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CoCalc - Collaborative Calculation in the Cloud
"CoCalc is a sophisticated online environment for

• Mathematical calculation: SageMath, GAP, SymPy, Maxima, …;
• Statistics and Data Science: R Project, Pandas, Statsmodels, Scikit-Learn, TensorFlow, NLTK, …;
• Document authoring: LaTeX, Markdown/HTML, ...
• General purpose computing: Python, Octave, Julia, Scala, …

Zero Setup: getting started does not require any software setup.

1. First, create your personal account.
2. Then, create a project to instantiate your own private workspace.
3. Finally, create a worksheet or upload your own files: CoCalc supports online editing of Jupyter Notebooks, Sage Worksheets, LaTeX files, etc.

Collaborative Environment

• Share your files privately with project collaborators — all files are synchronized in real-time.
• Time-travel is a detailed history of all your edits and everything is backed up in consistent snapshots.
• Finally, you can select any document to publish it online.

A default project under a free plan has a quota of 1.0 GB memory and 3.0 GB of disk space. Subscriptions make hosting more robust and increase quotas."
computing  collaboration  cloud  math  python  latex  chromebooks 
august 2018 by robertogreco
GitHub - jkriss/altcloud: A web server with extra powers. Run your own stuff.
"Altcloud is a web server with some niceties build in so that you can create real applications without any backend code or external services.

The idea is to set up an altcloud server on something like a Digital Ocean instance or a C.H.I.P. and run multiple sites off of that single server.

Altcloud is powered by simple configuration files and uses the local filesystem for storage. It doesn't scale, and that's just fine.

This implementation of the altcloud server is written in node.js, but the specification is platform and language agnostic.

DISCLAIMER: this is beta software. Please don't trust it just yet."
jessekriss  altcloud  cloud  diy  web  webdev  servers  software  applications  webdesign 
february 2017 by robertogreco
Liberio | Simple eBook creation and publishing.
"Make eBooks.Really simple.Right fromGoogle Drive.Dropbox.OneDrive.GitHub.anywhere.

Easy as 1, 2, 3
Write, design, publish for free
No more complicated exports or data handling with ePub files. Create your own eBooks for free with only one click right from the cloud or your computer, and start publishing with Liberio.

1. Write your Text
Liberio integrates seamlessly with Google Drive, Dropbox, OneDrive, Github and more. Any text-based document can be converted into an eBook — including LaTex and Markdown! Write your book wherever you please and import directly into Liberio.

2. Import to Liberio
Liberio imports (nearly) all features of your eBook’s documents: Text formatting, fonts and images are available to style and create your eBook. Easily generate an imprint, upload your own cover image or choose from a variety of free cover templates.

3. Publish your eBook
Liberio produces ePubs compliant to the official standard. Your books will be ready for all major eBook stores like Amazon™, Google Play™ Books or the iBooks™ Store. Share your books on Facebook™, Twitter™ and Google+™ directly from Liberio.

Liberio is for everyone
Publish for education, design or just for fun
We want to make the publishing of eBooks easy for everyone. No matter if you are a teacher, student, designer, artist, engineer or tinkerer, creating and publishing your own books is now only a push of a button away."

Liberio for Teachers
Create course materials for your students, publish your own books about your field of expertise or use Liberio as a platform to publish student essays. There’s so much knowledge to share – Now you can, for free, with one click!

Liberio for Creatives
Write and publish your own essays, novels, poems or create a collection of your best artwork. Share your stories, knowledge and ideas with others around the world. Liberio makes it super easy to create beautifully unique books.

Liberio for Engineers
Create technical manuals, write scientific papers or publish transcripts of conference talks. Easy import and processing of Markdown and LaTex with Liberio’s one click publishing lets you share your work with everyone, for free.

From your thoughts to the world
Liberio’s one-click publishing is incredibly simple
Sharing your ebooks with the rest of the world should not be a difficult task. From writing, editing and design to publishing and sharing on social networks — publishing an eBook has never been simpler than with Liberio.

Send to Google Play
Send your latest publication to your Google Play Books account where both Android smartphones and tablets alike can download them, with a push of a button in Liberio.

Publish & share online
Share your latest eBook with your family, friends, others around the world on Twitter, Facebook, Google+ and other social networks with one click right from Liberio.

