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robertogreco : circadianrhythms   5

Sleep and the Teenage Brain | Brain Pickings
"Biology’s cruel joke goes something like this: As a teenage body goes through puberty, its circadian rhythm essentially shifts three hours backward. Suddenly, going to bed at nine or ten o’clock at night isn’t just a drag, but close to a biological impossibility. Studies of teenagers around the globe have found that adolescent brains do not start releasing melatonin until around eleven o’clock at night and keep pumping out the hormone well past sunrise. Adults, meanwhile, have little-to-no melatonin in their bodies when they wake up. With all that melatonin surging through their bloodstream, teenagers who are forced to be awake before eight in the morning are often barely alert and want nothing more than to give in to their body’s demands and fall back asleep. Because of the shift in their circadian rhythm, asking a teenager to perform well in a classroom during the early morning is like asking him or her to fly across the country and instantly adjust to the new time zone — and then do the same thing every night, for four years."
sleep  adolescence  2013  books  circadianrhythms  learning  education 
july 2013 by robertogreco
When Should Schools Start in the morning? | A Blog Around The Clock, Scientific American Blog Network
"Forward-looking school systems in reality-based communities around the country have, over the last several years, implemented a policy that is based on science – sending elementary school kids to school first in the morning, middle-schoolers next, and high-schoolers last. This is based on the effects of puberty on the performance of the human circadian clock."

"What especially drives me crazy is that so many teachers, people who work with adolescents every day, succumb to this indulgence in personal power over the children. It is easier to get into a self-righteous ‘high’ than to study the science and do something about the problem. It is easier to blame the kids than to admit personal impotence and try to do something about it by studying the issue."
tcsnmy  parenting  borazivkovic  circadianrhythms  scheduling  schedules  health  education  schools  teaching  power  adolescents  teens  sleep 
june 2012 by robertogreco
Science teacher: Zeitgeber matters
"We keep time in class, as we do pretty much everywhere. We pretend days are exactly 24hrs long…each hour is as well proscribed & linear as next…hour in December lasts exactly as long as hour in June.

Kids know otherwise…until we train them.

We start school here in Bloomfield next week…daylight hours shrink dramatically this time of year…

Science teachers will make a big deal about this, explaining the seasons using globes & lamps, but if we've taught our children that sunlight does not matter, that the clock matters more than your hypothalamus, that we eat at noon, not when you're hungry, well, then, we should stop feigning shock when children really don't pay much attention to sunlight.

None of the adults around them do, either.

If college grads do not know why seasons happen, how trees accumulate mass, what forces act on a basketball in flight, maybe it's not because our children refuse to learn.

Maybe it's because they internalized what we've been teaching them all along…"
michaeldoyle  time  teaching  training  psychology  seasons  circadianrhythms  biorhythms  schooldesign  schooliness  schools  schooling  unschooling  deschooling  whatmatters  zeitgeber  2011  education  learning  conditioning  hunger  food  eating  sundial  science  culture  society 
september 2011 by robertogreco
Delayed sleep phase syndrome (DSPS) - Wikipedia [Story of my life]
"…also known as delayed sleep-phase disorder or delayed sleep-phase type, is a circadian rhythm sleep disorder, a chronic disorder of the timing of sleep, peak period of alertness, the core body temperature rhythm, hormonal and other daily rhythms, compared to the general population and relative to societal requirements. People with DSPS generally fall asleep some hours after midnight and have difficulty waking up in the morning.

Often, people with the disorder report that they cannot sleep until early morning, but fall asleep at about the same time every "night". Unless they have another sleep disorder such as sleep apnea in addition to DSPS, patients can sleep well & have a normal need for sleep. Therefore, they find it very difficult to wake up in time for a typical school or work day. If, however, they are allowed to follow their own schedules, e.g. sleeping from 4 a.m. to noon, they sleep soundly, awaken spontaneously, & do not experience excessive daytime sleepiness."
sleep  cv  science  psychology  productivity  health  via:caterina  circadianrhythms  sleepdisorder  alertness  society  mornings 
july 2011 by robertogreco
Study sheds light on 'teenage night owl syndrome' - latimes.com
"Riding in school buses in the early morning, then sitting in poorly lighted classrooms are the main reasons students have trouble getting to sleep at night, according to new research.
light  teaching  schooldesign  lighting  lcproject  tcsnmy  learning  schools  education  sleep  circadianrhythms 
february 2010 by robertogreco

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