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Should This Exist?
"It's the question of our times: How is technology impacting our humanity? Coming February 21, 2019, Should This Exist? invites the creators of radical new technologies to set aside their business plan, and think through the human side: What is the invention’s greatest promise? And what could possibly go wrong? Show host Caterina Fake (Partner, Yes VC; Cofounder Flickr) is a celebrated tech pioneer and one of Silicon Valley’s most eloquent commentators on technology and the human condition. Joined by a roster of all-star expert guests who have a knack for looking around corners, Caterina drops listeners into the minds of today’s ingenious entrepreneurs and guides them through the journey of foreseeing what their technology might do to us, and for us. Should This Exist? is a WaitWhat original series in partnership with Quartz."
caterinafake  podcasts  technology  2019 
february 2019 by robertogreco
Drunk people respect authority | Caterina.net
"Really interesting research by Laura Van Berkel shows that people who are drunk, tired, or suffering other types of cognitive impairment such as distraction or stress are more likely to be vulnerable to “those in charge” and when asked, affirm that “control or dominance over people or resources” is a “guiding principle in your life.” Equality is something a calm, leisurely person is more likely to support. We revert to hierarchy under cognitive stress.
According to a 2009 review, conservatives tend to support hierarchy and authority more than liberals do. Van Berkel, working with Chris Crandall and other colleagues, found that, in terms of how the hundred and seven subjects interviewed outside the bar thought about hierarchy, drunk people gave more conservative responses while sober people gave more liberal ones. Over the next few years, she and her team ran five more experiments, exploring the relationship between mental effort and support for hierarchy. In each case, they found that cognitive impairments, such as being stressed or distracted, made people more likely to favor hierarchy. Even encouraging “low-effort thought”—by forcing respondents to think quickly, say—made people more respectful of those in charge.

There may be some sub-category of people for whom being drunk arouses their own need to dominate. We’ve all seen belligerent, brawling drunks domineering drunks and aggressive drunks. And people who are stressed at work are also more likely to do what the boss says. Equality, the article notes, may be a state of mind."

[Referencing: "When Does Equality Flourish?"
http://www.newyorker.com/tech/elements/when-does-equality-flourish
hierarchy  management  flow  stress  caterinafake  2016  equality  cognitition  domination  obedience  control  lauravanberkel  chriscrandall  drunkenness 
june 2016 by robertogreco
Teachers dislike creative children | Caterina.net
"Do teachers dislike creative children in spite of their assertions to the contrary? 96% of teachers say that daily classroom time should be dedicated to creative thinking. And yet they seem biased against the very children whose thinking is most creative. At school, creative children are punished rather than rewarded, and the system seems designed to extinguish creativity. In spite of all the lip service.

The characteristics that teachers value in the classroom are those associated with the lowest levels of creativity. Teachers want students to be responsible, reliable, dependable, clear-thinking, tolerant, understanding, peaceable, good-natured, moderate, steady, practical and logical. Creativity is not moderate or logical. It is associated with characteristics such as determined, independent and individualistic, people who make up the rules as she goes along, divergent rather than conformist ways of thinking. You can read some of the research in this article [http://www.itari.in/categories/Creativity/19.pdf ].

For good reason Ken Robinson’s talk, Do Schools Kill Creativity? is the most viewed talk on the TED web site. “If you’re not prepared to be wrong, you will never come up with anything original,” he says, and rightness and wrongness, as anyone who has ever received a graded paper can attest, is the very backbone of education.

The gulf between rhetoric and reality isn’t really that surprising.  It’s nearly impossible for a teacher, outnumbered by his charges, to help the rebels and mavericks flourish in an environment requiring more supervision than vision. The system is set up for teachers to prefer the obedient."
caterinafake  education  schools  creativity  teaching  howweteach  learning  children  rebels  mavericks  2016  unschooling  deschooling  obedience  control  curriculum 
february 2016 by robertogreco
Designing a better umbrella | Caterina.net
"Umbrellas, as we know, blow inside out in the wind, and require the person holding it to sacrifice the use of one of their hands. Shouldn’t we all be using Knups? Knups are made from banana leaves lashed to a frame of bamboo. They are worn rather than carried, which allows you to use your hands. And if you lean into the wind, they won’t blow inside out, or away.

So often traditional designs are superior to modern designs. Knups are the traditional umbrellas of Northern India, and are here being used in the wettest place on earth, Mawsynram, which has over 38 feet of rain a year."

[See also: http://www.theatlantic.com/photo/2014/08/meghalaya-the-wettest-place-on-earth/100797/ ]
umbrellas  india  knups  design  caterinafake  2015  wearable  wearables 
october 2015 by robertogreco
The Techies Who Are Hacking Education by Homeschooling Their Kids | WIRED
“Do It Yourself” is a familiar credo in the tech industry—think of the hobbyists of the Homebrew Computing Club hacking together the personal computer, Mark Zuckerberg building the next great communications medium from his Harvard dorm room, or Palmer Lucky soldering together the Oculus Rift from spare parts in his garage. Progressive education is another leitmotif that runs through tech history—Larry Page and Sergey Brin have attributed much of their success to the fact that they attended a Montessori school. In recent years, Peter Thiel has launched a broadside against higher education, and Sir Ken Robinson’s lecture, “How Schools Kill Creativity,” has become the most popular TED Talk of all-time, with 31 million views. Now, all those strains are coming together to create a new phenomenon: the techie homeschooler.

