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robertogreco : camps   12

Capitalism Camp for Kids - The New York Times
"Embedded in these programs is at least one contradiction: They promote entrepreneurship and leadership, but are also training kids to be good employees; to be innovators and disrupters, but also to be model office drones."
camps  capitalism  socialism  contradiction  drones  employees  obedience  innovation  disruption  entrepreneurship  children  indoctrination 
june 2019 by robertogreco
QuantumCamp
"We were founded in 2009 on the simple idea that humans love to learn, and intentionally design an educational experience that supports this in our classrooms. The result is an exciting intellectual and social environment where students leave a class or a summer camp fulfilled, energized, and excited to continue exploring these ideas.

QC AT-A-GLANCE
QuantumCamp is a school enterprise with a core mission of delivering amazing, hands-on math and science courses to kids via three main platforms:

1. In-School Labs
2. Home School
3. Summer Camps

Students
Both homeschoolers and summer campers come from all backgrounds and from all academic skill levels. QuantumCamp students come from all nine Bay Area counties.

Faculty

QuantumCamp instructors are given one main task: facilitate an environment which allows student-driven discovery. We pride ourselves on our curriculum - developed by in-house content experts, and value the importance of collaboration. We are looking for innovative educators, who are excited to teach small classes, and contribute to our growing math and science program."
homeschool  marin  education  lcproject  openstudioproject  bayarea  camps  math  science 
march 2018 by robertogreco
The Winnebago Workshop Application « Little Brown Mushroom
"This August we’re going to have our first week-long Winnebago Workshop. Each day we will meet at the St. Paul studios of Alec Soth and Little Brown Mushroom. After a morning brainstorming session, we’ll board our RV and explore. Through photographs, video, drawing and writing, participants will collect visual stories. Throughout the course of the week, we’ll have public projections of the stories on the side of the RV.
Who: Teen artists (age 16-18)

When: August 17-22, 2015. 9am – evening

Where: We’ll meet each day in the Midway area of St. Paul and then drive wherever the wind blows us.

Cost: Free

Due by August 3rd at 5pm

Questions? Please email: workshop @ littlebrownmushroom.com



Do you like to *
• Draw
• Take Pictures
• Make Movies
• Write
• Otro: [blank]

Tell us a short informal story or anecdote that gives a sense of your personality. *

Tell us about your dream field trip you've never taken. *

Show us some stuff!

We want to get to know you. Send pictures, videos or links to your work online. We'd also love to see a self portrait.

Upload a self portrait here: https://goo.gl/NH9oW2

Email us links/videos/photos at: workshop @ littlebrownmushroom.com "

[See also: http://www.littlebrownmushroom.com/blog/the-winnebago-workshop/ ]
alecsoth  winnebagoworkshop  teens  youth  education  camps  summercamp  littlebrownmushroom  workshops  classideas  srpaul  minnesota  art  photography  storytelling  film  video 
july 2015 by robertogreco
Campsick: Julian Bleecker Reports from Alec Soth’s Camp for Socially Awkward Storytellers — Magazine — Walker Art Center
"To give a measure of what a Camp for Socially Awkward Storytellers is, let me describe some of its awkward moments.

1. Unspecified expectations, except whatever happens, it will be shared at a public slideshow on the last day.

2. No packing list. Usually, when I went to summer camp as a young tot, there were checklists of bug spray, 12 changes of underwear, swim trunks, swim goggles, toiletries, sleeping bag, wash cloth, pajamas, sun hat, etc.

3. No agenda, except to show up on July 9 at the offices of Little Brown Mushroom around 9:30 or 10.

4. Suburban excursion in a stout RV. That just sorta happened. Spontaneously.

5. Itchy, scratchy mosquito bites in spite of semi-legal, high-test, under-the-counter mosquito repellent.

6. Late-night slideshows. (Think of it as a modern variant of the campfire story telling hour.)

7. A surprise birthday cake.

8. A dance.

9. Campsick. It’s like homesick, but for camp. Specifically, an aching in the belly, like you’ve finished a great summer at camp and must immediately make plans to stay in touch and meet again. As soon as possible. Like something happened you didn’t want to stop, but you had to because it was too expensive to change flights and stay another day or two.

That was the Little Brown Mushroom Camp for Socially Awkward Storytellers, a project that brought together 15 eager campers from all over the map. Camp, as Soth described it to me, “evokes campfires and canoes, but the definition is actually quite flexible. ‘Camp’ simply means a summertime gathering that lacks the formal and institutionalized aura of school.” For Soth, the hope was “to just create a context in which people can make art happen.”