Send to your Kindle
Send your books to your Kindle. Whether it be the Kindle Paperwhite, HD, Fire, or previous models, you always have your eBooks with you in just seconds, with Liberio."
ebooks  publishign  googledrive  googledocs  cloud  epub 
january 2017 by robertogreco
Sandstorm
"Sandstorm is an open source operating system for personal and private clouds."

"What can I do with it?

Create
Create Google-Docs-like spreadsheets, documents, forms, etc. with EtherCalc, Etherpad, Sandforms, Draw.io, and more.

Collaborate
Share documents, diagrams, and other files with your colleagues and friends, and collaborate in real-time.

Communicate
Sync up with your colleagues securely with great chat applications like Rocket.Chat.

How is it different?

Usability | Designed for Humans
Sandstorm is the easiest way there has ever been to run a server.

Sandstorm requires no technical expertise to use.

Installing apps on Sandstorm is as easy as installing apps on your phone. No need to read documentation and edit config files – and no need to wait for IT to do it for you.

Sandstorm emphasizes users over apps.

You log into Sandstorm, not into each app separately.

All of your data across all apps (documents, chat rooms, whatever) can be found and searched in one place, rather than logging into each one separately.

You can share and collaborate on anything – or keep it private.

Security | Secure by Default
Sandstorm is ridiculously secure.

The biggest challenge to securing any server is buggy apps. Some app developers are good at security, but some are not, and it's usually impossible to know who is whom without doing a costly security audit.

Sandstorm, therefore, takes a different approach: break data down into "grains" (for example, individual documents, or chat rooms) and isolate each one in a secure sandbox from which it cannot talk to the world without your express permission. With this approach, no matter how buggy your document editor might be, each document can only possibly be accessed by the people you shared it with. No matter how buggy your chat room, only the people you permitted will ever see the logs.

Skeptical? Check out our security docs and list of security non-events to learn more.

Because Sandstorm manages access control on every document, it can tell you who has accessed your data and allow you to revoke that access at any time. Prove that your sensitive data is secure by reviewing all the systems it is connected to."
cloud  opensource  privacy  security  servers  sandstorm  onlinetoolkit  ethercalc  etherpad  sandforms  draw.io 
february 2016 by robertogreco
The Website Obesity Crisis
"Let me start by saying that beautiful websites come in all sizes and page weights. I love big websites packed with images. I love high-resolution video. I love sprawling Javascript experiments or well-designed web apps.

This talk isn't about any of those. It's about mostly-text sites that, for unfathomable reasons, are growing bigger with every passing year.

While I'll be using examples to keep the talk from getting too abstract, I’m not here to shame anyone, except some companies (Medium) that should know better and are intentionally breaking the web.

The Crisis

What do I mean by a website obesity crisis?

Here’s an article on GigaOm from 2012 titled "The Growing Epidemic of Page Bloat". It warns that the average web page is over a megabyte in size.

The article itself is 1.8 megabytes long."


Here's an almost identical article from the same website two years later, called “The Overweight Web". This article warns that average page size is approaching 2 megabytes.

That article is 3 megabytes long.

If present trends continue, there is the real chance that articles warning about page bloat could exceed 5 megabytes in size by 2020.

The problem with picking any particular size as a threshold is that it encourages us to define deviancy down. Today’s egregiously bloated site becomes tomorrow’s typical page, and next year’s elegantly slim design.

I would like to anchor the discussion in something more timeless.

To repeat a suggestion I made on Twitter, I contend that text-based websites should not exceed in size the major works of Russian literature.

This is a generous yardstick. I could have picked French literature, full of slim little books, but I intentionally went with Russian novels and their reputation for ponderousness.

In Goncharov's Oblomov, for example, the title character spends the first hundred pages just getting out of bed.

If you open that tweet in a browser, you'll see the page is 900 KB big.
That's almost 100 KB more than the full text of The Master and Margarita, Bulgakov’s funny and enigmatic novel about the Devil visiting Moscow with his retinue (complete with a giant cat!) during the Great Purge of 1937, intercut with an odd vision of the life of Pontius Pilate, Jesus Christ, and the devoted but unreliable apostle Matthew.

For a single tweet.