This may come as a shock to those of us who still associate homeschooling with fundamentalists eager to shelter their kids from the evils of the secular state. But it turns out that homeschooling has grown more mainstream over the last few years. According to the most recent statistics, the share of school-age kids who were homeschooled doubled between 1999 and 2012, from 1.7 to 3.4 percent.

And many of those new homeschoolers come from the tech community."



"Perhaps it’s not surprising that the tech community—a group not known for mastering the delicate social mores of adolescence—might pursue an unconventional approach to schooling. “I never really fit in,” says Flickr and Hunch co-founder Caterina Fake, who has homeschooled three kids (two of whom have since moved on to public school) along with her partner, serial entrepreneur Jyri Engestrom. “I grew up not watching any TV, excluded from pop culture, sitting around reading T.S. Eliot and playing classical music. But those things benefited me so much! I felt different in a good way—like I had secret superpowers.”"



"Feel free to roll your eyes at this point. There’s something inherently maddening about a privileged group of forward-thinkers removing their children from the social structures that have defined American childhood for more than a century under the presumption that they know better. (And if you want to see how antiauthoritarian distrust can combine malevolently with parental concern, look no further than the Disneyland measles outbreak caused by the anti-vaccine crowd.) I hear you. As a proud recipient of a great public school education, I harbor the same misgivings.

And yet, as I talked to more of these homeschoolers, I found it harder to dismiss what they were saying. My son is in kindergarten, and I fear that his natural curiosity won’t withstand 12 years of standardized tests, underfunded and overcrowded classrooms, and constant performance anxiety. The Internet has already overturned the way we connect with friends, meet potential paramours, buy and sell products, produce and consume media, and manufacture and deliver goods. Every one of those processes has become more intimate, more personal, and more meaningful. Maybe education can work the same way."



"The Cook family are not just homeschoolers but unschoolers. They don’t prefer homeschooling simply because they find most schools too test-obsessed or underfunded or otherwise ineffective. They believe that the very philosophical underpinnings of modern education are flawed. Unschoolers believe that children are natural learners; with a little support, they will explore and experiment and learn about the world in a way that is appropriate to their abilities and interests. Problems arise, the thinking goes, when kids are pushed into an educational model that treats everyone the same—gives them the same lessons and homework, sets the same expectations, and covers the same subjects. The solution, then, is to come up with exercises and activities that will help each kid flesh out the themes and subjects to which they are naturally drawn.

All of which sounds great. But, to put this in tech terms, it’s an approach that doesn’t scale very well. It seemed exhausting enough for Samantha to help her two sons write one-sentence business plans; it’s hard to imagine anyone offering the same kind of energy and attention to each student in a 20-person classroom. Indeed, that’s precisely why schools adopt a one-size-fits-all model. Unlike the Cooks, they don’t have the luxury of tailoring an entire lesson plan to the needs and proclivities of one or two students. They have to balance the needs of individual students against the needs of the class as a whole—including kids who come into school with different interests, skills, and abilities. That’s why so many teachers aim for the middle of the bell curve—hoping to have the maximum impact on the largest number of students, even as they risk losing the outliers on either end of the chart.

Of course, there are plenty of private schools, charters, or gifted programs pursuing some version of what’s called student-directed learning. But most unschoolers told me that even these schools were still too focused on traditional standards of achievement. (To be fair, it’s hard to imagine that even the most enlightened private school would be able to stay in business if it couldn’t demonstrate to parents that it was teaching their children how to read or add.) Unless every family homeschools their children—a prospect that even homeschooling advocates say is untenable—it will remain an individualized solution to a social need.

And this is where technologists see a great opportunity—to provide differentiated, individualized education in a classroom setting. There’s a lot of excitement around Khan Academy because it steps in to handle a teacher’s least personalized duties—delivering lectures, administering and grading quizzes—freeing up time for one-on-one tutoring. Last year, Khan Academy launched the Khan Lab School, an offshoot that will create “a working model of Khan Academy’s philosophy of learning in a physical school environment.” AltSchool, a startup created by a former Googler, has launched a series of “micro-schools” in which teachers help students create their own individualized lesson plans.

Jyri Engestrom, Caterina Fake’s partner, signed up with AltSchool this year. The couple had been homeschooling for a couple of years, an experiment that gradually expanded into a 10-student “microschool” called Sesat School. This year, his students started attending AltSchool part-time, in what he calls a “hybrid” approach. He says it’s just one example of how a new crop of startups could use technology to create new educational models, somewhere between homeschooling and traditional school. He foresees a day when the same forces that have upended everything from the entertainment industry to transportation wreak havoc on our current model of education, when you can hire a teacher by the hour, just as you would hire a TaskRabbit to assemble your Ikea furniture.