But that context, as camp’s name suggests, is decidedly awkward. That’s fitting for a group like Little Brown Mushroom. There is not the pretension that one might expect from a studio attached to an artist’s name. It would’ve been clear to anyone who knew of LBM—either through its blog, their books, or Soth’s work—that camp would not be supplicating students learning from the great master. First of all, Soth is self-admittedly awkward in front of people, so he would not be holding forth in the style of the self-indulgent artist. We’d be working among each other, campers and counselors on equal footing. It was activity-time camp, nearly 14 hours every day. We’d be defining the activities. Exuberant, exhausting, difficult, strange, get-your-game-face-on kinds of activities."



"I have no idea what’s going on, or what I’m doing, but I’m doing it.

And now, back at our encampment there are four of us quietly sitting, thinking, drawing, talking. Out of nowhere, Jim’s lying on the ground in front of the limb-and-leaf backdrop. He’s perfectly still. Is it overdone performance, or is he my muse for the day? I decide, game-face on, he’ll be my muse. Most people have left to find stories in the neighborhood surrounding the park. Some have driven to other parts of town.

The hard part is finding a story in that. You have to, though. Day Two slideshow is at 7 pm. That’s just a couple hours from now.

This is the day that I realize I need to be inspired by the constraints that exist at camp. There are constraints of time, obviously. Cooking out a slideshow from a day of conversations, excursions, light reading, trundling in RVs, following fellow campers in the woods. All this means I have to hold my ideas lightly, not make things too precious, keeping my nose up for any whiff of a story to find and tell.

Today, I’ve become sensitized to what Soth refers to as “humble epics.” Big, powerful things, perhaps in modest, carefully constructed, simple, compact, $18 or cheaper packages.

That’s a kind of storytelling that feels quite modern in a sense. The overwrought image and text story is not what will come out of camp. There are no Taschen-sized epics to be done here, at least for me. I find that liberating. As I quickly refine and hone and edit my forest slideshow, I consider LBM’s obsession with audaciously democratizing the pricing of their publications at $18. I think about Target, the Twin Cities mega-mega that I can imagine goes to nutso ends to whittle pricing by fractions of pennies to make them the no-brainer store. Soth mentions an LBM book that they couldn’t get cheaper than $24, and you can physically see the disappointment at the price-point in his shoulders. Soth would make a great Target buyer. You know, in case this whole photography thing doesn’t work out.

The inexpensive, accessible, humble, epic, image+text LBM books come with an inherent simplicity in production, packaging, and design that is an aesthetic in its own right. Accessible, humble epics are a thing of note, especially within the world that Soth could circulate. He’s a Minnesotan first, Magnum photographer second. Beautiful, seductive, tangible $18 stories-in-books are not a gimmick. Free camp isn’t a gimmick. I can see the earnestness in his explanation of the non-tuition camp. He wants it open. He doesn’t want to turn away someone who could not afford to attend because of a fee. He doesn’t want LBM to be big business.

And only now do I realize that we’re learning how to tell stories. I’ve never mentioned it and stifled the thought in my own head, but we’ve not had formal discussions about photography. At the end of Day Two, during the slideshow, I resolve the suspicion I’ve had since shortly before I arrived: this is not a photography camp, despite being in a photography studio. That thought relaxes me. No one’s geeking out on gear. There is scant feedback on technical elements of image-making or storytelling. We’re free to find stories. Of course, that’s liberating and debilitating at the same time. We’re not told what to do. We’re only told that “whatever you do, whatever story you want to tell at the public slideshow on Saturday, it mustn’t take more than five minutes to tell.”

Day Three
Bookmaking Day, although we don’t make books. We talk about books and their making and unmaking. Some campers wonder why we’re doing a slideshow rather than a book as a final deliverable. A book is easier to keep and share and show again and again. We have a nice, long discussion in the morning facilitated by Alec and designer and art director Hans Seeger. We talk about the materiality and tangibility of books. Their preciousness. The contrast in books designed too earnestly, and books devoid of design that are merely containers for famous photographs by famous photographers. We talked about the great glissade of books after 1986 when computers performed their radical democratization of visual design and publishing. And I wondered how short-form composition and networked dissemination frameworks like Twitter, Instagram, and Vine would do similar things. I wonder aloud to camp if the modern image+text story as we know it now—the things in Soth’s studio library—are for doddering “old” folks like us? I want to talk about the modern, modern image+text story? Is Adam Goldberg’s Vine feed tomorrow’s Willliam Eggleston, or perhaps Cindy Sherman? The comparison may sound idiotic. I once thought that instantly sharing one’s thoughts in 140 characters was idiotic and self-indulgent. I once thought #selfies were idiotic. Then the Arab Spring happened, facilitated in part by 140 characters and what protesters could share in a single image.

