it meant to be relentless and striving, never satisfied, intent on the hard way — could think I would be persuaded by a hasty reading of a few haphazard Bible verses. I felt compelled to show him his mistake."



"It was my wife who decided the time had come for swimming lessons. The class at the rec center was for parents to stand in the shallow end and raise and lower their infants into the water. This was silly, but I agreed. In parenting a baby, as in training for a distance race, the sets and intervals are really just illusions. They create a tolerable reality out of what is really a long, undifferentiated test of will. Swimming classes are not for the drowning child. They are for the drowning parent."



"Matthew and Luke are believed to have been written around the same time, and both by the same process: weaving together the earlier Gospel of Mark with a second document that recorded Jesus’s teachings. Considering this, the differences between them seemed stark. Matthew had placed so much stress on comparing Jesus to Moses; Luke placed very little. Luke’s audience must have been Gentile, since, in addition to this lack of emphasis on Moses, Luke simplifies or has to explain his “Jewish” material, as if his readers are not familiar with it. Perhaps for this same reason, Matthew’s bitterness and frustration — the gall of abandonment felt by a Jewish Christian toward fellow Jews who refused Jesus — is much harder to find in Luke.

Instead, Luke radiates love. His theme, more than that of any other gospel, is the innate goodness of people, a subject he is able to find everywhere. Eleven of Jesus’s parables exist in no other gospel but Luke, including two of the most famous: the Good Samaritan, about the unexpected mercy of our presumed enemies; and the Prodigal Son, about a wayward young man who returns home in shame, having wasted his inheritance, only to find that his father’s love and forgiveness are bottomless. This optimism and generosity are pervasive in Luke. It is hard not to feel that, in this author, Jesus has found the ideal messenger, a man able to see past misfortunes in order to keep heartfelt faith in a radical, transformative love.

The contrast between Matthew and Luke hits hardest at the end, where Matthew’s love of Jesus, and anger at Jesus’s death, leads him to those words seemingly bereft of redemption or forgiveness: “His blood be upon us and upon our children.” Matthew does not even change the devastating final words of Jesus on the cross, as reported by the Gospel of Mark: “My God, my God, why have you forsaken me?” Rather, it is Luke who changes them. And it is in Luke’s improbable version of the crucifixion that I see Jesus most vividly: as the hero of mercy and embodiment of love; as the man intent on seeing the goodness in us even when we give him no reason.

I see, also, Luke himself: his own mercy and love, his capacity to overlook the horror Matthew could not. As Jesus dies on the cross, crucified with two thieves, Luke adds a final story found in no other gospel:
“Now one of the criminals hanging there reviled Jesus, saying, ‘Are you not the Messiah? Save yourself and us.’ The other, however, rebuking him, said in reply, ‘Have you no fear of God, for you are subject to the same condemnation? And indeed, we have been condemned justly, for the sentence we received corresponds to our crimes, but this man has done nothing criminal.’ Then he said, ‘Jesus, remember me when you come into your kingdom.’ Jesus replied to him, ‘Amen, I say to you, today you will be with me in Paradise.'”

Today I have three sons. The oldest are nine and seven. They are competitive swimmers.

At one of their practices, I recently discovered a group of adults training in the adjacent lane. So I bought a new suit and joined them. For the first time in two decades, I have a practice group.

These days I swim side by side with my boys, separated only by a lane rope. When the old feeling returns, that the pool is infinite and the lap endless, I peer through the murk of the next lane and I wait for a glimpse of them.

How hard they work for every yard. How desperately they want air but force themselves not to breathe. Every once in a while, they catch me watching. And when they do, they try to keep up. Their arms spin faster, their kicks start to beat the water white. Unconsciously, as if they have inherited this instinct, they veer over toward the lane rope between us. They draft off me.

The final words of Jesus on the cross, according to the Gospel of Luke, are: “Father, into your hands I commit my spirit.” I push forward. Stroke on stroke, I try to part the water."
iancaldwell  swimming  srg  edg  education  bible  hypoxictraining  parenting  2017  abandonment  atheism 
april 2017 by robertogreco
TempleOS - Wikipedia
"TempleOS (formerly SparrowOS or LoseThos in development) is a biblical themed lightweight operating system created over the span of a decade by programmer Terry A. Davis. The software is a x86-64 bit, multi-tasking, multi-cored, public domain, open source, ring-0-only, single address space, non-networked, PC operating system for recreational programming.[1] The operating system was designed to be the Third Temple according to Davis and uses an interface similar to a mixture of DOS and Turbo C. Davis describes the operating system as a modern x86_64 Commodore 64 with C in place of BASIC.