“I’m feeling like something is brewing right now,” Engestrom says. “The cost of starting a company has gone down because there are online tools you can use for free. I can see that happening with school. So much of that stuff is just up for grabs.”"
homeschool  education  unschooling  parenting  siliconvalley  children  learning  2015  caterinafake  jyriengestrom  altschool  microschools  deschooling  libertarianism  trends  jasontanz 
february 2015 by robertogreco
Sitting Shiva for Stan, and Shared Memories | Caterina.net
"Today I ran across an article referring to research done around transactive memory, a fancy Psych. PhD way of saying that we share our memories with our spouses and partners, colleagues, children, parents and friends, that they are part of us by virtue of their memories of shared experiences. It was an idea developed by psychologist Daniel Wegner, who died in July of this year. The making of memories, keeping them, and telling the stories over and over is the very material of our lives. Our memories are jogged, amended and embellished by the memories of others, and this shared memory is one of the greatest benefits of long-term relationships. After a death, or a divorce, or a division, part of you is lost, because the shared memories are lost. “What was that story he used to tell me at bedtime when I was small?” After he dies, you can’t ask him anymore, and it is so much loss."
memory  memories  networks  relationships  danielwegner  psychology  caterinafake  2013  death  conviviality 
november 2013 by robertogreco
How to be Free: Proustian Memory and The Palest Ink « Caterina.net
"I often wonder if we should build some kind of forgetting into our systems and archives, so ways of being expand rather than contract. Drop.io… allowed you to choose the length of time before your data would be deleted. This seems not only sensible, but desirable. As Heidegger said, in Being and Time, “Forgetting is not nothing, nor is it just a failure to remember; it is rather a ‘positive’ ecstatic mode of one’s having been, a mode with a character of its own.” Proustian memory, not the palest ink, should be the ideal we are building into our technology; not what memory recalls, but what it evokes. The palest ink tells us what we’ve done or where we’ve been, but not who we are.

If we are not given the chance to forget, we are also not given the chance to recover our memories, to alter them with time, perspective, and wisdom. Forgetting, we can be ourselves beyond what the past has told us we are, we can evolve. That is the possibility we want from the future."
proustianmemory  time  reallife  irl  superficiality  jerrycosinski  wikileaks  becomingtarden  jillmagid  disappearingink  disappearing  evanratliff  tylerclementi  meganmeier  martinhendrick  yahooanswers  joelholmberg  googlestreetview  streetview  google  9eyes  jonrafman  lisaoppenheim  documentation  myspace  youtube  facebook  twitter  privacy  socialmedia  ephemerality  ephemeral  paleink  newmuseum  surveillance  offline  online  eecummings  heidegger  proust  drop.io  data  forgetting  memory  2012  caterinafake  perspective  wisdom  marcelproust 
september 2012 by robertogreco
11 year old boys make a neighborhood « Caterina.net
[Laure gave me a copy of this beautiful book.]

"In the January 2012 issue of The Believer, there is an interview with cartographer Denis Wood, who created Everything Sings, a representation of Boylan Heights, NC, where he lives and raised his children. The maps are not typical maps, instead they depict, according to the article (I don’t have this book, though I’m ordering it!) “the light that fills the streets, the delivery routes of local newspapers, the face of pumpkins in front of homes at Halloween”, among others. Wood says:

"I wanted to think about what a neighborhood is. What makes a neighborhood a neighborhood? What are the characteristics of neighborhoodness? There’s a theorist named Leonard Bowden who had the idea that neighborhoods are created by eleven-year-old preadolescent males. Intheir running through the neighborhood and connecting families together, crossing fences, going into homes that their parents would go into, and knowing people that their parents would never even acknowledge, they create the neighborhood. Not girls, because girls were not given the privilege of raning like the boys were, and not older boys, because they were being directed by the school toward classmates at a distance.""

[The interview: http://www.believermag.com/issues/201201/?read=interview_wood ]
cities  deniswood  books  maps  mapping  caterinafake  neighborhoods  edg  srg  thechildinthecity  communities  leonardbowden  northcarolina  boylanheights  place  meaning  catalysts  bonds  connections  bindingagents 
august 2012 by robertogreco
JOMO! - Anil Dash
"There can be, and should be, a blissful, serene enjoyment in knowing, and celebrating, that there are folks out there having the time of their life at something that you might have loved to, but are simply skipping."
happiness  emotions  nyc  2012  caterinafake  anildash  jomo  fomo 
july 2012 by robertogreco
Flickr Co-Founder Caterina Fake on the Value of Viral Loops [Exclusive Q&A;] | Fast Company
"There's both a good and bad side to virality. Products with viral hooks that are so strong they coerce people to sign up--in order to achieve a huge initial viral rush--are obviously bad. Not only do they alienate users, they don't lead to a sustainable business. On the good side, you have organic growth, which comes as a natural byproduct of something that spreads simply because people like it--eBay, Hot or Not, and Flickr. I can't think of an antonym for it."

"The decision to make all the photos public versus private was motivated by the fact that conversations are where metadata happens."
2009  via:tealtan  metadata  folksonomy  tagging  joshuaschachter  del.icio.us  growth  gameneverending  gne  socialmedia  design  viral  flickr  technology  caterinafake 
april 2012 by robertogreco
Caterina Fake: Fast Growth for a Social App Is a Very Bad Thing - Liz Gannes - Social - AllThingsD
"Fake added emphatically that the worst thing a start-up social network can do is to buy advertising to attract users. Growth should happen because users find value in a site, and then get their friends to join, she said.

And if users don’t come? Start-ups should try harder to make a better product.

That’s why Pinwheel plans to only slowly let in the tens of thousands of people on its email list, Fake said. And it’s why Pinwheel will ask users to write original notes, rather than filling the many empty places on its map with existing location-based content from around the Web. “We’re not going to suddenly metastasize by adding Wikipedia content,” Fake said."

