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robertogreco : certification   27

David Graeber on a Fair Future Economy - YouTube
"David Graeber is an anthropologist, a leading figure in the Occupy movement, and one of our most original and influential public thinkers.

He comes to the RSA to address our current age of ‘total bureaucratization’, in which public and private power has gradually fused into a single entity, rife with rules and regulations, whose ultimate purpose is the extraction of wealth in the form of profits.

David will consider what it would take, in terms of intellectual clarity, political will and imaginative power – to conceive and build a flourishing and fair future economy, which would maximise the scope for individual and collective creativity, and would be sustainable and just."
democracy  liberalism  directdemocracy  borders  us  finance  globalization  bureaucracy  2015  ows  occupywallstreet  governance  government  economics  politics  policy  unschooling  unlearning  schooliness  technology  paperwork  future  utopianism  capitalism  constitution  rules  regulation  wealth  power  communism  authority  authoritarianism  creativity  neoliberalism  austerity  justice  socialjustice  society  ideology  inequality  revolution  global  international  history  law  legal  debt  freedom  money  monetarypolicy  worldbank  imf  markets  banks  banking  certification  credentials  lobbying  collusion  corruption  privatization  credentialization  deschooling  canon  firstamendment 
january 2019 by robertogreco
Standardizing Human Ability | DMLcentral
"Here’s a thought experiment. Let’s try to imagine a society (there were lots of them before modernity) where there is no interest in measuring educational success. Let’s imagine a society where the only goal of teaching (it’s a high bar) is to help every child master what they need in order to lead the most fulfilling life they are capable of leading—productive, creative, responsible, contributing to their own well-being and that of their society. No grades. No tests. Just an educational system based on helping each child to find her or his potential for leading the best (Socrates would call it “happiest”) life possible. In such a world, do learning disabilities exist?"



"Here’s a list (in no particular order) of some of the changes in U.S. education, from kindergarten to professional school, either invented or finalized in the Taylorist era (the same era that produced the assembly line, statistics, standard deviation, spreadsheets, blueprints, punch clocks):  mandatory public secondary schooling, research universities, majors, minors, divisions, certification, graduate school, collegiate law school, nursing school, graduate school of education, collegiate business school, degree requirements, grades, required courses, electives, distribution requirements, IQ tests, multiple choice tests, item response college entrance exams (SAT), school rankings, class rankings. And learning disabilities.

There are some great things in that list. My point in this open-ended meditation, though, is that these are invented things.  Like all inventions, they are historically situated, created for a specific time and place, to solve problems of an era and address the possibilities afforded by the society, institutions, wealth, ambitions, and technologies of that time and place.  Like statistics and the assembly line, the system of education we have inherited is not “timeless.”  It is an industrial age invention.  So is the practice of ranking students from best to worst (“one best way”), using standardized forms of testing (extending Galton’s questionnaire form to the one-best-answer or item-response test).

We invented these standardized, regulatory, categorizing, statistical, practices for determining educational success or failure for the Fordist era of the assembly line. We can invent better ones for our own era."
cathdavidson  2014  taylorism  assessment  standardization  ability  accessibilities  ableism  testing  standardizedtesting  standards  success  disability  rankings  highered  highereducation  education  learning  teaching  howweteach  schools  schooliness  schooling  certification  disabilities 
december 2014 by robertogreco
SCHOOLHAUS
"Schoolhaus is a design studio classroom inspired by our desire to remedy the growing divide between learning and education. While learning is a universal way of life, education is the institutionalization of that way of life— at times to the detriment of learning, and at excessive cost to the student. But there are aspects of both education and learning that are valuable, and not necessarily mutually exclusive. Schoolhaus is Aesthetic Apparatus’ attempt to combine what we consider the best of education (a social community, invested and informed guidance) with the best of learning (self-motivation, one-on-one mentorship) and embed them into a studio discipline (working-world applications with opportunities for invention and entrepreneurship.)

Schoolhaus works like a group-mentorship, held on-site during operating hours at Aesthetic Apparatus. Similar to a studio, each student submits an application or letter of intent for consideration. Enrollment is limited to 12 students at any one time — the size of a comfortable classroom. Schoolhaus can be used as a stand-alone design education or to supplement a previous design education. Anyone of any ability is welcome to apply; beginners, amateurs, even seasoned veterans. Once accepted, students may stay with the Schoolhaus as long as they and the studio feel is necessary. The curriculum begins with the student’s own self-initiated goals for learning. As the studio gains better understanding of the student’s strengths and weaknesses, learning is augmented with suggested and mentored study. Client-based or studio-based projects may be introduced, as well as inter-student mentorships or new creative ventures. The curriculum is amenable, the goal is to create a shared place for human-scale learning.