History

Davis was born December 1969 and has been diagnosed with schizophrenia since the mid-1990s.[weasel words] Development for TempleOS began in 2003 after Davis suffered from a series of manic episodes that left him briefly hospitalized for mental health issues.[2][3]

Davis is a former atheist who believes that he can "talk with God" and that God told him the operating system he built was God's official temple. According to Davis TempleOS is of 'Divine' intellect due to the inspired nature of the code. According to Davis, God said to create the operating system with 640x480, 16 colors display and a single audio voice. The operating system was coded in a programming language, developed by Davis in C/C++ called "HolyC". The OS runs a file system called "Red Sea".[4]"
operatingsystems  via:ablaze  sparrowos  templeos  os  bible  terrydavis  religion 
july 2016 by robertogreco
CABINET // Inventory / The Bible: 2,728 Objects in Order of Appearance
"This list catalogues every individual object in the Bible in the order in which it appears. I defined an object as anything inanimate that can be moved. Animal carcasses or parts of the human body were included but I also included eggs and seeds, considering the status of these as objects to be more relevant for my purposes than the fact that they are in some sense animate. No given object is mentioned more than once, even if it is subsequently referred to in the text because it is still the same object. The list does, however, include multiple instances of the same type of object. For example, “Asherah pole” appears seven times in the list, since it is 
clear that these are all individual Asherah poles rather than repeated references to the same object. Hypothetical objects, such as those described in the visions of the prophets, are not included. The object is listed with its material properties, color, and dimensions where they are given."
via:doingitwrong  objects  bible  inventories  inventory  emmakay  2004  lists 
may 2016 by robertogreco
G O S P E L  O F  T H E  T R E E S
"The Bible is a story about trees. It begins, or nearly enough, with two trees in a garden: the Tree of Life, the Tree of the Knowledge of Good and Evil. The pivotal event in the book comes when a man named Jesus is hanged on a tree. And the last chapter of the last book features a remade Jerusalem: “In the midst of the street of it, and on either side of the river, was there the tree of life, which bare twelve manner of fruits, and yielded her fruit every month: and the leaves of the tree were for the healing of the nations.” If you understand the trees, you understand the story.

The words and images here are presented in no particular order: this is a mosaic rather than a narrative. Clicking on the arrow at the top right of each content page will take you randomly to another page on the site.

Also, this mosaic is a work in progress: more text and images will be added to it over time.

This site is one of the lesser fruits of the Project on Lived Theology. I am greatly indebted to Charles Marsh, the founder and Director of PLT, and to the other members of the Virginia Seminar, who have greatly enriched my life in recent years. Further support for the site has been provided by the Faculty Development Fund of Wheaton College.

My name is Alan Jacobs. Any text and images on this site that are not explicitly credited to others are created by me.

The site is designed by my very talented friend Brad Cathey. Hosting is by Highgate Cross."
trees  alanjacobs  religion  bible  theology 
july 2015 by robertogreco
Cool Tools – The Message
"At least once in your life you should read the Bible all the way through because it does not say what you expect it to say, no matter what you expect it to say.

Here is the translation of the Bible you want to read: The Message. This new street-wise paraphrase is looser than a translation and so irks purists. But it is storming Christian campuses and youth groups with its boldness, readability, and strong vernacular. Translated by one amazing guy, it’s as far from old King James as one can imagine. For those who find the Bible warmed-over old news, The Message is like reading it for the first time.

– KK"
kevinkelly  bible  2004  religion  literature 
august 2014 by robertogreco
Millsin' About - For those interested in 'Upstream Color'
After he saw it, my father and I discussed its possible meanings; I’d already written that I considered it likely that the movie explored ideas about religion, and specifically to our changing relationship with it. He pointed out something I cannot believe I haven’t read anywhere in analyses of the film: the story of Jesus and the demon(s) called Legion in the synoptic gospels (that is: Matthew, Mark, and Luke):
upstreamcolor  pigs  millsbaker  bible  2013 
july 2013 by robertogreco
The 2007 CBC Massey Lectures, "The City of Words" | Ideas with Paul Kennedy | CBC Radio
"The end of ethnic nationalism, building societies around sets of common values, seems like a good idea. But something is going wrong. In the 2007 Massey Lectures, writer Alberto Manguel takes a fresh look at some of the problems we face, and suggests we should look at what stories have to teach us about society.

"How do stories help us perceive ourselves and others?" he asks. "How can stories lend a whole society an identity...?"

From Gilgamesh to the Bible, from Don Quixote to The Fast Runner, Alberto Manguel explores how books and stories hold the secret keys to what binds us together."

