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robertogreco : binauralrecording   12

NOTHING | but the textures of my body de Nicole L'Huillier
"*These songs are composed for headphones.

[https://soundcloud.com/nicole-lhuillier/sets/things

1 NOTHING | but the textures of my body
2 SOMETHING | mindscapes
3 EVERYTHING | the space we share ]

THINGS is my first solo album. It consists of three tracks, and each one contains a different scale of sonic spatial scenario. This way, THINGS is constructed by 1. NOTHING (but the textures of my body), this track alludes to the nonexistent and constructed idea of the perception of silence by presenting a composition of the ever-present bodily textures. 2. SOMETHING (mindscapes) exposes the capacity of roaming from one mental space to another. To do so, the 5 different parts of this track are composed of frequencies that can stimuli different brain waves. The last track 3. EVERYTHING (the space we share) builds a sonic portrait of the place I grew up and the common sonic scenarios we all share in our culture. This piece gathers field recordings done during my last visit to Chile, my country of origin.

THINGS was released as a sound installation at the me Convention, SXSW, Frankfurt, September 2017. The installation was done using the radio as a spatial medium and was diffused in 3 different radio channels that could be tuned in with radios and headphones provided for the assistants. This way, THINGS presents different scales or layers of spaces by using in its physical form the radio as a mobile space and a transversal sonic architecture."
sound  audio  nicolel'huillier  chile  binaural  soundscapes  2017  silence  binauralrecording 
october 2017 by robertogreco
Stand At The Edge Of Geologic Time
"Transport yourself to Rocky Mountain National Park, with all its sights and sounds, in this immersive geology lesson."

"SELECT YOUR EXPERIENCE
Use headphones for immersive binaural audio

Listen to Oregon State University professor Eric Kirby describe the geologic history of Rocky Mountain National Park in this guided experience.

VR MODE: To view the virtual reality version of this story, visit this page on your phone using a Google Cardboard viewer."
geology  vr  binaural  video  erickirby  rockymountainnationalpark  2016  classideas  virtualreality  binauralrecording 
august 2016 by robertogreco
Surrounded by sound: how 3D audio hacks your brain | The Verge
[video on YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Yd5i7TlpzCk ]

[Bonus video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2Gpl99s02Aw ]

"The technique at the heart of binaural audio can be traced back to Clement Ader, a 19th-century French engineer. In 1881, Ader devised the Theatrophone, a telephonic system of transmission to broadcast a Paris Opera show. Pairs of microphones were systematically spaced in front of the stage, covering the breadth from left to right. Signals from the show were then transmitted via telephone receivers to listeners on the other end. With a pair of receivers, one mounted on each ear, listeners could hear the show from their designated suites at the gallery of Palais de l’Industrie.

In 1933, AT&T Bell Laboratories brought binaural audio to the Chicago World’s Fair. The acoustics research department of the company created a mechanical dummy, which it named Oscar, with microphones placed on its cheeks in front its ears. Oscar sat in a glass room capturing sounds while visitors gathered outside used headphones to hear exactly what the dummy heard. The technique revised the experience introduced by Ader, but both inventions offered poor sound quality.

Through World War II and the decades that followed, progress in binaural faced significant obstacles: primitive techniques failed to achieve accurate, high-fidelity recordings. But in 1973, Neumann, a renowned German microphone company, introduced the breakthrough KU-80, a prototype binaural recording device. Neumann’s iteration consisted of a detached dummy head with microphones placed in the eardrums – the position captured cues with more precision than any of its predecessors. Three generations of dummy heads later, the KU-100, introduced in 1992, featured omnidirectional microphones, expertly preserving the spatial cues and the overall quality of sound. It continues to be the go-to dummy head for binaural recordings.

Now, almost a century after the demise of the Theatrophones, investors are starting to revisit 3D audio technology: the prototype of Sony’s VR headset Project Morpheus includes a custom 3D audio binaural solution in its development kit. "3D audio adds to the feeling of presence that we strive so hard to achieve with the visuals in VR," says Richard Marks, senior director of research and development at Sony Computer Entertainment America. "When sound is perceived to come from the same direction as a visual stimulus, the credibility of the virtual experience is greatly increased. While purely visual VR experiences can be made, adding 3D audio greatly magnifies the impact and depth of a VR experience."

3D audio offers a more expansive experience than its visual counterpart. "Unlike with the visuals, 3D audio is not limited to the field of view of the display and can be rendered to give a 'complete 360-degree' experience," says Marks. "One of the biggest challenges for VR design is that the user can look in any direction, and may not even be looking when something momentous occurs. But using a 3D audio cue, it is possible to steer the user’s attention to look in the direction of the sound, similar to techniques that are used in live theater.""



"Back in Manhattan, Choueiri is considering another problem: since the inception of the technology, binaural audio has been reserved for headphone listening. But Choueiri wants to make the technology accessible over external speaker systems for a wider audience. The challenge is that with speakers, a right ear not only hears its respective cues, but also picks up information meant for the left ear. "It messes up the cues, so instead of hearing 3D sound, the brain just locates the speakers," Choueiri said. "It’s like watching 3D movies without the glasses on."

For decades, this confusing crosstalk between speakers has perplexed the audio community. But Choueiri’s BACCH SP, a filter that enables a pair of speakers to retain the aural cues, creates the illusion of 3D audio for the listeners. Jawbone has employed Princeton University’s algorithm over the last two years to create the LiveAudio filter for its wireless bluetooth speaker, Jambox. Loading the mini-speaker with the digital filter optimizes audio to create a three-dimensional experience. While effective, the experience is limited to a sweet spot — the device needs to be centered in relation to the listener. The illusion instantly collapses when the listener moves from the spot. Choueiri says a version of that software, the BACCH-dSP app, coupled with a head-tracking feature, can sustain the illusion irrespective of the listener’s head movements. That app is scheduled to show up in the store for Mac OS soon, bringing 3D audio experiences to laptops.

