recentpopularlog in

robertogreco : builtenvironment   11

Auckland Design Manual
"Designing the world’s most liveable city together

We are all involved in the design of our city - decisions we make about our homes and places of work, shape our streets, our neighbourhoods and our city. Great design comes from people with vision, knowledge and experience.

The Auckland Design Manual (ADM) provides a resource for everyone involved in design, building and development to either share their great design stories with others, or to seek inspiration, tools and best practice advice from those who have already been successful. Auckland's planning rulebook, the Proposed Auckland Unitary Plan (Unitary Plan) will articulate the rules for the future growth, whilst the ADM illustrates how to achieve the quality outcomes sought by the Unitary Plan.

The transformation of Auckland is a joint responsibility, not just council alone. We need the help, support and commitment of every resident to deliver the world's most liveable city.

Why is the design of the built environment important for Auckland?
"Everyone benefits from well-designed buildings, spaces and places. The built environment contributes a great deal to our quality of life and economic success, and delivers enormous value to society. Yet we often take it for granted, without appreciating its effect on our daily lives" (CABE 2005: 3)

Indeed design is often seen as a dirty word, some frivolous addition to the budget that adds little more than some aesthetic preference of those who are paying for it. We should consider design as a verb as well as an outcome. It is a process of constant refinement working with the variables of time, cost and quality to achieve the optimum outcome. Everything within the built environment has been designed and thought about to some degree. However we all know examples where it is obvious that this thinking has stopped early on and we are left with places or buildings that don't work well, not built well or are simply an eyesore. These are generally not great investments, and often need further money spent to rectify them over the longer term.

With Auckland likely to grow substantially over the next thirty years, we need to get more of these decisions right. As your council we are already trying new approaches, for example the Elliot Street shared spaces in the central city, the Transit Oriented Development in New Lynn and the Wynyard Quarter development on the waterfront. However, it is not just the council who builds the city; you do! It is your individual and collective decisions that shape our future – from where you choose to rent to what developments you might undertake.

We want to support the people of Auckland who are interested in the design of their house, their business premises, their street, their park or neighbourhood. So we have created the Auckland Design Manual – a website resource to provide you with inspiration through sharing good examples and some of the more detailed guidance about how to achieve similar great outcomes. We have started the ball rolling, but want to hear from you about your definition of a great project and want you to send us your best examples so we can continue to develop and refine the ADM – because only by sharing the lessons already learnt can we design the world's most liveable city together."

[via: https://twitter.com/anabjain/status/684252668668166144 ]

[See also “Māori Design Whakatairanga Tikanga Māori”

"Understanding and following a Māori design practice is key to delivering design outcomes that help to deepen our sense of place and develop meaningful and durable relationships with Iwi in Tāmaki Makaurau.This hub builds on design processes based upon Te Aranga principles. The content is being developed in partnership with Ngā Aho, a network of Mā​ori design professionals, and other partners. "
http://www.aucklanddesignmanual.co.nz/design-thinking/maori-design ]
via:anabjain  aukland  design  cities  auklanddesignmanual  participatori  maori  newzealand  neighborhoods  democracy  urban  livability  builtenvironment  māori 
january 2016 by robertogreco
CHUPAN CHUPAI on Vimeo
"In a near future heavily influenced by the imminent boom of the Indian subcontinent, an emerging technology and economic superpower a new digital city has developed. The film follows a group of young children as they play a game of hide and seek (Chupan Chupai) in the bustling streets of this smart city. Through their play the children discover how to hack the city, opening up a cavernous network of hidden and forgotten spaces, behind the scenes of everyday streets.

The narrative of piece focuses on how the children interact with their built environment, we explore the smart city through the device of the classic children's game. The design of the future city fuses technology and built matter as one programmable environment. Using gestures and signs as a language, the project takes the concept of gesture based control to the level where we can interact and control all elements of the built environment, creating a symbiosis between technology and the city. The film splits the physical architecture of the city into two categories; the synthesised lived in city, and its organic wild undergrowth.

The project was shot on location in India and uses a mixture of animation and visual effects to embellish the design of the city and locations that are pictured.

