recentpopularlog in

robertogreco : brokenwindows   7

Campaign Zero
"We can live in a world where the police don't kill people by limiting police interventions, improving community interactions, and ensuring accountability.

CLICK THE CATEGORIES BELOW FOR POLICY SOLUTIONS (DOWNLOAD THIS GRAPHIC)"
blacklivesmatter  policing  policy  police  activism  lawenforcement  2016  campignzero  oversight  brokenwindows  force  violence  bodycams  demilitarization 
july 2016 by robertogreco
Molly Crabapple: How 'broken windows' policing harms people of color -- Fusion
"Last summer, a New York city police officer choked a black grandfather named Eric Garner to death. Garner was suspected of selling loose cigarettes. The arrests of people like Garner are part of a controversial policing tactic called Broken Windows. Broken Windows claims to prevent large crimes by cracking down on small ones. But it’s really about controlling and punishing communities of color, through police encounters that can sometimes be deadly."

[Molly posts an email from Loic Wacquant to Pastebin:
http://pastebin.com/U8EZ48Mt

https://twitter.com/mollycrabapple/status/565145031917719552
https://twitter.com/mollycrabapple/status/565167505220861952
https://twitter.com/mollycrabapple/status/565167999456661504
https://twitter.com/mollycrabapple/status/565172797161619457
https://twitter.com/mollycrabapple/status/565205955705864193

Related conversation:
https://twitter.com/blacklikewho/status/565209516128862208 ]
brokenwindows  mollycrabapple  nyc  policing  lawenforcement  2015  crime  policy  billbratton 
february 2015 by robertogreco
The NYPD Slowdown Is Proving That ‘Broken Windows’ Is a Failure - The Root
"So what is the real takeaway from the NYPD slowdown where “broken windows” is concerned? We already knew that it was flawed in theory, and we have seen it fail miserably in application. One wild and crazy idea is that this approach to policing and the slowdown are both about little more than power and economics. The Police Department is attempting to flex its muscles to remind de Blasio and the thousands of nonviolent protesters who have dared to speak out against NYPD practices that the city needs them. The message is essentially that, even beyond the prevention of crime, police are still needed to help generate critical amounts of revenue for the city’s operating budget."
brokenwindows  laweenforcement  police  policy  2015  crime  statistics  revenue  nyc  nypd  power  economics 
january 2015 by robertogreco
2/2 The Culture Show : Jon Ronson meets Malcolm Gladwell - YouTube
"First broadcast: 02 Oct 2013.

Malcolm Gladwell is about to publish a book. He's done it four times before, and whenever it happens huge things occur: Millions of copies get sold, world leaders take note, catchy phrases infiltrate our language and millions of us are moved by his inspiring stories and big powerful ideas.

Jon Ronson goes head to head with The Tipping Point author in his New York home to talk about his latest work. 'David and Goliath: Underdogs, Misfits and the Art of Battling Giants' seeks to shake our faith in what it means to have the upper hand. In it Gladwell argues we get advantage and disadvantage the wrong way round. Being dyslexic, losing a parent in childhood, being bombed, shot at, marginalized... can all be turned to good, according to his latest optimistic tome.

In this candid and revealing confrontation, one thing comes clear... Giants beware: underdogs can surprise you when they make good the advantages that stem from a traumatic start."

[via: https://twitter.com/litherland/status/543135968304578561 ]
2013  via:litherland  malcolmgladwell  brokenwindows  jonronson  policing  lawenforcement  crime  journalism  power  policy  nyc  socialjustice  homelessness  injustice  justice  homeless 
december 2014 by robertogreco
Liberalism and Gentrification | Jacobin
"Gentrification isn’t a cultural phenomenon — it’s a class offensive by powerful capitalists."



"Tying up your assets, your middle-class future, in home values does something to people. It alters their interests. It sutures a professional class, of liberal and even progressive beliefs, to the rapacious capitalist expansion into the city. The people who move to gentrifying areas tend to have liberal, tolerant, cosmopolitan sympathies. But they are aligned materially with reactionary and oppressive city restructuring, pushing them into antagonism with established residents, who do nothing for property values. Behind every Jane Jacobs comes Rudy Giuliani with his nightstick."



