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robertogreco : chromeos   17

Auto Update policy - Google Chrome Enterprise Help
"Chrome devices receive automatic updates regularly that enhance both the device itself and the software on the device. Chrome device updates are designed to be simple for the user and, therefore, include updates to the device, Chrome operating system, browser and firmware. However, end-to-end updates for all our devices to ensure the highest levels of security requires dependencies on many third-party hardware and software providers so we cannot indefinitely ensure that older Chrome devices will receive updates to enable new OS and browser features."

[contains full listing of Chromebook models and their "Auto Update Expiration date"]
chromebooks  google  chromeos  updates 
may 2019 by robertogreco
The Ren'Py Visual Novel Engine
"Ren'Py is a visual novel engine – used by thousands of creators from around the world – that helps you use words, images, and sounds to tell interactive stories that run on computers and mobile devices. These can be both visual novels and life simulation games. The easy to learn script language allows anyone to efficiently write large visual novels, while its Python scripting is enough for complex simulation games.

Ren'Py is open source and free for commercial use.

Ren'Py has been used to create over 1,500 visual novels, games, and other works. You can find them at the official Ren'Py Games List, and the list of Games made with Ren'Py on itch.io."
games  gaming  gamedesign  design  ren'py  visualnovels  if  interactivefiction  lifesimulation  software  mac  osx  linux  chromeos  chrome  android  ios  applications  windows  gamemaking  classideas  writing  multiliteracies  opensource  onlinetoolkit  storytelling 
september 2018 by robertogreco
EquatIO Math Writing Software. A Digital Math Tool For Teachers & Students Of All Abilities | Texthelp
"easily add equations, formulas, graphs and more to g suite for education apps and microsoft word"

"We’ve made math digital
Made to help mathematics and STEM teachers and students at all levels, EquatIO® lets everyone create mathematical equations, formulas, Desmos graphs, and more on their computer or Chromebook.

Input’s easy. Type, handwrite, or dictate any expression, with no tricky coding or math languages to master. There’s a huge library of ready-made expressions to save you time, from simple formulas to complex functions. And when you’re done, just add the math to your document with a click."
math  mathematics  applications  chromebooks  android  mac  windows  osx  webapps  chromeos 
june 2018 by robertogreco
How Chromebooks Are About to Totally Transform Laptop Design | WIRED
"That’s not to say the Chrome OS crew are fortune-tellers, of course. They did miss out on one very important thing: smartphones. You may have heard of them. “Back when we were starting Chrome OS,” Lin says, “the web and mobile were in a dead heat. We were betting big on the web, and the Android team was betting big on mobile.” He doesn’t say the obvious next part, which is that mobile and Android won.

There are still times when you want a keyboard and trackpad, though, or a screen larger than the palm of your hand. And lucky for the Chrome team, Android’s also part of Google. So the two teams started talking about how to integrate. They had lots of concerns about performance, integration, and above all security. A couple of years ago, a Chrome engineer ran an experiment: He took containers, a way of separating parts of a system that’s common in data centers, and ran them on a local machine. Android in one, Chrome OS is another. “A few of us saw it,” Sengupta says, “and our eyes literally opened up.” That was the answer.
Android apps solve a couple of Chrome OS’s lingering problems. Most important, they bring all the software people are now accustomed to using, onto a new platform. Remember when people used to complain about Chromebooks not having Word? There are now billions of people who now reasonably expect their laptop to have Snapchat and Uber. Apps also offer offline support in a much more robust way, and they bring the kind of multi-window, desktop-app functionality that feels familiar to the old-school Windows users. Of course, they also require totally different things than traditional computer software. Most apps assume you’re using them on small, touch-enabled screens, running on devices with cellular connections and a bunch of sensors that you definitely don’t have in your laptop.

So, OK, new question: what does a laptop look like in the age of mobile?

New Puzzle Pieces

Imagine you want to build a Chromebook. Great idea! Before you can do anything, you have to deal with Alberto Martin Perez, a product manager on the Chrome OS team. Perez is the keeper of Google’s documentation, the huge set of requirements and standards given to all Chromebook makers. The documentation is an ever-changing organism, concerned with everything from how much RAM and battery life a Chromebook needs, to how hard you have to press the trackpad before it registers as a click. If your Chromebook takes more than ten seconds to boot, or the power button isn’t on the top right? Get on the plane back to China and try again. The long, complex document is written in engineer-speak and is remarkably detailed. It’s Google’s first line of defense against corner-cutting manufacturers.