This program offers neither an earned degree or certification. We question the requirement of either in the working profession of graphic design. That said, higher education is essential for those who wish to pursue a deeply academic or pedagogical pursuit of graphic design. If this is the case, we suggest attending an undergraduate and graduate degree path at an accredited institution, as is required for future consideration of professorship. What Schoolhaus does offer is intimate, responsive, one-on-one creative guidance within the context of a close-knit group studio in preparation for a creative position in graphic design.

We are now accepting initial applications for an initial 2-month preliminary Schoolhaus starting August 1. The current tuition subscription for Schoolhaus is $500/month."

[Aesthetic Apparatus: http://aestheticapparatus.com/ ]
studiohaus  aestheticapparatus  openstudioproject  certification  design  learning  education  unschooling  deschooling  mentoring  mentorship  openstudio  studioclassroom  schooldesign  via:ethanbodanr  graphicdesign  minneapolis 
june 2013 by robertogreco
SFPC
"school for poetic computation is an artist run school launching this fall in New York. A small group of students and faculty will work closely to explore the intersections of code, design, hardware and theory -- focusing especially on artistic intervention. It's a 10 week program, a hybrid of residency and research group, that will happen multiple times per year to be a powerboost for creativity. Our motto is: more poems less demos."

[From the Mission]

"The school for poetic computation is a school organized around exploring together the creative and expressive nature of computational approaches to art and design. The school’s focus is on writing code like creative writing — focusing on the mechanics of programming as well as demystifying as much as possible the tools, techniques and strategies for making art via code.

We are interested in how to program things that leave the screen and move into physical space, interacting with people through material-tactile expression. In this way, the school will focus on hardware, experimental interaction design, and computational ways of sensing movement, touch and gesture.

We are interested in craft, and the idea that every writer needs space and time to hone their trade. Our school aims to provide a safe haven – so you could get acquainted with the craft at your own pace, make it your own, find that part between your true creative process and the craft. This takes time, encouragement, the right push at the right time, conversations with colleagues, and more time.

This is a school for teaching. Every student who comes here will be asked to also teach, both to their classmates, but also in the form of workshops and outreach. We want to spread the things we care about as far and as wide as we can.

The goal of the school is to promote completely strange, impractical and magical work. We value aesthetics and poetics over efficiency and usefulness. It may not be the sort of things that are about building a portfolio for finding a job, but the sort of things that will surprise and delight people and enable you to be creative without the structure of school or job. However, we like to think employers will appreciate this kind of work as well.

This is not a program to get a degree, there are large programs for that. This is not a program to go for vocational skills, there are programs for that. This is a program for self initiated learners who want to explore new possibilities. This is a program for thinkers in search of a community to realize greater dreams."

[from the FAQ]

"Does the School issue certificate for graduation?
The school does not accredit any formal degrees but the group of alumni will grow into a lively community that will collaborate in the future. We hope students experience at the school and skill will be a validation for them to pursue a creative career."

"What are the core principles the school stands for?
Hacking, exploration, open source, publish everything and often, tools for building, deep understanding through hands on experience and so on…

What kind of students are you looking for?
We want to work with students who are creative at heart and dedicated to learning and teaching code and technology in general. We like students who are kind to help one another.
Where did this idea come from?

We have been teaching and organizing workshops at schools and festivals around the world. We want to create a safe haven for others to develop ideas into reality. We want to bring all of our experience and knowledge to make a sustainable system for learning and teaching code, electronics, installation, performance, user experience, data visualization and etc.



What is the teaching philosophy?
We celebrate failure and collaboration. Our classes are going to be a mix of lecture, demo and lab hours. We respect our students and support them as artist and educator. We hope our students will have the experience to create projects on their own and to teach after the program.



