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robertogreco : boardgames   32

Othertongue 1: Spellbound - Language Card Games
"Othertongue is a language learning card game where players use vocabulary from target languages they are studying to fight each other! The best part is: two or more people can play together even if they are studying different languages. In this game, players are required to speak vocabulary words in their target language, which belong to different categories (like animals) and different linguistic types (like loanwords). By doing this successfully, they activate the magical powers of their cards and battle."
games  lanaguages  cardgames  boardgames  othertongue  languagelearning  srg  vocabulary 
10 weeks ago by robertogreco
Sign – Thorny Games
"Nicaragua in the 1970s had no form of sign language. In 1977, something happened. Fifty deaf children from across the country were brought together to an experimental school in Managua. Without a shared language to express themselves, the children did the only thing they could -- they created one. In Sign, we follow a small piece of their journey. 

To learn more about, or to download the free digital edition here (booklet and cards). All proceeds from the physical version go to the Nicaraguan Sign Language Foundation.

Sign is also available digitally in Dutch (booklet, cards - courtesy of Willeke Kort), and Norwegian (booklet, cards - courtesy of Aleksander Husøy)."
games  cardgames  communication  boardgames  thornygames  1970s  nicaragua  1977  deaf  deafness  signlanguage  srg  language  languages  sign 
10 weeks ago by robertogreco
Xenolanguage – Thorny Games
"Xenolanguage: A Game About Language and Thought

It's five minutes in the future and we've just made first contact. In Xenolanguage, you are a linguist tasked with deciphering an alien language. As you gain fluency, you begin to see the world differently.

Xenolanguage is currently in active playtesting and gearing up for a 2019 release.

We'd love to share some of the current design and prototypes with you here.

What Makes Xenolanguage Different?
As characters decipher the language, memories are awakened in them. They use these memories as the foundation for interpreting the meaning of the language. They grab the pieces they didn’t previously have words for, the complex parts of their lived experience, and discover those pieces in the alien language.

The words don't have clean translations, they're confusing, vague, and alien. We gain understanding through our interpretation, but can only hope to glean parts of the language.

As they decipher the language piece by piece, the players use a shared channeling board with the new symbols to communicate with the aliens. You ask them questions in their language, and use it to hear their response.

Play With Us!

By signing up to our newsletter above, you'll be the first to know when we open Xenolanguage for public testing. Until then though, there are still plenty of opportunities to play!

We'll be at GenCon, Metatopia, Dreamation, GoPlayNW, and BigBadCon where we'll be listing open games for playtesting.

Hope to see you there!"
games  language  puzzles  srg  boardgames  2019  thornygames  xenolanguage 
10 weeks ago by robertogreco
Dialect: A Game about Language and How it Dies by Thorny Games — Kickstarter
[See also:
https://thornygames.com/pages/dialect

"Dialect is a game about an isolated community, their language, and what it means for that language to be lost. In this game, you’ll tell the story of the Isolation by building their language. New words will come from the fundamental aspects of the community: who they are, what they believe in, and how they respond to a changing world.

Players take away both the story they’ve told and the dialect they’ve built together. Includes hardcover book, deck of language generating cards used to play the game, and a free digital copy delivered immediately.

Click here for a preview of the game.

Available as:

- The Digital Edition
- The Standard Edition (includes the digital edition, hardcover book, and language deck)
- The Glossopoet Edition (includes everything from the Standard Edition and a one-of-a-kind cloth bag to keep the game book and cards, illustrated by master letterer Jill DeHaan and printed in Olympia Washington)"]
games  cardgames  srg  languages  isolation  language  extinction  boardgames  thornygames  dialect 
10 weeks ago by robertogreco
The Board Soul - Fuck Colonialism | Unwinnable
"The board game community continues to have a big problem when it comes to theming certain games. Designers still fetishize and romanticize the so-called “Age of Discovery.” So many games portray settlers as the protagonists of games, lionizing them while casting native peoples as either savage enemies to be defeated or resources you need to use. What’s more, designers on the whole refuse to reckon with the violent history of colonialism even as they use it as a theme for their game. The result is a whitewashed genre of board game that paints over every uncomfortable part of what happened during this era, costuming a game with an uncritical, damaging theme.

