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robertogreco : calculators   8

Numi ‒ Beautiful calculator app for Mac
"Numi supports many units, and allows to easily convert one into another like $20 in Euro or 20 cm in inches. When it's needed, Numi will convert units automatically, like in 20 CAD + 4 Euro + 5 GBP.

You can easily convert time between time zones and get current time in different locations like Seoul time or now in Germany.

Numi supports word operations, scales and different numeral systems. So you can calculate 3 times 4 or use $1k instead of $1000 and convert 240 to hex. App allows to set variables, like var = $20 - 5%. Numi also supports tokens for operations like sum for sum of all results above or prev for the result on the previous line.

Numi supports many mathematical functions, constants and friendly percentage functions like 20% of $10 or 5% of what is 6 cm. Numi allows you to format your calculations with labels, comments and headers. Use special shortcuts to improve your calculation typing, like ⇧⌘0 for surrounding with parentheses."

[via: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hcYAHix-riY ]
calculators  mac  osx  naturallanguage  softwre  applications 
july 2016 by robertogreco
Desmos | Beautiful, Free Math
"At Desmos, we imagine a world of universal math literacy, where no student thinks that math is too hard or too dull to pursue. We believe the key is learning by doing. When learning becomes a journey of exploration and discovery, anyone can understand – and enjoy! – math.

To achieve this vision, we’ve started by building the next generation of the graphing calculator. Using our powerful and blazingly-fast math engine, the calculator can instantly plot any equation, from lines and parabolas up through derivatives and Fourier series. Data tables open up a world of curve-fitting and modeling. Sliders make it a breeze to demonstrate function transformations. As browser-based html5 technology, the graphing calculator works on any computer or tablet without requiring any downloads. It's intuitive, beautiful math. And best of all: it's completely free.

Desmos is used by students, teachers, researchers, and general math enthusiasts from every state, and 169 countries. Join the fun! Launch the calculator"

[via: http://infinitesums.com/commentary/2015/ipad-use-years-later ]
math  software  graphing  education  tools  applications  ios  android  mathematics  teaching  calculators 
march 2015 by robertogreco
Calculating the Weight of the Object / Snarkmarket
"I’ve been thinking a lot lately about the relationship between objects and activities. It’s something obviously affected by digitally-enabled multi-functionality. The digital object doesn’t so much have “a function” as a series of functions under an umbrella of one or two metafunctions – to wit, “this device is what I use to keep up to date” or “my tablet is what I use to read everything from the news to novels.” The association between object and function that was often one-to-one has become multiplied, perhaps receding into infinity (what, really, is the limit of what you can do with your iPhone?)

But more than that, though I know it sounds like mere tautology, the function of physical devices is related to their physicality. How they operate and what they do in 3D space is dependent on the manner in which they occupy that space. Maybe it’s my digitally-addled brain that needs reminding of that, but it somehow feels like a point worth repeating. And the Curta, in a world in which even the scientific calculator feels arcane, just seems so fascinatingly, resoundingly, undeniably physical. And perhaps it’s because of that physicality, but something about it thus seems so purposeful.

It is easy to get caught up in romanticizing the object we can touch, just as we here on Snarkmarket can occasionally get a bit too attached to pixels you can interact with and manipulate. But I’ve been wondering lately if, beyond the chatter about the attention economy or a supposed “inherent” nature to print or screens, there isn’t something pleasurable in the object that performs but one function. Physical or digital, it doesn’t matter. All I mean to ask is if there isn’t something to be enjoyed in a conscious minimalism of function rather than form – that one might find relief in the simplicity of a one-to-one relationship between an activity and a thing."

[Video referenced within: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZDn_DDsBWws ]
snarkmarket  2014  objects  physicality  weight  navneetalang  williamgibson  patternrecognition  curta  calculators  digital  physical  digitalobjects  metafunctions  functions  space  purpose  pixels  dimensionality  3d 
january 2014 by robertogreco
Soulver | Acqualia
"Soulver helps you work things out.

It's quicker to use than a spreadsheet, and smarter and clearer than a traditional calculator.

Use Soulver to play around with numbers, do "back of the envelope" quick calculations, and solve day-to-day problems."
via:clivethompson  applications  math  iphone  software  calculator  osx  interfacedesign  interface  calculators  ios 
december 2012 by robertogreco
Pasta&Vinegar » Blog Archive » The graphing calculator plateau
"This piece in The Atlantic by Alexis Madrigal deals with an interesting case in technological evolution: the stabilization of a technical objects, which in this case in the so-called graphing calculator."
technology  calculators  math  education  science  nicolasnova  tools  plateaus  2011  alexismadrigal 
september 2011 by robertogreco
A 19th-Century Mathematician Finally Proves Himself : NPR
"Charles Babbage, the man whom many consider to be the father of modern computing, never got to complete any of his life's work. The Victorian gentleman was a brilliant mathematician, but he wasn't very good at politics and fundraising, so he never got the financial backing to finish any of his elaborate machine designs. For decades, even his fans weren't certain whether his computing machines would have worked.
history  computers  charlesbabbage  adalovelace  engineering  geek  math  npr  calculators  victorianage 
december 2009 by robertogreco

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