[See also the correction Caterina Fake makes in the comments.]
myspace  linkedin  facebook  twitter  google+  flickr  startups  growth  scaling  scale  2012  pinwheel  storytelling  caterinafake 
february 2012 by robertogreco
Caterina.net» Killing the Abraham
"Companies without a strong Abraham lose their way. If you can’t identify who is at the helm, it better be a commodity business that anybody can run (Warren Buffett: “Invest in a company any fool can run, since some day a fool will.”)…

The Abraham is especially powerful in social software, in anything that shows the people, the members, what to do, how to communicate, and how to behave. The founders dictate what the software does, how people use it, what the practices and mores are of the community. This is built into the software, and its assumptions of human behavior."…

Abrahams are often called upon to do difficult work, thankless tasks, and sometimes, terrible things, as when god asked Abraham to kill his own, firstborn son, Isaac. Steve Jobs was rightly praised for his ability to “Kill his babies” — that is, disrupt himself."
caterinafake  business  startups  leadership  creativity  2011  culture  management  lcproject  tcsnmy  administration  cv  behavior  killingtheabraham  abrahams 
november 2011 by robertogreco
Networked Society 'On the Brink' - YouTube
"In On The Brink we discuss the past, present and future of connectivity with a mix of people including David Rowan, chief editor of Wired UK; Caterina Fake, founder of Flickr; and Eric Wahlforss, the co-founder of Soundcloud. Each of the interviewees discusses the emerging opportunities being enabled by technology as we enter the Networked Society. Concepts such as borderless opportunities and creativity, new open business models, and today's 'dumb society' are brought up and discussed."
future  trends  social  soundcloud  caterinafake  davidweinberger  ericwahlforss  davidrowan  mobile  web  internet  socialmedia  business  startups  networkedsociety  society  change  mindshift  2011  entrepreneurship  ccpgames  eveonline  robinteigland  elisabetgretarsdottir  work  virtualcurrencies  connectivity  mobility  internetofthings  robfaludi  botanicalls  touch  interaction  jeffbezos  networkedcities  education  healthcare  robinteiglend  spimes  iot 
november 2011 by robertogreco
We have to call it school « Sesat Blog
"A film by Peggy Hughes about Ny Lille Skole, in the 1970s. From Teach Your Own by John Holt:

"…over the titles one of the teachers says “We have to call it school. The law in Denmark says that children have to go to school, and if we didn’t call this a school, they couldn’t come here.” But it is not a school in any way that we understand those words. It is a meeting, living, and doing place for six or seven adults and about eighty children, aged about six through fourteen. It s more like a club than anything I can compare it to. The children come there when they feel like it, most of the time during the winter, not so often when spring and the sun arrive. Once there, they talk about and do many things that interest them, sometimes with the adults, sometimes by themselves. In the process, they learn a lot about themselves, each other and the world."

[Video embedded: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VKcHsKBkhN4 ]

A good contrast to this, from the same era in Danish education, is the book Borderlines by Peter Hoeg."
peggyhughes  unschooling  deschooling  johnholt  caterinafake  nylilleskole  teachyourown  education  learning  perterhoeg  books  children  schools  schooliness  society  1970s  denmark  documentary  wehavetocallitschool  BagsvægdNyLilleskole  copenhagen  peterhøeg  borderliners 
september 2011 by robertogreco
Caterina.net» Blog Archive » Make things
John Holt: "Leaders are not what many people think–people with huge crowds following them. Leaders are people who go their own way without caring, or even looking to see whether anyone is following them. “Leadership qualities” are not the qualities that enable people to attract followers, but those that enable them to do without them. The include, at the very least, courage, endurance, patience, humor, flexibility, resourcefulness, determination, a keen sense of reality, and the ability to keep a cool and clear head even when things are going badly. This is the opposite of the “charisma” that we hear so much about."

…People ask me who inspires me…often stumps me because I have been inspired in my work by stuff that people make… [bunch of examples]…the people who make these things are my leaders. Most of the time I don’t know their names. Sometimes I’m lucky & do.

