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robertogreco : braindrain   5

Manso: Jay Porter Interview #3, Part 1
[Follow-up: http://manso.jed.co/post/75926441677/why-i-keep-interviewing-jay-porter
Commented on VoSD (crosspost) and Twitter too (no link): http://voiceofsandiego.org/2014/02/06/i-just-wasnt-that-stoked-on-where-the-citys-going/ ]

[Also available here: http://jayporter.com/dispatches/san-diego-exit-interview-part-1/ ]

"For me, when I was working in tech, it was an easy decision to come here. I remember specifically turning down a job in Alameda that paid a little more than I’d get paid in San Diego and probably offered better career advancement too.

But it was really easy because you could get so much more for your dollar in San Diego than you could in Alameda in ’99. There seemed to be a lot of potential here. The tech industry was really thriving in San Diego.

I left that industry in 2005, so I don’t know it as well as I used to, but I get the sense that the industry is not thriving the way it was. And I also clearly see now that you get so much less for your money here than you do in Oakland or even San Francisco (with the caveat that you get less housing for your dollar in San Francisco). But you get so much more for your money in every other aspect of your life in Oakland and San Francisco.

The sun tax has gotten pretty steep. Over the past 15 years, the relative cost of living in San Diego has gone way up compared to competitive towns, but without keeping up with infrastructure. Over that same period of time, how many miles of bike lanes have been created in any comparable city, whether it’s San Francisco, Austin, New York, Portland, Seattle or wherever? Many more than have been created here.

It’s hard to say what the impact of the brain drain really is because we don’t have the data to show it. We can only estimate it based on what we’ve seen anecdotally.

What we could see at the Linkery was people arriving from Place X and then leaving to Place Y. We didn’t necessarily see an increase in people leaving town, but we definitely saw a decline in people coming here and moving to North Park, Golden Hill, and the areas that had been previously attracting talented people in their mid-20s. We just stopped meeting them.

Part of that might be due to the fact that I got older and married and stopped going to bars, so I stopped meeting those people. But I definitely got the sense, particularly around 2010 or 2011, that we were getting a much smaller influx of people into the city who worked in the knowledge economy.

Then you see Ted and Erin leave, and then Andy and Flo leave, and then the dominoes start falling. You suddenly realize that you know more people in San Francisco than you do around San Diego.

At that point, not only does the Bay Area offer a better quality of life, but a great social network too. Add to that the fact that there’s a bigger market for the specific business that I want to be in, and for what Katie wants to be in. Not only a bigger market, but a growing market. It all comes together and the decision is clear.

It’s been a year since we made that decision, and at this point, we feel much more strongly that we made the right choice. Our quality of life is better and we haven’t opened the business yet, but all indications are that it’s really well situated.

Both the city of Oakland and the city of San Francisco have been really active in helping us find a great location and open up. The kind of outreach to small business people is not something that I saw from the city of San Diego.

Although the people we dealt with in the city of San Diego were always very polite, they weren’t very forthcoming. We got business outreach from North Park main street, which was fantastic, but we didn’t get much from the city level.

It’s been really neat up there to see that the city wants us to be successful. There are a lot of great things to say so far. We’ll see what I say in 10 years from now, but I’m pretty stoked right now."
jedsundwall  jayporter  linkery  sandiego  food  bayarea  oakland  sanfrancisco  2014  business  community  money  braindrain  infrastructure  bikes  biking 
february 2014 by robertogreco
Documenting Exodus: Hit Man Gurung and Nepal's Departing Youth | Los Angeles | Artbound | KCET
"Much of our Southern California culture is defined by the continuous influx of new residents from far-flung parts of the world. At the receiving end of migrations of people fleeing economic hardship, ethnic or religious persecution or civil unrest, we may at times worry about the effect immigration on jobs, schools, and our resources, but we rarely consider the effects that emigration has on the countries left behind. Artist Hit Man Gurung has traveled from Nepal for two month residency at the 18th Street Arts Center in Santa Monica. While here, he is creating a series of photo collages illustrating the recent exodus of Nepalese youth who are leaving the country to find work. Rows of passport-style photos of young Nepalese faces glued onto sheets of handmade paper, these works read like missing persons posters. Gurung is depicting the unraveling of a country, one person at a time."
hitmangurung  california  ummigration  art  artists  2013  nepal  losangeles  santamonica  emigration  migration  youth  braindrain 
may 2013 by robertogreco
Berlusconi's exit – what does it mean for Italy? | World news | The Guardian
"Austerity might also strengthen the most well-known building block of Italian society: the family. Many foreigners are rather sneering when they observe extended families living in the same block of flats, if not the same flat. It creates childish, immature grownups, they say. It's not usually true at all, and what those criticisms fail to realise is not only the fact that living together is very often an economic, rather than an emotional, choice…; they also ignore the fact that the strength of the family is the reason that Italy's social fabric is so much better knitted than Britain's. And there are useful economic consequences: almost every successful business is built upon the family…If austerity means relatives have to huddle once again under the same roof, it might be claustrophobic, but at least it might mean that Italy, once again, resists the disintegration of the family unit."
italy  2011  europe  eurozone  austerity  austeritymeasures  families  society  bureaucracy  competition  economics  berlusconi  carlolevi  normandouglas  blackmarket  blackeconomy  romanoprodi  rootlessness  mobility  arrangiarsi  slow  slowfood  braindrain  meritocracy  tobiasjones 
november 2011 by robertogreco
Emily Pilloton: Teaching design for change | Video on TED.com
"Designer Emily Pilloton moved to rural Bertie County, in North Carolina, to engage in a bold experiment of design-led community transformation. She's teaching a design-build class called Studio H that engages high schoolers' minds and bodies while bringing smart design and new opportunities to the poorest county in the state."
design  ted  education  change  teaching  lcproject  schooldesign  studioh  projecthdesign  projecth  emilypilloton  northcarolina  rural  designthinking  tcsnmy  classsize  vocational  systems  systemsthinking  humanitariandesign  cv  braindrain  criticalthinking  meaning  purpose 
december 2010 by robertogreco
Advice for Teachers Scorned | Beyond School
"East Asia is blessed by Confucianism. When Han Dynasty...put political support behind [his] teachings...unknowingly rooted in Chinese spirit a devotion to education & scholarship...teachers, students, & schools.
politics  unschooling  schools  education  teaching  clayburell  confucius  confucianism  asia  china  korea  japan  respect  learning  academics  teachers  students  choices  braindrain  eastasia  priorities 
july 2010 by robertogreco

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