Or consider this 400-word-long Medium article on bloat, which includes the sentence:

"Teams that don’t understand who they’re building for, and why, are prone to make bloated products."

The Medium team has somehow made this nugget of thought require 1.2 megabytes.

That's longer than Crime and Punishment, Dostoyevsky’s psychological thriller about an impoverished student who fills his head with thoughts of Napoleon and talks himself into murdering an elderly money lender.
Racked by guilt, so rattled by his crime that he even forgets to grab the money, Raskolnikov finds himself pursued in a cat-and-mouse game by a clever prosecutor and finds redemption in the unlikely love of a saintly prostitute.

Dostoevski wrote this all by hand, by candlelight, with a goddamned feather."



"Everyone admits there’s a problem. These pages are bad enough on a laptop (my fan spun for the entire three weeks I was preparing this talk), but they are hell on mobile devices. So publishers are taking action.

In May 2015, Facebook introduced ‘Instant Articles’, a special format for news stories designed to appear within the Facebook site, and to load nearly instantly.

Facebook made the announcement on a 6.8 megabyte webpage dominated by a giant headshot of some dude. He doesn’t even work for Facebook, he’s just the National Geographic photo editor.

Further down the page, you'll find a 41 megabyte video, the only way to find out more about the project. In the video, this editor rhapsodizes about exciting misfeatures of the new instant format like tilt-to-pan images, which means if you don't hold your phone steady, the photos will drift around like a Ken Burns documentary.

Facebook has also launched internet.org, an effort to expand Internet access. The stirring homepage includes stories of people from across the developing world, and what getting Internet access has meant for them.
You know what’s coming next. When I left the internet.org homepage open in Chrome over lunch, I came back to find it had transferred over a quarter gigabyte of data.

Surely, you'll say, there's no way the globe in the background of a page about providing universal web access could be a giant video file?

But I am here to tell you, oh yes it is. They load a huge movie just so the globe can spin.

This is Facebook's message to the world: "The internet is slow. Sit and spin."

And it's not like bad connectivity is a problem unique to the Third World! I've traveled enough here in Australia to know that in rural places in Tasmania and Queensland, vendors treat WiFi like hundred-year-old brandy.

You're welcome to buy as much of it as you want, but it costs a fortune and comes in tiny portions. And after the third or fourth purchase, people start to look at you funny.

Even in well-connected places like Sydney, we've all had the experience of having a poor connection, and almost no battery, while waiting for some huge production of a site to load so we can extract a morsel of information like a restaurant address.

The designers of pointless wank like that Facebook page deserve the ultimate penalty.
They should be forced to use the Apple hockey puck mouse for the remainder of their professional lives. [shouts of horror from the audience]

Google has rolled out a competitor to Instant Articles, which it calls Accelerated Mobile Pages. AMP is a special subset of HTML designed to be fast on mobile devices.

Why not just serve regular HTML without stuffing it full of useless crap? The question is left unanswered.

The AMP project is ostentatiously open source, and all kinds of publishers have signed on. Out of an abundance of love for the mobile web, Google has volunteered to run the infrastructure, especially the user tracking parts of it.

Jeremy Keith pointed out to me that the page describing AMP is technically infinite in size. If you open it in Chrome, it will keep downloading the same 3.4 megabyte carousel video forever.
If you open it in Safari, where the carousel is broken, the page still manages to fill 4 megabytes.

These comically huge homepages for projects designed to make the web faster are the equivalent of watching a fitness video where the presenter is just standing there, eating pizza and cookies.

The world's greatest tech companies can't even make these tiny text sites, describing their flagship projects to reduce page bloat, lightweight and fast on mobile.

I can't think of a more complete admission of defeat."



"The other vision is of the web as Call of Duty—an exquisitely produced, kind-of-but-not-really-participatory guided experience with breathtaking effects and lots of opportunities to make in-game purchases.

Creating this kind of Web requires a large team of specialists. No one person can understand the whole pipeline, nor is anyone expected to. Even if someone could master all the technologies in play, the production costs would be prohibitive.

The user experience in this kind of Web is that of being carried along, with the illusion of agency, within fairly strict limits. There's an obvious path you're supposed to follow, and disincentives to keep you straying from it. As a bonus, the game encodes a whole problematic political agenda. The only way to reject it is not to play.