Settling lands by developing them up via buildings and other improvements is a incredibly common theme among board games. Arguably the biggest name in the hobbyist side of the medium, The Settlers of Catan, has it right in the name. Though you never really see any natives in the game, you’re importing and trading resources with other settlers to build settlements, roads, and developments to try and win the game. It’s all very innocuous on first blush, but there are hints of a Eurocentric viewpoint when you stop to consider the Thief, who steals resources from whoever they’re next to when someone rolls a seven. It’s not explicit that the Thief is a native from the fictional Catan Island, but the solution of playing Knight cards to move the Thief somewhere else suggests a militaristic approach to setting land and pushing around hypothetical natives.

Catan skirts the colonialism issue somewhat by being set on a fictional island, but plenty more board games represent real historical locales and events with varying degrees of self-awareness. One of the more unfortunate examples of this is the classic game Puerto Rico, where you’re tasked with building up your piece of the city of San Juan through shipping goods and constructing buildings. But to make said buildings function, you had to place little brown discs on them to represent workers working in them.

You can probably already see the problem with this. The simple act of making the discs brown loads them with political meaning, as it’s clear they represent the different people of color that the conquistadors enslaved during the age of discovery. In Puerto Rico, these brown discs act as resources to be accumulated and spent, which takes a pretty nasty turn once you realize what this parallels – new ones even arrive by ship, further cementing the allusion. That alone could have made for a powerful statement about the true face of colonialism, but it paints over this fact by calling them “colonists”. By calling them colonists and not what they are – slaves – Puerto Rico reveals itself as a game that isn’t interested in grappling with the realities of colonialism, instead merely being content to build its mechanics on the back of a particularly ugly time in history."

[See also:

"How Board Games Handle Slavery: A medium that often looks to the past, board games often have to confront questions about slavery's place in game design."
https://waypoint.vice.com/en_us/article/vvj39m/how-board-games-handle-slavery ]
via:tealtan  boardgames  colonialism  gaming  games  play  2017  jeremysignor 
november 2017 by robertogreco
Selected analog/board game references
"Selected analog/board game references
Hand-picked by Joe Wasserman for Paolo Pedercini

Board versus digital

Bellomy, I. (2017). What counts: Configuring the human in platform studies. Analog Game Studies. Retrieved from http://analoggamestudies.org/2017/03/what-counts/

Gandolfi, E. (2015). The online dream of old ludi. RESET. Recherches En Sciences Sociales Sur Internet, 4. doi:10.4000/reset.506

Nicholson, S., & Begy, J. (2014). A framework for exploring tablet-based tabletop games. In Proceedings of the Canadian Game Studies Association Annual Conference: Borders without Boundaries. Retrieved from http://scottnicholson.com/pubs/jsbgame.pdf

Rogerson, M. J., Gibbs, M., & Smith, W. (2015). Digitising boardgames: Issues and tensions. In Proceedings of DiGRA 2015: Diversity of play: Games – Cultures – Identities. Retrieved from http://www.digra.org/digital-library/forums/12-digra2015/

Xu, Y., Barba, E., Radu, I., Gandy, M., & MacIntyre, B. (2011). Chores are fun: Understanding social play in board games for digital tabletop game design. In Proceedings of DiGRA 2011 Conference: Think Design Play. Retrieved from http://www.digra.org/digital-library/forums/6-think-design-play/

Text, more than

Brown, A., & Waterhouse-Watson, D. (2014). Reconfiguring narrative in contemporary board games: Story-making across the competitive-cooperative spectrum. Intensities: The Journal of Cult Media, 7. Retrieved from http://dro.deakin.edu.au/eserv/DU:30069183/brown-reconfiguringnarrativee-2014.pdf

Evans, J. (2013). Translating board games: Multimodality and play. The Journal of Specialised Translation, (20), 15–32.

