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robertogreco : bogotá   26

Reasons To Be Cheerful
"I’m starting an online project here that is an continuation and extension of some writing and talks I’ve done recently.

The project will be cross-platform—some elements may appear on social media, some on a website and some might manifest as a recording or performance… much of the published material will be collected here.

What is Reasons To Be Cheerful?

I imagine, like a lot of you who look back over the past year, it seems like the world is going to Hell. I wake up in the morning, look at the paper, and go, "Oh no!" Often I’m depressed for half the day. It doesn’t matter how you voted on Brexit, the French elections or the U.S. election—many of us of all persuasions and party affiliations feel remarkably similar.

As a kind of remedy and possibly as a kind of therapy, I started collecting good news that reminded me, "Hey, there's actually some positive stuff going on!" Almost all of these initiatives are local, they come from cities or small regions who have taken it upon themselves to try something that might offer a better alternative than what exits. Hope is often local. Change begins in communities.

I will post thoughts, images and audio relating to this initiative on whichever platform seems suitable and I’ll welcome contributions from others, if they follow the guidelines I’ve set for myself.

These bits of good news tend to fall into a few categories:

Education
Health
Civic Engagement
Science/Tech
Urban/Transportation
Energy
Culture

Culture, music and the arts might include, optimistically, some of my own work and projects, but just as much I hope to promote the work of others that has a proven track record.

Why do I do this? Why take the time? Therapy, I guess, though once in awhile I meet someone who has the connections and skills but might not be aware of some of these initiatives and innovations, so I can pass the information on. I sense that not all of this is widely known.

Emulation of successful models- 4 guidelines

I laid out 4 guidelines as I collected these examples:

1. Most of the good stuff is local. It’s more bottom up, community and individually driven. There are exceptions.

2. Many examples come from all over the world, but despite the geographical and cultural distances in many cases others can adopt these ideas—these initiatives can be utilized by cultures other than where they originated.

3. Very important. All of these examples have been tried and proven to be successful. These are not merely good IDEAS; they’ve been put into practice and have produced results.

4. The examples are not one-off, isolated or human interest, feel-good stories. They’re not stories of one amazing teacher, doctor, musician or activist- they’re about initiatives that can be copied and scaled up.

If it works, copy it

For example, in an area I know something about, there was an innovative bike program in Bogota, and years later, I saw that program become a model for New York and for other places.

The Ciclovia program in Bogota"
davidbyrne  politics  urban  urbanism  bogotá  curitiba  addiction  portugal  colombia  brazil  brasil  jaimelerner  cities  society  policy  qualityoflife  economics  drugs  health  healthcare  crime  ciclovia  bikes  biking  bikesharing  activism  civics  citybike  nyc  medellín  afroreggae  vigariogeral  favelas  obesity  childabuse  education  casamantequilla  harlem  civicengagment  engagement  women'smarch  northcarolina  ingridlafleur  afrotopia  detroit  seattle  citizenuniversity  tishuanajones  sunra  afrofuturism  stlouis  vancouver  britishcolumbia  transportation  publictransit  transit  velib  paris  climatechange  bipartisanship  energy  science  technology  culture  music  art  arts  behavior  medellin 
january 2018 by robertogreco
YBCA: Visualizing Citizenship: Seeking a New Public Imagination
“Teddy Cruz and Fonna Forman

Visualizing Citizenship: Seeking a New Public Imagination

Mar 10 2017 — Jun 18 2017

The Mexico-US border is a geography of conflict from which a more inclusive political vision can be shaped, based on integration and cooperation, not division and xenophobia.” - Teddy Cruz and Fonna Forman

In the face of a new, more divisive, political landscape, the public narrative around borders surfaces fears on all sides of the political spectrum. Yet for architect and theorist Teddy Cruz and political scientist Fonna Forman, border communities are opportunities for civic and political creativity, rather than criminalization. These sites, to which they refer as “geographies of conflict,” are the basis of three projects that present case studies for more expansive and inclusive ways of thinking of the relationships between the United States and its neighbors, and more broadly propose that citizenship is organized around shared values and common interests, and not on the action of an isolationist nation with a homogeneous identity.

