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robertogreco : city   12

The Fumblr
"Your place to vent on the city issues San Diego's "droipped the ball" on"



"San Diego's exploring its options around building a new Chargers stadium, something the team and the mayor both say has hung over the city's head for more than a decade. But plenty of Voice of San Diego readers and members have brought up other issues they think the city needs to address first.

What city issues has San Diego dropped the ball on? Maybe it's never-ending construction on streets in your neighborhood, a nearby lot that's sat vacant for years or lackluster support for the city's cultural institutions or police force. Maybe you think the city's taken too long to build a new stadium.

Tell us about it or share your photos where appropriate. Click on "Submit a Fumble" below for details on how to weigh in."
voiceofsandiego  tumblr  sandiego  city  civics  participatory 
march 2015 by robertogreco
What Tech Hasn’t Learned From Urban Planning - NYTimes.com
“SAN FRANCISCO — The tech sector is, increasingly, embracing the language of urban planning — town hall, public square, civic hackathons, community engagement. So why are tech companies such bad urbanists?



Gone also is any sign of life the plaza ever had. Google leased as much of the complex as it could get its hands on — and the correspondingly skyrocketing rents accelerated the closing of all the ground-floor businesses, even a short-lived outpost of The Melt (a franchise that serves uniformly grilled sandwiches made with a high-tech — and tech-industry-financed — piece of machinery). In place of Starbucks there is now something called the Mozilla Community Space — that isn’t open to the community. You need to be a registered “Mozillian” (whatever that is) to gain access.

Tech companies that remain in the suburbs are taking a similarly upside-down approach to urbanism. Facebook’s Menlo Park campus, set in a sea of parking, is a sort of movie-set version of a city, with cafe, dry cleaner, doctor, dentist and personal trainers all accessible only to employees. Informal public gathering places (like Starbucks, for example, or a barbershop) are essential to local democracy and community vitality. But by creating “third places” (home and work are the first and second) that aren’t actually open to the public, that benefit is severely compromised.

“Community space” implies something that is open to, well, the community. Subverting of naming conventions to suggest public access and transparency, while providing neither, is troubling and increasingly pervasive. But this turning inward, despite the incessant drumbeat of “community,” is quickly becoming the rule rather than the exception.”
urbanism  city  cities  google  twitter  sanfrancisco  lament  spur  community  architecture  planning  technology  siliconvalley  janejacobs  isolation  communities  commons  2013  via:migurski 
december 2013 by robertogreco
An Introduction to Infrastructure Fiction | superflux
"'All-in-One' was an EPSRC-funded project ... [T]he basic research question was 'would it be possible to replace all the disparate utility infrastructures which we have currently with a system that uses one single unified infrastructure to fulfil all the needs of end-users?' ... [L]ook at the actual ideas we came up with: a 'city blood' circulatory system, wherein energy is carried to homes dissolved in water like oxygen is carried to our cells by haemoglobin; a rhizome-topology urban network of underground freight-delivery tunnels; the entire planet powered by orbital solar collector satellites, and eventually by a belt of photovoltaics on the moon; and a subterranean modular city based around the central need for water, energy and fresh air."
infrastructure  city  design  commentary  infrastructurefiction  fiction  paulgrahamraven  designfiction  via:jbushnell 
august 2013 by robertogreco
The (new) Book of Questions.
Described here: http://nomadicity.tumblr.com/post/34543891539/what-if-it-was-the-body-that-gives-meaning-to as:

"In 1974 Pablo Neruda published his best-seller “The Book of Questions” : poems in the shape of questions, observing whatever surrounded him , with the wonder of a child. Is in this spirit that the proposal "The (New) Book of Questions" is founded: to observe , discuss and question the “territories in process” we live in, rather than to “answer” them. This questions will lead the author and reader into the realm of further observation and, if lucky, further questioning. The aim of this “book” is to become a device or tool for thinking, observing and understanding the city and landscape. Through the questioning of others we can see how the space is conformed somewhere else, or how others perceive the same space we live in.

You are the author of “The (New) Book of Questions.”"

“The (New) Book of Questions” is an on-going project."
2012  territoriesinprocess  urban  urbanism  landscape  cities  city  understanding  observing  thinking  classideas  questioning  observation  territory  territories  thebookofquestions  questions  pabloneruda 
october 2012 by robertogreco
I Wish This Was
"New Orleans is full of vacant storefronts and people who need things. These stickers are an easy tool to voice what you want where you want it. Fill them out and put them on abandoned buildings and beyond.

These stickers are custom vinyl and can be easily removed without damaging property. They're free and can be found in corner stores, cafes, bookstores, bars, hair salons, and other places around New Orleans. See select photos here and share more on Flickr (tag your photos "iwishthiswas") or email photos or locations.

This project was created by local designer Candy Chang and launched with exhibit Ethnographic Terminalia at DuMois Gallery. Come to the opening Nov 19 or visit the show until Dec 3 2010 for good times and free stickers."
candychang  crowdsourcing  stickers  urbanism  neworleans  location  labels  papernet  city  nola  activism  iwishthiswas  via:migurski  cities  classideas  civics  potential 
november 2010 by robertogreco
jeweled platypus · text · Grids of tubes and wires (the city and the internet)
"wrote an essay about how learning to use internet is like learning to live in city…for class where we read urban critics/philosophers/sociologists Walter Benjamin, Michel de Certeau, & Georg Simmel…lived in 19th & 20th centuries, talked about: what happens to people when they move to cities, how it feels to live in dense urban centers, & whether “the city” is imaginary place…Some of their concerns about experience of mass urbanization are similar to concerns…about experience of mass internet use: dealing w/ infooverload, wandering in non-linear fashion, learning unfamiliar interfaces, developing less sensitivity to shocking sights, finding connections w/in fragmented communities, encountering thousands of strangers every day, & acting badly when anonymous.