Analyses of more than one

Begy, J. (2015). Board games and the construction of cultural memory. Games and Culture, Advance online publication. doi:10.1177/1555412015600066

Chappell, D. (2010). Success through excess: Narratives and performances in board and card games. In D. Chappell (Ed.), Children under construction: Critical essays on play as curriculum (pp. 277–298). New York, NY: Peter Lang.

Chappell, D. (2013). Circles within circles: The commercial pursuit of leisure time and morality through board games in the 18th and 19th century United States. In S. Fitzpatrick (Ed.), Work of play: Where business meets leisure (pp. 40–58). Madison, NJ: Museum of Early Trades and Crafts.

Book-length

Booth, P. (2015). Game play: Paratextuality in contemporary board games. New York, NY: Bloomsbury.

Costikyan, G., & Davidson, D. (Eds.). (2011). Tabletop: Analog game design. Pittsburgh, PA: ETC Press. Retrieved from http://press.etc.cmu.edu/files/Tabletop-CostikyanDavidson-etal-web.pdf

Woods, S. (2012). Eurogames: The design, culture and play of modern European board games. Jefferson, NC: McFarland."
boardgames  games  gaming  play  joewasserman  bibliography  digital  analog 
july 2017 by robertogreco
The Game Worlds We Make: Why designing a simple board game with my son rivals anything he’s learning in school
"You will have already noticed the echo here: You design a complex system based on a hypothesis about how all its component parts will interact, then you test the system to see if it corresponds to your hypothesis. When it invariably deviates from your initial predictions, you refine your model and build a new hypothesis. The actual content you are analyzing is, literally, child’s play: imaginary baseball players; virtual crops. But the form of the cognition is the scientific method.

I wish I could tell you that this story ends with a Charles Darrow-style runaway hit game. (Though even that triumph turned out to be fiction.) After a few cycles of revisions, I made up a bunch of cards on the computer and color-printed the whole thing out to glossy paper. That alone was a meaningful threshold for Dean: We’d graduated into the world of color illustrations and proper typefaces, and left behind our magic-marker sketches. We played it start-to-finish in its final draft form probably a dozen times. We investigated a few services that self-publish board games, but somehow once we had figured out the rules, the possibility of sharing (or even selling) the game seemed less intriguing. (Though it didn’t stop Dean’s brothers from demanding a percentage of future royalties, thanks to their work as unpaid “consultants” on the project.) Blossom never became a hit. But as a creative project shared by parent and child, it was pure magic.

The kind of blended thinking you have to do in creating a playable game — particularly one that models some kind of real-world equivalent — is, by my measure at least, every bit as rich as the more conventional classroom experiences, and much more fun. I’m hardly the first person to make this observation; game design has already made its way onto many curricula around the world, and there are wonderful institutions dedicated to exploring the pedagogical opportunities that games present."



"That, of course, is the beauty of game design as a learning experience. It doesn’t feel like learning. It feels like the other side of play: not play in the sense of escape, the breaking of boundaries, but play in the sense of figuring out the rules, and figuring out the way the rules aren’t quite working yet and dreaming up better ones. You don’t do that kind of thinking when you memorize state capitals, or read novels, or solve quadratic equations, or write expository essays, as important as all those enterprises are. It’s one of those rare skills that happens to play well at both tables of general and vocational education. You’re learning the scientific method when you conjure up a game, but you’re also learning product design. If we’re lucky, more of our schools will come around to the power of game creation as a pedagogical tool. But in the meantime, parents can make their own luck — dice or no dice. Designing a game teaches your kid how to think. And it reminds you how much there is to learn from playing."
stevenjohnson  2017  games  boardgames  gamedesign  children  parenting  classideas  systems  systemsthinking  play  scientificmethod  learning  howwelearn  modeling  education  schools  productdesign  criticalthinking  thinking 
january 2017 by robertogreco
Tiffin | Board Game | BoardGameGeek
"Every day in Mumbai, the bustling financial capital of India, hot lunches are hand-delivered to employees in workplaces across the city. These home-cooked meals, packed in tins called tiffins or dabbas, are picked up from the customer’s home, whisked off by bicycle to a sorting facility, loaded onto carts and wheeled to the train station, loaded onto a train car, unloaded, resorted, routed, and delivered (again, by bicycle) to recipients at work. Each tiffin is carried by multiple dabbawallas (delivery people) along the way. Despite more than 250,000 lunch deliveries every day, mistakes are rare.

