recentpopularlog in

robertogreco : bobfilner   2

Urbanism Took a Beating in 2014 | Voice of San Diego
"This time last year, I took a look at all the things happening in San Diego that suggested the city was accepting its role as a major metropolis and embracing urbanist thinking.

“Urbanism seems to have taken hold of San Diego in 2013,” I wrote.

That seems to have been absurd.

In the year since, some of the crumbs that led me to that conclusion have been dismantled or dismissed. New efforts aimed at making the city a more urban place, with denser development and increased use of public transportation didn’t fare well.

The biggest piece of evidence to suggest San Diego was getting serious about planning and development — the hiring of nationally renowned smart-growth champion Bill Fulton as the city’s planning director — was also the biggest counter-argument in 2014. He was welcomed with open arms in 2013.

He’s already gone. He was pushed out, left unsatisfied or took a can’t-pass-up job, depending on who you ask. He’s now running a university planning institute in Houston.

In Fulton’s last months, Mayor Kevin Faulconer created a position above Fulton that would limit his decision-making ability, and the economic development department that had answered to him was taken away, too.

One thing he was left in control of — the Civic Innovation Lab — was born in 2013, and shut down this year.

The brainchild of former Mayor Bob Filner and two UCSD professors, it was meant to be an ambitious mod squad working between city departments to solve urban problems.

Faulconer stripped its funding after it had only been operating a few months. His office said the four full-time employees weren’t fired – but they were.

San Diego’s pivot away from urbanism isn’t all about personnel, either.

Fulton’s planning department this spring unveiled plans in Bay Park near two planned trolley stations in the area.

The new development plan would have increased the number of homes and the height of buildings that could be built in the area. Residents did not like that idea. At all.

Former Councilman Ed Harris organized a three-hour town hall meeting for residents to protest the whole thing. The few plan supporters who got on stage were shouted down, and the city frantically tried to back away from the plan. Fulton said the city would no longer pursue an increase in building height limits, though that change isn’t official yet. A Council race under way at the time became a competition to declare who hated the plan the most.

A few months later, Fulton took the gig in Texas.

And while the city’s ever-hopeful urbanists won a second court victory in their lawsuit against the region’s transportation plan — which they say is too reliant on cars, highways and sprawl — the regional planning agency SANDAG’s board last month voted to go for one more appeal to see if they could avoid making changes to the plan.

But the news wasn’t all bad for urbanist in 2014.

Significantly, Faulconer threw his support behind the Climate Action Plan, a city outline to reduce overall greenhouse gas emissions dramatically by 2035.

The plan would do that, in part, by committing the city to direct new development so that 61 percent of people living within a half mile of a major transit station — as many as 470,000 people — will walk, bike or take transit to work.

It would do that by building lots of homes in dense clusters around transit stations.

And on the micro-scale, the city did see another parklet this year, plus the imminent opening of a temporary commercial space made out of shipping containers downtown from a vacant lot, meant to revitalize the area until it can be developed.

And the city’s oft-delayed bike-share program is tentatively scheduled to open in January.

Nonetheless, 2014 showed anyone looking to make San Diego more like San Francisco, Portland or Denver that they have their work cut out for them."
urbanism  urban  sandiego  2014  regression  andrewkeatts  2013  planning  urbanplanning  transportation  bikes  biking  kevinfaulconer  billfulton  bobfilner  civicinnovationlab  edharris  sandag  policy  politics  density  cities 
december 2014 by robertogreco
San Diego Mayor Building Economic Bridges to Tijuana - NYTimes.com
"“We need to make the border the center, not the end — but the biggest problem we have is not security, it is openness and communication,” Mr. Filner said in an interview in his City Hall office. “People have to understand that the infrastructure that we need should be an important part of any discussion on immigration. The volume here is so incredible, yet nobody understands how much this matters. People can’t go back and forth, and we’re losing out.”"



"There are still signs that the longstanding ambivalence about the border here remains. While other American cities along the border have deep ties — or even a reliance — with Mexico, many here say San Diego residents mostly have their back to the border and give little thought to their southern neighbor. A recent survey by one local group found that less than 10 percent of residents believed that strengthening the border region should be a priority for improving the local economy. By some estimates, more than 60 percent of San Diego residents have never crossed the border."



"Many business leaders here say that marketing San Diego and Tijuana as one large region can help attract jobs and have encouraged manufacturers to move operations from China to Mexico. They mention the success of DJO, an orthopedic company based in Vista, just north of San Diego, with a factory in Tijuana. Over the last several years, the company has added hundreds of jobs on both sides of the border, and several executives work in Tijuana but live in San Diego."
sandiego  tijuana  2013  border  borders  mexico  us  cities  bobfilner 
may 2013 by robertogreco

Copy this bookmark:





to read