Internationally acclaimed as an anthologist, translator, essayist, novelist, and editor, Alberto Manguel is the bestselling author of several award-winning books, including A Dictionary of Imaginary Places and A History of Reading."
imaginarycities  cities  reading  ulysses  jamesjoyce  kafka  jung  carljung  apollo  cassandra  meaningmaking  meaning  sensemaking  understanding  perception  imagination  therealworld  mapping  maps  theself  self  literature  fiction  reality  margaretatwood  plato  names  naming  language  words  rubendarío  socrates  aristotle  symbolism  symbols  thecityofwords  worlds  writing  borges  themaker  poetry  commonvalues  donquixote  gilgamesh  bible  history  society  storytelling  stories  cbc  masseylectures  2007  albertomanguel 
august 2012 by robertogreco
Fiction Writers Review » Magic and Music Steer this Vessel: On Jorge Luis Borges’s This Craft of Verse
"In this lecture, Borges famously declares that laziness kept him from writing novels. I wonder if this is the same “happy indolence” that Billy Collins has described as his modus operandi. Borges, like the ancients, defines the poet as “‘a maker’—not only as the utterer of those high lyric notes, but also as a teller of a tale."

"“Thought and Poetry” finds Borges asserting over and over again that metaphors should both resonate and unsettle."

"Borges’s humility should be admired but what must also be considered here is the incredible challenge—one may even describe it as a daunting, accusing mountain—that faces the writer. Those “tolerable” pages arrive from labored and conscientious output, through the uncertain process of trial and error, and through the making of, the awareness and recognition of, as well as the correction and ultimate learning from, mistakes."
cervantes  donquixote  bible  beowulf  wittgenstein  2009  books  writing  novels  johnmadera  music  odyssey  homer  poetry  classics  literature  borges 
january 2012 by robertogreco
Paul Simms: “God’s Blog” : The New Yorker [Samples from the "comments"]
"Why are the creatures more or less symmetrical on a vertical axis but completely asymmetrical on a horizontal axis? It’s almost like You had a great idea but You didn’t have the balls to go all the way with it."

"I liked the old commenting format better, when you could get automatic alerts when someone replied to your comment. This new way, you have to click through three or four pages to see new comments, and they’re not even organized by threads. Until this is fixed, I’m afraid I won’t be checking in on Your creation."

"Unfocussed. Seems like a mishmash at best. You’ve got creatures that can speak but aren’t smart (parrots). Then, You’ve got creatures that are smart but can’t speak (dolphins, dogs, houseflies). Then, You’ve got man, who is smart and can speak but who can’t fly, breathe underwater, or unhinge his jaws to swallow large prey in one gulp. If it’s supposed to be chaos, then mission accomplished. But it seems more like laziness and bad planning."
humor  religion  creation  blogging  commenting  paulsimms  bible  genesis  internet  web 
august 2011 by robertogreco
Why the King James Bible Endures - NYTimes.com
"But what this modernizing ignores is that the most powerful religious language is often a little elevated and incantatory, even ambiguous or just plain hard to understand."
religion  bible  history  literature  language  kingjamesbible  via:britta  classideas  ambiguity 
april 2011 by robertogreco
Wonder of Creation » Wendell Berry: Nature Theologian
"In the Bible we find none of the industrialist’s contempt or hatred for nature. We find, instead, a poetry of awe and reverence and profound cherishing, as in [the verses above] from Moses’ valedictory blessing of the twelve tribes. If we credit the Bible’s description of the relationship between Creator and Creation, then we cannot deny the spiritual importance of our economic life. Then we see how religious issues lead to issues of economy, and how issues of economy lead to issues of art, of how to make things. If we understand that no artist—no maker—can work except by reworking the works of Creation, then we see that by our work, by the way we practice our arts, we reveal what we think of the works of God. How we take our lives from this world, how we work, what work we do, how well we use the materials we use and what we do with them after we have used them—all these are questions of the highest and gravest religious significance. These questions cannot be answered by thinking, but only by doing. In answering them, we practice, or do not practice, our religion."