In Tiffin, players represent dabbawallas working to deliver tiffins and earn rupees by starting tiffins on a route and contributing to successful delivery of their tiffins and those of other players. The more tiffins delivered on a single route, the higher the payout for each player participating in the deliveries.

Shortcuts speed things up, flat tires slow things down, and an ever-present competitor might get there first. The game ends when all delivery routes are complete and the player with the most rupees is the winner."
games  boardgames  raeldornfest  jonathanhager  2016  toplay  mumbai 
february 2016 by robertogreco
A New Installation Gamifies the Future of Los Angeles | GOOD
"Like any city, Los Angeles has taken on various forms throughout its history. What was once a small Mexican town now sprawls in every direction as the entertainment capital of the world, resembling from an aerial view a gigantic circuit board.

Building on archives of the city’s past at the University of Southern California (USC), the new exhibition LATBD imagines a future vision of Los Angeles. In a sense, LATBD gamifies the city. In a library on the USC campus, the installation features 3D models, interactive text, one-off game boards designed by David Mellen, and historical artifacts, all arranged so that viewers can construct their own visions of future Los Angeles.

Conceived and created by collaborators Geoff Manaugh, Mark Smout, and Laura Allen (the latter two of the architectural design firm Smout Allen), LATBD uses materials, artifacts, books, and ephemera “hidden way deep in USC libraries” as the building blocks of this imaginative future Los Angeles. Manaugh, a Los Angeles-based writer and futurist, tells GOOD that the trio began by asking themselves the following question: “if all these things preserved in the archives represent what L.A. used to be—where L.A. came from and what used to be here—then could we also use those same objects to talk about where L.A. might be going next or what sort of city it could still become?”

“The question of the future is particularly interesting in Los Angeles, and it always has been,” says Manaugh. “Thinking about the future is part of the very narrative of L.A. For example, how the city will survive into the future at all, given its chronic lack of a reliable large-scale water supply and the inevitability of earthquakes, both large and small, isn’t just idle speculation here.”

The notion of future transformation explored in LATBD is helped along, as Manaugh muses, because L.A. is a city, culturally speaking, that seems built on the premise of “becoming something else.”

“People move to L.A. specifically to change something about their lives or even explicitly for the purpose of reinventing themselves as stars,” he says. “That’s one of the clichés of the city: that everyone here is playacting at being someone else, essentially road-testing alternative future versions of themselves.”

Manaugh sees this concept of “becoming something else” as sort of the mutant DNA of Los Angeles. He and the Smout Allen principals wondered what this notion might mean on an architectural and narrative level. “The name of the exhibition, obviously, is also a reflection of this,” says Manaugh. “It’s a Los Angeles that is always yet to be determined.”

Manaugh says he has admired the work of Smout and Allen for a decade, and the idea of working with them on this was just too good to pass up. Because their work has always been focused on unstable landscapes or shifting ground conditions where designing architecture is very challenging, and, despite the fact that they live in London, Manaugh felt they were the perfect fit for a Los Angeles-based project.

“The overall idea with this was not for them to create one architectural model that we could then sort of take out around the city to try to convince someone to build, as if we had some vision of the future that we want to sell to City Hall or to a developer,” he says. “Instead, the idea was to give architectural shape to many different potential scenarios that we came up with for how Los Angeles might change in the future.”

The resulting 3D models demonstrate such things as how L.A. neighborhoods might try to fortify themselves against future earthquakes. In LATBD, the trio proposed building huge underground pendulums that would act as seismic counterweights for the city, while at the same time imagining that this seismic energy could be turned into a potential source of renewable energy.

“To make a long story short, we wanted to literalize the idea of a game about the future of Los Angeles,” Manaugh says. “This meant that, in addition to the narrative themes that you can see in Smout Allen’s models, I also got to work with a local designer named David Mellen to produce actual game boards, featuring old archival photos from the USC collection laid out like a dice game.”

