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robertogreco : cardgames   19

OCCULTURE: 52. John Michael Greer in “The Polymath” // Druidry, Storytelling & the History of the Occult
"The best beard in occultism, John Michael Greer, is in the house. We’re talking “The Occult Book”, a collection of 100 of the most important stories and anecdotes from the history of the occult in western society. We also touch on the subject of storytelling as well as some other recent material from John, including his book “The Coelbren Alphabet: The Forgotten Oracle of the Welsh Bards” and his translation of a neat little number called “Academy of the Sword”."



"What you contemplate [too much] you imitate." [Uses the example of atheists contemplating religious fundamentalists and how the atheists begin acting like them.] "People always become what they hate. That’s why it's not good idea to wallow in hate."
2017  johnmichaelgreer  druidry  craft  druids  polymaths  autodidacts  learning  occulture  occult  ryanpeverly  celts  druidrevival  history  spirituality  thedivine  nature  belief  dogma  animism  practice  life  living  myths  mythology  stories  storytelling  wisdom  writing  howwewrite  editing  writersblock  criticism  writer'sblock  self-criticism  creativity  schools  schooling  television  tv  coelbrenalphabet  1980s  ronaldreagan  sustainability  environment  us  politics  lies  margaretthatcher  oraltradition  books  reading  howweread  howwelearn  unschooling  deschooling  facetime  social  socializing  cardgames  humans  human  humanism  work  labor  boredom  economics  society  suffering  misery  trapped  progress  socialmedia  computing  smarthphones  bullshitjobs  shinto  talismans  amulets  sex  christianity  religion  atheism  scientism  mainstream  counterculture  magic  materialism  enlightenment  delusion  judgement  contemplation  imitation  fundamentalism  hate  knowledge 
february 2018 by robertogreco
The Quiet Year – Buried Without Ceremony
"For a long time, we were at war with The Jackals. But now, we’ve driven them off, and we have this – a year of relative peace. One quiet year, with which to build our community up and learn once again how to work together. Come Winter, the Frost Shepherds will arrive and we might not survive beyond that. But we don’t know about that yet. What we know is that right now, in this moment, there is an opportunity to build something.

The Quiet Year is a map game. You define the struggles of a post-apocalyptic community, and attempt to build something good within their quiet year. Every decision and every action is set against a backdrop of dwindling time and rising concern.

The game is played using a deck of cards – each of the 52 cards corresponds to a week during the quiet year. Each card triggers certain events – bringing bad news, good omens, project delays and sudden changes in luck. At the end of the quiet year, the Frost Shepherds will come, ending the game.

a game by Avery Alder
with endless support and vision from Jackson Tegu
and art by Ariel Norris
(header photo taken from Shut Up & Sit Down review.)"
games  cardgames  play  maps  mapping  toplay  time 
january 2018 by robertogreco
A card game about drone strikes makes you comfortably numb - Kill Screen - Videogame Arts & Culture.
"By my third game of Bycatch, I was no longer bothered if the target was a child. It didn’t matter who the target was at all. They were a number and a few identifying characteristics: red bag, orange dress, man or woman, young or old. I was surprised by how quickly I settled into the rhythms of the game and its dictionary. This is the reason such language is so meticulously crafted by state departments and militaries to remove the humanity from a war zone. “Bycatch,” collateral damage, the fish in the net you didn’t mean to swoop up that is too worthless to worry about.

Those first couple games, though, it was unsettling. Bycatch is a Rummy-like card game in which each player is a country looking to place numerically ordered runs of citizens into shelters, taking them out of play and earning that player points. Nine numbered cards make up the citizens, each with flat but distinct character art. Two of these citizens are children; one of them wears a yarmulke. “Intelligence” cards randomly determine the current target; if you shelter the target, your points for that shelter are doubled. But you can also send out the drones.

