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robertogreco : carmageddon   3

What Carmageddon taught us about behavioral economics | MNN - Mother Nature Network
"It was supposed to be Carmageddon in L.A., but instead the two-day closure of the busiest freeway in Los Angeles reiterated a timeless lesson about cars: We lose less than we think when we make them a lower priority in our cities."
losangeles  carmageddon  2011  cars  behavior  transportation  walking  masstransit  cities  mobility  habits  priorities  freeways 
july 2011 by robertogreco
Carmageddon #flightvsbike challenge: How a team of cyclists beat a Jet Blue flight from Burbank to Long Beach. - By Tom Vanderbilt - Slate Magazine
"But the moment of folly seemed to provide an aperture for new thinking. In the face of this fanciful idea (a traffic-busting flight!) it became possible to demonstrate that cycling, often taken as a non-serious or marginal or even annoying (to some drivers) form of transportation in the United States, could seem eminently reasonable: not only the cheapest form of transportation, not merely the one with the smallest carbon footprint, not only the one most beneficial to the health of its user, but the fastest.…

But the race today wasn't only about the cyclists. Gary Kavanagh*, who had reacted enthusiastically to my initial daydreaming about a "Tour de Carmageddon," was the day's dark horse, revealing the secret efficacy—and perhaps, for some remote Twitter spectators, the existence—of Los Angeles' oft-derided subway system. (When I thought of a cyclist racing a jet, I admittedly wasn't even aware one could take mass transit between BUR and LGB)…"
losangeles  bikes  biking  masstransit  highspeed  rail  buses  carmageddon  2011  transportation  airtravel  airplanes  efficiency  speed  contests  highspeedrail  trains 
july 2011 by robertogreco
Californian freeways: Carmageddon | The Economist
"A European might ask why people don’t bicycle instead, or take a bus or train. Yes, Los Angeles does have a weighty document, the “2010 Bicycle Plan”, but nobody believes it will do more than the two previous, and equally grandiose, bike visions, proclaimed in the 1970s and 1990s. As for buses, they do exist, but only the poor seem to be on them and routes are being cancelled for budgetary reasons. Los Angeles’s mayor, Antonio Villaraigosa, also has a pet underground project, called the “subway to the sea”. But the general rule seems to be that public transport in Los Angeles has a great future, and always will."
losangeles  cars  carculture  publictransit  masstransit  freeways  the405  2011  carmageddon  california  socal 
july 2011 by robertogreco

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