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robertogreco : circles   7

Different languages: How cultures around the world draw shapes differently — Quartz
"How do you draw a circle? We analyzed 100,000 drawings to show how culture shapes our instincts"



"Did you start at the top or bottom? Clockwise or counterclockwise? New data show that the way you draw a circle holds clues about where you come from.

In November, Google released an online game called Quick, Draw!, in which users have 20 seconds to draw prompts like “camel” and “washing machine.” It’s fun, but the game’s real aim is to use those sketches to teach algorithms how humans draw. By May this year, the game had collected 50 million unique drawings.

We used the public database from Quick, Draw! to compare how people draw basic shapes around the world. Our analysis suggests that the way you draw a simple circle is linked to geography and cultural upbringing, deep-rooted in hundreds of years of written language, and significant in developmental psychology and trends in education today.

Circles, a universal form

Revered by the ancient Greeks, essential to Islamic art, and venerated in Zen and Tibetan Buddhism, circles are a universal shape. No matter where you begin, there are really only two ways to draw a circle, a single stroke heading clockwise, or a single stroke heading counterclockwise.

Google’s dataset contains 119,000 unique circles drawn by people in 148 countries, and includes coordinates for the path traced by each player’s finger (or mouse). Applying some simple geometry to data from the 66 countries that submitted over 100 circles, we identified the circle-drawing directions favored by different nations.

Americans tend to draw circles counterclockwise. Of nearly 50,000 circles drawn in the US, 86% were drawn this way. People in Japan, on the other hand, tend to draw circles in the opposite direction. Of 800 circles drawn in Japan, 80% went clockwise. Here’s a random sample of 100 circles people drew in each country:

[image]

British, Czech, Australian, and Finnish circles were drawn in the same direction, with the same consistency, as American ones. Some countries are even more regular—around 90% of French, German, and Filipino drawers submitted circles drawn counterclockwise. In Vietnam, a full 95% were drawn this way.

[image]

Most of the world, it seems, draws circles counterclockwise, with just two exceptions from our dataset: Taiwan and Japan."



"There are countless ways that we subtly, unconsciously carry our cultures with us: the way we draw, count on our fingers, and imitate real-world sounds, to name a few. That’s the delight at the heart of this massive dataset. To test our theories, we approached colleagues, friends, and family who write in Japanese, Arabic, Hebrew, Chinese, Thai, and Vietnamese, and, feeling a bit silly, asked them to draw circles. They gladly jumped in, wondering what their fingers would do, and eager to feel part of something larger.

But there’s still plenty we don’t know. Interest in shape-drawing seems to have gone out of style in psychology. With one exception, all of the research we found on cultural shape-drawing and the torque test was from before 1997. Increasingly, people around the world communicate by typing and tapping, but while the art of handwriting might someday get lost all together, perhaps we’re already forming a whole new crop of keyboard-led cultural differences."
us  japan  japanese  srg  circles  classideas  2017  culture  taiwan  chinese  scripts 
june 2017 by robertogreco
Albert Gusi – Caminar en círculo | 30y3 – Spanish Photography Now
"Caminar en círculo es un proyecto que propone mini itinerarios que no avanzan. Una caminata que no nos lleva a ninguna parte, pero que a su vez, paso tras paso, termina por dejar la traza de uno mismo, haciendo el propio itinerario cada vez más evidente. Caminar en rodó es la manera idónea de ver un paisaje en toda su dimensión; en una contemplación expansiva y completa en constante itinerancia.

Proyecto de intervención en el paisaje sobre el soporte de una fotografía tomada por los satélites de Google (es pues un postfotograma en tiempos de postfotografía), que manifiesta una experiencia artística que permite ser compartida y experimentada por cualquiera de nosotros.

(Se pueden descargar las rutas haciendo clic en cada imagen.)