Slowly but surely, binaural is becoming a linchpin in virtual reality development. Oculus’ most recent prototype, Crescent Bay, unveiled at CES last month, integrates binaural technology with Rift’s head tracking for complete audio-visual immersion. And while Sony’s Project Morpheus hasn’t announced final specifications of the product yet, their emphasis on 3D audio is evident. As Adam Somers of Jaunt put it, "Binaural audio is critical to an immersive experience within the context of VR. We consider audio to be 50 percent of the immersive experience.""

[via: http://tinyletter.com/chrbutler/letters/2-6-neighborhoods-the-anti-algorithm ]
ryanmanning  binaural  audio  2015  history  clementader  soundscapes  sound  virtualreality  oculusrift  edg  srg  glvo  video  pointofview  beck  radiohead  binauralrecording  monalalwani  vr 
february 2015 by robertogreco
Binaural beats - Wikipedia
"Binaural beats, or binaural tones, are auditory processing artifacts, or apparent sounds, caused by specific physical stimuli. This effect was discovered in 1839 by Heinrich Wilhelm Dove and earned greater public awareness in the late 20th century based on claims coming from the alternative medicine community that binaural beats could help induce relaxation, meditation, creativity and other desirable mental states. The effect on the brainwaves depends on the difference in frequencies of each tone: for example, if 300 Hz was played in one ear and 310 in the other, then the binaural beat would have a frequency of 10 Hz.[1][2]

The brain produces a phenomenon resulting in low-frequency pulsations in the amplitude and sound localization of a perceived sound when two tones at slightly different frequencies are presented separately, one to each of a subject's ears, using stereo headphones. A beating tone will be perceived, as if the two tones mixed naturally, out of the brain. The frequencies of the tones must be below 1,000 hertz for the beating to be noticeable.[3] The difference between the two frequencies must be small (less than or equal to 30 Hz) for the effect to occur; otherwise, the two tones will be heard separately, and no beat will be perceived.

Binaural beats are of interest to neurophysiologists investigating the sense of hearing.[4][5][6][7]

Binaural beats reportedly influence the brain in more subtle ways through the entrainment of brainwaves[3][8][9] and provide other health benefits such as control over pain."
binaural  sound  music  brain  audio  binauralbeats  heinrichwilhelmdove  binauralrecording 
november 2014 by robertogreco
Sounds We Hear - Binaural Headphones on Vimeo
"Experimenting the use of head-worn binaural headphone CS-10EM with static directional sound in a visual mix.

Binaural hearing has been emulated in sound laboratories by using mannequin heads with built-in microphones. Except this time, I'm the living breathing head. :) From these signals, human beings can determine characteristics such as inter-aural time and level differences and—based on the listening experience—information about the spatial origin of the sounds being heard. Are they coming from in front or behind, from the left or right, or above or below? This ability to perceive where a sound originates from is referred to as binaural hearing.

Read more about binaural audio
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Binaural_recording

Also noted, that GoPro WiFi app does not work well in snow somehow. It was -5ºC that morning and the range was somehow drastically reduced. My iPhone sees an connect to the GoPro ad hoc WiFi connection but buttons initiation does not relay well even at this rope length. It could be either the iPhone or GoPro. But phone is warm in my pocket while GoPro is close to the freezing floor.

Tech specs:

Binaural Mic
Roland CS-10EM
roland.com/products/en/CS-10EM

Field Recorder
Roland R-26 powering the binaural mics internally
roland.com/products/en/R-26

GoPro Hero2 + Wifi BacPac + Dive Housing
gopro.com/hd-hero2-cameras

Manfrotto Super Clamp
manfrotto.com/super-clamp-without-stud

Velbon Alu Mini Ball Head QHD-51Q
velbon.co.uk/products/heads/ball_and_socket.html "
recording  soundscapes  binaural  audio  video  gopro  hasanismail  binauralrecording 
november 2014 by robertogreco
Rev Dan Catt: RDCXAD #007, the binaural episode.
"The latest experimental audio diary is out and this one is a bit of fun (for me). For this week it's all about the binaural recordings.

I was introduced to binaural recordings for the first time back in 2008 by Scott while working at Flickr. In short you record with microphones positioned at ear distance apart, with a head like object between them to block the sound from one side of the head directly reaching the other. A good way to simulate this head like object is to use your actual head, easy huh!

Then when someone wearing headphones listens back to the recording they end up with the slightly freaky experience of essentially ending up in your head. The effect isn't so great on stereo speakers, but I figure most people listen to podcasts with headphones.

Anyway, wearing a pair of handy in-ear microphones we all set off on a family walk around our local deer park, with the intent of getting some nice nature/field records. Turns out as a family we don't really shut up for more than 20 seconds at a time, I blame the kids."

[Direct link to the podcast: https://soundcloud.com/revdancatt/rev-dan-catt-experimental-audio-diary-episode-7 ]

[Hardware:

Zoom H1 Handy Portable Digital Recorder
http://www.amazon.com/dp/B003QKBVYK/

Roland CS-10EM Binaural Microphone Earphones
http://www.amazon.com/dp/B003QGPCTE/ ]
revdancatt  fieldnotes  fieldrecording  audio  sound  soundscapes  2014  classideas  projectideas  microphones  binaural  binauralrecording  zoomh1 
november 2014 by robertogreco

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