Manaugh says the point of it all was to play with the idea that the future of Los Angeles is subject to competing interests.

“Different people and different groups often want very different outcomes for the city,” he adds. “In other words, this means that L.A., even on a regular day, is already a game, a landscape fought over by different strategies and intentions, and we thought that a series of L.A.-themed game boards made specifically for the exhibition would be a nice way to communicate this idea.”"
losangeles  games  futurism  2015  future  davidmellen  latbd  geoffmanaugh  marksmout  lauraallen  smoutallen  gaming  boardgames  play 
december 2015 by robertogreco
In nerdhaven — The Message — Medium
"The roster of Essential Social Spaces includes, among others: the library, the union hall, the community garden, the coffee shop. To that list, we must add the nerdhaven. The question, though: Is it on its way out — winding down as nerds go digital? Or is it here to stay, a humble fixture wherever there exist enough nerds to muster a Magic tournament? (These shops support a $700 million market, according to an industry website, but I can’t decide whether that’s big or small. I think it be might be small.)

I hope they’re here to stay. At the shop in Gaylord I made my circuit of the nerdly Stations of the Cross and walked out with ten antique D&D books, three comics, two vintage sci-fi novels, and a board game."
robinsloan  nerhaven  libraries  thirdspaces  coffeshops  cafes  communitygardens  unionhalls  comics  boardgames  games  gaming  nerds  roleplayinggames  dungeonsanddragons  magicthegathering 
august 2014 by robertogreco
Custom Game Cards
"Specifications:
Type: Poker sized blank cards
Number of cards per deck: from 18 up to 234
Customization: Each card can be customized individually both front and back as required.
Dimensions: 63mm x 88mm, 2.5" x 3.5"
Material options: [cardstock details]
270gsm promotional quality card stock with blue core
300gsm premium quality card stock with blue core (smooth finish)
310gsm French casino quality card stock with black core (linen finish)
13pt 100% white plastic (0.325mm)
Packaging options (per deck):
Cellowrap (default for deck sizes of above 54 cards)
White plain tuck box (add US$ 0.10 per deck)
White window tuck box (add US$ 0.10 per deck)
Clear plastic case (add US$ 0.30 per deck)
Tin box (add US$ 0.90 per deck)
Custom-printed tuck box (add as low as US$ 0.60 per deck)
Uncut sheet - your cards are not cut individually. Taken straight off the press. 54 cards per sheet (add US$ 9 per deck design)
Delivery packaging: card deck individually shrink-wrapped, boxes shrink-wrapped, uncut sheets rolled up
No minimum order required. Buy 1 deck for $12.00"
cards  games  gamedesign  boardgames  printing  via:bopuc 
april 2014 by robertogreco
Finally on the same side — Board Games — Medium
"Board games don’t traditionally foster teamwork . From the cutthroat capitalism of Monopoly to the one-upmanship of Catan’s “longest road,” the tabletop is a battleground where friends become rivals and parents bankrupt their children. This has always felt a little off to me. We’re a social species… why do our games always pit us against each other?

It may be that we simply need something to challenge us, something as dynamic and unpredictable as a human being. Until recently, tabletop games had nothing like an AI opponent, and so you were forced to choose between a dull puzzle like Solitaire or a combative, winner-take-all game like Risk.

In the 1980s, a few cooperative games started to change this formula. In Scotland Yard, a hack was introduced that finally allowed players to work as a team: one person would play as the elusive “Mr. X”, an enemy with his own agenda and rules,while everyone else ganged up to destroy him.

It’s Mr. X (foreground) vs. every detective in London in Scotland Yard (1983)
The idea had promise, and led to other great “all against one” games of this era such as Fury of Dracula and Arkham Horror. These are all great fun, particularly if you have a friend who enjoys playing the asshole. But they still divide players; they aren’t fully cooperative.