Along the lines of Go Fish, where you are sniffing around the other players’ hands and calling out what you want and think they might have, Bycatch gives you the option to use a camera phone to shakily spy on your neighboring countries to identify targets worth a strike attempt. Remote-manned military vehicles have dominated our collective consciousness lately, and with good reason: We are told in many ways that they are all-knowing, all-powerful, and they would never be used against us. Here your camera-in-hand is the drone, and when taking surveillance over another player, you hold your phone over their hand such that you can’t see the screen or the faces of their cards. Thus you don’t know what you’ve got until you have already taken the picture, and your resulting intelligence is often pointed up your own nose or just a blur, though even a little info is better than nothing.

During your turn you can only take a single action: survey an opposing player’s hand with your drone-phone, build a shelter for points, order a strike if you discard two of the same citizens, or do nothing. You can’t drop bombs willy-nilly, and information is always outdated. Whenever a drone strike is ordered, three citizens are removed; if one of them is the target then the attacking player gets 100 points per matching target, minus 10 for each citizen that was not the target, aka the “bycatch” or collateral damage.

As we played, I learned a few things about myself: Taking blind photos of your opponent’s hand is difficult at first, resulting in some hilarious and creepy selfies; no intelligence is infallible and the ability to bluff is key; and, though I was quite uncomfortable with the idea of administrating death from above during the first game or two, I would eventually to order drone strikes with no information and no concern who the current target was, just to mess up an opponent’s chance to build a high-scoring shelter.

Bycatch does have an explicit goal of getting people to talk about this sort of military activity, done on our behalf and affecting thousands of innocent people around the world. And it works, though it doesn’t dominate the experience. When my opponent racks up ten collateral damage kills in a sort of scorched earth campaign against me, eventually he gets his target, but at what cost? Even a successful strike sweeps up the innocent, you will pretty much always catch non-targeted citizens in an attack, so a strike is often imprecise and never clean.