When Google decided to integrate Android apps with Chrome OS, Perez and his team combed through the documentation. “We wanted to make sure we were ahead,” Perez says. “It’s really easy to change a web app, it’s really hard to change a laptop.” Google now strongly recommends—which is a lightly-veiled warning that it’ll be mandatory soon—that every Chromebook include GPS, NFC, compass, accelerometer, a fingerprint reader, and a barometer. Those are all smartphone parts that have made little sense in a laptop before. But Android apps are inspiring manufacturers to make devices that move, that adapt, that take on different forms in different contexts.

Computer industry execs believe Chrome OS has come into its own, that people will now choose it over Windows for reasons other than price. For many new customers, says Stacy Wolff, HP’s global head of design, “their first device was a smartphone. And they look for the cleanliness, the simplicity, the stability of what we see in those devices.” That’s the thinking behind the sharp and business-like HP Chromebook 13, the company’s new $500 laptop. Wolf sounds eager to continue down the fancy road, too: When I ask why the Chromebook 13’s not as nice as the Windows-powered Spectre 13, which is one of the best-looking and lightest laptops ever made, he pauses to make sure he’s not giving too much away. “I can’t talk about the future, but there’s nothing that stops us from continuing to go and revolutionize that space.” The $1,000 Chromebook used to be a silly sideshow, Google’s way of overshooting. Soon enough, it’ll be a totally viable purchase.

The next few months are shaping up to be the PC market’s most experimental phase in a long time. The addition of Android apps “begs for higher performance hardware and new form factors to support these new use cases,” says Gary Ridling, Samsung’s senior vice president of product marketing. Batteries are more important than ever, as are touch-friendly displays. Windows manufacturers have been experimenting with convertible and detachable devices for the last few years, but the combination of Android and Chrome will actually make them work.

The results are already starting to trickle out. Acer announced the Chromebook R13, which has a 1080p, 13-inch touchscreen that flips 360 degrees, along with 12 hours of battery, 4 gigs of RAM, and up to 64 gigs of storage. It’ll only get crazier from here: you’ll see laptops that are maybe more like tablets, a few that are maybe even a little bit like smartphones, and every imaginable combination of keyboard, trackpad, and touchscreen. Google and its partners all see this as the moment Chromebook goes from niche—for school, or travel, or your Luddite dad—to mainstream. “The ability to run their favorite apps from phones and tablets,” Ridling says, “without compromising speed, simplicity, or security, will dramatically expand value of Chromebooks to consumers.”

When the legendary Walt Mossberg started his personal technology column at the Wall Street Journal in 1991, he opened with a now-classic line: “Personal computers are just too hard to use, and it isn’t your fault.” 25 long years later, that story’s finally changing. Chromebooks are exactly the computer the world needs now: simple, secure, usable. They just work. And starting this fall, they’ll work they work the way people do in 2016: online everywhere, all the time, in a thousand different ways. “Personal computing” left desks and monitors behind a long time ago, and personal computers are finally catching up."
chromebooks  laptops  2016  martiperez  android  chromeos  google  acer  srg 
september 2016 by robertogreco
Crouton: Turn Your Chromebook into far more than a “glorified web browser” | AndroidAuthority
"Congratulations! You now have a very capable operating system installed on your Chromebook. Video/photo editing, coding, web development, audio production, advanced file management, and office work are only a shortcut away. You can also perform these tasks while offline, unlike Chrome OS, which requires a constant internet connection to be truly effective (though there are a growing number of offline apps even with Chrome OS).

The moral of the story is: certain operating systems are suitable for specific tasks. Chrome OS is by far the best platform for casual computing, while Linux has all the tools a professional could ever need. By installing Ubuntu on your Chromebook you get the best of both worlds and have transformed a relatively inexpensive laptop into a very capable and flexible piece of hardware.

It is important to note that, while the aforementioned tasks require far less capable hardware on Linux than competing platforms, I highly recommend installing Linux on a Chromebook with at least 4 GB of RAM, 32 GB of storage, and an Intel CPU (preferably a Core i3 or better) for the best overall experience. Any Chromebook users out there? Do you utilize the power of Linux, or is Chrome OS alone more than enough to suite your needs?"
chromebooks  chromeos  linux  srg  ubuntu  2016  crouton 
january 2016 by robertogreco
Google brings Chrome OS straight into Windows 8 in latest update | The Verge
"Google started dropping hints about its Chrome OS-like plans for Windows 8 back in October. At the time it was merely an experiment in the developer version of Chrome, but today Google is rolling out a new user interface to all Chrome Windows users alongside a noisy tabs tracking feature. The new "Metro" mode essentially converts Chrome for Windows 8 into Chrome OS. Just like Google's full Chrome OS, you can create multiple browser windows and arrange them using a snap to the left or right of the display or full-screen modes. There's even a shelf with Chrome, Gmail, Google, Docs, and YouTube icons that can be arranged at the bottom, left, or right of the screen.