This all changed in 2010 when Matt Leacock introduced a “virus” mechanic in his game Pandemic. The virus is your collective opponent: like an AI algorithm from a video game, it’s just a set of rules, but it’s simple enough that your teammates can run the program themselves."
boardgames  games  gaming  2014  patrickewing  cooperative  cooperativegames  collaboration  monopoly  pandemic  competition  settlersofcatan  risk 
february 2014 by robertogreco
Kevin Slavin: Debunking luck
"Pioneering gamer Kevin Slavin takes the PopTech audience on a colorful tour of the history of luck in America, games of chance, gambling and mathematical formulas. "That's amazing, the idea that anything that seems to be built out of chance or instinct or luck can yield to a computational assault.""
2013  kevinslavin  games  play  history  luck  statistics  saschapohflepp  crispinjones  mohansrivastava  shingtat-chung  dariuskazemi  boardgames  gametheory  dice  jacksonlears  stanulam  nicholasmetropolis  georgedyson  computing  johnvonneumann  edwardthorp  teetotums  chance  meritocracy  jasonrohrer  unpredictability  success 
november 2013 by robertogreco
Bat, Bean, Beam: Old games
"Amongst the things that I salvaged from the house in which I grew up were four supermarket bags full of Lego. I found the stuff over a number of trips, each time marvelling at how much of it there was. As well as being practically indestructible (the only pieces of ours that ever broke were two of the large thin bases), Lego has fared remarkably well in terms of both its exchange and use value over the last half century. We had all sorts of trouble – and ultimately failed – in finding a good home to a very good library. We literally couldn’t give away the stuff, which was a source of some heartache. But Lego, it might as well be a global currency, or a precious ore. It keeps going up in price. It’s worth shipping around the world. There’s always a use for it, even in small quantities.

The last find involved one of Lego’s early electric engines, which was used to power a train’s locomotor. I vaguely remember playing with this set. Not much you could do with it, as the carriages came pretty much assembled whole. But the rest of those bags contain mostly the standard universal pieces with which I used to build houses and robots and once, I think, a football stadium. It’s a rather sharp lesson in informational entropy now. Four plastic bags’ worth of chaos."



"Totòpoli is a bafflingly elaborate horse-racing board game in two parts. First, the players lease and train the horses, as well as acquire facilities like foraging merchants and veterinary practices. This is not too dissimilar from Monopoly, and results in the accumulation of advantage and disadvantage cards, as well as special cards to forestall certain events, except instead of getting out of jail is preventing your top horse from bursting a blood vessel on the home straight. Then, once the training is completed, the board is flipped over and the race can begin. However even that phase comprises two quite different activities: the taking of bets on the outcome, with what money you have left over from part one, and the race itself. As the rulebook explains:
The winner can either be the one with the most money at the end of the race, or the one with the winning horse. This should be decided at the beginning of the race.


You’d hate to play for three solid hours and be left unsure as to who won.

