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robertogreco : bilingual   9

Why the Spanish Dialogue in 'Spider-Verse' Doesn't Have Subtitles
"While watching the new animated feature Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse – featuring Miles Morales’ big screen debut as the arachnid superhero – it’s reassuring to notice the subtle, yet transcendent details through which the creators ensured both parts of his cultural identity are present.

Miles (voiced by Shameik Moore), an Afro-Latino teen who lives in Brooklyn and first appeared in Marvel’s comics back in 2011, is the son of a Puerto Rican mother and an African-American father. The protagonist’s significance – when it comes to representation – cannot be overstated, making the fact that he and his mother (Rio Morales who’s voiced by Nuyorican actress Luna Lauren Velez) speak Spanish throughout the action-packed narrative truly momentous.

Although brief, the Spanish phrases and words we hear connote the genuine colloquialisms that arise in bilingual homes as opposed to the artificiality that sometimes peppers US-produced movies and feels like the result of lines being fed through Google Translate. It might come as a surprise for some that Phil Lord, known for writing and directing The Lego Movie and 21 Jump Street with his close collaborator Christopher Miller, was not only one of the main scribes and a producer on Spider-Verse, but also the person in charge of the Spanish-language dialogue.

“I grew up in a bilingual household in the bilingual city of Miami where you hear Spanish all over the place, and it’s not particularly remarkable,” he told Remezcla at the film’s premiere in Los Angeles. Lord’s mother is from Cuba and his father is from the States. As part of a Cuban-American family, the filmmaker empathized with Miles’ duality: “I certainly understand what it’s like to feel like you’re half one thing and half something else,” he noted.

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Despite the massive success of Pixar’s Coco, including Spanish-language dialogue in a major studio’s animated release is still rare – doing so without adding subtitles, even for some of the longer lines, is outright daring. “It was important for us to hear Spanish and not necessarily have it subtitled,” said Lord. “It’s just part of the fabric of Miles’ community and family life.”

For Luna Lauren Velez, whose character speaks mostly in Spanish to Miles, Lord and the directors’ decision to not translate her text in any way helped validate the Latino experience on screen. “That was really bold, because if you use subtitles all of a sudden we are outside, and we are not part of this world anymore. It was brilliant that they just allowed for it to exist,” she told Remezcla. Her role as Rio Morales also benefited from the production’s adherence to specificity in the source material, she is not portrayed as just generically Latina but as a Puerto Rican woman from Brooklyn.

With the help of a dialect coach, Velez and Lord were also partially responsible for getting Shameik Moore (who has roots in Jamaica) to learn the handful of Spanish-language expressions Miles uses during the opening sequence were he walks around his neighborhood. “[Luna] has been getting on me! I need to go to Puerto Rico, and really learn Spanish for real,” Moore candidly told Remezcla on the red carpet.

Aside from Rio and Miles, the only other Spanish-speaking character is a villain named Scorpion. The insect-like bad guy who speaks only in Spanish is voiced by famed Mexican performer Joaquín Cosio. “He is an actor from Mexico City who was using slang that we had to look up because we didn’t understand it! I had never heard some of the words he used,” explained Lord.

[video: "Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse - "Gotta Go" Clip"
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9Q9foLtQidk ]

For Lord, having different Spanish accents represented is one of the parts of Into the Spider-Verse he’s the most proud of. He wanted to make sure Miles and Rio didn’t sound alike to indicate how language changes through different generations. Being himself the child of a Cuban immigrant, the parallels were very direct. “Miles is second-generation, so he speaks different than his mother.”

Velez, who like Miles is born in New York, identifies with what it’s like to communicate in both tongues. “Growing my parents spoke to us in Spanish and we responded in English. Now this happens with my nieces and nephews,” she said. “You want to make sure kids remember their culture and where they come from.” In playing Rio, she thought of her mother who instilled in her not only the language but appreciation for her Latinidad.

Clearly, casting Velez was essential to upholding the diversity and authenticity embedded into Miles Morales’ heroic adventure since not doing so would have been a disservice to an iteration of an iconic figure that is so meaningful for many. “If Spider-Man’s Puerto Rican mom had been played by somebody who isn’t Latino I’d have a problem with that,” Velez stated emphatically."
language  translation  spanish  español  bilingualism  bilingual  srg  edg  glvo  carlosaguilar  2018  spider-verse  spiderman  miami  losangeles  nyc  coco  subtitles  specificity  puertorico  cuba  immigration  via:tealtan  accents  change  adaptation  latinidad 
february 2019 by robertogreco
The Superior Social Skills of Bilinguals - The New York Times
"We found that bilingual children were better than monolingual children at this task. If you think about it, this makes intuitive sense. Interpreting someone’s utterance often requires attending not just to its content, but also to the surrounding context. What does a speaker know or not know? What did she intend to convey? Children in multilingual environments have social experiences that provide routine practice in considering the perspectives of others: They have to think about who speaks which language to whom, who understands which content, and the times and places in which different languages are spoken."



"Multilingual exposure, it seems, facilitates the basic skills of interpersonal understanding. Of course, becoming fully bilingual or multilingual is not always easy or possible for everyone. But the social advantage we have identified appears to emerge from merely being raised in an environment in which multiple languages are experienced, not from being bilingual per se. This is potentially good news for parents who are not bilingual themselves, yet who want their children to enjoy some of the benefits of multilingualism."
bilingualism  bilingual  languages  empathy  perspective  2016  psychology  communication  katherinekinzler  boazkeysar  zoeliberman  samanthafan  interpersonal  understanding  multilingual  multilingualism 
march 2016 by robertogreco
Storylines TJ/SD
"Storylines TJ/SD maps subjective narratives from the past century that mark, trace, and challenge the transborder condition of Tijuana/San Diego, by highlighting bilingual stories of place-based resistance that have often gone underrepresented and bringing first person narrative to a region that is often interpreted through dehumanizing ideologies.