…resemblance btwn physical & virtual worlds is not surprising…“city is an archetype of human imagination”…social aspects of web modeled on places where many of its developers, entrepreneurs & designers live: SF, LA, NY…"

[via: http://twitter.com/tcarmody/status/21262061506 ]
walterbenjamin  micheldecerteau  georgsimmel  cities  2009  psychology  urbanism  urban  society  culture  city  internet  social  flickr  del.icio.us  youtube  flaneur  brittagustafson  online  web  urbanization  non-linearity  learning  explodingschool  colinward  strangers  lcproject  unschooling  deschooling  fear  tcsnmy  anonymity 
august 2010 by robertogreco
TRANSFORMATIONS — Walter Benjamin and the Virtual: Politics, Art, and Mediation in the Age of Global Culture: From Flâneur to Web Surfer: Videoblogging, Photo Sharing and Walter Benjamin @ the Web 2.0 By Simon Lindgren
"This paper explores and illustrates how Benjamin’s analysis of the nineteenth century culture of consumption might contribute to an understanding of the new communal formations and self-reflexive subjectivities of the internet in the twenty-first century. Theoretically, this will be done with a specific focus on the concept of the flâneur as discussed in The Arcades Project (416-455), and on some lines of reasoning that are central to his essay on “The Work of Art in the Age of Mechanical Reproduction”. The empirical emphasis will be on two examples of so called Web 2.0 technologies: the photo sharing service of flickr and the videoblogging functionality of YouTube."

[via: http://jeweledplatypus.org/cgi-bin/blosxom.cgi/text/citynet.html ]
urbanism  walterbenjamin  flaneur  culture  city  blogging  politics  urban  art  internet  web  flickr  youtube  virtual  situationist  global 
august 2010 by robertogreco
A Sense of Place, A World of Augmented Reality: Part 1: Places: Design Observer
"It’s not that the public became interested in nothing. They became interested in place as a zone of consumption, not production. Stripped of those meanings and relationships that were part and parcel of productive activity, everyday place became an unseen zone and we, its inhabitants, became experience addicts — constantly on the hunt for a flashier, more entertaining sensorial fix."
anthropology  ar  architecture  augmentedreality  change  city  location  media  mobilelearning  designobserver  design  future  film  reality  place  gps  geography  communications  cities  meaning  consumption  production  entertainment 
june 2010 by robertogreco
Natural Fuse : home / map
"Natural Fuse creates a city-wide network of electronically-assisted plants that act both as energy providers and as circuit breakers.

Every seemingly helpful device that a human being uses has its own carbon “footprint” which, in excess, can harm other living beings. “Natural fuse” is a micro scale CO2 monitoring & overload protection framework that works locally and globally, harnessing the carbon-sinking capabilities of plants.

Natural fuses allow only a limited amount of energy to be expended in the system; that amount is balanced by the amount of CO2 that can be absorbed by the plants that are growing in the system.

In the same way that circuit-breakers are useful for preventing excessive current use, so too can the Natural Fuse plants break the CO2 footprint “circuit”.

What would you do? Use less energy?Or supersize the fuse?"
usmanhaque  design  art  science  community  green  electronics  sensors  plants  city  network  carbon  situated  energy 
november 2009 by robertogreco
Snarkmarket: Personality and Urban Affection
"Whitman feels the power of the city of strangers. He’s looking at a city of strangers and how something we might now call urban affection begins to develop. How do you come to care for people that you have never seen before and that you may never see again?

Every day we encounter people, eyes make contact, we brush by people, physically come into contact with them, and may never see them again.

But Whitman’s notebooks at this time are filled with images, just jottings, of these people, what they’re doing, what they look like, what their names are. ‘What is this person doing? What’s the activity that defines this person?

“If I were doing that activity that person would be me. If I were wandering the other way, rather than this way, that person could be me. That could be me. That could be me. What is it that separates any of us?’"

[Also here: http://snarkmarket.com/2009/2545 ]
waltwhitman  urban  urbanism  place  noticing  observation  affection  bionicnoticing  cities  strangers  belonging  engagement  surroundings  environment  empathy  city 
february 2009 by robertogreco
The Anti-Advertising Agency » Demand a Read/Write City
"Why is read/write better? Because you can consume, process, and respond. This is how we think critically. This is how we learn. You can talk back. You can express yourself. You don’t just consume expression, you create expression.
advertising  engagement  democracy  graffiti  activism  streetart  cities  urban  urbanism  culture  politics  marketing  art  visual  speech  city 
january 2009 by robertogreco
Intelligent Travel: How Is Your City Feeling?
"The result is a very public display of the emotional status of the city, sparking conversations about how we interact with each other and influence our feelings."
city  psychology  display  visualization  happiness  art  installation  information  infographics  data  cities 
february 2008 by robertogreco

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