Why do you teach?
Teaching inspires to continue to learn. We love meeting new people and we often make our best work in collaboration with others."
hackerspaces  education  art  computing  programming  coding  altgdp  openstudioproject  lcproject  residencies  jenlowe  amitpitaru  zachliberman  taeyoonchoi  schoolforpoeticcomputation  time  slow  process  certification  accreditation  conversation  sharing  collaboration  teaching  learning  sfpc  schoolforpoeticcomputing 
april 2013 by robertogreco
Rent-seeking - Wikipedia
"In economics, rent-seeking is an attempt to obtain economic rent by manipulating the social or political environment in which economic activities occur, rather than by creating new wealth, for example, spending money on political lobbying in order to be given a share of wealth that has already been created. A famous example of rent-seeking is the limiting of access to lucrative occupations, as by medieval guilds or modern state certifications and licensures. People accused of rent seeking typically argue that they are indeed creating new wealth (or preventing the reduction of old wealth) by improving quality controls, guaranteeing that charlatans do not prey on a gullible public, and preventing bubbles."

"A simple definition of rent seeking is spending resources in order to gain by increasing one's share of existing wealth, instead of trying to create wealth. The net effect of rent-seeking is to reduce total social wealth, because resources are spent and no new wealth is created. It is important to distinguish rent-seeking from profit-seeking. Profit-seeking is the creation of wealth, while rent-seeking is the use of social institutions such as the power of government to redistribute wealth among different groups without creating new wealth.

Rent-seeking implies extraction of uncompensated value from others without making any contribution to productivity. The origin of the term refers to gaining control of land or other natural resources. An example of rent-seeking in a modern economy is political lobbying for government benefits or subsidies, or to impose regulations on competitors, in order to increase market share.
Studies of rent-seeking focus on efforts to capture special monopoly privileges such as manipulating government regulation of free enterprise competition.[2] The term monopoly privilege rent-seeking is an often-used label for this particular type of rent-seeking. Often-cited examples include a lobby that seeks tariff protection, quotas, subsidies[3], or extension of copyright law.[4]"
motive  finance  community  greedheads  rent-seeking  wealth  access  economics  manipulation  politics  leeches  selfishness  greed  guilds  certification  licenses  via:straup  resources  capitalgoods  economicgrowth  growth  allocationofresources  efficiency  monopolies  monopolyprivileges  competition  regulation  ownership  productivity  subsidies 
august 2012 by robertogreco
Now You See It // The Blog of Author Cathy N. Davidson » New post on DMLcentral: Standardizing Human Ability
"Here’s a list (in no particular order) of some of the changes in U.S. education, from kindergarten to professional school, either invented or finalized in the Taylorist era (the same era that produced the assembly line, statistics, standard deviation, spreadsheets, blueprints, punch clocks): mandatory public secondary schooling, research universities, majors, minors, divisions, certification, graduate school, collegiate law school, nursing school, graduate school of education, collegiate business school, degree requirements, grades, required courses, electives, distribution requirements, IQ tests, multiple choice tests, item response college entrance exams (SAT), school rankings, class rankings. And learning disabilities.

… these are invented things. … Like statistics and the assembly line, the system of education we have inherited is not “timeless.” It is an industrial age invention."
compulsory  certification  curriculum  assessment  rankings  grading  ranking  iqtests  sat  specialization  departmentalization  learningdisabilities  inventions  invention  learning  tcsnmy  lcproject  context  deschooling  unschooling  standardization  taylorism  2012  cathydavidson  history  education 
august 2012 by robertogreco
Majoring in Idiocy | Front Porch Republic
"colleges and universities are essentially diploma retailers obsequiously bent on making the shopping experience of their customers enjoyable and painless.

…For education presently conceived and presently practiced has but one goal: the mass production of idiots.

I’m speaking—I hope—in fairly precise terms here.

An “idiot,” from the Greek idios (“private,” “own,” “peculiar”), is someone who is peculiar because he is closed in on himself or separated or cut off. In short, he is a specialist. If he knows anything, he knows one thing.

… The idiot may have extensive knowledge of a given thing, but to the extent that he has no sense of where to place that knowledge in the larger context of what is known and knowable, and to the extent that he doesn’t know that the context for the known and the knowable is the unknown and the unknowable—to that extent his knowledge ceases to be knowledge and becomes a collection of mere facts, which, as Cervantes said, are the enemy of truth."

[via: http://randallszott.org/2012/06/13/specialization-idiocy-jason-peters-education/ ]
cv  criticalthinking  thinking  universities  colleges  curriculum  skepticism  science  tunnelvision  knowledge  2010  generalists  certification  diplomas  wisdom  specialization  idiots  highereducation  deschooling  unschooling  education  jasonpeters  specialists 
july 2012 by robertogreco
Certifying 14-year-old poets « Re-educate Seattle
"But here’s a question: should a 14-year-old who is forced to take a required class in poetry be subjected to a process of certification?