Totòpoli was a lot of fun. But I rescued form the home some things that I don’t recall playing with, and probably belonged to my sister. A rather exquisite medical set, all in plastic but very detailed and missing remarkably few pieces, given how the small parts in today’s equivalents seem to explode out of the packaging and immediately get lost whenever my children are involved. I wonder if this is a function of the relative scarcity of those years."
games  boardgames  play  giovannitiso  2013  lego  gamedesign  horses  horseracing  childhood  scarcity 
june 2013 by robertogreco
The Brooklyn Strategist - Game Center, Cafe, Social Club - New York
"At The Brooklyn Strategist, we love games! Our unique atmosphere is a great place to enjoy strategy, community and competition through interactive board- and card-games. It is a place to play, learn, think creatively, socialize and strategize against an opponent or with team members. We are pleased to offer afternoon clubs to kids (7+ years old), tweens, teens and adults and look forward to providing our community with a space that promotes fun, interaction and learning."
strategy  learning  nyc  gaming  boardgames  games  brooklyn 
december 2012 by robertogreco
No Accidents, Comrade – The New Inquiry
"But where fiction generally resists reader alteration, board games take it for granted and depend on it. A fictional narrative remains the same despite how it’s interpreted by readers. The underlying expectation in gameplay, however, is that the player actively constructs a narrative and perhaps even modifies the game’s rules. Meaning for players comes only through the active process of experiencing play. Operating Twilight Struggle’s narrative platform provides a ludic truth — truth through play that gives experiential knowledge using popular, though misleading, historical explanations for the period. It purports to compress the Cold War experience while maintaining some semblance of fidelity to the mentalité of the period, but the chance experienced through gameplay is wed to narrative exposition that clearly embraces a U.S.-centric worldview. Chance narratives help players validate experiential knowledge they acquire during play, but their execution actually inverts the meaning…"
influence  ussr  alternativeplay  bias  toplay  containment  rationalirrationality  distortion  nostalgia  meaning  interpretation  assemblage  narrativeassemblage  narrative  individualism  perception  history  us  opportunity  luck  chance  gameplay  storytelling  fiction  2006  2012  coldwar  boardgames  gaming  games  play  twilightstruggle 
august 2012 by robertogreco
a-small-lab by Chris Berthelsen | Look-A-Round Board Game
"Produced in collaboration with Mammoth School and Knee High Media for the second issue of the Mammoth School free paper, "Look-A-Round" is a board game which encourages learning about city accessibility."
boardgames  mammothschool  2012  urbanism  cities  urban  exploration  disability  accessibility  games  chrisberthelsen  disabilities 
august 2012 by robertogreco
prosthetic knowledge • One Page Graphic Novel: The Thames Megalodon The...
The above image appears to be some kind of map, but is actually an attempt to tell a big story within one frame. In a way, it is a game of narrative, as there is a list of important points to make as you guide yourself through it.

From the creaor, Henry Flint:

"Welcome to a new story telling medium… the One Page Graphic Novel. Is this a gimmick? Yes, probably.

Keith is a dustman who is shot into the future by a Time Vortex. He meets three companions and they start an epic adventure and It’s up to you to fill in the gaps."

A higher resolution version of the image can be found at Henry’s site here [click on the map]"

[See also: http://henryflint.wordpress.com/2012/01/20/one-page-graphic-novel-2/ ]
mapping  maps  comics  henryflint  boardgames  games  srg  edg  classideas  storytelling  graphicnovels 
january 2012 by robertogreco
The American Crawl : “Pandemic Right Here! Got That Pandemic!”
"A board game that relies on collaboration amongst players instead of competition, Pandemic finds players racing around the globe treating infections and feverishly trying to discover the cure before another epidemic wrecks havoc on the globe. In effect, the players are working together to beat the game; either we all win or – as was most oft the case for us – we all lose.

A game that can be played by anyone, we found ourselves deliberating every action and discussing (or arguing) strategy. We were metacognitive in our decision making process. We highlighted what failed in past games (deciding to ignore the wildfire-like spread of disease in Asia, for instance was a particularly terrible strategy) and relied on our various locations, cards, and other game attributes to eventually beat the game."
pandemic  boardgames  games  play  collaboration  anterogarcia  2009  strategy  classideas 
october 2011 by robertogreco
Real-World Math - storify.com
"Hey, kids! Ever wonder how math is done in the real world? This is the way math is done in the real world."

Storify that I put together to document a conversation on Twitter about a specific math problems that Diana Kimball asked for help with.
math  mathematics  realworld  cv  storytelling  storify  collaboration  twitter  2011  timcarmody  robinsloan  dianakimball  games  boardgames  problemsolving  statistics  probability  conversation  comments 
july 2011 by robertogreco
Lego Carcassonne
"After seeing the Lego Catan doing the rounds a couple of weeks ago, I thought I'd like to have a go at something similar. I've been playing a lot of Carcassonne on the iPhone recently (Hit me up for a game, I'm really bad: cal at iamcal.com) so that was the natural choice. The tiles are square, so that immediately made it much simpler."
boardgames  carcassone  tiles  lego  games  play  calhenderson 
march 2011 by robertogreco
The Boardgame Remix Kit - new ways to play your favourite board games
"Liven up your Christmas by remixing the boardgames in your house to make brand new games.

The Boardgame Remix Kit works with all the great family favourites. It's got twenty five games that you can play using the boards and pieces you've already got.

