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robertogreco : cards   26

Looking at Perfect Shuffles - Numberphile - YouTube
"How do cards move in a perfectly shuffled deck.
More links & stuff in full description below ↓↓↓

This continues on Numberphile2 at: http://youtu.be/UawZn7X42OM (including a look at 52 card decks)
Featuring Federico Ardila from San Francisco State University.
Federico: https://twitter.com/FedericoArdila

More cards and shuffling videos: http://bit.ly/Cards_Shuffling "
federicoardila  math  mathematics  classideas  shuffling  cards  2015 
april 2018 by robertogreco
Why cards are the future of the web - Inside Intercom
"Cards are fast becoming the best design pattern for mobile devices."



"In addition to their reputable past as an information medium, the most important thing about cards is that they are almost infinitely manipulatable. See the simple example above from Samuel Couto Think about cards in the physical world. They can be turned over to reveal more, folded for a summary and expanded for more details, stacked to save space, sorted, grouped, and spread out to survey more than one.

When designing for screens, we can take advantage of all these things. In addition, we can take advantage of animation and movement. We can hint at what is on the reverse, or that the card can be folded out. We can embed multimedia content, photos, videos, music. There are so many new things to invent here.

Cards are perfect for mobile devices and varying screen sizes. Remember, mobile devices are the heart and soul of the future of your business, no matter who you are and what you do. On mobile devices, cards can be stacked vertically, like an activity stream on a phone. They can be stacked horizontally, adding a column as a tablet is turned 90 degrees. They can be a fixed or variable height.

Cards are the new creative canvas

It’s already clear that product and interaction designers will heavily use cards. I think the same is true for marketers and creatives in advertising. As social media continues to rise, and continues to fragment into many services, taking up more and more of our time, marketing dollars will inevitably follow. The consistent thread through these services, the predominant canvas for creativity, will be card based. Content consumption on Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, Instagram, Line, you name it, is all built on the card design metaphor.

I think there is no getting away from it. Cards are the next big thing in design and the creative arts. To me that’s incredibly exciting."
cards  web  webdesign  webdev  userinterface  ux  userexperience  ui  design  mobile  pauladams 
september 2017 by robertogreco
Card Thief
"Card Thief is a solitaire style stealth game played with a deck of cards.

In Card Thief you move through a deck of cards as a stealthy thief. Sneak in the shadows, extinguish torches, pickpocket guards and steal valuable treasures without getting caught. In your thief hideout you can use your stolen goods to unlock powerful equipment cards. Each heist you can use 3 equipment cards to become a skillful master thief.

Card Thief, the official follow up to Tinytouchtales excellent dungeon crawler Card Crawl, attempts to condense the classic stealth genre into a solitaire style card game. The game offers an accessible core gameplay with a deep layer of tactical planning and various risk reward mechanics on top. In 4 different heists you can test your skills against various enemy and trap types. By successfully completing heists you can unlock and upgrade 12 equipment cards each with a unique ability to improve your highscores."
games  ios  iphone  ipad  applications  cards  gaming 
june 2017 by robertogreco
Taking note: Luhmann's Zettelkasten
"Index cards played a large role in research during the last century -- the 20th century, that is. And there is still a great deal of interest in using index cards as a means for organizing one's daily life. See, for instance, Index Cards, More Index Cards, Photos, or any number of other sites that are fascinated by paper or "analog devices," as they are sometimes referred to by geeks in this time when electronic devices take over more and more of our lives. But index cards clearly also were the model for important early programs intended for what is by some called with the unfortunate phrase "personal knowledge management" today. I mean such programs as NoteCard, HyperCard, and their successors, which began from the index- or note-card metaphor.

One of the more interesting systems for keeping such index cards was developed by the German sociologist Niklas Luhmann (1927-1998). I have no great interest in his theory. I am fascinated by his method of keeping notes, and will therefore restrict my comments to this aspect of his work. But if you are interested, you can visit Niklas Luhmann for a short introduction to his theory. Clearly, his index-card-system and his sociological theory are connected in interesting, intricate, and not easily understood ways, but I will forgo investigating these for now.

