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Generation Z: Who They Are, in Their Own Words - The New York Times
[See also, the interactive feature:

"What is it like to be part of the group that has been called the most diverse generation in U.S. history? We asked members of Generation Z to tell us what makes them different from their friends, and to describe their identity. Here's what they had to say."

https://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2019/us/generation-z.html ]

"They’re the most diverse generation in American history, and they’re celebrating their untraditional views on gender and identity.

Melissa Auh Krukar is the daughter of a South Korean immigrant father and a Hispanic mother, but she refuses to check “Hispanic” or “Asian” on government forms.

“I try to mark ‘unspecified’ or ‘other’ as a form of resistance,” said Melissa, 23, a preschool teacher in Albuquerque. “I don’t want to be in a box.”

Erik Franze, 20, is a white man, but rather than leave it at that, he includes his preferred pronouns, “he/him/his,” on his email signature to respectfully acknowledge the different gender identities of his peers.

And Shanaya Stephenson, 23, is the daughter of immigrants from Jamaica and Guyana, but she intentionally describes herself as a “pansexual black womxn.”

“I don’t see womanhood as a foil to maleness,” she said.

All three are members of what demographers are calling Generation Z: the postmillennial group of Americans for whom words like “intersectionality” feel as natural as applying filters to photos on Instagram.

Born after 1995, they’re the most diverse generation ever, according to United States census data. One in four is Hispanic, and 6 percent are Asian, according to studies led by the Pew Research Center. Fourteen percent are African-American.

And that racial and ethnic diversity is expected to increase over time, with the United States becoming majority nonwhite in less than a decade, according to Census Bureau projections.

Along with that historic diversity, members of the generation also possess untraditional views about identity.

The New York Times asked members of Generation Z to describe, in their own words, their gender and race as well as what made them different from their friends. Thousands replied with answers similar to those of Melissa, Erik and Shanaya.

“It’s a generational thing,” said Melissa, the preschool teacher. “We have the tools and language to understand identity in ways our parents never really thought about.”

More than 68 million Americans belong to Generation Z, according to 2017 survey data from the Census Bureau, a share larger than the millennials’ and second only to that of the baby boomers. Taking the pulse of any generation is complicated, but especially one of this size.

Generation Z came of age just as the Black Lives Matter movement was cresting, and they are far more comfortable with shifting views of identity than older generations have been.

More than one-third of Generation Z said they knew someone who preferred to be addressed using gender-neutral pronouns, a recent study by the Pew Research Center found, compared with 12 percent of baby boomers.

“Identity is something that can change, like politics,” said Elias Tzoc-Pacheco, 17, a high school senior in Ohio who was born in Guatemala. “That’s a belief shared by a lot of my generation.”

Last summer, Elias began identifying as bisexual. He told his family and friends, but he does not like using the term “come out” to describe the experience, because he and his friends use myriad sexual identities to describe themselves already, he said.

Elias said he defies other expectations as well. He goes to church every day, leans conservative on the issue of abortion and supports unions, he said. He has campaigned for both Democrats and Republicans.

His bipartisan political activism, he said, was a natural outcome of growing up in a world where identity can be as varied as a musical playlist.

This is also the generation for whom tech devices, apps and social media have been ubiquitous throughout their lives. A Pew study last year found that nearly half of all Americans aged 13 to 17 said they were online “almost constantly,” and more than 90 percent used social media.

Wyatt Hale, a high school junior in Bremerton, Wash., has few friends “in real life,” he said, but plenty around the world — Virginia, Norway, Italy — whom he frequently texts and talks to online.

Their friendships started out on YouTube. “I could tell you everything about them,” he said. “But not what they look like in day-to-day life.”"

["as the boomers and millennials fight to the death, gen x and gen z will snuggle up to talk top emotional feelings and best life practices and I am here for it!!"
https://twitter.com/Choire/status/1111248118694187009 ]
genz  generationz  edg  srg  2019  nytimes  interactive  identity  us  diversity  photography  socialmedia  instagram  internet  online  web  change  youth  race  sexuality  gender  demographics  identities  choiresicha  generations  millennials  geny  generationy  genx  generationx  babyboomers  boomers  classideas 
march 2019 by robertogreco
Ursula K. Le Guin - Page - Interview Magazine
"URSULA K. LE GUIN: You want strong opinions? Anybody can write. You know, one of my daughters teaches writing at a community college. She teaches kids how to put sentences together, and then make the sentences hang together so that they can express themselves in writing as well as they do in speaking. Anybody with a normal IQ can manage that. But saying anybody can be a writer is kind of like saying anybody can compose a sonata. Oh, forget it! In any art, there is an initial gift that had to be there. I don't know how big it has to be, but it's got to be there."