Despite the lavish production values, there's a strange sameness to everything. You're always in the same brown war zone.

With great effort and skill, you might be able make minor modifications to this game world. But most people will end up playing exactly the way the publishers intend. It's passive entertainment with occasional button-mashing.

Everything we do to make it harder to create a website or edit a web page, and harder to learn to code by viewing source, promotes that consumerist vision of the web.

Pretending that one needs a team of professionals to put simple articles online will become a self-fulfilling prophecy. Overcomplicating the web means lifting up the ladder that used to make it possible for people to teach themselves and surprise everyone with unexpected new ideas

Here's the hortatory part of the talk:

Let’s preserve the web as the hypertext medium it is, the only thing of its kind in the world, and not turn it into another medium for consumption, like we have so many examples of already.

Let’s commit to the idea that as computers get faster, and as networks get faster, the web should also get faster.

Let’s not allow the panicked dinosaurs of online publishing to trample us as they stampede away from the meteor. Instead, let's hide in our holes and watch nature take its beautiful course.

Most importantly, let’s break the back of the online surveillance establishment that threatens not just our livelihood, but our liberty. Not only here in Australia, but in America, Europe, the UK—in every free country where the idea of permanent, total surveillance sounded like bad science fiction even ten years ago.

The way to keep giant companies from sterilizing the Internet is to make their sites irrelevant. If all the cool stuff happens elsewhere, people will follow. We did this with AOL and Prodigy, and we can do it again.

For this to happen, it's vital that the web stay participatory. That means not just making sites small enough so the whole world can visit them, but small enough so that people can learn to build their own, by example.

I don't care about bloat because it's inefficient. I care about it because it makes the web inaccessible.

Keeping the Web simple keeps it awesome."
pagebloat  webdesign  maciejceglowski  2015  webdev  participatory  openweb  internet  web  online  minecraft  accessibility  efficiency  aesthetics  cloud  cloudcomputing  amazonwebservices  backend  paypal  google  docker  websites  wired  theverge  medium  javascript  advertising  ads  acceleratedmobilepages  mobile  html  facebook  freebasics  jeremykeith  timkadlec  internet.org  facebookinstantarticles  maciejcegłowski 
january 2016 by robertogreco
Web Design - The First 100 Years
"Today I hope to persuade you that the same thing that happened to aviation is happening with the Internet. Here we are, fifty years into the computer revolution, at what feels like our moment of greatest progress. The outlines of the future are clear, and oh boy is it futuristic.

But we're running into physical and economic barriers that aren't worth crossing.

We're starting to see that putting everything online has real and troubling social costs.

And the devices we use are becoming 'good enough', to the point where we can focus on making them cheaper, more efficient, and accessible to everyone.

So despite appearances, despite the feeling that things are accelerating and changing faster than ever, I want to make the shocking prediction that the Internet of 2060 is going to look recognizably the same as the Internet today.

Unless we screw it up.

And I want to convince you that this is the best possible news for you as designers, and for us as people."



"So while Moore's Law still technically holds—the number of transistors on a chip keeps increasing—its spirit is broken. Computers don't necessarily get faster with time. In fact, they're getting slower!

This is because we're moving from desktops to laptops, and from laptops to smartphones. Some people are threatening to move us to wristwatches.
In terms of capability, these devices are a step into the past. Compared to their desktop brethren, they have limited memory, weak processors, and barely adequate storage.

And nobody cares, because the advantages of having a portable, lightweight connected device are so great. And for the purposes of taking pictures, making calls, and surfing the internet, they've crossed the threshold of 'good enough'.

What people want from computers now is better displays, better battery life and above all, a better Internet connection.

Something similar happened with storage, where the growth rate was even faster than Moore's Law. I remember the state-of-the-art 1MB hard drive in our computer room in high school. It cost a thousand dollars.
Here's a photo of a multi-megabyte hard drive from the seventies. I like to think that the guy in the picture didn't have to put on the bunny suit, it was just what he liked to wear.

Modern hard drives are a hundred times smaller, with a hundred times the capacity, and they cost a pittance. Seagate recently released an 8TB consumer hard drive.

But again, we've chosen to go backwards by moving to solid state storage, like you find in smartphones and newer laptops. Flash storage sacrifices capacity for speed, efficiency and durability.