One of the things that made his Zettelkasten or slip box (or note card file) so intriguing to the larger (German) public was a 1981 paper, entitled "Kommunikation mit Zettelkästen. Ein Erfahrungsbericht" (Communication with Index Card Systems. An Empirical Account. It appeared in Niklas Luhmann, Universität als Milieu. Kleine Schriften. hrsg. von André Kieserling. Bielefeld: Verlag Cordula Haux, 1992.) Luhmann claimed that his file was something of a collaborator in his work, a largely independent partner in his research and writing. It might have started out as a mere apprentice when Luhmann was still studying himself (in 1951), but after thirty years of having been fed information by the human collaborator it had acquired the ability of surprising him again an again. Since the ability of genuinely surprising one another is an essential characteristic of genuine communication, he argued that there was actually communication going on between himself and his partner in theory.

Luhmann also described his system as his secondary memory (Zweitgedächtnis), alter ego, or his reading memory or (Lesegedächtnis).

Luhmann's notecard system is different from that of others because of the way he organized the information, intending it not just for the next paper or the next book, as most other researchers did, but for a life-time of working and publishing. He thus rejected the mere alphabetical organisation of the material just as much as the systematic arrangement in accordance with fixed categories, like that of the Dewey Decimal System, for instance. Instead, he opted for an approach that was "thematically unlimited," or is limited only insofar as it limits itself.

Instead, he opted for organisation by numbers. Every slip would receive a number, independently of the information on it, starting with 1, and potentially continuing to infinity. Since his slips were relatively small (slightly larger than 5 x 8 cards, or Din-A 6, to be precise), he often had to continue on other slips the information or train of thought started on one slip. In this way, he would end up with Numbers like 1/1 and 1/2 and 1/3 etc. He wrote these numbers in black ink at the top of the slip, so that they could easily be seen when a slip was removed and then put back in the file.

Apart from such linear continuations of topics on different slips, Luhmann also introduced a notation for branchings of topics. Thus, when he felt that a certain term needed to be further discussed or the information about it needed to be supplemented, he would begin a new slip that addded a letter, like a, b, or c to the number. So, a branching from slip 1/6 could have branches like 1/6a or 1/6b, up to 1/6z. These branching connections were marked by red numbers within the text, close to the place that needed further explanation or information. Since any of these branches might require further continuations, he also had many slips of the form 1/6a1, 1/6a2, etc. And, of course, any of these continuations can be branched again, so he could end up with such a number as:

21/3d26g53 for -- who else? -- Habermas.

These internal branchings can continue ad infinitum -- at least potentially. This is one of the advantages of the system. But there are others: (i) Because the numbers given to the slips are fixed and never change. Any slip can refer to any other slip by simply writing the proper number on the slip; and, what is more important, the other slip could be found, as long as it was properly placed in the stack or file. (ii) This system makes internal growth of the Zettelkasten possible that is completely independent of any preconceived ordering scheme. In fact, it leads to a kind of emergent order that is independent of any preconception, and this is one of the things that makes surprise or serendipity. (iii) it makes possible a register of keywords that allow one to enter into the system at a certain point to pursue a certain strand of thought. (iv) it leads to meaningful clusters within the system. Areas on which one has worked a lot are much more spatially extended than those on which one has not worked. (v) There are no privileged places in the note-card system, every card is as important as every other card, and no hierarchy is super-imposed on the system. The significance of each card depends on its relation to other cards (or the relation of other cards to it). It is a network; it is not "arboretic." Accordingly, it in some ways anticipates hypertext and the internet.

Almost all of these advantages of Luhmann's numbering scheme are, of course, easily realizable in any database system that have fixed record system. And the branching ability is easily reproduced by wiki-technology. (For more on the relation of this approach and wiki, see "Some Idiosyncratic Reflections on Note-Taking in General and ConnectedText in Particular" or Idiosyncratic Reflections on Note-Taking).

If you would like to see a video of Luhmann, explaining the intricacies of his system, go to Luhmann on Zettelkasten"
indexcards  niklasluhmann  via:tealtan  2007  notetaking  indexing  notecards  cards  zettelkasten  memory  reading  archives  organization  habermas  branching  annotation 
june 2016 by robertogreco
Small, Moving, Intelligent Parts – Words in Space
"Abstract: The great expositions and World’s Fairs of the 19th and 20th centuries were known for celebrating new technological developments. The world of index cards, fiches, and data management hardly seems germane to the avant-garde, one of the central concerns of this special issue – yet the fairs made clear that information management systems were themselves designed, and were critical components of more obviously revolutionary design practices and political movements. Cards and files became familiar attractions at expos throughout the long-20th century. But those standardized supplies came to embody different ideologies, different fantasies, as the cultural and political contexts surrounding them evolved – from the Unispheric “global village” modeled in 1964; to 1939’s scientifically managed World of Tomorrow; and, finally, to the age of internationalist aspirations that led up to World War I. We examine how the small, moving parts of information have indexed not only data, but also their own historical and cultural milieux."