An app launcher is also available in the lower left-hand corner, providing access to search and recent apps. It’s all clearly designed to work well with touch on Windows 8, something that the traditional desktop version of Chrome has not focused on so far. The "Metro" mode presents the keyboard automatically, and also includes the ability to navigate and resize windows within the Chrome OS-like environment. Some UI elements still require some touch optimization, but overall it’s a better experience than the existing desktop version with touch.

While the Chrome browser acts as a Windows 8 application, it's using a special mode that Microsoft has enabled specifically for web browsers. The software maker allows browsers on Windows 8 to launch in its "Metro-style" environment providing they're set as default. The applications are listed in the Windows Store and they're still desktop apps, but the exception allows them to mimic Windows 8 apps and access the app and snapping features of the OS. While Chrome runs in this mode on Windows 8, Microsoft does not permit this type of behavior on Windows RT.

Google’s latest update for Windows 8 is clearly a big step forwards in its Chrome Apps initiative. The search giant is working with developers to create apps that exist outside of the browser and extend Chrome’s reach into more of a platform for third parties to build upon. Having a Chrome OS-like environment directly inside of Windows 8 extends Google’s browser into a Trojan horse to eventually convince users to download more and more Chrome Apps and possibly push them towards Chrome OS in the future.

We’ve reached out to Microsoft for comment on whether Google’s latest Chrome OS update conforms with the Metro-style browser policies, and we’ll update you accordingly."
chromeos  windows8  edg  android  chrome  google  2014  applications 
april 2015 by robertogreco
You can now run Android apps on a Mac or PC with Google Chrome | The Verge
"Google’s convergence of Chrome and Android is taking a big step forward this week. After launching a limited App Runtime for Chrome (ARC) back in September, Google is expanding its beta project to allow Android apps to run on Windows, OS X, and Linux. It’s an early experiment designed primarily for developers, but anyone can now download an APK of an existing Android app and launch it on a Windows / Linux PC, Mac, or Chromebook.

You simply need to download the ARC Welder app and obtain APKs from Google’s Play Store. There are some limitations: only one app can be loaded at a time, and you have to select landscape or portrait layout and whether you want the app to run in phone- or tablet-style. However, you can load multiple apps by selecting the download ZIP option in Arc Welder and extracting it and then enabling extension developer mode to load the folder of the extracted APK. During my testing I’ve found that most apps run really well. There are some exceptions like Gmail and Chrome for Android that throw up Google Play Services errors, but that’s not because ARC doesn’t support them. Developers will need to optimize their apps for ARC, and some Google Play Services are also supported right now, making that process a lot easier.

ARC is based on Android 4.4, meaning a lot of standalone apps are immediately compatible. Twitter works well, and Facebook Messenger loads just fine but does continuously say it’s waiting for the network. I was impressed with Flipboard, and the ability to flick through using two finger gestures on a trackpad, and even Instagram works well for casual browsing. Of course, trying to use the camera in apps will immediate force the app to crash, and keyboard commands aren’t always recognized properly. The biggest issue is that most apps are simply designed for touch, or in the case of games to use a phone’s accelerometer.

I tried a variety of games, and while simple titles like Candy Crush Soda work very well, others refused to launch properly or couldn’t handle mouse input correctly. That’s not surprising for apps that aren’t even optimized, and it’s clear Google’s project has a bright future. While Microsoft is building out Windows 10 and the idea of universal apps across PCs, phones, tablets, and the Xbox One, Google is turning Android into its own universal app platform. Google already built a way to push Chrome OS straight into Windows 8, and this latest Android experiment brings Google even closer to a PC market dominated by Microsoft. Developers can now run their Android apps on phones, tablets, PCs, Macs, Chromebooks, and even Linux-powered devices, and that’s a big opportunity that will likely result in a lot of these apps arriving in the Chrome Web Store in the near future."
mac  osx  android  chrome  emulators  2015  google  googleplay  chromeos 
april 2015 by robertogreco

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