So, to hell with all that noise. It’s just a big mass of envy, chatter & FOMO. Let’s get excited & make things."
leadership  caterinafake  johnholt  making  doing  entrepreneurship  inspiration  noise  talk  technology  techindustry  whatmatters  cv  freemandyson 
september 2011 by robertogreco
Social Psychology: Are home educated children as socialized as publicly educated children and is there any solid research on this topic? - Quora
"Personally I believe our society is broken in that people mainly associate with people their own age. My relatives in the Philippines, if they threw a party, would include everyone -- babies, kids, teenagers, people in their 20s, 30s, 40s -- and grandmas in their 80s. This was not unusual, and I think, the mark of a healthy society. However I rarely see this kind of intergenerational mixing in the States, except with first generation immigrants."
caterinafake  homeschool  education  learning  socialization  social  society  agesegregation  parenting  unschooling  deschooling  2011  children 
july 2011 by robertogreco
Caterina.net» Blog Archive » Anonymity and Pseudonyms in Social Software
"Pseudonyms are not in themselves harmful. Yes, they can be used for harm, as when people use them for anonymous, slanderous attacks, trolling, etc., but in the vast majority of cases there is no harm done. Importantly, they can serve to protect vulnerable groups. There’s even a comprehensive list of people harmed by Real Names policies. In the cases where pseudonyms are being abused, it is the harm that should be stopped, not the pseudonyms. To my mind there are three categories of Pseudonymous behavior, and they should be treated differently: AKA or “Also Known As” … Pseudonym … Trolls … “Real identities” have real benefits to users — creating communities of trust, silencing trolls, people standing by their words. Nothing can destroy a happy social space faster than allowing the trolls to go unchecked…Pseudonyms, which provide so many benefits to the first two categories, should not be banned because of the third."
community  socialnetworking  identity  facebook  privacy  google+  pseudonyms  caterinafake  2011  trolls  steganography 
july 2011 by robertogreco
YouTube - Disruptive Heroes, Caterina Fake
Caterina covers several topics as she talks about hacking the organization and ‘going rogue’: intrinsic motivation, passion, conformism, control, schools, learning, entrepreneurship, organizations, systems, leadership, etc.
caterinafake  entrepreneurship  unschooling  deschooling  education  motivation  intrinsicmotivation  extrinsicmotivation  management  administration  leadership  passion  goingrogue  organizations  hierarchy  bureaucracy  schools  conformism  control  systems  hacking  hackdays  yahoo  flickr  hunch  learning  lcproject  tcsnmy  disruption  innovation 
june 2011 by robertogreco
Caterina.net » Creativity, Collaboration and Hacking
"Hours go by, you are lost in the flow, or the zone, or the jam, or whatever you want to call it. You know when this is happening with your hockey team, when you’re reaching a sublime level of banter at the dinner table, even when your flirting is really hitting the mark. Your subconscious is working together with someone else’s, time vanishes, peace prevails on earth, and everyone is dissolved together into the great, unimpeachable and omnipotent Is.<br />
<br />
Hacking and art-making are like this, especially when done together — an artist-hacker matched with a hacker-artist for the day — to jam, invent, make things, do stuff, and have ideas. Both technology and art are about making things new and seeing things new, and the way to arrive at the new is a collaborative, mysterious and Ouija-like process."
caterinafake  hacking  collaboration  flow  creativity 
may 2011 by robertogreco
Caterina.net» The Truth About Zombies
"After watching The Truth about Zombies, I learned things about zombies I didn’t know. People in Haiti, where Voudoun is practiced, fear zombification more than they fear zombies. Zombies are fairly harmless, since they are ppl who have been poisoned so that they suffer paralysis, but with total consciousness and awareness. But what was most interesting to me was that zombification is a form of capital punishment visited upon ppl who have done some harm to people in the community, but who have not been served by the justice system. So it is a punishment meted out by an extra-legal Voudoun justice system. The adjudicator, in addition to zombifying the perp, takes their will, their “petit bon ange”, and keeps it in a bottle."
zombies  edg  srg  caterinafake  religion  belief  voodoo  haiti  voudoun  vodou 
march 2011 by robertogreco
Caterina.net» Blog Archive » FOMO and Social Media
"It’s an age-old problem, exacerbated by technology. To be always filled with craving and desire (also called defilement, affliction) is one of the Three Poisons of Buddhism, called kilesa, and it makes you a slave. There is true meaning in social media—real connections, real friendships, devotion, humor, sacrifice, joy, depth, love. And this is what we are looking for when we log on. Most of the world is profane, not sacred, in the Mircea Eliade sense. So it is. But within it is the Emmy award speech of Mister Rogers, a Japanese man being rescued at sea, Abraham Lincoln, moms who comfort sick children, the earnest love that dogs have for people…

FOMO can be fought. Stay alert! En garde!"
psychology  culture  technology  socialmedia  social  twitter  ditto  fomo  fearofmissingout  cv  internet  web  online  craving  desire  buddhism  kilesa  sxsw  behavior  human  tcsnmy  toshare  classideas  caterinafake  sacrifice  joy  relationships  friendship  devotion  love  depth 
march 2011 by robertogreco
Caterina.net » Tinkering as Learning
"John Seely Brown…has a new book coming out soon, The New Culture of Learning…download first 3 chapters from the site.

He talks a lot about one of my pet subjects, Community Mentoring, the apprenticeship model of education:

"Where traditionally mentoring was a means of enculturating members into a community, mentoring in the collective relies more on the sense of learning and developing temporary, peer-to-peer relationships that are fluid and impermanent. Expertise is shared openly and willingly, without regard to an institutional mission. Instead, expertise is shared conditionally and situationally, as a way to enable the agency of other members of the collective."

as well as a dozen other favorite topics of mine: play as a means of learning, constraints as a stimulus for, rather than an inhibition of, creativity, and so on. I wish I could figure out how to get my hands on the whole book. There is a great page of resources on the site as well, for further exploration."
johnseelybrown  caterinafake  tinkering  learning  mentoring  mentorship  creativity  inhibition  education  books  toread  collective  collectivism  sharing  unschooling  deschooling  lcproject  community  apprenticeships  newcultureoflearning  online  web  internet  change  peer-to-peer  peers  relationships  informallearning 
january 2011 by robertogreco
About « Sesat Blog [Quote from David Albert's "And the Skylark Sings with Me"]
"Our vision of the perfect learning environment is a library, but like none we have ever encountered. The library would have books and videos and tapes and computers, but that would be just the beginning. There would be lots of librarians, or more accurately “docents” — guides to the trails of knowledge. Primary docents would provide instruction in the technologies necessary to utilize the available resources. … There would be a vast learning exchange of skills, from basic mathematics to auto mechanics. There would be lending libraries of tools and materials, from carpenter’s saws and hammers, to biologists’ microscopes, to astronomers’ telescopes. There would be organized classes, learning support groups, and lectures. Self-evaluation tools would be available for learners to measure their own progress.