[See also this thread,
https://twitter.com/shannonmattern/status/748180579426930688

that points to
https://twitter.com/npseaver/status/735140727806648320
http://savageminds.org/2014/05/21/structuralism-thinking-with-computers/
https://takingnotenow.blogspot.com/2007/12/luhmanns-zettelkasten.html ]
shannonmattern  2016  information  history  postits  hypercard  indexcards  cards  paperslips  1964  1939  data  archives  fiches  microfiche  datamanagement  officesupplies  ottoneurath  patrickgeddes  jamerhunt  evenote  writersduet  scrivener  notecards  obliquestrategycards  brianeno  peterschmidt  marshallmcluhan  julesverne  milydickinson  walterbenjamin  wittgenstein  claudelévi-strauss  rolandbarthes  niklasluhmann  georgesperec  raymondcarver  stanleybrouwn  marklombardi  corneliavismann  eames  fragments  flow  streams  johnwilkins  knoradgessner  williamcroswellcharlescoffinjewett  vannevarbush  timberners-lee  remingtonrand  melvildewey  deweydecimalsystem  srg  paulotlet  henrilafontaine  sperrycorporation  burroughscorporation  technology  kardexsystems  sperryrand  hermanhollerith  frederickwinslotaylor  worldoftomorrow  charleseames  ibm  orithlpern  johnharwood  thomasfarrell  wallaceharrison  gordonbunschaft  edwarddurrellstone  henrydreyfuss  emilpraeger  robertmoses  janejacobs  post-its 
june 2016 by robertogreco
Parachutes | Instructions for landing in the 21st century
"
“‘Who cares for you?’ said Alice . . . ‘You’re nothing but a pack of cards!’” — Lewis Carroll

Unlike a book, cards are unbound, unnumbered, and give no indication of any order. Free of the constraints of linearity, cards move in many directions. They rub up against one another and generate unforeseen connections. And as the reader moves through them, they begin to work a simultaneous effect. A pack of cards doesn’t mount an argument or tell a story, but uncovers a terrain.
“The same or almost the same points were always being approached afresh from different directions, and new sketches made . . . if you looked at them you could get a picture of the landscape. Thus this book is really only an album.” — Ludwig Wittgenstein

Our approach, however, is nothing new. Parachutes follows a long tradition of fragmentary thinking, from the heady and enigmatic (McLuhan’s Distant Early Warning and Eno’s Oblique Strategies) to the methodical and encyclopedic (IDEO’s Method Cards and W.I.R.E.’s Mind the Future). Placing ourselves in their midst, Parachutes was born from the need to think in both parts and wholes.
“No one fragment carries the totality of the message, but each text (which is in itself a whole) has a particular urgency, an individual force, a necessity, and yet each text also has a force which comes to it from all the other texts.” — Hélène Cixous

Though diverse in their topics and far-reaching in their speculations, these cards have a definite subject matter. Without speaking too much for the text itself—a sin every introduction is fated to commit—we try to make sense of a world in which hyperconnectivity has flattened space and collapsed time, untethered us from our bodies and fractured our identities; where static objects have given way to fluid experiences and organizations call forth communities of interaction rather than make products for individual consumption.

Despite the supremacy of technology—and yet, somehow, because of it—people have never been in a better position to understand what it means to be human. In this tightly knit latticework of activity and feeling and thought, our connection with others can be felt as subtly and yet as directly as if we were swimming in a school of fish. Our study, now as ever, is the human being.

Above all, our aim has been to dismantle clichéd forms of thinking—the maps that lead us astray—in order to view the territory with fresh eyes. As we parachute into the reality of the 21st century, we survey the land from a variety of elevations and scales, vistas and vantage points. Only in that way could we observe the land’s depth as well as its extent. Only when we consider both dimensions do essential patterns emerge.
“Writing has nothing to do with meaning. It has to do with landsurveying and cartography, including the mapping of countries yet to come.” — Gilles Deleuze and Félix Guattari

In the end, however, there can be no grand conclusion. One must always move forward, chart new territories, assimilate new findings. No all-seeing summit could be reached that would not be blind to itself. Alas, and yet thankfully, we are forever amid the trees."
classideas  books  cards  publishing  linear  lewiscarroll  wittgenstein  obliquestrategies  srg  methodcards  marshalmcluhan  fragmentarythinking  hyperconnectivity  gilleseleuze  félixguattari  thinking  order  disorder  juxtaposition  howwered  deleuze&guattari  cartography  linearity  organization  hélènecixous  hypertext  connections  media  technology  business 
june 2016 by robertogreco
The End Of Apps As We Know Them - Inside Intercom
"The experience of our primary mobile screen being a bank of app icons that lead to independent destinations is dying. And that changes what we need to design and build.