The bookmaking-day discussions turn into a list of books to get and a note to consider getting another bookshelf at home. That’s fine. Having a library of books—the material sort—is validated by LBM’s amazing collection. It’s the morning-quiet-time gathering place we all meander through as our coffee takes hold. There’s a quiet reverence to the library in the mornings as campers peruse the stacks, heads cocked to the side to read titles. I find my first photo book in the B’s [Hello, Skater Girl, 2012] and feel suddenly embarrassed at its earnest naivete. I wish I had been to camp and learned what I am learning at camp before I made that.

LBM is a publisher of stories, so one might think camp would do a book as a final outcome. But that brings along complexity and time and money, and you begin to obsess over the operational details of producing such a thing. The slideshow. It has a tradition. It’s familial. It’s familiar. It’s something that can be condensed into a short amount of time. It has history."



"I think about “bookmaking” day’s discussion of Darin Mickey’s Stuff I Gotta Remember Not To Forget and his image story about his father’s odd, Cohen-esque life as a salesman of storage space in underground vaults. In 27 images, Mickey tells a remarkable, humorous, heartfelt story about his father. And I think of Soth’s image of a strikingly pale Indonesian girl he stumbles upon, photographs for The Auckland Project, loses the photograph and then spends the rest of his time struggling to find a story, struggling to find an image that moves him. He finds “missing cat” posters, bird road kill, and pale models. Just hours before he leaves Auckland, he stumbles upon Diandra, the pale Indonesian girl, sitting delicately on a low wall, watching the tiniest bird.

These count as powerful stories in my mind and from what I’ve been learning at camp. I’m thinking about “humble epics,” creative constraints. And how to get done in the next four hours."
julianbleecker  campforsociallyawkwardstorytellers  alecsoth  openstudioproject  camp  lcproject  classideas  walkerartcenter  minnesota  adventure  fun  conferences  unconferences  experientialeducation  design  bookslcproject  summerinwintercamp  littlebrownmushroom  ncmideas  conferenceideas  2013  camps  learning  collaboration  projectideas  experientiallearning 
august 2013 by robertogreco
Why I am no longer a skeptic
"That's right: the nerds won, decades ago, and they're now as thoroughly established as any other part of the establishment. And while nerds a relatively new elite, they're overwhelmingly the same as the old: rich, white, male, and desperate to hang onto what they've got. And I have come to realise that skepticism, in their hands, is just another tool to secure and advance their privileged position, and beat down their inferiors. As a skeptic, I was not shoring up the revolutionary barricades: instead, I was cheering on the Tsar's cavalry."

"The truth is, I became a skeptic for aesthetic reasons, and the truth is, its aesthetics now repel me. I increasingly find the core skeptical output monotonous and repetitive: there are only so many times you can debunk the same old junk, and I've had it up to here with science fanboyism. And when skeptics talk about subjects outside their domain of expertise, I'm struck by how irrelevant their comments are, and how ugly, shrill and trivial."
stephenbond  psychology  camps  mindset  reality  narrative  identity  cv  howwethink  howweact  privilege  bullying  nerds  thought  criticism  politics  science  philosophy  atheism  skepticism  via:nicolefenton 
september 2012 by robertogreco
Amazon.com: Mob Rule Learning: Camps, Unconferences, and Trashing the Talking Head eBook: Michelle Boule: Kindle Store
"In response to the increasing failure to successfully instruct through traditional conferences and learning environments, this comprehensive resource offers the first examination of, and guide to, the “unconference” movement. Dissecting the impact of internet “mob rule” on continuing education and training, this book shows how a new breed of digital solutions—including camps, “unconferences,” and peer learning strategies—successfully put the power of knowledge in the hands of learners. In addition to providing a step-by-step approach to planning and leading a successful camp or “unconference,” numerous case studies are presented, as well as interviews and examples of emerging education and training models for organizations, businesses, and community groups of all sizes."