Composed of videos, diagrams, maps, and visual narratives designed in collaboration with Studio Matthias Görlich, the exhibition presents The Political Equator (2011), a video and wall diagram that captures a collective border-crossing performance through a drainage pipe joining two marginalized neighborhoods along the border wall that divides an informal settlement in Mexico from a natural estuary in California. Produced for this exhibition, a series of posters synthesize their work on the Cross-Border Citizenship Culture Survey (2011-ongoing), the result of a collaboration with Antanas Mockus, the former mayor of Bogotá, Colombia; his think tank, Corpovisionarios; and city officials in San Diego and Tijuana. Also featured is The Medellín Diagram (2012-ongoing), which presents a new political and civic model for creating public spaces that facilitate cultural, political, and knowledge exchange based on the example of the city of Medellín and its extraordinary social and urban transformation."

[See also:
https://www.instagram.com/p/BUKugmPB1ev/
https://www.instagram.com/p/BUKuesOhEW3/
https://www.instagram.com/p/BUKucvjBnb4/
https://www.instagram.com/p/BT91baWBDUT/
https://www.instagram.com/p/BT91XhMB1B5/
https://www.instagram.com/p/BT91TldB9-0/ ]
ybca  teddycruz  fonnaforman  border  borders  sandiego  tijuana  medellín  antanasmockus  bogotá  matthiasgörlich  studiomatthiasgörlich  corpovisionarios2011  2012  cities  urban  urbanism  transformation  us  mexico  politcalequator  conflict  integration  cooperation  politic  geopolitics  art  design  california  medellin 
may 2017 by robertogreco
Radical tactics transform Latin American cities | Opinion | Architectural Review
"Given that 85 per cent of the world’s housing is illegal, this book poses relevant questions: ‘Who is the city for? When are we going to recognise that favelas are not an aberration, but the primary urban condition? When will we come to terms with the fact that the favelas are not a problem of urbanity, but the solution? When will we accept that the favela is the city?’ Provocative and enticing in both its language and its subject, the fundamental right of shelter for our growing population is one of those truths that we can easily understand, but find ourselves powerless to plan for. As U-TT (Urban-Think Tank) writes, ‘The totally planned city is a myth.’ The optimistic, personal journeys in the book are a lesson in self-help and self-motivation that resonate, whatever city we inhabit."
justinmcguirk  latinamerica  cities  urban  urbanism  favelas  rogerzogolovitch  torredavid  alejandroaravena  bogotá  caracas  lima  chile  colombia  venezuela  quintamonroy  iquique 
june 2015 by robertogreco
Auto Correction: L.A. rethinks its car culture. - The California Sunday Magazine
"No one is more pleased than Aaron Paley to see Los Angeles morphing from a sprawling, car-dependent metropolis into a series of interconnected neighborhoods served by transit. In 2010, Paley introduced CicLAvia to his hometown. Modeled on Bogotá’s street festival Ciclovía, the event drew an estimated 100,000 residents on foot, bike, scooter, Rollerblades, and skateboard to a seven-and-a-half-mile stretch of car-free road between Boyle Heights and East Hollywood. The daylong festival has expanded from an annual event to a quarterly one and is now an L.A. institution, moving from neighborhood to neighborhood.

As we meander through Down­town’s Bunker Hill on a drizzly Satur­day morning, Paley is explaining CicLAvia’s rise. He believes the event’s popularity is emblematic of L.A.’s transition to a post-car city. “It took 27 years,” he says, “from the closure of the trolley lines in 1963 until the opening of the first light rail in 1990. During that time, Los Angeles essentially finished its freeway system and became the automobile capital of the planet. And during that time, you could answer any ‘How long does it take to get there?’ question with ‘Twenty minutes or less,’ and it was true. But then it wasn’t any longer.”