How we experience content via connected devices – laptops, phones, tablets, wearables – is undergoing a dramatic change. The idea of an app as an independent destination is becoming less important, and the idea of an app as a publishing tool, with related notifications that contain content and actions, is becoming more important. This will change what we design, and change our product strategy.

NO MORE SCREENS FULL OF APP ICONS

This is such a paradigm shift it requires plenty of explaining. Whilst it may not transpire exactly as I’m about to describe, there is no doubt what we have today — screens of apps — is going to dramatically change. Bear with me as I run through the context.

The idea of having a screen full of icons, representing independent apps, that need to be opened to experience them, is making less and less sense. The idea that these apps sit in the background, pushing content into a central experience, is making more and more sense. That central experience may be something that looks like a notification centre today, or something similar to Google Now, or something entirely new.

The primary design pattern here is cards. Critically it’s not cards as a simple interaction design pattern for an apps content, but as containers for content that can come from any app. This distinction may appear subtle at first glance, but it’s far from it. To understand it, and chart the trajectory, we need to quickly run through two things.

1. Designing systems not destinations

I covered this topic in detail in a previous post, so I’ll quickly summarise here. Most of us building software are no longer designing destinations to drive people to. That was the dominant pattern for a version of the Internet that is disappearing fast. In a world of many different screens and devices, content needs to be broken down into atomic units so that it can work agnostic of the screen size or technology platform. For example, Facebook is not a website or an app. It is an eco-system of objects (people, photos, videos, comments, businesses, brands, etc.) that are aggregated in many different ways through people’s newsfeeds, timelines and pages, and delivered to a range of devices, some of which haven’t even been invented yet. So Facebook is not a set of webpages, or screens in an app. It’s a system of objects, and relationships between them.

2. Recent changes to iOS and Android notifications

Things changed with iOS 8 and Android KitKat. Notifications used to be signposts to go to other places. A notification to tell you to open an app. To open a destination.

But that is changing fast. For a while now, you can take action directly in Android notifications. Sometimes that takes you to that action in the app itself, but sometimes you can do the action directly, meaning that you don’t need to open the app at all.



We’ve moved pretty quickly from notifications as signposts, to containers (cards) that include content, and actions on that content."

[Follow-up post: “It's not the end of apps”
http://blog.intercom.io/its-not-the-end-of-apps/ ]
applications  design  ux  mobile  phones  smarthphones  interface  2015  pauladams  content  interaction  ios  android  services  software  notification  cards 
march 2015 by robertogreco
Publishing | metaLAB (at) Harvard
"metaLAB is committed to developing and experimenting with new models of scholarly and cultural communication. Its publishing projects involve partnerships with university presses, museums, libraries, and archives, and explore the boundaries of both print plus and post-print publishing. Print plus refers to innovative intertwinings between digital and printed artifacts; post-print to purely digital/multimedia models of dissemination.

There are four main areas of publishing that we are currently exploring:

◉ alternate futures for the scholarly book (the metaLABprojects series)
◉ multichannel publishing (ludic variations on the metaLABprojects series books)
◉ iterative and instant publishing (print as process, not as product)
◉ digital publishing (natively digital publishing experiments)

***

Beautiful Data Publications

These publications serve as entry points to engagement with both the material and the modes of inquiry that shaped the Beautiful Data workshop. With the intention of “open-sourcing” the elements and processes that came out of the workshop, these publications complement the material available on this website, offering routes for exploration of this material that are meant to be applicable in diverse contexts. We hope that you will activate whatever elements seem useful to you, fostering the continuing evolution of Beautiful Data.

◉ The field guide documents the concepts and flows of information that came out of the Beautiful Data workshop, linking critical discussion with invitations to experimentation and making. Using a range of modes, including case studies, maps, activities, and prototypes (and linking to online documentation of these elements), the guide aims to serve as a resource, providing various entry points into the dialogue surrounding Beautiful Data and promoting further experimentation around this material.

◉ The prototyping game provides a set of raw materials for remixing and rethinking the ways in which we design experiences with objects. This playful framework, drawn from institutional missions and contexts, offers springboards for discussion, ideation, and project development.