"LE GUIN: Yeah. Too much. This is not Tierra del Fuego, you know. I get bored with the parochialness of the East Coast. They think that the news doesn't get out here and that people out here live in rustic ignorance of real life. It's embarrassing that people can be so ignorant as East Coast people tend to be of the West Coast-and the whole Midwest-and, of course, so contemptuous of the whole South. So sometimes I have written some rather resentful and snarky things about the urban Northeast-particularly in literature-the notion that nothing is worth writing about except the suburbs of large Eastern cities. Blech. That gets nowhere with me."
2015  ursulaleguin  choiresicha  interviews  writing  oregon  westcoast  howwewrite 
september 2015 by robertogreco
The Oyster Review: Ursula K. Le Guin: Everything you ever needed to know about the work of Ursula K. Le Guin and where to start.
"Ursula K. Le Guin is a very famous writer, and she's old enough now that she's entering into legendary. That's the fun part of aging. But she isn't really treated like those famous writers like, say, Philip Roth or Jonathan Franzen. That's in part because she only lived on the East Coast of the United States for a little while—while she was very young and going to college at Radcliffe and then at Columbia. But after that she went to France, where she met her husband, and they came back, and hopped around a bit. But fifty-some years ago, they settled in Oregon and never left. She also considers herself, a lot of the time, a poet, actually. If you get intrigued about her, she has a very fun occasional blog, and she writes about her cats quite a bit. And politics. And ideas. And being a writer.

She also doesn't get treated like many of the fancy writers because she's written a diverse body of work for different kinds of readers. You literally would never know what she was going to publish next, which is pretty cool, when you think about how predictable some writers can be. Also, she wrote a number of books for young adults. Now that's all the rage, and these days it's often difficult to tell what books are for young people and what books are for the rest of us. But things were different in The Olden Times and people were much stuffier.

So where should you start? Let us move from near to far, from comfortable to alien and strange."



"The Dispossessed is a much-loved book, for good reason, but it has a very sneaky trick, one that is hard on minds like mine, which is that two stories run simultaneously, divided into alternating chapters, and they are not happening at the same time. It's a beautiful effect actually but it requires some care in the reading.

The other big truly famous book is The Left Hand of Darkness, which is basically the book that they should give all 16-year-olds when they give out driver's licenses. It's a book that blew the whole world's mind. Usually when people say "Where do I start?" everyone says start here. There are very few better books in the whole world."
2014  ursulaleguin  choiresicha  sciencefiction  srg 
november 2014 by robertogreco
The State of the Internet Is… Not Good? - AtlanticLIVE - The Atlantic
"[Q:] How does The Awl approach that with trying to expand its reach and trying to engage with an audience?

[A:] I don’t actually know. I feel like I have aged out of this a little bit, which is weird. All things new go to the young, which is true and not true. I feel like I’m a Web 1.0 native, and now there are Web 4.0 natives, and they live a little differently than I do.

But we don’t do much. From a business perspective, half of the internet is fake traffic, and fake everything, and that’s fine. But from a personal perspective, people still recommend and share and talk about things that they really like in email and IM. So we want to give people things that they really like and enjoy, but also things they maybe didn’t think they would like and enjoy, because I feel like unexpectedness is a big, wonderful component of the internet. Things that make you say, “I did not know that,” or “I did not know I wanted to know that,” or “maybe I still don’t want to know that.”

[Q:] So I stalked you on Twitter, for full disclosure, and I noticed that you use it more for personal stuff as opposed to corporate stuff.

[A:] I barely use it at all. And you know why? Because once people have come for you on Twitter, you’re sort of done. It’s like, all right, this isn’t my fun place. I keep my Tumblr really isolated – it’s my fun place. It’s just pictures of shit that I like –

[Q:] Pictures of your cat.

[A:] A lot of them. And I don’t care what anybody thinks about it; it’s for me, and that’s it. And with Twitter, you can’t really live like that, because it’s interactive, and there’s people there. And there’s people you know, and people you don’t know, and people connected further and further, which is strange. And it’s also sort of… it’s a challenge.

I just don’t know where this ends. I would say I’m slightly concerned about where this is all going.

[Q:] It seems like the internet is a thing that you were really into when it was Web 1.0 or Web 2.0, and now you’ve found that real life-online balance that a lot of people struggle to find.

[A:] Yeah, I think the internet gets less alluring in a couple of ways over time, probably. Really, the internet is very alluring; I spend a lot of time on the internet. We all do, right? And it’s great. I mean, honestly, it’s great. I’ve also really noticed – and this is very tangential – I’ve noticed that with friends, email is dying. There’s more and more email, but there’s less and less friends, it’s less and less personal.

I didn’t like email that much, but now I feel like the way I felt when letter-writing died. I used to write people long emails. Then I wrote people short emails. And now I don’t know if I even really write people emails at all.