Given their brain development and the fact that traditional schooling places kids in required activities, should a 14-year-old—or an 8-year-old, or 16-year-old—be subjected to a process of certification for anything?

There are profound differences between the developmental needs of kids in K-12 versus those in higher education. Young kids need to be in environments in which they can try new things, experiment, grow up, discover who they are.

They need teachers to draw out the genius within them. Higher education, for those who choose that path, is a place where that genius can get refined into certified expertise."
certification  stevemiranda  learning  grades  grading  caltech  unschooling  deschooling  education  pscs  pugetsoundcommunityschool  highered  highereducation  discovery  exploration  maturity  k12  lcproject  tcsnmy 
october 2011 by robertogreco
We, Who Are Web Designers — Jon Tan 陳
"I’m self-actualised, without the stamp of approval from any guild, curriculum authority, or academic institution. I’m web taught. Colleague taught. Empirically taught. Tempered by over fifteen years of failed experiments on late nights with misbehaving browsers. I learnt how to create venues because none existed. I learnt what music to play for the people I wanted at the event, and how to keep them entertained when they arrived. I empathised, failed, re-empathised, and did it again. I make sites that work. That’s my certificate. That’s my validation."
posteducation  education  learning  unschooling  deschooling  certification  pln  authority  curriculum  curriculumisdead  problemsolving  2011  design  webdesign  webdev  empathy  learningbydoing  web  making  makers  make  do  autodidacts  jontan 
september 2011 by robertogreco
Mozilla’s Open Badges Announcement, Storified | Hack Education
"I have covered the Open Badges project several times over the past year:  in an article for MindShift and most recently with an interview in O'Reilly Radar with Project Manager Erin Knight.

In the storify below, I've collected some of the resources about the project, as well as some of the reactions via Twitter to today's announcement -- Mozilla's announcement as well as the Digital Media & Learning's badges competition."

[See also: http://radar.oreilly.com/2011/09/open-badges-project-learning-education.html AND http://mindshift.kqed.org/2011/08/mozillas-open-badges-project-a-new-way-to-recognize-learning/ AND http://commonspace.wordpress.com/2010/08/12/badges-identity-and-you/ ]
audreywatters  mozilla  openbadges  2011  motivation  learning  dmlbadges  badges  lifelonglearning  alternativecertification  certification 
september 2011 by robertogreco
Model and Method [Xskool]
"The Xskool model is expected to be based on some kind of self-directed action learning that enables participants to study locally, at work or on a project, and in their own language – but supported by a distributed network of learning providers, tutors and mentors.

To be determined: Accreditation/certification

Xskool is envisaged, at the moment, as a part-time programme of intensive workshops, each of a three to five days’ duration. Some workshops on this learning journey will be at a residential site; others will involve participation in live projects."
xskool  actionlearning  unschooling  deschooling  workshops  2011  self-directedlearning  self-directed  altgdp  distributed  networkedlearning  networks  lcproject  local  projectbasedlearning  projects  tcsnmy  classideas  accreditation  certification  pbl 
june 2011 by robertogreco
Shanker Blog » Talking About But Not Learning From Finland
"So, for whatever it’s worth, the three policy measures that are currently receiving virtually all the attention in the U.S. – charter schools, removing tenure protections, and tying teacher pay and evaluation to test scores – all fly directly in the face of the Finnish system.

In contrast, not a single feature of Finland’s education system that we don’t use is currently under serious, widespread consideration in the U.S.