Based on a short story by Tim Maly
Directed by FACTORY FIFTEEN
Produced by Liam Young"

[See also: http://www.factoryfifteen.com/ ]
[Interview: http://www.dazeddigital.com/artsandculture/article/17980/1/factory-fifteens-futureworlds-dazed-visionaries ]
timmaly  sciencefiction  scifi  2014  film  video  jodhpur  india  hideandseek  children  interface  design  technology  play  gestures  cities  cityasclassroom  thecityishereforyoutouse  architecture  ux  smartcity  smartcities  urban  urbanism  streets  streetgames  games  builtenvironment  liamyoung  factoryfifteen  speculativefiction  jaipur  cherrapunjee 
february 2014 by robertogreco
Tina Richardson: Schizocartography
"Schizocartography is a form of urban critique that studies the aesthetic and psychological response that individuals have to the built environment.

Developed by Tina Richardson - based at the University of Leeds - it encourages individuals to question, and respond to, the outside spaces in which they work and live.

Schizocartography reveals the ideological contradictions that appear in urban space, while simultaneously enabling creative expression for those who inhabit it."

"What is Schizocartography?

I have developed schizocartography from the psychoanalyst Félix Guattari’s term “schizoanalytic cartography”. Schizocartography enables alternative existential modes for individuals in order to challenge dominant representations and power structures. This provides an opportunity for multiple ways of operating in space and reading the environment; it critiques the conventional ways of viewing, interpreting and mapping space. While the term “schizoanalysis” is derived from “schizophrenia”, it does not promote mental illness; rather, “schizo” is used as a way of offering up the possibility of multiple voices, and alternative world-views, amongst other factors.

This is my definition of ‘schizocartography’:

Schizocartography offers a method of cartography that questions dominant power structures and at the same time enables subjective voices to appear from underlying postmodern topography. It is both the process and output of a psychogeography of particular spaces that have been co-opted by various domineering operations, routines or procedures. It attempts to reveal the aesthetic and ideological contradictions that appear in urban space while simultaneously reclaiming the subjectivity of individuals by enabling new modes of creative expression. Schizocartography challenges anti-production, the homogenizing character of overriding forms that work towards silencing heterogeneous voices."
psychogeography  schizocartography  cartography  urban  urbanism  place  builtenvironment  via:selinjessa  tinarichardson  power  powerstructures  multiplicity  ant-production  theory  geography  félixguattari 
march 2013 by robertogreco
How Do We Teach Children About Their Cities? — BMW Guggenheim Lab | log
"With “This City Life,” he challenges kids to become critical investigators of the built environment in various ways, and to document their analysis through video and podcast media (check out the video above, the first one to come out of the program, to get a better sense of what it’s all about). In one of his workshops, the kids were given two types of stickers: hearts and frowning faces. They were then asked to stick those stickers all over things in the neighborhood that they liked (a street sign that had been guerilla-modified to be more fun was a popular one) or disliked (garbage, for instance). Then they talked about why they liked or disliked those things."
curriculum  citylife  cities  educations  context  wherewelive  cv  tcsnmy  lcproject  local  bighere  place  via:chrisberthelsen  2012  cityclassroom  cityasclassroom  urban  children  urbanism  education  builtenvironment 
august 2012 by robertogreco
Jane Jacobs Walk
"Jane Jacobs Walk is a program of the Center for the Living City, a nonprofit organization created by people who knew Jane Jacobs and were fortunate enough to call her a friend. As an organization we celebrate her life and legacy by helping people organize walks in their communities around the time of Jane’s birthday in early May…

We honor Jane Jacobs by helping people leave the isolation of their homes to come together to experience areas of their city outside of the automobile. Our mission is to help people walk, observe, and connect with their built environment. We make a difference because a Jane Jacobs Walk enables members of a community to discover and respond to the complexities of their city through personal and shared observation."
sharedobservation  events  notiving  observation  builtenvironment  walking  neighborhoods  cities  community  janejacobs 
april 2012 by robertogreco
Preserving the Environment with Cities, Not In Spite of Them - Design - The Atlantic Cities
"We cannot allow the future to mimic the recent past. We need our inner cities and traditional communities to absorb as much of our anticipated growth as possible, to keep the impacts per increment of growth as low as possible. And, to do that, we need cities to be brought back to life, with great neighborhoods and complete streets, with walkability and well-functioning public transit, with clean parks and rivers, with air that is safe to breathe and water that is safe to drink.