(…) Pero el recorrido circular de Gusi es adrede, intencionado, y porta con ello también para desafiar el sello del absurdo de caminar en círculos, sin principio ni fin claros, sino que sólo dejando la huella sobre la tierra para ser leída por el GPS desde Wikiloc o de cualquier plataforma de toma de imágenes satelitales, en una ultramoderna intervención sobre el paisaje que sólo queda documentada por la imagen satelital.

(…) Si se piensa que la fotografía de autor hace referencia justamente a un autor al patentar con autoridad que la toma fue hecha efectivamente por alguien, y detrás de ese alguien hay un discurso, una poética, una propuesta particular, la obra de Gusi va más allá. Las tomas son ahora unas sin autor, y el absurdo camino en redondo documenta esa imposibilidad autoral de una imagen satelital. ¿Puede seguir siendo fotografía? ¿o lo es sólo porque ilustra esta presencia de una ausencia? Si la instantaneidad es siempre una falsa promesa, aunque sea por algunos segundos ¿Acaso no es siempre esa la característica de cualquier tipo de imagen?


(Citas extraídas de un Texto de Lucy Quesada. Texto completo aquí http://www.albertgusi.com/pdfs/Texto_Lucy_Quezada.pdf )"

[See also:
http://www.albertgusi.com/galeria/caminar_rodo.html
http://www.albertgusi.com/ ]
art  walking  circles  gps  gpsart  albertgusi 
april 2014 by robertogreco
Episode Forty Four: Snow Crashing; danah boyd; Facebook and Oculus Rift
"It looks like Facebook's leadership is waking up to this (in fairness to them, the rest of the industry is waking up to this, too). With mobile, there isn't (and doesn't have to be) a one-size-fits-all communication/social networking utility or app. Facebook may well be the thing that everyone ends up having an account on, but in their latest earnings call, they reiterated their strategy to build more mobile apps and with the acquisition of WhatsApp alongside Instagram it seems clear to me (without my work hat on) that Facebook's goal to connect the world is through Facebook the holding company, not just through Facebook the product/platform. 

You can contrast boyd's work with that of Paul Adams' in his book Grouped[2], the result of which was Google Plus Circles shortly after he left Google for Facebook. Circles (and Google Plus) appears to me to be the sort of social network you end up building where you want everyone *and* you want to solve the problem of having different spaces and contexts. But we don't work like that, not as people: Google Plus is the place and it doesn't matter how many different circles I might have there - the cognitive overhead involved in placing people in circles is just too great and causes too much friction as opposed to just using a different app like Snapchat or WhatsApp or Twitter or Secret that comes with intrinsic contextual cues to being another place.

Adams' research was right - people don't like inadvertently sharing different facets of themselves to the wrong audience. No product has successfully catered for multiple facets, I don't think, and trying to build it into a one-size-fits-all product has failed so far. Mobile, which has reduced context-switching to near negligible, as well as provided a new social graph through the address book, has finally let a thousand social flowers bloom at scale."



"So when you're vision driven, look at Facebook the way you look at Google. One way of looking at Google is that they want to organise the world's information and make it freely available. One way of looking at Facebook is that they literally want to connect the world and enable every living person to communicate as frictionlessly as possible with everyone else.
Like I said, the devil is in the detail.

Facebook - the product you and I use, the one with the newsfeed - is just one way Facebook the holding company is connecting the world. Instagram is another. WhatsApp is another.

Some of those products are ad-funded, some others aren't. And if you're thinking about an end-goal of connecting the world, what's going to connect more people more quickly? Them paying for it, or the connection being available for free?

This might sound like having drunk the kool-aid, but try crediting Zuckerberg with more intelligence and think of him as the prototypical smart nerd: optimize for a connected world. What do you build? How do you deploy it?

It's against this background that they buy Oculus Rift. And don't think agency people have any knowledge - I'm in a plane at 30k feet, and when the news broke about WhatsApp, we were in a meeting *with our clients* - we find out about this stuff when you do, when Twitter explodes.