Compact and energetic, Paley is 57 years old with a salt-and-pepper beard. He grew up in the San Fernando Valley and was trained as an architect and urban planner. For the past 26 years, he has been president of an orga­­ni­­zation he cofounded called Community Arts Re­­sources (yes, cars for short), which puts on art and street festivals throughout the area. Our route through Bunker Hill is not direct. Instead of streets, we take the tucked-away staircases and escalators that weave between the hill’s high-rises. Along the way, Paley points to the sky bridges that were built in the 1970s in anticipation of a never-constructed people mover. “That idea of separating the pedestrians from car traffic goes back to the middle of the 20th century,” Paley says. “It made for great science fiction, but it’s a terrible idea.”

After grabbing breakfast at Grand Central Market, we sit down at one of a handful of outdoor tables on South Broadway. Buses go by, a lot of buses, and lots of people are riding them. Where public transit in L.A. used to be the mode of necessity for those who couldn’t afford a car, it’s become a lifestyle choice for increasing numbers of residents. Former mayor Antonio Villaraigosa and his successor, Eric Garcetti, have promoted an aggressively bold campaign to make transit a cornerstone of the region’s growth and development. In 2008, Los Angeles County voters approved a half-cent sales-tax increase that will raise $40 billion over 30 years to expand light-rail, subway, and bus lines, more than doubling the current system.

We walk down Spring Street, head­ing for the Metro Red Line that will take us to Union Station, the gorgeous 1939 Mission Revival train depot that is now the city’s transportation hub. “The past 40 years have brought hundreds of thousands of immigrants who had no alternative to get to work or school aside from mass transit,” Paley says. “Kids found other ways of staying in touch with their friends aside from cruising down Van Nuys Boulevard. It’s socially acceptable now for a 16-year-old kid not to get her driver’s license on her 16th birthday. That was unheard of in L.A. 20 years ago. A generation is opting to get their licenses later or opting not to get them at all. All these factors meant that by the early 2000s there was a mass of folks taking transit, a burgeoning bike culture, and more and more people saying that they wanted to live in a walkable neighborhood.”

Dodging raindrops, Paley and I take in some of Downtown’s greatest hits: the Bradbury Building (the 1893 landmark that starred in Blade Runner), the Last Bookstore (only a decade old and California’s largest used and new bookstore), and the Angels Flight funicular (the now-shuttered 298-foot railway that once delighted generations of Angelenos). We then hit upon a hidden treasure. Behind a roll-up door on Sixth Street is a vaulted room covered with custom tiles depicting scenes from Holland, which Arts and Crafts pioneer Ernest Batchelder created in 1914 for a soda parlor called the Dutch Chocolate Shop. We never would have been able to experience all this from a car.

I ask Paley if he worries that mass transit, especially the subway, will lead to the gentrification of L.A.’s poor neighborhoods, as it has in cities like Washington, D.C. “What we’re really talking about is the unwilling displacement of people and communities,” he says. “It’s occurring in every city throughout the world, and I don’t know one that has dealt with it effectively. In L.A., you have this weird symmetry at either end of the wealth spectrum. In richer neighborhoods, residents want everything to stay just as it is, and this form of nimbyism prevents transit stations from opening and affordable housing from being built. And in disadvantaged areas, the fear that good transit might lead to gentrification has led to the opposition to new lines in transit-dependent areas.”

