recentpopularlog in

robertogreco : changes   3

Editing the Past | Swell Content
"I’m looking into ways of making my posts living, breathing things. I don’t feel like I have any of the answers yet, so I’m compiling some questions about the effects of editing the past.

Looking at the archive…

**As an evolution of feelings**

What’s the best way to update old blog posts? Does my audience care if I’ve changed the meaning of something from 2011 [http://www.swellcontent.com/2011/05/scratching-the-greatest-itch/ ] or simply removed the harshness of my tone? What about the fact that I often write to get it halfway there (or even 5% there), just to help myself understand my feelings?

What if my feelings turn inside out? What if I want to delete something, because it’s just plain bad?

Do I get to decide what’s important as the author? Why? Or do my readers get to decide with traffic, comments, or attention?

Is frequency important, or is all of this an exhaustive attempt at making order out of chaos? [https://readmill.com/nicoleslaw/reads/the-library-at-night/highlights/0i9t9g ] Maybe I should stop right now.

**As a written record**

What are the ethics of deleting something? Or hiding it? What if I just shove it in a corner or an armpit, only to be found by Google or someone with a link? Why bother keeping it there, if it’s not worth sharing openly?

Is it an archive if I don’t preserve my words as they were originally posted? Or does it break the web to think anything should be static for more than a month or two? Do we breathe here in minutes, months, or milliseconds?

**As a resource**

Is this helpful if it’s not updated? Should I announce every change I make, or put notes within each article? Do I get to summarize my own summaries, or is there a more programmatic way of showing changes, like a differential or commit?

Should I notify anyone of anything? Or is it annoying and uninteresting to know about teeny changes on a personal site? But isn’t everything connected? Even if my opinions are small and unsharpened, isn’t that the point of sharing them and working on them over a lifetime?"

[Recorded here ;]
archives  archiving  nicolejones  2013  addendums  changes  history  longnow  past  future  writing  sharing  web  digital  internet  personalarchives  evolution  recordkeeping  time  memory  persistence  change  nicolefenton 
february 2013 by robertogreco
The Update | Contents Magazine
"More and more, what we post to the internet isn’t brand new: it’s an update—new information that builds on something posted earlier. Updates are everywhere… it’s time to give the update its due.
An update is simply a post with a history. But because data plus time almost always reveals a story, that history is rich with possibility. …

…the ascendancy of the update means that our content is increasingly likely to have a future. When we build the relationship between a post and its updates into our code, we allow our users to follow the development of our content over time. …

…the more we enhance our ability to follow ideas and stories over time, the more complex those ideas can become…

…what’s disorienting about our media today isn’t that our stories fail to end, but that we often sever the connections between them…

I leave these thoughts unfinished; I’ve summoned ideas and left them in suspense. Surely we’ll develop these ideas over time, but how are you ever to know?"
contentsmagazine  facebook  sbnation  changes  corrections  twitter  paulford  media  change  persistence  online  web  future  time  journalism  news  contents  2012  unfinished  updates  mattthompson 
august 2012 by robertogreco
NewsDiffs | Tracking Online News Articles Over Time
"NewsDiffs archives changes in articles after publication.
Currently, we track nytimes.com, cnn.com, politico.com and the bbc.co.uk.

NewsDiffs, which was born out of the Knight Mozilla MIT hackathon in June 2012, is trying to solve the problem of archiving news in the constantly evolving world of online journalism.

The New York Times recently highlighted NewsDiffs in the public editors column (which had previously discussed the difficulties of revisions in the digital age).

You can browse our repository of articles. Or you can take a look at some of the examples of articles that have changed.

If you are a developer, you can check out the Github repository.

If you want updates, you can subscribe to our newsletter, or you can follow NewsDiffs on Twitter."

[via: http://contentsmagazine.com/articles/the-update/ ]
bbc  politico  cnn  nytimes  changes  updates  mit  journalism  news  tracking  newsdiffs 
august 2012 by robertogreco

Copy this bookmark:





to read