Organized by a binational editorial board of artists, art historians, and activists, Storylines: TJ/SD serves as a living narrative archive, manifesting as both live programming + public events accessible on both sides of the border, and as an interactive website and podcast released serially.

Storylines TJ/SD is:

Kate Clark (SD)

Misael Diaz (TJ)

Amy Sanchez (TJ)

Emily Sevier (SD)

Sara Solaimani (SD)

Adriana Trujillo (TJ)"
sandiego  tijuana  border  borders  stories  storytelling  bilingual  spanish  english  español  via:publichistorian  kateclark  misaeldiaz  amysanchez  emilysevier  srasolaimani  adrianatrujillo  art  history  events  mexico  us  activism  resistance  place 
april 2015 by robertogreco
Borderblaster: Transmission 6 'Mixtape for Crossing' | San Diego | Artbound | KCET
"What song comes to mind when you think of the border? We asked individuals who work at the crossing and live on either side of the border this question and compiled their answers for our final Borderblaster Live Recording Event: Mixtape for Crossing. The project's finale invited individuals to contribute songs along with the stories behind those songs to the creation of a collaborative mixtape that would be the basis of Transmission 6--the final transmission of Borderblaster."
borderblaster  tijuana  sandiego  2012  sanysidro  misaeldiaz  mixtapes  border  borders  djganas  music  bilingual  mexico  us 
march 2013 by robertogreco
Bilingualism: Stephen Colbert's 'truthiness' inspires a language - latimes.com
"Then the researchers had the study participants listen to Colbertian words and pick the matching image out of the choices presented. They tracked participants’ eye movements and mouse movements, to see if they veered over to the wrong choice because of interference from their native language.

For example, if the participants were presented with the word "shundoe" and asked to choose between a picture of a shovel and an acorn, the shovel (which sounds similar to "shundoe") might distract a speaker before they chose the acorn as the correct answer.

The study showed that bilinguals were much better at suppressing the native-language alternative while picking the correct Colbertian translation than the monolinguals were, neutralizing the competing language in half the time (700 milliseconds) than the monolinguals could (up to 1,400 ms).

It seems that learning a second language very well makes it easier to pick up others…"
bilingual  languages  language  interference  bilingualism 
july 2012 by robertogreco
Mammoth School | Knee High Media Japan
From Google Translate:<br />
<br />
"School and Mammoth, Mammoth's proposed concept for children continue to lead the future. Magazine, WEB, be linked to events, and explores a new STANDARD for education. These are the basic principles of a mammoth school. Learn from both parents and children, to disseminate the ideas that we will foster a rich opportunity.<br />
(1) PLAY to LEARN what there is to learn to play inside.<br />
(2) HANDS on LEARNING lead to a deeper understanding of experience to stimulate the mind and body.<br />
(3) GREEN LEARNING connection with the earth, learn how to live eco-friendly.<br />
(4) BILINGUAL CONVERSATION create an environment to learn from each other adult and children."<br />
<br />
[See also Knee High Media: http://www.khmj.com/contact ]<br />
<br />
[via: http://a-small-lab.com/projects/look-a-round ]
design  children  education  japan  tokyo  magazines  glvo  bilingual  green  learning  environment  handsonlearning  play 
september 2011 by robertogreco
Steve Hargadon: Free Copy of "Lifelike Pedagogy"
"A few weeks ago I interviewed Marcelo Rodrigues, the author of Lifelike Pedagogy and education director of Escola do Max in Brazil, about his philosophy of "real life" education. Links to his interview are available at FutureofEducation.com.

Marcelo was taken by the fact that another interviewee, David Wood, offered free copies of his book in electronic form during that session, and felt that he would like to do the same for Lifelike Pedagogy. If fact, Marcelo has created a special page and video for the book in order to help spread the word about the educational model they have built and the work that they are doing.

For those interested in how to run a school based on students choosing real problems and ideas to work on, this is a book that will interest you a great deal. http://www.lifelikepedagogy.com/book/ "
pedagogy  escoladomax  sãopaulo  brasil  emergentcurriculum  student-led  student-centered  lifelikelearning  lifelikeprojects  tcsnmy  bilingual  marcelorodrigues  lifelikepedagogy  schools  teaching  learning  unschooling  deschooling  stevehargadon  lcproject  via:hrheingold  projectbasedlearning  brazil  pbl 
august 2010 by robertogreco
Escola do Max - English
"The methodology applied at Escola do Max motivates the students and brings along some meaning with the knowledge. The child needs to want to learn and to understand why the activity is being done. For this reason, the methodology follows some steps:

1. The children democratically choose what they want to learn.

2. Children raise questions and hypothesis towards the theme they’ve chosen

3. Together with the teacher, the children start searching about their project.

4. They decide a conclusion activity, which is the main point of the project. It can be a trip, an event, whatever they decide.

5. The children develop several activities in order to reach their goal.

6. The children achieve their conclusion.

In order to understand the development of the Project according to these steps, let’s analyze a practical situation that happened at Escola do Max."
pedagogy  escoladomax  sãopaulo  brasil  emergentcurriculum  student-led  student-centered  lifelikelearning  lifelikeprojects  tcsnmy  bilingual  marcelorodrigues  lifelikepedagogy  schools  teaching  learning  unschooling  deschooling  stevehargadon  lcproject  projectbasedlearning  brazil  pbl 
august 2010 by robertogreco

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