Before we depart, Paley pulls out a map of Los Angeles he’d picked up on a recent trip to Berlin. It not only shows yet-to-be-completed subway lines. It depicts Downtown as the city’s center. Santa Monica, indeed the whole coastline, is an inset, an afterthought. That California-loving German tourists would be drawn not to the fantasy of Los Angeles but the Los Angeles of bikeshare and sidewalks amuses Paley. “I can only wish,” he says, “that urbanism has supplanted movie stars, but I’m sure that our worldwide identity as the home of Hollywood is firmly entrenched. The truth is, I’m far less concerned with how the rest of the world sees us and far more interested in how Angelenos themselves see their own city. If we can figure out how to move to the next incarnation — a place with viable transportation alternatives — then we’ll offer a new model to emulate for all those cities that followed our lead into the car century. There are a lot more cities that look like L.A. than look like San Francisco, Paris, Copenhagen, or Manhattan.”"
alisonarieff  losangeles  bogotá  colombia  cars  bikes  biking  walking  aaronpaley  ciclavia  ciclovía  tranporation  urban  urbanism  cities 
march 2015 by robertogreco
Transitory Map .:. Milena Bonilla
"I randomly took several bus rides in Bogotá and sew the torn fabric of some of the buses seats. The size of the holes defined the time invested in repairing them while traveling along the city. After each journey, I highlighted the bus's itinerary by sewing it on a map of the city, using the same thread color as the one used to sew the seat. Twenty-five tours were completed in the project and sixteen are documented."

[via: https://twitter.com/ablerism/status/566767100556247041 ]
milenabonilla  art  bogotá  colombia  repair  sewing  glvo  mending  buses  publictransit  publictransportation  repairing 
february 2015 by robertogreco
Playable cities
"In Bristol, the recent conference “Making the City Playable” reveals that being smart isn’t the only attribute to which cities should aspire: publicly playful activities can create a happier, more cohesive and even more effective urban future."



"How do you empower people to transform their cities? It is a question that Usman Haque grapples with at Umbrellium on a daily basis. Trained as an architect, Haque’s interest in the psychology of public space led him to a career building creative response environments, interactive installations, and mass participation initiatives designed to foster a sense of collective creative ownership. With creations such as Burble (in which the public collectively constructs a massive inflatable structure made of balloons containing sensor-controlled LEDs that send crowd-responsive patterns of light rippling through the structure) or Assemblance (which recently filled the Barbican, London’s renowned performing arts center, with an immersive environment of three-dimensional interactive light-structures that encourage people to work together to sculpt and manipulate their form), Haque uses creative technology to explore the decision making frameworks that foster collaboration. “It is not inevitable that technology isolates us,” he argues; instead, he sees it as a call to action to explore its ability to connect us. “What I’d like to see more of is the feeling of belonging and ‘this is ours and we can do great things with it’” he concludes: “I’d like to see more of that sense of ownership, and anything that supports and reinforces that.”"



"As the recent Making the City Playable Conference highlighted, many things must work together to support and reinforce that sense of ownership and engagement. “Real regeneration is about people not buildings; activity not big investment,” affirms Bristol’s mayor—and former architect—George Ferguson. A champion of good urbanism, Ferguson has had a pivotal role in some of Bristol’s largest urban transformation projects and is a strong advocate of the Playable City movement. His support has not only enabled many of the city’s recent playful interventions—from Park and Slide, to a city wide zombie chase game, streets temporarily closed for children’s play, and the Playable City Award’s Hello Lamppost and Shadowing—it has also highlighted the benefits that can be achieved by (and often necessity of) working with local authorities. Nevertheless it is worth noting that playful interventions can come in all sizes and degrees.

To wit, while Bristol has built its reputation as a city willing to try things and be unorthodox, it has not always done so by being the class clown. As both Playable City Award projects show, serendipity and the unexpected are equally as valid as the overt gesture. “At first you have the initial excitement reaction where you have people doing crazy things and having their friends come visit and take videos,” explains Matthew Rosier of Shadowing, the shadow-capturing streetlight he and partner Jonathan Chomko recently unveiled in eight locations throughout Bristol, “but we’re more excited to see how it’s working in a few weeks time, when it has become part of peoples’ routines and we can see how they experience it in their daily lives.” It’s about more than cheeky people doing funny things in the streets.