◉ The provocation cards, drawn from the work of participants in Beautiful Data’s weekend workshop component, provide prompts for adventures in museums, lightly provoking users to engage with these spaces in new and generative ways.

***

metaLABprojects Series

Developed with our partner, Harvard University Press, the series provides a platform for emerging currents of experimental scholarship, documenting key moments in the history of networked culture, and promoting critical thinking about the future of institutions of learning. The volumes’ eclectic, improvisatory, idea-driven style advances the proposition that design is not merely ornamental, but a means of inquiry in its own right. Accessibly priced and provocatively designed, the series invites readers to take part in reimagining print-based scholarship for the digital age. The first three books in the series are:

Matthew Battles, Jeffrey T. Schnapp, The Library Beyond the Book

Johanna Drucker, Graphesis – Visual Forms of Knowledge Production

Todd Presner, David Shepherd, Yoh Kawano, HyperCities – Thick Mapping in the Digital Humanities

The “provocations” strewn throughout The Library Beyond the Book may also be found in playing card deck form:

***

sandBOX

Inspired by mid-twentieth century experimental publications like Aspen Magazine, metaLAB is planning a “documentary in a box” project that will serve as a lab archive, time capsule, and collection of remixable provocations in material form. The publication, with sandBOX for its working title, will consist of a set of objects—maps, field guides, card decks, lego sets, and sundry unnameables that breach the analog/digital divide—delivered to its audience in a box. Under the editorial direction of metaLAB fellow Maggie Gram, sandBOX will eventuate through an iterative cascade of publishing phenomena beginning in early 2015."
metalab  2014  publishing  books  lcproject  openstudioproject  cscrd  print  srg  johannadrucker  matthewbattles  jeffreyschnapp  toddpresner  davidshepherd  yohkawano  hypercities  sandbox  beautifuldata  fieldguides  prototyping  cards  epublishing  digital 
october 2014 by robertogreco
Custom Game Cards
"Specifications:
Type: Poker sized blank cards
Number of cards per deck: from 18 up to 234
Customization: Each card can be customized individually both front and back as required.
Dimensions: 63mm x 88mm, 2.5" x 3.5"
Material options: [cardstock details]
270gsm promotional quality card stock with blue core
300gsm premium quality card stock with blue core (smooth finish)
310gsm French casino quality card stock with black core (linen finish)
13pt 100% white plastic (0.325mm)
Packaging options (per deck):
Cellowrap (default for deck sizes of above 54 cards)
White plain tuck box (add US$ 0.10 per deck)
White window tuck box (add US$ 0.10 per deck)
Clear plastic case (add US$ 0.30 per deck)
Tin box (add US$ 0.90 per deck)
Custom-printed tuck box (add as low as US$ 0.60 per deck)
Uncut sheet - your cards are not cut individually. Taken straight off the press. 54 cards per sheet (add US$ 9 per deck design)
Delivery packaging: card deck individually shrink-wrapped, boxes shrink-wrapped, uncut sheets rolled up
No minimum order required. Buy 1 deck for $12.00"
cards  games  gamedesign  boardgames  printing  via:bopuc 
april 2014 by robertogreco
The Metropolitan Museum of Art's surprising baseball card collection - ESPN
"Anyway, as Burdick was moving into middle age, he began thinking about where he wanted his collection to end up. Baseball cards weren't yet hot collectibles, so the idea that his cards might have commercial value never occurred to him. Instead, he proposed giving his collection to the Metropolitan Museum, which basically told him, "Sure, we'll take it -- as long as you catalog it and organize it first." So Burdick spent years making daily trips to the Met, where he painstakingly put all his cards into albums. He gave each series of cards its own alpha-numeric code -- sort of his own Dewey Decimal System -- that's still used by baseball card collectors today. That includes the code that has become the most famous shorthand in the card-collecting world: T206."
via:robinsonmeyer  cataloging  baseball  baseballcards  collection  folksonomy  themet  jeffersonburdick  organization  archives  cardcollecting  cards 
may 2013 by robertogreco
BBC News - In pictures: Stick men
"For those with a disability, there are times when communication can be difficult. These stick-men cards were created by Hannah Ensor to overcome that issue and are designed to be carried on a key ring."
disability  communication  design  via:anne  2013  hannahensor  cards  disabilities 
april 2013 by robertogreco
Curious Terrain | Explorer's Deck
"This deck of cards is your companion for exploring all kinds of places — streets, gardens, trails, parks, plazas, buildings, even entire neighborhoods. Use these cards as a creative catalyst and as a tool for sharpening your appreciation of the world around you.