Or else we put our data in 'the cloud', which has vast capacity but is orders of magnitude slower.

These are the victories of good enough. This stuff is fast enough.

Intel could probably build a 20 GHz processor, just like Boeing can make a Mach 3 airliner. But they won't. There's a corrollary to Moore's law, that every time you double the number of transistors, your production costs go up. Every two years, Intel has to build a completely new factory and production line for this stuff. And the industry is turning away from super high performance, because most people don't need it.

The hardware is still improving, but it's improving along other dimensions, ones where we are already up against hard physical limits and can't use the trick of miniaturization that won us all that exponential growth.

Battery life, for example. The limits on energy density are much more severe than on processor speed. And it's really hard to make progress. So far our advances have come from making processors more efficient, not from any breakthrough in battery chemistry.

Another limit that doesn't grow exponentially is our ability to move information. There's no point in having an 8 TB hard drive if you're trying to fill it over an AT&T network. Data constraints hit us on multiple levels. There are limits on how fast cores can talk to memory, how fast the computer can talk to its peripherals, and above all how quickly computers can talk to the Internet. We can store incredible amounts of information, but we can't really move it around.

So the world of the near future is one of power constrained devices in a bandwidth-constrained environment. It's very different from the recent past, where hardware performance went up like clockwork, with more storage and faster CPUs every year.

And as designers, you should be jumping up and down with relief, because hard constraints are the midwife to good design. The past couple of decades have left us with what I call an exponential hangover.

Our industry is in complete denial that the exponential sleigh ride is over. Please, we'll do anything! Optical computing, quantum computers, whatever it takes. We'll switch from silicon to whatever you want. Just don't take our toys away.
But all this exponential growth has given us terrible habits. One of them is to discount the present.

When things are doubling, the only sane place to be is at the cutting edge. By definition, exponential growth means the thing that comes next will be equal in importance to everything that came before. So if you're not working on the next big thing, you're nothing.



A further symptom of our exponential hangover is bloat. As soon as a system shows signs of performance, developers will add enough abstraction to make it borderline unusable. Software forever remains at the limits of what people will put up with. Developers and designers together create overweight systems in hopes that the hardware will catch up in time and cover their mistakes.

We complained for years that browsers couldn't do layout and javascript consistently. As soon as that got fixed, we got busy writing libraries that reimplemented the browser within itself, only slower.

It's 2014, and consider one hot blogging site, Medium. On a late-model computer it takes me ten seconds for a Medium page (which is literally a formatted text file) to load and render. This experience was faster in the sixties.

The web is full of these abuses, extravagant animations and so on, forever a step ahead of the hardware, waiting for it to catch up.

This exponential hangover leads to a feeling of exponential despair.

What's the point of pouring real effort into something that is going to disappear or transform in just a few months? The restless sense of excitement we feel that something new may be around the corner also brings with it a hopelessness about whatever we are working on now, and a dread that we are missing out on the next big thing.

The other part of our exponential hangover is how we build our businesses. The cult of growth denies the idea that you can build anything useful or helpful unless you're prepared to bring it to so-called "Internet scale". There's no point in opening a lemonade stand unless you're prepared to take on PepsiCo.

I always thought that things should go the other way. Once you remove the barriers of distance, there's room for all sorts of crazy niche products to find a little market online. People can eke out a living that would not be possible in the physical world. Venture capital has its place, as a useful way to fund long-shot projects, but not everything fits in that mold.

The cult of growth has led us to a sterile, centralized web. And having burned through all the easy ideas within our industry, we're convinced that it's our manifest destiny to start disrupting everyone else.

I think it's time to ask ourselves a very designy question: "What is the web actually for?"
I will argue that there are three competing visions of the web right now. The one we settle on will determine whether the idiosyncratic, fun Internet of today can survive.



Vision 1: CONNECT KNOWLEDGE, PEOPLE, AND CATS.

This is the correct vision.



Vision 2: FIX THE WORLD WITH SOFTWARE

This is the prevailing vision in Silicon Valley.



Vision 3: BECOME AS GODS, IMMORTAL CREATURES OF PURE ENERGY LIVING IN A CRYSTALLINE PARADISE OF OUR OWN CONSTRUCTION

This is the insane vision. I'm a little embarrassed to talk about it, because it's so stupid. But circumstances compel me.