But it’s easy to bury those impulses relatively quickly. In the moment it’s simply a game, with rules and a lexicon that strips out empathy from drone strike victims while simultaneously every card is a picture of a person living an ordinary life and collateral damage is nothing short of murder executed at your order. I mean, ok: we are holding cards, not nuclear launch codes, but the artwork of Bycatch is a consistent reminder of the human costs involved even if this is all just a metaphor. It’s all disconcerting at first, but by my sixth go-round I was cheering successful strikes and moving on accordingly. Still, even a number of games later, uncertainty creeps up on me. By then it’s too late."
games  cardgames  drones  droneproject  2015  bycatch  collateraldamage  military  warfare  war  toplay 
march 2015 by robertogreco
Whist - Wikipedia
"Whist is a classic English trick-taking card game which was played widely in the 18th and 19th centuries. It derives from the 16th century game of Trump or Ruff, via Ruff and Honours. Although the rules are extremely simple, there is enormous scope for scientific play."
games  cardgames  play  srg  edg  classideas  whist  trump  ruff 
may 2011 by robertogreco
scottmccloud.com - Five Card Nancy
"Five Card Nancy is a Dada card game using cut-up panels from Ernie Bushmiller's long-running 20th Century comic strip Nancy. Here are the official rules if you want to make your own deck and try it out. Special thanks to Barry Deutsch whose Usenet post in late ‘98 gave me the jumping off point for the write-up.<br />
<br />
You're looking at pictures of fish because I'm too lazy to argue with United Media's lawyers."
comics  games  storytelling  humor  cards  cardgames  diy  scottmccloud  fivecardnancy  dada  dadaism 
april 2011 by robertogreco
The Phylomon Project
"Well 2010 is here, a.k.a. the International Year of Biodiversity, and to us at the SCQ, it means that we're finally ready to go ahead with our long awaited phylomon project. “What is this?” you ask? Well, it's an online initiative aimed at creating a Pokemon card type resource but with real creatures on display in full “character design” wonder. Not only that - but we plan to have the scientific community weigh in to determine the content on such cards (note that the cards above are only a mock-up of what that content might be), as well as folks who love gaming to try and design interesting ways to use the cards. Then to top it all off, members of the teacher community will participate to see whether these cards have educational merit. Best of all, the hope is that this will all occur in a non-commercial-open-access-open-source-because-basically-this-is-good-for-you-your-children-and-your-planet sort of way."
pokemon  taxonomy  pedagogy  education  children  teaching  science  games  animals  biology  memory  biodiversity  conservation  2010  gaming  cardgames  tcsnmy  opensource  creativecommons  kids  art  life  eowilson  publicservice  glvo  edg  srg  drawing  illustration  pokémon 
january 2010 by robertogreco
Brisca - Wikipedia, la enciclopedia libre
"La brisca es un juego de naipes que se juega con la baraja española. Se puede jugar de a dos, de a cuatro (dos parejas enfrentadas) o de a seis (dos equipos de tres jugadores enfrentados), siendo el juego de a cuatro el más habitual. Si se juega de a s
games  play  cardgames  cards  argentina  spain  español  naipes  españa 
may 2008 by robertogreco
Tute - Wikipedia, la enciclopedia libre
"El tute es un juego de naipes muy arraigado en España. Tiene varias modalidades y se puede jugar entre dos, tres o cuatro jugadores. El juego consiste en "sumar tantos", se emplea la baraja española de 40 cartas, con las únicas excepciones del tute su
games  play  cardgames  cards  argentina  spain  español  naipes  españa 
may 2008 by robertogreco
Mus - Wikipedia, la enciclopedia libre
"El mus es un juego de naipes, de origen vasco-navarro, que en la actualidad se encuentra muy extendido por toda la geografía española. Lo juegan cuatro personas agrupadas en dos parejas. Las reglas pueden variar mucho dependiendo de dónde se juegue, p
games  play  cardgames  cards  argentina  spain  español  naipes  españa 
may 2008 by robertogreco
Chinchón (juego de naipes) - Wikipedia, la enciclopedia libre
"El objetivo final del juego es formar chinchón (escalera de siete cartas del mismo palo), cuando un jugador quede con una cantidad de puntos igual o inferior a -100, o cuando el resto de los jugadores haya superado los 100 puntos, o se hayan retirado."
games  play  cardgames  cards  argentina  spain  español  naipes  españa 
may 2008 by robertogreco
Escoba del 15 - Wikipedia, la enciclopedia libre
"La Escoba o Escoba de 15 es un juego de cartas para dos, tres o cuatro jugadores, que se juega con una baraja española. El juego de la escoba se basa en hacer bazas de cartas que sumen 15 puntos, teniendo en cuenta que cada una de ellas tiene el valor d
games  play  cardgames  cards  argentina  spain  español  naipes  españa 
may 2008 by robertogreco
Truco (juego de naipes) - Wikipedia, la enciclopedia libre
"El truco, truque o truc es un juego de naipes con baraja española originario de Valencia y las Islas Baleares (España), muy difundido en el Cono Sur de América: Argentina, Paraguay, Uruguay, sur de Chile y sur de Brasil. Existe también una versión l
games  play  cardgames  cards  argentina  uruguay  spain  español  naipes  españa 
may 2008 by robertogreco
Naipes Casino
Reglamentos de juegos: Chin-chon, Mus, Truco, Tute, Brisca, Escoba de 15
games  play  español  glvo  rules  cards  cardgames 
april 2008 by robertogreco
Play This Thing! | Game Reviews | Free Games | Independent Games | Game Culture
"In a sense, Fluxx is a stripped down version of Nomic -- a self-modifying game with a small initial set of rules and the ability to change them. Nomic depends on player voting; Fluxx depends on card-play."
cards  gamedesign  games  play  fun  cardgames 
january 2008 by robertogreco
Welcome to Perplex City
"Mind Candy has been appointed agents on Earth to the Perplex City Academy, and are handling all the logistics, marketing and customer support related to the Cube Retrieval project. The Perplex City puzzle cards are a key element in raising awareness of t
games  interactive  play  online  fun  fiction  culture  urban  web  internet  perplexcity  arg  puzzles  reality  MMO  media  marketing  cardgames  multiplayer 
february 2006 by robertogreco

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