The Playable City will face some inevitable growing pains. One of its major challenges—as a movement not primarily about economic impact or mass behavior change—is providing quantifiable metrics. Bristol’s relatively small size and progressive city governance present a very unique breeding ground that is not easily replicated. Furthermore the concept of play is not a constant across cultures. Nevertheless, Watershed is determined to drive a global playable city network comprised of 10-20 cities around the world that want to steward the movement. “We’d really like to fund a much more significant global playable city award where we would be able to award another city with funds to pioneer something that we can learn from, be inspired by, and share,” Watershed’s Reddington says. With Hello Lamppost set to travel to Austin, USA, it seems the Playable City movement is gaining ground. Between you, me and the lamppost, I’d join their team."
play  cities  urban  urbanism  kimberliebirks  2014  playablecities  hellolampost  playablecity  clarereddington  umbrellium  usmanhaque  thewatershed  tomuglow  smartcities  bogotá  stockholm  publicspace  burble  ownership  technology  isolation  connection  social  engagement  shadowing  parkandslide  georgeferguson  matthewrosier  jonathanchomko 
october 2014 by robertogreco
Fighting Crime With Architecture in Medellín, Colombia - NYTimes.com
"city’s transformation established roots before…Fajardo took office, in thoughtful planning guidelines, amnesties & antiterrorism programs, community-based initiatives by Germany & UN &…Colombian national policy mandating architectural interventions as a means to attack poverty & crime.

…every mayor here has to have enormous architectural & infrastructural plans, or risk coming across as small-minded or an outsider.

…Empresas Públicas de Medellín…constitutionally mandated to provide clean water & electricity even to houses in the city’s illegal slums, so that unlike in Bogotá, where the worst barrios lack basic amenities, in Medellín there’s a safety net.

E.P.M.’s profits…go directly to building new schools, public plazas, the metro & parks.

“We took a view that everything is interconnected — education, culture, libraries, safety, public spaces,”

…goal of government should be providing rich and poor with the same quality education, transportation and public architecture…"
moravia  planb  jprcr  anaelviravélez  lorenzocastro  alejandrobernal  felipemesa  camilorestrepo  rogeliosalmona  conservation  catalinaortiz  normanfoster  slums  giancarlomazzanti  comuna13  epm  aníbalgaviria  chocó  chocano  bogotá  alejandroecheverri  transmobility  equality  transportation  schools  education  libraries  parks  architecture  policty  government  urban  urbanism  crimeprevention  placemaking  2012  sergiofajardo  colombia  medellin  medellín 
august 2012 by robertogreco
Colombia's architectural tale of two cities | Art and design | guardian.co.uk
"Medellín developed a model that many cities around the world could learn from. For instance, the local energy company, EPM, is neither private nor nationalised but owned by the city, and it was decided that its profits (about $450m a year) should be fed back into the city. Where most mayors, including London's, have to lobby central government for money, Medellín's have tremendous spending power. Alongside this public-private partnership, the mayors have actively sought out the advice of an architecture community trained in the problems of their own city. Again, this is all too rare. In a short space of time, Medellín has turned itself into a model Latin American city, with good transport, dynamic public spaces, new schools and a culture of civic architecture. The real design project, however, was one of social organisation, with a section of society grouping together and deciding to rewrite their city's story."
politics  policy  engagement  slums  cities  urbanplanning  socialurbanism  socialchange  social  socialarchitecture  libraries  swimmingpools  bogotá  enriquepeñalosa  cablecars  transportation  poverty  crime  urbanism  urbandesign  urban  architecture  giancarlomazzanti  sergiofajardo  antanasmockus  jorgeperez  2012  colombia  medellin  medellín 
april 2012 by robertogreco
Le Corbusier en Bogotá
"La publicación doble -que incluye la edición facsimilar del «Informe técnico del Plan Director para Bogotá» y una compilación de artículos analíticos sobre la presencia de «Le Corbusier en Bogotá: 1947-1951»- busca, desde la escala de un proyecto, aportar a la reflexión que, sobre la obra del Maestro, se trabaja desde diferentes latitudes. Los dos libros se proponen como un material necesario para las generaciones de futuros investigadores que, sobre el tema de la ciudad y la arquitectura en Le Corbusier, en general, y de Bogotá, en particular, quieran seguir ahondando en la materia, tengan acceso a un material hasta ahora inédito y a las reflexiones que varios autores han hecho especialmente para este libro. Los artículos, más que dar conclusiones respecto al proyecto, ponen al día una discusión sobre Arquitectura y Urbanismo que amerita seguir siendo fuente de muchas investigaciones de quienes piensen, sueñen o construyan la ciudad de hoy, mañana y siempre."
urbanism  urbandesign  urban  architecture  colombia  bogotá  lecrobusier 
january 2012 by robertogreco
El Bosque de la Esperanza - Architecture - Domus
"Location:
This Project is located in the municipally of Soacha, Altos de Cazucá. This lies in a very depressed area that lacks of public infrastructure. This area is known for its security problems and it has become the shelter of thousands of people that have been displaced from their home towns due to recent conflict.