As well as smoothing out or speeding up a standard game, the kit can turn Monopoly* into a family poker tournament, Trivial Pursuit* into a surrealist parlour game; Scrabble* into fight between a wasp and a robot, and Cluedo* into a zombie invasion."
games  remix  boardgames  gifts  play 
december 2010 by robertogreco
The Future of Board Games: Innovation Is Afoot
"“Scavenger hunts have been around for a long, long time, but still I believe they are a harbinger of things to come. They’re relatively easy to put together and can be quite fun, and no doubt will become increasingly more complex and varied in the years to come. Especially given the technology that exists today – cell phone, camera phones, text messaging, GPS, and more – it seems quite reasonable that such games will get more and more sophisticated with more and more coordination and variation. There is obviously no actual board to speak of. The board is the neighborhood, the mall, or the city. I have to believe at some point, someone, somewhere will actually formalize rules for such a game, complete with technology variations and scoring systems.”

Well done Nike. You’ve found a way to effectively combine exercise, fun, competition, technology, social networking, and more. Participants absolutely loved The Nike Grid."
boardgames  nike  socialnetworking  nikegrid  games  gaming  play  scavengerhunts  classideas  gps  technology  fun  innovation 
november 2010 by robertogreco
Family Pastimes
"Family Pastimes games are the inventions of Jim Deacove. Jim started making co-operative games for his own family, and was encouraged by friends to make more.

The Deacove family was and is no different from others. Sharing toys, helping mom and dad and being kind to others are values taught in all homes. To find games which help reinforce such sharing attitudes, however, is very difficult. Thus, Jim and Ruth felt the need to create some.

The "hobby" became a small business in their home 31 years ago (1972). Slow but steady growth in sales required moving the business into a cottage. With the addition of new games and greater interest by the public, a switch occurred. The family moved into the cottage and the business occupied the two stories of the old farm house. A new workshop was built in 1984 to replace the old farm house, destroyed by a terrible fire in October 1983."

[via: http://shareable.net/blog/the-case-against-competition ]
games  cooperation  boardgames  cooperative  education  gaming  toys  noncompetitive 
august 2010 by robertogreco
iPad board games: Apple has created a 'Jumanji platform' - Recombu
"While many people struggle to understand why they would ever buy an iPad, we think we've come up with a pretty exciting reason - digital board games. If you've ever tried to play a board game on a games console, computer or mobile phone you'll know that it's just not the same as sitting around a table with your friends and family. Enter the iPad, the perfect device to play board games on."
games  mobile  boardgames  ipad  touchscreen  scrabble  iphone  apple  gaming 
february 2010 by robertogreco
The Game Crafter - Your game REALIZED
"It is time you took that game you created and publish it. No more homemade board or cards. You have arrived. Now, publish it!"
games  boardgames  make  diy  publishing  gamedesign  tcsnmy  glvo 
july 2009 by robertogreco
Monopoly Killer: Perfect German Board Game Redefines Genre
"Settlers is now poised to become the biggest hit in the US since Risk. Along the way, it's teaching Americans that board games don't have to be either predictable fluff aimed at kids or competitive, hyperintellectual pastimes for eggheads. Through the complex, artful dance of algorithms and probabilities lurking at its core, Settlers manages to be effortlessly fun, intuitively enjoyable, and still intellectually rewarding, a potent combination that's changing the American idea of what a board game can be."
boardgames  settlersofcatan  society  games  play 
march 2009 by robertogreco
The case against Candy Land - Boing Boing
"Just as a thought experiment: "Imagine what the manual for Super Mario would read like were it structured like Candy Land: To explore Super Mario Galaxy, just hit the “action” button. At that point the game will randomly determine what action you have selected, and whether it was successful. When the action is over, hit the button again to see what’s next!" You think that game would have been a runaway hit? Even dressed up with accelerometers and adorable graphics? Of course not. But that’s what most of us who grew up before videogames accepted as normal when we were five."
stevenjohnson  videogames  mario  boardgames  games  play  gaming  parenting  learning  culture  children  candyland 
january 2009 by robertogreco

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