[Q:] So you just gchat instead?

[A:] I feel like my gchat is dying too. I feel like even at work people don’t answer my emails. They answer me 48 hours later, and I’m like, “We’re planning a meeting, what is going on?” But they don’t care. Email is just a. an annoyance, b. inefficient, c. it’s not people’s first inclination to use on their phone.

[Q:] What do you think is the next step?

[A:] I think it’s going to be some horrible Tinder/Instagram hybrid, where we direct message each other.

[Q:] Through pictures?

[A:] Through pictures, through pictograms.

[Q:] Like selfies that we take?

[A:] Videogram selfies. It’s going to be amazing. Or terrible.

Most of us don’t even need computers anymore. Unless you’re writing a story or a blog, where you do need a computer… we just need our phones. Maybe we’ll just sext each other.

[Q:] Is that your corporate plan?

[A:] That’s my corporate plan. Sexting is the future. I’m sorry that we had to have this conversation. Now I’m depressed."
2014  choiresicha  internet  web  twitter  email  tumblr  online  gchat  rss  communication  videograms  tinder  video  images  howwecommunicate 
may 2014 by robertogreco
TL;DR: Choire Sicha | Full Stop
Where does the most interesting (innovative in form and content) writing find its home right now?

I would say the most fascinating and challenging writing is happening on GroupMe, Hipchat, IRC, Campfire, maybe Snapchat and Whisper, and then on the more conversational corners of Tumblr and maybe sometimes Twitter, but not that often, because Twitter is for the olds, and it calcifies really fast.

As writing gets more diverse and possibly more insane in daily practice, as more people are engaged publicly in issuing text to each other, writing in traditional forms—which includes Teh Blogz—has calcified. There are, after all, only so many ways of making a point. The rise of published amateurs is a good thing, overall, though it leads to many hiccups. But everyone has to create her juvenilia somewhere! Meanwhile, everyone else has decided that [animated GIF "lol nothing matters]"



"The internet makes possible new forms of collaboration and discussion. How has this changed the concept of authorship online?

We’re not there yet, but it’s coming. Although, of course, authorship was weirder historically than it is now. Editor-writer relationships were more complex in the past; of course, in many eras, writer-reporter arrangements were far more complex. (What a dreamy job, to be the writer who waits in the office for the reporters to notebook dump at your desk, and then to make it all purple! I suppose we have a bit of that now, it’s just that the reporters don’t work for the same publication as the writers. You know.) Collaboration is incredibly difficult in writing; there aren’t a great number of successful examples. But it’s coming, because all the new online writing tools are being built by engineers and nerds, who think “transparency” and “collaboration” are worthwhile goals. (They are in life, but not in writing.) So the tools encourage peer review, multiple “suggestions,” a role of advisor rather than editor. This is probably a mistake, though it’ll lead to some good experiments. But. Editing really at its best is probably bullying."
choiresicha  writing  online  internet  groupme  hipchat  irc  campfire  snapchat  whisper  tumblr  twitter  collaboration  web  interviews  editing  editors  journalism  2014  books  howwewrite  classideas 
january 2014 by robertogreco
On Smarm
"It is also no accident that David Eggers is full of shit."

"Smarm should be understood as a type of bullshit, then. It is a kind of moral and ethical misdirection."

"The old systems of prestige are rickety and insecure. Everyone has a publishing platform and no one has a career."

"What carries contemporary American political campaigns along is a thick flow of opaque smarm."

"Romney clambered up to a new higher ground, deploring the divisiveness of dwelling on his divisiveness."

"Through smarm, the "centrists" have cut themselves off from the language of actual dispute. In smarm is power."

"A civilization that speaks in smarm is a civilization that has lost its ability to talk about purposes at all."

"Joe Lieberman! If you would know smarm, look to Joe Lieberman."

"The plutocrats are haunted, as all smarmers are haunted, by a lack of respect. On Twitter, the only answer to "Do you know who I am?" is "One more person with 140 characters to use.""

"To actually say a plain and direct word like "corrupt" is more outlandish, in smarm's outlook, than even swearing."

"Anger is upsetting to smarm. But so is humor and confidence."