Approach:
Mazzanti came to the project with the belief that architecture's value lies in what it can produce. Mazzanti is interested in producing actions, change and relationships which in turn help generate shapes, patterns or open organizations that act in the construction of social actions. Hope Forest is what Mazzanti calls an open project, a project made out of modules that have the potential to grow and adapt to different situations. It consists of a canopy where modules can be added depending on the circumstances."
design  architecture  bogotá  giancarlomazzanti  colombia 
january 2012 by robertogreco
David Byrne's Journal: 10.26.2011: Bogota Part 1
"I was recently asked to do a conversation/talk with Janette Sadik-Kahn, our commissioner of transportation, at the  AIA New York Center for Architecture Center (American Institute of Architects).  Since I imagined there might be some architects or designers in the audience, I took some time to share some of my notes and photographs from my summer Latin American bikes and cities tour. I also took this opportunity to finally organize some of the notes I had taken and post them. So here it is, many months late."
davidbyrne  colombia  bogotá  2011  cities  sergiofajardo  enriquepeñalosa  janettesadik-kahn  oscardíaz  kennedydistrict  medellin  transmilenio  buses  bikes  biking  librarians  urban  urbanism  urbanplanning  policy  design  giancarlomazzanti  rogeliosalmona  alejandroecheverri  sergiogomez  projecth  emilypilloton  bertiecounty  northcarolina  medellín  projecthdesign 
november 2011 by robertogreco
3er Congreso Internacional Educación Sin Escuela
"Los casos de familias y comunidades que deciden educar sin escuela y educar en familia crecen aceleradamente en diversos países del mundo, incluyendo a Colombia. Este fenómeno es nuevo para los intereses de investigación científica académica universitaria. Las agudas problemáticas de la deserción escolar, el absentismo escolar y la baja o nula motivación de los niños, niñas, adolescentes y jóvenes para asistir a la escuela, tienen directa relación con este campo de investigación académica. En algunos países, como Estados Unidos, Canadá, Reino Unido, España, Noruega y Francia, ha ido creciendo rápidamente la investigación universitaria sobre esto temas, denominados generalmente como Homeschooling o Unschooling."

[via: http://www.patfarenga.com/pat-farengas-blog/2011/10/20/education-without-school-conference-in-bogota-colombia.html ]
colombia  bogotá  unschooling  homeschool  education  conferences 
october 2011 by robertogreco
urbanology: bazaarchitecture, streetlife, hoodism, i-city, & more
"The Institute of Urbanology aims at learning from its environment while contributing to its improvement. Its research is intended to be directly relevant to the localities where it works as well as anyone interested in urban development and neighborhood life.

Urbanology is defined as the understanding of incremental developmental processes and daily practices in any given locality through direct engagement with people and places. The institute contributes to the debate on urban development by engaging with local community groups, creating new concepts, implementing projects and recommending strategies and policies.