Like everyone apart from Apple, Facebook missed the boat. But Oculus as display technology - as another way to augment the human social experience is provocative and interesting. In the PR, Zuckerberg is quoted as saying:

"Oculus has the chance to create the most social platform ever, and change the way we work, play and communicate."

He's not wrong. You are always going to be able to meet more people through mediated experiences than physically. Physicality doesn't scale. Is this a terrible harbinger of the replacement of physical social contact? Probably not. We have always invented and looked for more ways to connect with people. boyd says in her book that teenagers aren't addicted to Facebook in the same way they were never addicted to texting or tying up the house landline for hours. They're addicted to *people*. And if Oculus genuinely has the way to change the way people connect, then that makes perfect strategic sense for Facebook.

It turns out that today, people are still using Snow Crash as a business plan."
personas  diversity  facebook  occulusrift  personality  pauladams  danahboyd  google  google+  circles  toolbelttheory  onlinetoolkit  multitools  killerapps  instagram  whatsapp  spaces  socialnetworking  socialnetworks  communication  multiplefacets  contextswitching  danhon  markzuckerberg  snowcrash  nealstephenson  googleplus 
march 2014 by robertogreco
Wheel of Stars
"You are watching, and listening to, a musical clock made of stars.

To make this, I downloaded public data from Hipparcos, a satellite launched by the European Space Agency in 1989 that accurately measured over a hundred thousand stars. The data I downloaded contains position, parallax, magnitude, and color information, among other things…"
sound  stars  polaris  clocks  time  musicofthespheres  circles  2009  jimbumgardner  astronomy  science  measurement  via:nicolefenton 
january 2013 by robertogreco
Can We Ever Digitally Organize Our Friends? « kev/null
"We’re incredibly adept at knowing the right situations to include the right people. They’re not black or white rules and depend heavily on context: is it a party, who else is there, do they know any of the other people, have you talked recently, etc. Unfortunately, this skill and these implicit social rules we know are not easily translated.

Maintenance

…Sociologist Gerald Molenhorst has shown that we change half of our social network every seven years but there isn’t a Changing of the Guard ceremony here. It’s not entirely clear at what point Mike moved from one group to another.

Thus, maintaining digital groups has two problems. First, you don’t know when to move someone from one group to another because transitions happen gradually. Second, it’s simply a lot of effort to maintain. How often would you update the entire list? And if it’s not updated, how useful are the groupings, really?"

[via: http://log.scifihifi.com/post/7724790329 ]
google  socialnetworking  facebook  organization  google+  relationships  circles  change  fluidity 
july 2011 by robertogreco
Volunteered Geographic Information » ‘Compactness’ in Zoning: the circle as the ideal.
"I saw a thought provoking presentation recently, given by Wenwen Li of the University of California Santa Barbara, the talk was a wide ranging insight into Cyber Infrastructure, its uses for geospatial information, and some of the computational techniques that underpinned the project. One element of the project involved zone design for the greater Los Angeles region, and involved the implementation of an algorithm that was intended to aggregate small areal units into larger zones whilst meeting a number of conditions, principle among these conditions was ‘compactness’. The output looked very much like a single hierarchy of Christaller hexagons, and this got me thinking about the nature of space and compactness."
compactness  density  cities  losangeles  geography  hexagons  circles  zoning  clustering  python  builtenvironment  demographics  infrastructure  space  centralplacetheory  wenwenli  ucsb  cyberinfrastructure  geospatial  information 
february 2011 by robertogreco
Take It to the Limit - Opinionator Blog - NYTimes.com
"What’s so charming about this calculation is the way infinity comes to the rescue. At every finite stage, the scalloped shape looks weird and unpromising. But when you take it to the limit — when you finally “get to the wall” — it becomes simple and beautiful, and everything becomes clear. That’s how calculus works at its best."
math  infinity  archimedes  pi  circles  circumference  area  calculus  mathematics  via:migurski  proof  visualization  geometry  limits  education  history 
april 2010 by robertogreco

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