This, I believe, leads to some imperatives: where cities have been dis-invested, we must rebuild them; where populations have been neglected, we must provide them with opportunity; where suburbs have been allowed to sprawl nonsensically, we must retrofit them and make them better. These are not just economic and social matters: these are environmental issues, every bit as deserving of the environmental community’s attention as the preservation of nature."
cities  urban  urbanism  environment  sustainability  economics  kaidbenfield  us  innercities  people  humans  edglaeser  davidowen  density  energy  civilization  classideas  urbanization  builtenvironment  infrastructure  society  libraries  parks  publictransit  transportation  mobile  schools  education  growth  population  2011 
september 2011 by robertogreco
Volunteered Geographic Information » ‘Compactness’ in Zoning: the circle as the ideal.
"I saw a thought provoking presentation recently, given by Wenwen Li of the University of California Santa Barbara, the talk was a wide ranging insight into Cyber Infrastructure, its uses for geospatial information, and some of the computational techniques that underpinned the project. One element of the project involved zone design for the greater Los Angeles region, and involved the implementation of an algorithm that was intended to aggregate small areal units into larger zones whilst meeting a number of conditions, principle among these conditions was ‘compactness’. The output looked very much like a single hierarchy of Christaller hexagons, and this got me thinking about the nature of space and compactness."
compactness  density  cities  losangeles  geography  hexagons  circles  zoning  clustering  python  builtenvironment  demographics  infrastructure  space  centralplacetheory  wenwenli  ucsb  cyberinfrastructure  geospatial  information 
february 2011 by robertogreco
J. B. Jackson - Wikipedia
"taught landscape history courses as adjunct professor at Harvard's GSD as well as at the College of Environmental Design & the Department of Geography at the UC Berkeley. He finished teaching in the late 1970s & then went on to give lectures especially those pertaining to urban issues. Jackson states that “We are not spectators; all human landscape is not a work of art.” He felt strongly that the purpose of landscape is to provide a place for living and working and leisure."

Quote from him: "The bicycle had, and still has, a humane, almost classical moderation in the kind of pleasure it offers. It is the kind of machine that a Hellenistic Greek might have invented and ridden. It does no violence to our normal reactions: It does not pretend to free us from our normal environment."
jbjackson  landscape  education  bikes  builtenvironment  via:javierarbona  geography  urban  urbanism  johnstilgoe  biking  environment 
february 2011 by robertogreco
CITYterm: Admission » Admitted Students » Outside Lies Magic
"Get out now. Not just outside, but beyond the trap of the programmed electronic age so gently closing around so many people at the end of our century. Go outside, move deliberately, then relax, slow down, look around. Do not jog. Do not run. Forget about blood pressure and arthritis, cardiovascular rejuvenation and weight reduction. Instead pay attention to everything that abuts the rural road, the city street, the suburban boulevard. Walk. Stroll. Saunter. Ride a bike, and coast along a lot. Explore.

Abandon, even momentarily, the sleek modern technology that consumes so much time and money now, and seek out the resting place of a technology almost forgotten. Go outside and walk a bit, long enough to forget programming, long enough to take in and record new surroundings.

Flex the mind, a little at first, then a lot. Savor something special. Enjoy the best-kept secret around--the ordinary, everyday landscape that rewards any explorer, that touches any explorer with magic."
architecture  books  via:britta  johnstilgoe  pedestrians  walking  biking  bikes  psychogeography  noticing  learning  landscape  classideas  openstudio  classtrips  fieldtrips  bighere  exploration  looking  cities  urban  urbanism  builtenvironment  visibility  meandering  deliberate 
february 2011 by robertogreco
In Defense of Architecture (Fiction) | varnelis.net
"Instead of being Utopian or imaginative, might it be possible for architecture to shape our experiences in such ways as to approximate the effects of films or fiction? Or better yet, video games? Please don't take this to mean that architects need to copy Doom or Quake (they've tried that already). But rather, could architecture fiction be something that re-shapes our subjectivity?" ... "if architects are such experts at shaping space, who is to say they always need to work with the building trades? The Eameses made furniture and films. If they were around today, I think they'd be out in the city, finding ways to shape the environment through existing forms of locative media." ... "Instead of writing novels on a cell phone, why shouldn't we be reading the city on our cell phones?"
kazysvarnelis  architecture  history  writing  theory  narrative  us  starchitects  archigram  builtenvironment  eames  cities  literature 
march 2009 by robertogreco
Kim Beck I Ideal Cities I Works
"Using images of architecture and landscape, Kim Beck makes drawings, prints, paintings and installations that survey peripheral and suburban spaces. Her work urges a reconsideration of the built environment - the peculiar street signs, gas station banners, overgrown weeded lots, and self-storage buildings — bringing the banal and everyday into focus."
kimbeck  artists  nature  green  design  landscape  sculpture  architecture  installation  portfolios  art  cardboard  glvo  via:reas  cities  suburbs  publicstorage  space  builtenvironment 
february 2009 by robertogreco

Copy this bookmark:





to read