[via: http://bettyann.tumblr.com/post/2457678491 ]
wendellberry  creation  glvo  art  making  doing  make  industrialization  industry  nature  bible  religion  work  theology 
december 2010 by robertogreco
slacktivist: Private property?
A series of Bible/Saint quotes countering pro-free market conservative Christians. "Pastor Ted's embrace of "private property" as the badge. hallmark and signifier of Christianity is absurd. Christians do believe and always have believed in the right to private property, but that right has always, always been limited. And the insistence on those limits has always been just as important, or more important, than the insistence on the right itself."
culture  politics  economics  religion  wealth  christianity  money  hypocrisy  bible  saints 
february 2010 by robertogreco
Codex Sinaiticus
"Codex Sinaiticus is one of the most important books in the world. Handwritten well over 1600 years ago, the manuscript contains the Christian Bible in Greek, including the oldest complete copy of the New Testament. Its heavily corrected text is of outstanding importance for the history of the Bible and the manuscript – the oldest substantial book to survive Antiquity – is of supreme importance for the history of the book"
codexsinaiticus  manuscripts  online  history  greek  ancient  digitization  classics  christianity  bible  religion  archives 
july 2009 by robertogreco
Former fundamentalist 'debunks' Bible - CNN.com
"Doctrines such as the divinity of Jesus and heaven and hell are not based on anything Jesus or his earlier followers said. At least 19 of the 27 books in the New Testament are forgeries. Believing the Bible is infallible is not a condition for being a Christian. "Christianity has never been about the Bible being the inerrant word of God," Ehrman says. "Christianity is about the belief in Christ." ... even many of Ehrman's critics say he has a knack for making arcane New Testament scholarship accessible to the public.
christianity  bartehrman  belief  bible  religion 
may 2009 by robertogreco
The Gospel Truth: Sometimes A Little Hazy : NPR
"Now a professor at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Ehrman began his studies at the Moody Bible Institute. He was initially an evangelical Christian who believed the Bible was the inerrant word of God. But later, as a student at Princeton Theological Seminary, Ehrman started reading the Bible with a more historical approach and analyzing the contradictions among the Gospels. Eventually, he lost faith in the Bible as the literal word of God. He now describes himself as an agnostic."
bartehrman  bible  religion  christianity  athieism  gospels  npr  belief  books 
march 2009 by robertogreco
Unsucky English, Lecture 1: On Gilgamesh | Beyond School
"Let’s start with the oldest story ever told (at least that we have written down), the first story in the history of this whacked and wonderful species we all belong to, the story whose title will make your eyes roll and your feet head for the exit door the minute you hear it, because it’s associated with your lifetime of aversion to schooly suckiness."
clayburell  classics  literature  gilgamesh  tcsnmy  deschooling  unschooling  academia  writing  bible 
august 2008 by robertogreco
CR Blog » Blog Archive » The Bible According To Google Earth
"Scenes from the Bible have been imagined by countless artists over the centuries, but never quite like this. God’s Eye View portrays four key Biblical events as if captured by Google Earth. Above, The Crucifixion."
art  earth  google  googleearth  googlemaps  maps  photography  religion  bible 
december 2007 by robertogreco
The 9 Most Badass Bible Verses | Cracked.com
"It turns out, the Bible is already chock full of ass kicking. Here are the verses that make us want to take to the streets and put some unbelievers to the sword."
bible  christianity  humor  religion  violence 
november 2007 by robertogreco
Kuka: Robot Ascetic Inscribes Bible - Boing Boing Gadgets
"Kuka, what appears to be a fairly standard industrial robot, has been reprogrammed to inscribe the entire Martin Luther bible onto a endless roll of paper. It uses a calligraphic style translated by its creators RobotLab from an early font called "Schwab
robots  religion  bible  typography  art 
october 2007 by robertogreco
Biblical Living: Following Every Rule for One Year - Newsweek Beliefs - MSNBC.com
"What if you spent one year following every rule in the Bible? A. J. Jacobs did exactly that."
bible  reviews  religion  books  kevinkelly  structure  military  life  rules  choice  happiness  trends 
september 2007 by robertogreco
Conceptual Trends and Current Topics - A Year of Following All the Rules in the Bible
"As a devout Christian I find the experiment in this new book, The Year of Living Biblically, fascinating. The guy who wrote The Know-It-All, a book about reading the entire Encyclopedia, recently spent a year trying to follow all 700 plus rules he found in the Bible. These rules ranged from the obvious Ten Commandments to the more obscure details of Old Testament laws, which ultra orthodox Jews might follow: leaving side hair uncut, dwelling in huts on certain holidays, strict dietary routines. To give some idea of the physical transformation he underwent, the book offers this photo."
bible  reviews  religion  books  kevinkelly  structure  military  life  rules  choice  happiness  trends 
september 2007 by robertogreco
Reading Judas - Elaine Pagels and Karen L. King - Books - Review - New York Times
"Like Jefferson’s Bible, it scoffs at the notion that God would sacrifice his son to atone for the world’s sins. It too depicts Jesus as a teacher rather than a savior"
books  religion  bible  christianity 
june 2007 by robertogreco

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