[See also: http://www.worldcat.org/title/mob-rule-learning-camps-unconferences-and-trashing-the-talking-head/oclc/726821067 ]
egalitarian  mobrulelearning  edcamp  presentations  camps  2011  michelleboule  books  hierarchy  unschooling  deschooling  unconferences  education  learning 
february 2012 by robertogreco
YouTube - Audubon Society of Portland: Marmot Cabin on the Joe Miller Wildlife Sanctuary
"Experience an unforgettable overnighter at our rustic cabin in the foothills of Mt Hood, Groups will meet our Naturalists at the "Marmot Cabin" (near Sandy) & have the site to themselves as they explore a remote Wildlife Sanctuary. Children will seek out signs of Beaver, Deer & Elk as they venture through the lush vegetation of a pristine riparian zone. Students learn to read animal sign, identify plants & interpret the landscape, honing their own naturalist skills along the way. After dinner, students will venture into the darkness in search of bats & owls, & return for an educational program on these nocturnal creatures. In the morning, children will get to learn even more about our native animals via a hands-on study of pelts, skulls & specimens. We will design a program that builds, expands & enhances your environmental curriculum."

[More at: http://audubonportland.org/trips-classes-camps/school-programs/overnight AND http://trackerspdx.com/youth/outdoor-school.php ]

[See also: http://www.flickr.com/photos/audubonkidspdx/5759352809/ ]
portland  outdoors  outdooreducation  audubon  oregon  marmotcabin  sandy  mthood  naturalists  nature  education  camps  cabins 
june 2011 by robertogreco
CITYterm
"CITYterm, a semester program for thirty intellectually adventuresome juniors and seniors in high school, makes New York City its Laboratory and Classroom.

At CITYterm you will explore the city. You will immerse yourself in the city's five boroughs, connecting with them. You will meet authors, city officials, historians, urban planners, the homeless. you will come to understand New York City, its inhabitants and your own learning potential, returning to your home school ready to embark upon new adventures."
nyc  cityterm  classtrips  conferences  teaching  experientiallearning  education  cities  lcproject  cv  exploration  urban  urbanism  psychogeography  classideas  fieldtrips  highschool  learning  unschooling  deschooling  tcsnmy  residential  camps  interdisciplinary  multidisciplinary  crossdisciplinary 
february 2011 by robertogreco
Palomar5 The Movie
"It is impossible to really capture what happened in the roundabout 65.000 minutes during the Palomar5 camp in 2009 in something like a movie. Nevertheless, we want everyone to experience at least a glimpse of it - within 60 minutes.

Thanks to our filmmaker and editor Patricia Günther, who accompanied great parts of the camp and made this movie possible."
berlin  conferences  palomar5  workshops  camps  collaborative 
april 2010 by robertogreco
Not Back to School Camp: A Glance Within on Vimeo
"Not Back to School Camp is a week-long camp for teenage unschoolers, which occurs annually in Oregon and Vermont. At this camp, both teens and staff gather to learn from, grow with, and inspire each other by sharing their talents, interests, and skills in true unschooler fashion.
unschooling  notbacktoschool  notbacktoschoolcamp  camps  documentary  gracellewellyn  learning  glvo 
february 2010 by robertogreco
TED Blog: TED's Facebook fans asked Gever Tulley absolutely anything -- and he answered
Just a few clips: "In support of both of those ideas, we are working with a homeschooling (both unschooling, and curriculum-based) group in Santa Rosa, California who are allowing us to experiment with their children (cue cartoon-ominous laugh). ... If we are to change public policy around testing, we will have to show that not-testing works better. Tinkering School is an experiment in one aspect of that, but their are some courageous efforts out there like the Sudbury Valley schools that have been creating an unschooling-like experience in a school-like facility for more than 30 years -- and showing that it works. Almost 90 percent of kids from those schools go on to higher education after graduating -- and that's after never haven taken a test in their lives."
gevertulley  tinkering  homeschool  unschooling  make  making  learning  exploration  safety  fear  interviews  children  trust  risk  tools  camps  time  education  deschooling  diy  tcsnmy  handson  projectbasedlearning  criticalthinking  failure  lcproject  sudburyschools  tinkeringschool  pbl 
july 2009 by robertogreco
Gever Tulley teaches life lessons through tinkering | Video on TED.com
"Gever Tulley uses engaging photos and footage to demonstrate the valuable lessons kids learn at his Tinkering School. When given tools, materials and guidance, these young imaginations run wild and creative problem-solving takes over to build unique boats, bridges and even a rollercoaster!"
gevertulley  tinkering  homeschool  unschooling  make  making  learning  exploration  safety  fear  interviews  children  trust  risk  tools  camps  time  education  deschooling  diy  tcsnmy  handson  projectbasedlearning  criticalthinking  failure  lcproject  sudburyschools  tinkeringschool  pbl 
june 2009 by robertogreco

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