There would be large gardens and orchards, staffed by botanists and farmers, where students would learn to grow fruits and vegetables, and home economists who would teach their preparation and storage. There would be apprenticeships for virtually everything kind of employment the community requires.

There would be rites of passage and celebration of subject or skill mastery. There would be storytellers and community historians, drawn from the community’s older members. Seniors would play a vital role in preparing young children to make use of all the library has to offer.

The library would be the community’s hub and its heart. It would be supported the usual ways we support schools, through public taxation, but all users, both children and adults, would be required to contribute time to the library’s success."
lcproject  davidalbert  andtheskylarksingswithme  learning  unschooling  education  deschooling  caterinafake  libraries  library  librarydesign  design  schooldesign  community  apprenticeships  gardens  gardening  parenting  farming  tools  storytelling  mentoring  agriculture 
december 2010 by robertogreco
The Community as Teacher « Sesat Blog
"Actively accessing the community has taught us an important lesson: schoolteachers are credentialed to be experts in teaching. They may have knowledge about and little or no real interest in the content of their lessons beyond what is necessary to communicate it to their charges. Some few of us have the fondest memories of teachers who were painters, restored old cars, played sousaphones, wrote poetry or raised horses. But this expertise is peripheral to their teaching. And rare indeed is the elementary school teacher who has ongoing relationships with students and their families outside of the classroom.

When, instead of the traditional school, one utilizes the community as a flexible learning environment, the whole point is to find individuals prepared and willing to share their deepest passions and most highly developed expertise with our children."
davidalbert  andtheskylarksingswithme  caterinafake  homeschool  unschooling  deschooling  lcproject  education  learning  libraries  schooling  schools  teaching  families  community  tcsnmy  cv  relationships 
december 2010 by robertogreco
Sesat Blog
Caterina Fake appears to have started a homeschooling blog.

[Now here: http://sesatschool.blogspot.com/ ]
homeschool  education  blogs  unschooling  deschooling  caterinafake  learning  lcproject 
december 2010 by robertogreco
Caterina.net: Want to be an entrepreneur? Drop out of college.
"College works on factory model, & is in many ways not suited to training entrepreneurs. You put in a student & out comes a scholar.

Entrepreneurship works on apprenticeship model. The best way to learn how to be an entrepreneur is to start a company, & seek advice of a successful entrepreneur in the area in which you are interested. Or work at a startup for a few years to learn the ropes. A small number of people—maybe in the high hundreds or low thousands—have knowledge of how to start & run a tech company, & things change so fast, only people in the thick of things have a sense of what is going on. Take a few years off & you're behind the times. Some publishers have asked Chris to collate his blog posts on entrepreneurship into a book, but he said, What's the point, it'd be out of date by the time it hit bookstores.

As Fred pointed out, basic skills necessary to start tech company—design or coding—are skills that can be learned outside of academy, & are often self-taught."
education  entrepreneurship  business  startup  college  universities  colleges  autodidacts  unschooling  deschooling  caterinafake  fredwilson  evanwilliams  robkalin  bizstone  jackdorsey  markzuckerberg  dropouts  lcproject  billgates  stevejobs  industrial  learning 
december 2010 by robertogreco
Caterina.net» Blog Archive » Cheating vs. Learning
"Teaching from a textbook is almost always crappy teaching, so the whole system is flawed. It seems to me that cheating is the almost inevitable consequence of test-giving and test-taking. It doesn’t have to be this way. The best method for assessing learning progress is self-assessment, with the input of someone passionate and knowledgeable about the subject. This would require a lot of trust in the student, but also more work on the part of the teacher — who would not really be a teacher at all, in the traditional sense, but a person in love with a certain topic, probably a practitioner of the subject in question, maybe retired, maybe active.

Here’s my idea of what an ideal school would be like, borrowed from David Albert’s book And the Skylark Sings with Me a book about a family’s experience in home and community based education. It’s how I’ve envisioned, but never articulated, my own perfect school. "
caterinafake  education  unschooling  deschooling  learning  schools  schooling  teasting  testtaking  textbooks  self-assessment  selfeducated  self-evaluation  davidalbert  andtheskylarksingswithme  lcproject  tcsnmy  apprenticeships  cheating 
december 2010 by robertogreco
Caterina Fake: WikiLeaks and Free at the New Museum
"Pervading the show is this sense of how the 'data' tells us something, but fails to capture the human drama, the story, the suffering, the lived lives behind the info gathered & arranged. Images of people caught on Google Maps "streetview" appear in Jon Rafman's work, Martijn Hendrik shows texts of people responding to video of Saddam Hussein execution; Joel Holmberg asks earnest questions on Yahoo! Answers – all show the gap btwn the impassive data-gathering technology, human inputs & the strange hybrid that is result of those interactions. The final quote in Magid's Becoming Tarden is from Jerzy Kosinski's Cockpit:

"All that time & trouble, & still the record is a superficial one: I see only how I looked in the fraction of a second when the shutter was open. But there's no trace of the thoughts & emotions that surrounded that moment. When I die & my memories die with me, all that will remain will be 1000s of yellowing photographs & 35mm negatives in my filing cabinets."
art  media  free  news  wikileaks  information  data  emotion  meaning  internet  flickr  googlestreetview  photography  jonrafman  julianassange  2010  caterinafake  experience  perception  feeling  drama  human  suffering  detachment  humandrama  streetview  lostintherecord  colddata  interpretation  jerzykosinski  laurencornell  jillmagid  lisaoppenheim 
december 2010 by robertogreco
Caterina.net» Blog Archive » Individualism, infantilism
"One begins to suspect that over the years the ideal of individuality which lies at the root of the idea of America has become infantilized. The corruption of individualism we now so often see about us is a species of arrogance that confirms itself by excluding others and begets conflict with others, opposition and fear." —From The American Soul by Jacob Needleman
us  politics  individualism  individuality  arrogance  caterinafake  jacobneedleman  fear  opposition  conflict  avoidance  exclusion  2010  infantilism 
august 2010 by robertogreco
What You Want: Flickr Creator Spins Addictive New Web Service | Magazine
"[Hunch] isn’t just helping people shop for cars—it is getting its users to volunteer a truly impressive amount of unique psychographic data...

Fake may not be the tunnel-visioned tyro found at most Internet startups. She doesn’t keep a schedule, & she works on projects only when they feel “intuitively right.”

But there are few people more skilled at building online communities. “If you think about Caterina, she is literally one of the creators of user-generated content on Web”...

For Fake, Hunch is just latest step in her mission to make Internet a forum for people to interact, to turn it into one big board-game night. “One of the overarching goals of my career has been to make technology more human. You should be able to feel the presence of other people on the Internet.”

...She fell in love with Net because it allowed her to discuss Jorge Luis Borges w/ people in Denmark. (“I’m an insomniac. Who else is around in middle of night but people in other countries?”)"
caterinafake  hunch  borges  internet  cv  insomnia  generalists  matchmakers  social  collaborative  collaboration  semanitc  web  collaborativefiltering  search  socialmedia  flickr  gne  entrepreneurship  wired  games  play  relationships  socialobjects  poetry 
august 2010 by robertogreco
Caterina.net: Want to be an entrepreneur? Drop out of college.
"College works on the factory model, & is in many ways not suited to training entrepreneurs. You put in a student & out comes a scholar.

Entrepreneurship works on apprenticeship model...best way to learn how to be entrepreneur is to start a company & seek advice of successful entrepreneur in area you are interested...Take a few years off & you're behind the times. Some publishers have asked Chris to collate his blog posts on entrepreneurship...What's the point, it'd be out of date by the time it hit bookstores...

basic skills necessary to start tech company—design or coding—re skills that can be learned outside of academy, & are often self-taught...

I was on verge of attending grad school to get a PhD in Renaissance poetry - my lost careers...writer, artist or academic. Do I regret spending all that time poring over Shakespeare when I could have been getting a jump start on competition? Not at all. There's no money in poetry, but then again, there's no poetry in money either."
startup  twitter  entrepreneurship  college  advice  autodidacts  self-education  learning  apprenticeships  tcsnmy  alternative  change  caterinafake  evanwilliams  fredwilson  robkalin  etsy  markzuckerberg  billgates  stevejobs  dropouts  life  glvo  edg  srg 
april 2010 by robertogreco
Caterina.net: Participatory media and why I love it (and must defend it)
"I love participatory media, collective knowledge systems, user-generated content and the like, and spent much of my life and career participating in them and making them. As I say in this post from 2005, the internet is built on a culture of generosity -- the first web page I built was when I noticed there was no page on Nabokov and realized I could just make one. Amazing! And it dawned on me that every other page on the web -- this was 1994 -- had come about for the same reason. Then the dotcom thing happened. And then Web 2.0 brought us back to the web's roots -- communication and contribution. That is why I love participatory media and must defend it."
caterinafake  jaronlanier  participatory  web2.0  communication  crowdsourcing  del.icio.us  tumblr  flickr  twitter  facebook  hunch  wikipedia  amateur  amateurism  collectiveintelligence  participatoryculture  culture  internet  social  media  collaboration  vladimirnabokov 
january 2010 by robertogreco
Caterina.net: Uncertain ends, confident means
"My friend Emily pointed out a great quote in this week's New Yorker, in an article about the painter Luc Tuymans, who describes how he creates his work: "It's like I don't know what I'm doing but I know how to do it." Peter Schjeldahl, the article's author, notes that "uncertain ends, confident means is about as good a general definition of creativity as I know."
art  creativity  writing  innovation  life  process  caterinafake 
october 2009 by robertogreco
Caterina.net: Working hard is overrated
"a lot of what we then considered "working hard" was actually "freaking out"...panicking, working on things just to be working on something, not knowing what we were doing, fearing failure, worrying about things we needn't have worried about, thinking about fund raising rather than product building, building too many features, getting distracted by competitors...& other time-consuming activities. This time around we have eliminated a lot of freaking out time. We seem to be working less hard this time...Much more important than working hard is knowing how to find the right thing to work on. Paying attention to what is going on in the world. Seeing patterns. Seeing things as they are rather than how you want them to be. Being able to read what people want. Putting yourself in the right place where information is flowing freely and interesting new juxtapositions can be seen. But you can save yourself a lot of time by working on the right thing."
caterinafake  working  careers  life  work  tcsnmy  cv  wisdom  business  entrepreneurship  startups  productivity  gtd  lifehacks  focus  philosophy  time  balance  flickr  advice  ideas  culture  patterns  management  leadership  administration  confidence  freakingout 
september 2009 by robertogreco
Caterina.net: How that idiot made 10 million dollars: Cities and Genius
"it may be that creativity and invention are more dependent on the networks in which the creator participates than their individual genius or their willingness to put in the hours. As we've so often seen, great ideas occur where there is a confluence of ideas taken from the environment surrounding the creator or creators. Thus, Silicon Valley. Even people designing office spaces have discovered that creating little meeting spaces and sitting areas at the junctures between hallways increase communication between different departments in an organization and increase cross-fertilization of ideas and intra company relationships.
genius  circumstance  davidbyrne  cities  environment  networks  enhancement  invention  creativity  caterinafake 
september 2009 by robertogreco
Caterina.net: Eustress
"I found the word "eustress" on a page from an online book or workshop about Stress Management page by a professor named Wes Sime, whom I was reading about in Steven Johnson's book Mind Wide Open: Your Brain and the Neuroscience of Everyday Life. He distinguishes two kinds of stress:

• Eustress = Positive exhilarating challenging experiences of success followed by higher expectations

• Distress = Disappointment, failure, threat, embarrassment and other negative experiences"
words  distress  eustress  language  failure  success  caterinafake  stevenjohnson  stress  slow  balance  experience  expectations  embarrassment 
august 2009 by robertogreco
Caterina.net: Being Lazy by doing too much
"There's a Buddhist teaching," one of our friends on the mailing list writes, "that the impulse to stay busy can be a particularly insidious form of laziness. As Sogyal Rinpoche put it:

There are different species of laziness: Eastern and Western. The Eastern style is like the one practised in India. It consists of hanging out all day in the sun, doing nothing, avoiding any kind of work or useful activity, drinking cups of tea, listening to Hindi film music blaring on the radio, and gossiping with friends. Western laziness is quite different. It consists of cramming our lives with compulsive activity, so there is no time at all to confront the real issues. This form of laziness lies in our failure to choose worthwhile applications for our energy."
culture  psychology  work  process  wisdom  productivity  balance  eustress  stress  caterinafake  sogyalrinpoche  laziness  india  western  slow  compulsivity 
august 2009 by robertogreco
Hunch
"Hunch helps you make decisions and gets smarter the more you use it."
caterinafake  decisionmaking  decisions  crowdsourcing  hunch  socialnetworking 
march 2009 by robertogreco
Caterina.net: Hunch!
"Look. Decision-making is difficult, and decisions have to be made constantly. What should I be for Halloween? Do I need a Porsche? Does my hipster facial hair make me look stupid? Is Phoenix a good place to retire? Whom should I vote for? What toe ring should I buy?
caterinafake  hunch  decisionmaking  socialsoftware  socialnetworking  decisions  crowdsourcing 
march 2009 by robertogreco
Caterina.net: Obsessions and Spare Time Pursuits
"I've often quoted this, from Robert Heinlein: "A human being should be able to change a diaper, plan an invasion, butcher a hog, conn a ship, design a building, write a sonnet, balance accounts, build a wall, set a bone, comfort the dying, take orders, give orders, cooperate, act alone, solve equations, analyze a new problem, pitch manure, program a computer, cook a tasty meal, fight efficiently, die gallantly. Specialization is for insects." ...quoted most recently in 2003, in another blog post about obsessions, and whether or not it is possible to know a lot about one thing without knowing less of another"
caterinafake  generalists  specialization  specialists  obsession  passion  motivation  learning  administration  management  interviews  jobsinterviews  lifestyle  quotations  via:preoccupations  robertheinlein 
january 2009 by robertogreco
I’m So Totally, Digitally Close to You - Clive Thompson - NYTimes.com - "ultimate effect of the new awareness brings back the dynamics of small-town life, where everybody knows your business"
"paradox of ambient awareness...Each little update — each individual bit of social information — is insignificant on its own, even supremely mundane. But...together, over time...coalesce into surprisingly sophisticated portrait of your friends’ & family members’ lives, like dots making pointillist painting...never before possible, because in real world, no friend would bother to call you up and detail the sandwiches she was eating...ambient information becomes like “a type of E.S.P.,”...invisible dimension floating over everyday life." ... "common complaint I heard, particularly from people in 20s...If you don’t dive in, other people will define who you are. So you constantly stream your pictures, your thoughts, your relationship status and what you’re doing — right now! — if only to ensure the virtual version of you is accurate, or at least the one you want to present to the world."
clivethompson  ambientintimacy  ambientawareness  tumblr  twitter  facebook  technology  relationships  co-presence  mimiito  messaging  sms  mobile  phone  online  dunbar  leisareichelt  danahboyd  caterinafake  flickr 
september 2008 by robertogreco

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