The Institute sharpened its methodology through years of fieldwork in New York, Bogota, Tokyo, Istanbul, New Delhi, Goa and Mumbai. It has offices in Dharavi, Mumbai and Aldona, Goa. In Dharavi, the Institute studies homegrown practices in the fields of housing, artisanship and trade, and physical and theoretical spaces where these fields converge…"
urbanology  bogotá  mumbai  nyc  tokyo  urban  urbanism  urbanplanning  design  art  culture  architecture  goa  newdelhi  istanbul  dharavi  aldona  economics  ecology  systems  matiasechanove  rahulsrivastava  urbz 
september 2011 by robertogreco
Bogota Urban Lab [bilingual website]
"Bienvenidos a Bogotá Urban Lab . Esta página Web fue creada por Trading Places, una red global de estudiantes de la ciudad que organiza conferencia itinerantes e intercambios virtuales alrededor del mundo. Buscamos promover el intercambio internacional de ideas e información sobre planeación y diseño urbano.

Este es el producto de la Conferencia Itinerante de 2003 a Bogotá. Decidimos ampliar el objeto de esta página Web y convertirla en una plataforma para intercambiar información e ideas sobre la ciudad de Bogotá. Esta plataforma está abierta a quien tenga algo que contribuir.

Esta página Web está en español y en inglés. Por favor utilicen el lenguaje con el cual se sientan más cómodos para comunicar sus ideas. Sus comentarios sobre cualquiera de los artículos y su participación en el foro son bienvenidos."

[via: http://www.urbanology.org/2005/01/26/bogota-at-the-edge-planning-the-barrios/ ]
design  architecture  urban  planning  colombia  antanasmockus  cities  urbanplanning  urbanism  bogotá  urbandesign 
september 2011 by robertogreco
Food as fine art | PRI's The World
"The answer is Chia, about 45 minutes north of Bogota. Anchor Marco Werman takes us to a restaurant [Carne de Res] in Chia where owner Andres Jaramillo has transformed food and entertainment planning into a fine art. " [Includes slideshow of the restaurant, the design office, the workshop, etc.]

[See also: http://www.andrescarnederes.com ]
colombia  restaurants  food  andrésjaramillo  art  crafts  chia  bogotá  carnederes 
november 2010 by robertogreco
Shareable: Can We Design Cities for Happiness?
"Happiness itself is a commons to which everyone should have equal access.

That’s the view of Enrique Peñalosa, who is not a starry-eyed idealist given to abstract theorizing. He’s actually a politician, who served as mayor of Bogotá, Colombia, for three years, and now travels the world spreading a message about how to improve quality-of-life for everyone living in today’s cities.

Peñalosa’s ideas stand as a beacon of hope for cities of the developing world, which even with their poverty and immense problems will absorb much of the world’s population growth over the next half-century. Based on his experiences in Bogotá, Peñalosa believes it’s a mistake to give up on these cities as good places to live."
enriquepeñalosa  bogotá  colombia  cities  happiness  transportation  sustainability  urbanplanning  urban  economics  government  bikes  architecture  design  socialjustice  qualityoflife  cycling  commons  antanasmockus  jaimelerner  buses  biking  pedestrians 
august 2010 by robertogreco
pensamientos genericos - Plan De Cultura Para una Nueva Tijuana, cont.
""Aquí dos ejemplos de como la cultura y el transporte publico pueden ir mano a mano. Estas intervenciones son de eventos artísticos en espacios diseñados para el transporte.

1 eventos culturales en las estaciones que son parte del circuito TransMilenio en Bogota, uno de los sistemas mas eficientes de transporte publico en el mundo. http://www.transmilenio.gov.co/WebSiteGaleriaDeFotos/ViernesCultural/index.html

2. opera en la central camionera de Tijuana. Confundidos entre el publico artistas de opera de Tijuana vestidos de trabajadores de limpieza, maleteros, cajeras etc realizaron un espectáculo operístico para el asombro del publico/usuario de la central.

Se pudiese ir mas alla de solo presentar espectáculos/obras de arte, otra alternativa es diseñar las estaciones y centrales con espacios dedicados a la cultura, con la intención de acercar el quehacer cultural a las miles de personas que usan el transporte publico en la ciudad. Un solo presupuesto - dos infraestructuras!"