There's a William Gibson quote that Tim O'Reilly likes to repeat: "the future is here, it's just not evenly distributed yet."

O'Reilly takes this to mean that if we surround ourselves with the right people, it can give us a sneak peek at coming attractions.

I like to interpret this quote differently, as a call to action. Rather than waiting passively for technology to change the world, let's see how much we can do with what we already have.

Let's reclaim the web from technologists who tell us that the future they've imagined is inevitable, and that our role in it is as consumers.

The Web belongs to us all, and those of us in this room are going to spend the rest of our lives working there. So we need to make it our home.

We live in a world now where not millions but billions of people work in rice fields, textile factories, where children grow up in appalling poverty. Of those billions, how many are the greatest minds of our time? How many deserve better than they get? What if instead of dreaming about changing the world with tomorrow's technology, we used today's technology and let the world change us? Why do we need to obsess on artificial intelligence, when we're wasting so much natural intelligence?


When I talk about a hundred years of web design, I mean it as a challenge. There's no law that says that things are guaranteed to keep getting better.

The web we have right now is beautiful. It shatters the tyranny of distance. It opens the libraries of the world to you. It gives you a way to bear witness to people half a world away, in your own words. It is full of cats. We built it by accident, yet already we're taking it for granted. We should fight to keep it! "
technology  web  webdesign  internet  culture  design  history  aviation  airplanes  planes  2014  constraints  growth  singularity  scale  webdev  siliconvalley  technosolutionism  boeing  intel  microsoft  cloud  raykurzweil  elonmusk  williamgibson  inequality  mooreslaw  timoreilly  software  bloat  progress  present  future  manifestdestiny 
july 2015 by robertogreco
The Anthropoid Condition - The Los Angeles Review of Books
[via: "Great interview w/ John D. Peters at @LAReviewofBooks: http://lareviewofbooks.org/interview/the-anthropoid-condition-an-interview-with-john-durham-peters/ . A lot of people think they’re smart; Peters is really smart."
https://twitter.com/mattthomas/status/619916078093742080

"Peters’s new book, “The Marvelous Clouds,” is easiest the smartest thing I’ve read in a ages, btw. http://amzn.to/1LY8MqQ "
https://twitter.com/mattthomas/status/619916841733894144 ]

"BRÍAN HANRAHAN: What distinguishes your understanding of 'media' in The Marvelous Clouds from other, maybe better-known uses of the term?

JOHN DURHAM PETERS: 'Media' is one of those terms whose meaning is as imprecise as a plate of spaghetti. And like 'spaghetti,' few can tell if it is a plural or singular noun. My academic preference is to say “media are” with a plural verb in order to underline the diversity of media forms and formats, but most people are happy to talk about media as a mass noun and use the term to refer to everything from journalists and publicity to furnace filters and hard drives. In the field of media studies, media typically are more clearly defined as a cluster of institutions, audiences, and programs (e.g., Disney, BBC, or Google), but there is a minority tradition I favor that sees media more broadly as staples, environments, and data processors of all kinds — as elements in the middle. Some of my critics say this view stretches the concept beyond its breaking point, but I believe ubiquitous computing has already stretched media more than our concepts have: thanks to digital transformations, media are so environmentally pervasive that we need an encompassing definition to match. Theory is usually playing catch-up.

BRÍAN HANRAHAN: The book delves into innumerable subjects, skipping through dozens of disciplines: anthropology, zoology, theology, astronomy, the history of technology, cultural history of many kinds, philosophy and literature and more. But if there is one term that you seem to identify with, it is 'media theory.' On the face of it, that might seem a modest label for such a broad vision. So what is “media theory,” as you understand it, and what can be learned from it?

JOHN DURHAM PETERS: Glad that you think it is a matter of skipping rather than skidding! The book presupposes a view of knowledge and research that it doesn’t spell out at any length. What would the university look like if we took seriously the mortality of the human knower and the responsibility to speak to the species rather than only to one’s peers? I believe it would be a less turfy, more humble, and more interdisciplinary place, one less focused on the newest thing and more open to long stretches of time.[i] Labeling fields of study often amounts to little more than a branding exercise, so my unpretentious choice of “media theory” is, among other things, an indirect comment on academic tribalism. Media theory has almost no barriers to entry — you’d be amazed at how readily some people opine on media without any sense of the field’s traditions or concepts — and almost anyone can call themselves a media theorist; as beings who live in the middle, in medias res, I think that every human being is potentially such a creature. Media theory, at its best, is a means of seeking greater awareness of the basic conditions in which we live.