Discover cards draw your attention to the unique elements and qualities that define a place. Record cards inspire you to try a wide range of techniques for capturing and sharing a place. Wild cards provoke thought about how issues of time and perspective affect your experience of a place.

Develop a more insightful eye for new places, and gain fresh perspectives on familiar places. Go somewhere and open the box."
oregon  portland  curiousterrain  noticing  discovery  situationist  gifts  cards  exploration 
august 2012 by robertogreco
scottmccloud.com - Five Card Nancy
"Five Card Nancy is a Dada card game using cut-up panels from Ernie Bushmiller's long-running 20th Century comic strip Nancy. Here are the official rules if you want to make your own deck and try it out. Special thanks to Barry Deutsch whose Usenet post in late ‘98 gave me the jumping off point for the write-up.<br />
<br />
You're looking at pictures of fish because I'm too lazy to argue with United Media's lawyers."
comics  games  storytelling  humor  cards  cardgames  diy  scottmccloud  fivecardnancy  dada  dadaism 
april 2011 by robertogreco
Brisca - Wikipedia, la enciclopedia libre
"La brisca es un juego de naipes que se juega con la baraja española. Se puede jugar de a dos, de a cuatro (dos parejas enfrentadas) o de a seis (dos equipos de tres jugadores enfrentados), siendo el juego de a cuatro el más habitual. Si se juega de a s
games  play  cardgames  cards  argentina  spain  español  naipes  españa 
may 2008 by robertogreco
Tute - Wikipedia, la enciclopedia libre
"El tute es un juego de naipes muy arraigado en España. Tiene varias modalidades y se puede jugar entre dos, tres o cuatro jugadores. El juego consiste en "sumar tantos", se emplea la baraja española de 40 cartas, con las únicas excepciones del tute su
games  play  cardgames  cards  argentina  spain  español  naipes  españa 
may 2008 by robertogreco
Mus - Wikipedia, la enciclopedia libre
"El mus es un juego de naipes, de origen vasco-navarro, que en la actualidad se encuentra muy extendido por toda la geografía española. Lo juegan cuatro personas agrupadas en dos parejas. Las reglas pueden variar mucho dependiendo de dónde se juegue, p
games  play  cardgames  cards  argentina  spain  español  naipes  españa 
may 2008 by robertogreco
Chinchón (juego de naipes) - Wikipedia, la enciclopedia libre
"El objetivo final del juego es formar chinchón (escalera de siete cartas del mismo palo), cuando un jugador quede con una cantidad de puntos igual o inferior a -100, o cuando el resto de los jugadores haya superado los 100 puntos, o se hayan retirado."
games  play  cardgames  cards  argentina  spain  español  naipes  españa 
may 2008 by robertogreco
Escoba del 15 - Wikipedia, la enciclopedia libre
"La Escoba o Escoba de 15 es un juego de cartas para dos, tres o cuatro jugadores, que se juega con una baraja española. El juego de la escoba se basa en hacer bazas de cartas que sumen 15 puntos, teniendo en cuenta que cada una de ellas tiene el valor d
games  play  cardgames  cards  argentina  spain  español  naipes  españa 
may 2008 by robertogreco
Truco (juego de naipes) - Wikipedia, la enciclopedia libre
"El truco, truque o truc es un juego de naipes con baraja española originario de Valencia y las Islas Baleares (España), muy difundido en el Cono Sur de América: Argentina, Paraguay, Uruguay, sur de Chile y sur de Brasil. Existe también una versión l
games  play  cardgames  cards  argentina  uruguay  spain  español  naipes  españa 
may 2008 by robertogreco
Naipes Casino
Reglamentos de juegos: Chin-chon, Mus, Truco, Tute, Brisca, Escoba de 15
games  play  español  glvo  rules  cards  cardgames 
april 2008 by robertogreco
Play This Thing! | Game Reviews | Free Games | Independent Games | Game Culture
"In a sense, Fluxx is a stripped down version of Nomic -- a self-modifying game with a small initial set of rules and the ability to change them. Nomic depends on player voting; Fluxx depends on card-play."
cards  gamedesign  games  play  fun  cardgames 
january 2008 by robertogreco
Set (game) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Had no idea that Set has only been around since 1991.
games  reference  cards  play  shapes  color 
march 2007 by robertogreco

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