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robertogreco : bookselling   2

From space to time « Snarkmarket
"Bri­dle says read­ers don’t value what pub­lish­ers do because all of the time involved in edit­ing, for­mat­ting, mar­ket­ing, etc., is invis­i­ble to reader when they encounter final prod­uct. Maybe. But mak­ing that time/labor vis­i­ble CAN’T just mean brusquely insist­ing that pub­lish­ers really are impor­tant & that they really do do valu­able work. It needs to mean some­thing like find­ing new ways for read­ers to engage with that work, & mak­ing that time mean­ing­ful as THEIR time.

In short, it means that writ­ers & pro­duc­ers of read­ing mate­r­ial prob­a­bly ought to con­sider tak­ing them­selves a lit­tle less seri­ously & read­ers & read­ing a lit­tle more seri­ously. Let’s actu­ally BUILD that body of knowl­edge about read­ers and their prac­tices — let’s even start by look­ing at TIME as a key deter­mi­nant, espe­cially as we move from print to dig­i­tal read­ing — & try to offer a bet­ter, more tai­lored yet more vari­able range of expe­ri­ences accordingly."
reading  writing  snarkmarket  comments  thebookworks  books  publishing  annotation  quotations  interactivity  experience  time  space  data  amazon  penguin  jamesbridle  robinsloan  respect  ebooks  kindle  ipad  bookfuturism  attention  timcarmody  edting  formatting  value  understanding  commonplacebooks  transparency  visibility  patterns  patternrecognition  friends  lisastefanacci  bookselling  npr  practice 
may 2010 by robertogreco
Local Bookstores, Social Hubs, and Mutualization « Clay Shirky
"The core idea is to appeal to that small subset of customers who think of bookstores as their “third place”, alongside home and work. These people care about the store’s existence in physical (and therefore social) space; the goal would be to generate enough revenue from them to make the difference between red and black ink, and to make the new bargain not just acceptable but desirable for all parties. A small collection of patron saints who helped keep a local bookstore open could be cheaply smothered in appreciation by the culture they help support...All of which is to say that trying to save local bookstores from otherwise predictably fatal competition by turning some customers into members, patrons, or donors is an observably crazy idea. However, if the sober-minded alternative is waiting for the Justice Department to anoint the American Booksellers Association as a kind of OPEC for ink, even crazy ideas may be worth a try."
bookselling  books  business  clayshirky  adaptation  community  trends  publishing  digital  bookstores  culture  future  online  local  thirdplaces  social  media  activism  commerce  thebookworks  bookfuturism  technofuturism  thirdspaces 
november 2009 by robertogreco

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