[Parte 1: http://generica.blogspot.com/2010/06/plan-de-cultura-para-una-nueva-tijuana.html ]
reneperalta  tijuana  culture  transportation  bogotá  infrastructure  art 
july 2010 by robertogreco
line of sight » bogotá: first impressions
"Regardless of its rapid expansion, Bogotá seemed remarkably clean. Sidewalks were in need of major repair & quite a number of buildings were neglected, but the city itself was impeccable. We only took a couple of the ubiquitous lemon yellow taxis (cheap, fun, & clean as well) as most of our transportation was on the Transmilenio: bus service using dedicated lanes (two each way) with stations in the middle of the avenues. Although the schedules are confusing at first & lines for tickets can be long, service is quick & once again, the buses are amazingly clean. Buenos Aires could learn a lot from Bogotá:"
bogotá  colombia  robertwright  cities  latinamerica 
april 2010 by robertogreco
Abitare » Special School – Modular School
"Giancarlo Mazzanti’s design for the Gerardo Molina High School in the outskirts of Bogotá is more of a piece with traditional modernist school design in Latin America, with the important difference that his interest in the social aspects of architecture has led to substantial changes to the general design of the building."
giancarlomazzanti  schools  schooldesign  colombia  bogotá  education  architecture  design  lcproject  tcsnmy  modernism 
january 2010 by robertogreco
By Degrees - Buses May Aid Climate Battle in Poor Cities - Series - NYTimes.com
"To be effective, a new international climate treaty that will be negotiated in Copenhagen in December must include “a policy response to the CO2 emissions from transport in the developing world,” the Bellagio conference statement concluded.

Bus rapid transit systems like Bogotá’s, called TransMilenio, might hold an answer. Now used for an average of 1.6 million trips each day, TransMilenio has allowed the city to remove 7,000 small private buses from its roads, reducing the use of bus fuel — and associated emissions — by more than 59 percent since it opened its first line in 2001, according to city officials."
bogotá  enriquepeñalosa  colombia  bus  infrastructure  environment  transportation  energy  rapidtransit 
july 2009 by robertogreco
Removing Cars to Create Public Space | Planetizen
"Cars dominate cities, especially in America. But as many cities in other countries have found, removing cars can turn busy streets into lively public places. Now the U.S. is starting to catch on."
cities  us  bikes  urbanism  sustainability  streets  cars  culture  urban  landscape  bogotá  pasadena 
october 2008 by robertogreco
enRoute February 2008
"From Paris to Bogotá, urban spaces are undergoing a radical transformation with one thing in mind: your well-being...more time we spend on foot, on bikes or even on public transit, more we slow down, more we fuel this kind of social alchemy."
via:cityofsound  bikes  canada  cities  transportation  urban  urbanism  bogotá  colombia  paris  france  planning  well-being  creativity  design  psychology  lifestyle  mexico  mexicodf  qualityoflife  traffic  df  mexicocity 
march 2008 by robertogreco
Streetsblog » The Bogotá Transformation: Vision and Political Will
"How is it, we asked, that a city with about one-tenth the per capita income of New York was able to build one of sleekest, most efficient and high-tech surface transportation systems in the world?"
bogotá  colombia  urbanism  design  planning  latinamerica  environment  bikes  transportation  urban  streets  politics  buses 
october 2007 by robertogreco
Hedonics, aka Happiness Economics
"From the Globe and Mail comes Bogota's urban happiness movement. It's a long article that packs a punch, here summarized."
happiness  hedonics  traffic  vars  walking  pedestrians  community  environment  transportation  bogotá  colombia  urban  planning  bikes  buses  public 
june 2007 by robertogreco
globeandmail.com: Bogota's urban happiness movement
"From living hell to living well: A radical campaign to return streets from cars to people in Colombia's largest city is now a model for the world"
happiness  hedonics  traffic  vars  walking  pedestrians  community  environment  transportation  bogotá  colombia  urban  planning  bikes  buses  public 
june 2007 by robertogreco

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