Now, again - we obviously shouldn’t adopt policies just because Finland uses them, nor should we reject policies just because Finland doesn’t. But it seems clear, at least from our national discourse, that we’re not really learning much from Finland (at least not yet). Maybe they’re just bad teachers?"
finland  education  us  policy  reform  schools  unions  labor  training  schoolyear  certification  evaluations  privatization  2010  salaries  curriculum  classsize  charterschools 
october 2010 by robertogreco
For Most People, College Is a Waste of Time - WSJ.com
"Here's the reality: Everyone in every occupation starts as an apprentice. Those who are good enough become journeymen. The best become master craftsmen. This is as true of business executives and history professors as of chefs and welders. Getting rid of the BA and replacing it with evidence of competence -- treating post-secondary education as apprenticeships for everyone -- is one way to help us to recognize that common bond."
education  colleges  universities  learning  degrees  credentials  employment  work  apprenticeships  certification  accountability  accounting  testing  assessment  academia  society  culture  lcproject  change  reform 
december 2008 by robertogreco
Hoover Institution - Education Next - What Happens When States Have Genuine Alternative Certification?
"Genuine alternative certification opens the door to more minority teachers, and student learning is more rapid in states where the reform has been introduced. Meanwhile, scientific evidence that alternative certification harms students remains somewhere between scant and nonexistent."
teaching  education  policy  schools  administration  leadership  management  certification 
november 2008 by robertogreco
Education Next - Photo Finish
"The results of our study of New York City public school teachers confirm a simple truth: some teachers are considerably better than others at helping students learn. For example, elementary-school students who have a teacher who performs in the top quartile of all elementary-school teachers learn 33 percent of a standard deviation more (substantially more) in math in a year than students who have a teacher who performs in the bottom quartile. Yet as we embrace this piece of conventional wisdom, we must discard another: the widespread sentiment that there are large differences in effectiveness between traditionally certified teachers and uncertified or alternatively certified teachers. The greatest potential for school districts to improve student achievement seems to rest not in regulating minimum qualifications for new teachers but in selectively retaining those teachers who are most effective during their first years of teaching. "
teaching  schools  policy  certification  experience  leadership  retention  assessment  management  administration 
september 2008 by robertogreco
I, Cringely . The Pulpit . War of the Worlds | PBS
"the younger technical generations are so empowered they are impatient and ready to jettison institutions most of the rest of us tend to think of as essential, central, even immortal. They are ready to dump our schools"
education  future  schools  reform  change  learning  technology  culture  society  certification  homeschool  deschooling  unschooling  generations  e-learning  cringely  knowledge  search  gamechanging  millennials  digitalnatives  via:preoccupations  software  philosophy  sharing  pedagogy  singularity  literacy  elearning  academia  demographics  parenting  schooling  internet  futurism 
march 2008 by robertogreco
How to build a green building without really trying (or caring about the planet). - By Daniel Brook - Slate Magazine
"Critics of LEED—many of them architects who were green before green was cool—see a system that's easy to game and has more to do with generating good PR than saving the planet. Just a few years ago, such criticisms were limited to architectural and e
leed  green  sustainability  criticism  certification  architecture  environment  environmentalism  standards  energy  design 
january 2008 by robertogreco
Design Observer: writings about design & culture
"Yet once Graphic Design is introduced in the classroom, how do educational offerings differ? I soon discovered a fascinating diversity of approaches: from "the guiding principles of good visual communications" in Seventh Grade to "development of a verbal
graphics  design  education  schools  children  universities  colleges  certification  culture  learning 
september 2007 by robertogreco
Slashdot | MIT Dean of Admissions Resigns in Lying Scandal
"stepped down from her post after admitting that she had misrepresented her academic degrees to the institute"
certification  degrees  education  society  universities  colleges  work  qualifications  schooling  honesty  character  admissions 
april 2007 by robertogreco
Meaningless masters at Joanne Jacobs
"Teachers earn more money if they complete a master’s degree, yet there’s no evidence they teach any better."
teaching  effectiveness  pay  masters  education  certification  salaries  work  economics  politics 
january 2007 by robertogreco
Design and the State | Metropolis Magazine
"The crux of the issue is whether or not a design degree is a good measure of skill." - the problem with credential... and not just in the design professions
design  credentials  society  law  teaching  policy  education  certification  practice 
december 2006 by robertogreco
Teacher Magazine: Critical Thinking (Arthur Levine)
"After visiting institutions across the country and conducting surveys, Levine and researchers found that most teaching programs suffer from low standards, out-of-touch faculty, and poor quality control—that, in short, they fail to prepare educators for
teaching  education  certification  colleges  universities  future  programs  schools 
november 2006 by robertogreco
Teach and Learn Online: What would it be like to be the rain
"an idea of how formal teaching and learning, assessment and accreditation might occur in that decentralised educational context"
assessment  freedom  ideas  public  instruction  education  teaching  learning  future  networking  networked  lcproject  freelanceeducation  students  certification  organizations  schools  colleges  universities  socialnetworks 
october 2006 by robertogreco
Teach and Learn Online: Out from under the umbrellas
"The individual teacher would be out from under the umbrella of the organisation as a whole, and made more responsible for their own actions - or lack there of - while the organisation and its hiearchy is set up to support the development of that individu
assessment  freedom  ideas  public  instruction  education  teaching  learning  future  networking  networked  lcproject  freelanceeducation  students  certification  organizations  schools  colleges  universities  socialnetworks 
october 2006 by robertogreco

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