"The liberal discourse on gentrification has absolutely nothing to say about finance or prison, the two most salient institutions in urban life. Instead, it does what liberal discourse so often does: it buries the structural forces at work and choreographs a dance about individual choice to perform on the grave. We get tiny dramas over church parking lots and bike lanes and whether 7-11 will be able to serve chicken wings. Gentrification becomes a culture war, a battle over consumer choices: gourmet cupcake shop or fried chicken joint? Can we all live side by side, eating gourmet pickles with our fried fish sandwiches? Will blacks and whites hang out in the same bars? wonders Racialicious.

The problems of gentrification always boil down to those of mutual tolerance (and so, poor black people often become “racists” intolerant of yuppies); the solutions, therefore, reside in personal conduct and ethical choices. In “How To Be A Good Gentrifier,” Elahe Izadi offers such helpful pointers as saying hello to your neighbors and not crossing the street to avoid them. After all, if you’re going to participate in the expulsion of poor people from their communities, you might as well be civil."



"Marx called the violent expropriation of the poor from their lands “primitive accumulation.” The term conjures a one-time sin, in the distant past — Adam Smith called it “originary accumulation.” However, primitive accumulation accompanies capitalist development every step of the way, wherever valuable land meets valueless humanity.

In the early days of America, before Washington existed, nothing short of genocide would suffice. Today’s colonization requires little more than a low-interest mortgage and 911 on speed dial. In the face of this slow destruction of the urban poor, liberals have only one question: can’t we have fried chicken and cupcakes, too?"
capitalism  gentrification  ideology  homeownership  policy  politics  race  racism  2014  gavinmueller  brokenwindows  rudygiuliani  janejacobs  economics  money  sharonzukin  class  urban  urbanism  urbanplanning  carollloyd  sanfrancisco  washingtondc  nyc  richardflorida  creativeclass  frantzfanon  primitiveaccumulation  colonization  housing 
october 2014 by robertogreco
Why I Feel Bad for the Pepper-Spraying Policeman, Lt. John Pike - Alexis Madrigal - National - The Atlantic
Structures, in the sociological sense, constrain human agency. And for that reason, I see John Pike as a casualty of the system, too. Our police forces have enshrined a paradigm of protest policing that turns local cops into paramilitary forces. Let's not pretend that Pike is an independent bad actor. Too many incidents around the country attest to the widespread deployment of these tactics. If we vilify Pike, we let the institutions off way too easy.
police  policing  alexismadrigal  ows  occupywallstreet  davis  UCD  systems  protests  brokenwindows  history  sociology  psychology  institutions  negotiatedmanagement  2011  1960s  1970s  wto  1999  9/11  strategicincapacitation  hierarchy  policy  politics  lawenforcement  alexvitale  order  disorder  violence  blackbloc  anarchism 
november 2011 by robertogreco
Does the broken windows theory hold online?
"how does the broken windows theory apply to online spaces? Perhaps like so: Much of the tone of discourse online is governed by level of moderation & to what extent people are encouraged to "own" their words. When forums, message boards & blog comment threads with more than a handful of participants are unmoderated, bad behavior follows. The appearance of one troll encourages others. Undeleted hateful or ad hominem comments are an indication that that sort of thing is allowable behavior & encourages more of same. Those commenters who are normally respectable participants are emboldened by the uptick in bad behavior & misbehave themselves. More likely, they're discouraged from helping with the community moderation process of keeping their peers in line w/ social pressure. Or stop visiting the site altogether. Unchecked comment spam signals that the owner/moderator of forum or blog isn't paying attention, stimulating further improper conduct. Anonymity provides commenters w/ immunity"

[follow-up post here: http://www.kottke.org/08/12/randy-farmer-talks-broken-windows-online ]
kottke  brokenwindows  anonymity  communities  socialmedia  sociology  community  internet  web  online  behavior  economics  psychology  anthropology  society  culture  moderation  crime 
december 2008 by robertogreco

Copy this bookmark:





to read