"Immense fortunes have bloomed in Silicon Valley on the most ephemeral and stupid windborne seeds of concepts. What's wrong with you, that you didn't get a piece of it?"
criticism  culture  smarm  snark  daveeggers  malcolmgladwell  2013  tomscocca  buzzfeed  heidijulavits  isaacfitzgerald  daviddenby  bambi  arifleischer  lannydavis  leesiegel  cynicism  negativity  tone  politics  writing  critique  mittromney  barackobama  michaelbloomberg  ianfrazier  centrists  power  redistribution  rebeccablank  civilization  dialog  conversation  purpose  jedediahpurdy  irony  joelieberman  marshallsella  billclinton  mainstream  georgewbush  maureendowd  rudeness  meanness  plutocrats  wealth  publishing  media  respect  niallferguson  alexpareene  mariabartiromo  gawker  choiresicha  anger  confidence  humor  spikelee  upworthy  adammordecai  juliachild  success  successfulness  niceness  tompeters  bullshit  morality  ethics  misdirection  insecurity  prestige  audience  dialogue  jedediahbritton-purdy 
december 2013 by robertogreco
The Pretty New Web and the Future of “Native” Advertising | The Awl
"Web publishing tools" were first about easy customization, from Blogger to Livejournal, with the last big monster being Tumblr. (Though the funny thing about Tumblr is, for all the time tweens put in to tweaking their "themes," nobody really reads their sites except by the internal "dashboard." So really, Tumblr was the genius publishing tool that transitioned us into "apps.") After Twitter, that's all really over. Twitter is for sure an "app" not a "website" or a "publishing tool"—it's not something you make "look like you." You don't bring Twitter to you and make it yours, you go to it.

Now one beloved troll, I mean, VISIONARY (totally same difference, no?), is calling for the end of web pages. …

The hot word in advertising right now is "native." If I hear "native" one more time this week, oof, I swear. As with all terms in advertising, it's a word that doesn't make much sense on its face."
reading  instapaper  dashboard  daringfireball  spam  ads  income  money  business  content  feeds  pages  stockandflow  flow  branch  svbtle  medium  2012  anildash  choiresicha  tumblr  twitter  nativeadvertising 
august 2012 by robertogreco
You Are Not a Curator, You Are Actually Just a Filthy Blogger | The Awl
"Anyway, replace "curator" with "people who are really picky with what they share on Facebook" and maybe Joe Hill will be right on the money! Although I suspect that in the 16th century, if not "painter," then actually the "patron" was the "artist-king." (Commissioning is an art! Ask Pope Julius II!) And then that "editors" were the dominant influence in the 19th. And "studios" in the 20th. So I guess now either "ad sales people" or "web engineers" are at the top of the artistic food chain? Oh dear."
culture  curation  internet  blogging  art  choiresicha  2012  curating 
june 2012 by robertogreco
Curated Thoughts on Curation • Quisby
It’s clear to me (with a few years under my belt of posting to The Feature) that the simple act of passing along a link or nugget of information really isn’t particularly valuable. Someone that’s good at it can gain a reputation and a substantial following, as Popova has, but the discrete acts that contribute to that reputation aren’t that valuable on their own. Whenever I’ve seen something that literally adds value to its source material by transforming it in someway before passing it along (be it an essay, a mashup, a piece of art, or, sure, a gif) it seems to me that its creative forefathers are consistently well-credited. Is it maybe the case that just passing it on isn’t an act loaded with creative authorship at all?
internet  curation  information  quisby  web  blogging  linkblogs  attribition  choiresicha  via:tealtan  2012  curating 
june 2012 by robertogreco
Some Advice for Young People | The Awl
"2. Yes, you should not worry too much about the consequences and you should definitely quit your job that you hate and it'll probably all work out great. Job quitters are the happiest people around…

The soulless careerists, though: they get where they are because social training doesn't allow us to stop them. They depend upon our unwillingness to say "bad things" about people. But if you don't, who will?

It is incumbent upon you to put a fucking boot in the face of the soulless careerist.

When people ask you about them, tell the truth. Practice saying "They're useless and horrible." Practice saying "They're soulless careerists who don't care about anything or believe in anything and they're just using us all to get ahead at any cost." Practice telling the truth. They can't stand the exposure in the light of day. They can't keep stepping on people if their previous steppings-on are known. You'll all be happier in the long run."
advice  people  workpolitics  careerism  2012  careerists  choiresicha 
february 2012 by robertogreco
Snark and bile and something worse « Snarkmarket
[Why Robin is such a class act…]

"When people complain about the relentless snark and bile of the internet, I never get it. Maybe I’ve just feathered too comfortable a nest for myself in Reader, on Twitter, and here on the Sesame Street of Snarkmarket. Whatever the case, the complaint just never rings true. It never corresponds to my actual experience of the internet.

Tonight, it does…

[Jim Romenesko issue of attribution on his Poynter Institute blog]

But even so, I’d like to think I’m arguing something general and reasonable here. Simply put, it’s this:

YES to public reasoning rooted in real values.
NO to cruelty. NEVER to cruelty."
cruelty  robinsloan  2011  levelheadedness  conversation  snarkmarket  poynterinstitute  jimromenesko  choiresicha  juliemoos  disagreement  behavior  reasoning  publicreasoning  attribution  thoughtfulness  journalism  discourse  argument 
november 2011 by robertogreco

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