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robertogreco : bike   4

» seattle’s booming sd urban
"I’ve been blabbering to anyone who’ll listen about the density increase we witnessed in Seattle, from the Amazon-induced construction-on-every-block in South Lake Union just north of downtown, to the five-to-eight story buildings going up in every near-urban neighborhood. And it’s not anything new – Seattle has been building multi-unit housing at a rate twice that of San Diego for years (more data here)."



"Imagine if we had hundreds, if not thousands, of new units going into Hillcrest, North Park, Golden Hill and Mission Hills. Because that’s exactly what was happening in the similar neighborhoods of Seattle. And this rainy city is priming itself for the future after years of high unemployment by building the housing that its tech workforce requires. How is Seattle able to overcome NIMBY opposition to smart growth, while San Diego isn’t?

Seattle’s also building the mass transit and bike facilities younger workers seek, while raising its minimum wage to $15 as our mayor vetoes our much smaller increase. The Seattle metro’s unemployment rate is the nation’s lowest, at 5.9%. It’s the fastest-growing large metro in the country. I wonder where our city’s economy will be 20 years from now versus Seattle, as our skilled workers move away in search of affordable housing, our aging population continues to fight development, our hourglass economy worsens, and we continue to expand our freeways for ‘boomers in the ‘burbs."

[See also post about Denver: http://sdurban.com/?p=8974 ]
pauljamason  sandiego  seattle  cities  denver  urban  trasnportation  housing  planning  urbanplanning  transit  publictransit  bike  biking  2014 
august 2014 by robertogreco
“…than the evening of an Etruscan grove”: Soho in the bones « Adam Greenfield's Speedbird
"we are all of us making and remaking the places we live in on a constant basis, speaking them into reality through the things we say and the comments we leave on blogs, knitting them into being with bicycles and cars and our own two feet. We bring them to life with our custom and our traffic, our peregrinations and the exercise of our habits. And if we want to leave legends behind, we’d better get busy. These particular streets, richly shrouded in story as they are, demand no less."
adamgreenfield  memory  place  meaning  meaningmaking  soho  london  2011  subcultures  bike  biking  cars  cities  atemporality  change  evolution  urban  urbanism  pedestrians  walking  persistence  persistenceofmemory  legacy  living  life  reinvention  making  remaking  markmaking 
september 2011 by robertogreco
Secrets of the Happiest Places on Earth - NatGeo News Watch
"San Luis Obispo has the best emotional health in country & highest level of well-being…because they have a dozen or so things going for them that were put in place in late 1970s.

They made decision as a city, rather than making the city optimal for commerce, to make it optimal for quality of life. It used to be a forest of signs. Signs beget more signs. They instead limited the size of signs & put the resources into aesthetics. They outlawed fast-food drive-throughs so you don't have idling cars polluting the air, it's harder for people to eat fast food. They were the first place in the world to outlaw smoking in bars & restaurants, so as a result you have about the lowest rate of smoking in the country.

You can stand any place in SLO, a city of about .25 million people, & look around & see green. They have zoned it such that there's no building beyond a certain point, so everybody has access to green space, which we know lowers stress levels, & has access to recreation."
happiness  singapore  urbanism  geography  planning  urban  sanluisobispo  california  traffic  bike  biking  signs  greenery  denmark  nuevoleón  mexico  well-being 
november 2010 by robertogreco

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