BRÍAN HANRAHAN: Clouds, unlike fire, sky, and sea, don’t get chapters to themselves in the book, but they are in the title, and they are a recurring motif. What is so interesting about clouds for a media theorist and historian?

JOHN DURHAM PETERS: Clouds are interesting because they bring together so many great questions. It’s hard to boil down something I’ve thought so much about, but here goes.[ii]

First, clouds raise very fundamental questions of where significance lies. Clouds are often thought to be blank and meaningless, the playthings of whimsy. Hardly. Few things are so packed with meaning. Once you start looking at clouds, you see them everywhere in art, literature, religion, and popular culture, and of course in the sky. The question of what clouds mean is a deep one; reading clouds is the paradigm case of how to interpret nature and how not to. Clouds tell us about the weather and the future, and reading the sky is a basic human task; in Iowa, where I live, like many places, clouds are among the most spectacular forms of natural beauty. Of course, there is a long tradition of scorn starting from at least Aristophanes aimed at anyone who finds meaning in clouds, but it is just as foolish to say clouds have no meaning (ask a sailor, pilot, or farmer if clouds mean nothing). The meaning that remains once you subtract human intention turns out to be rich, and I argue that media theory should take this abundant zone of meaning seriously.

Second, from the poison gas clouds of World War I to the mushroom cloud of World War II to the data cloud today, clouds are telling historical markers. While writing the book, I would tell people I was writing about clouds, and they’d sometimes respond, Oh, I work in IT too! (The cloud metaphor, with its hints of benign oversight and calm flow, richly serves the ideological interests of the IT industry.) That the default meaning of “cloud” has become “server-based data storage” is a symptom of nature being absorbed by technology and technology becoming second nature. It is remarkable how casually we accept this monstrous hybrid of atmospheric aerosols and computing infrastructure without a second thought. Clouds are thus a symptom of what it is fashionable to call the anthropocene, the geological epoch in which human agency alters nature radically.

Third, clouds are an elemental background that surrounds us — and unnoticed environments are prime territory for media theory. A central point of the book is that if we define media as carriers of significance then media should include natural elements; studying aerosol clouds and data clouds side by side gives me a way to make this point.

Fourth, clouds raise two fundamental problems in media theory: how to record phenomena that exist in time and how to represent ones that do not conform to a symbolic system.

Regarding recording, the book is a meditation on how media capture and fail to capture time, and clouds are a good example of entities whose nature is to vanish. Clouds illustrate media ontology. Like sounds and music, clouds exist by disappearing. They exist in time. Clouds are highly material — just this morning so much rain dumped on southeastern Iowa as to trigger flashflood warnings again — and their dynamic materiality is suggestive for media under volatile digital conditions (probably one reason the cloud metaphor took hold so readily).

Regarding representing, clouds bear significance, but without any code to clarify what they mean. Their meanings are essentially vague. The history of cloud media, in painting and photography, is the struggle to capture sensuous objects that are also abstract. (The sky was painting abstract impressionist images long before humans did!) Clouds are the original white noise. Well before analog media such as film and sound recording broke the stranglehold of the symbolic in the late nineteenth century, painters struggled to depict cloud colors and forms, often with stunning results. The ability to represent the indefinite is one of the great achievements of modern mathematics and media, and clouds were at the vanguard here too. If you want to understand how meaning works, you have to understand vagueness, and clouds are a chief example.

Finally, clouds have long been associated with thinking, philosophizing and ultimate things, so they fit my atmospheric interests well. I know the title opens me up to wisecracks about academic loftiness. But in a world run by data-analytics Luftmenschen, it is good to get reacquainted with clouds and other kinds of sky media.

BRÍAN HANRAHAN: Why does the media culture of cetaceans, as you imagine it, play such a large role in your history of planetary technics? And what distinguishes your approach from previous thinking about the cetacean world? As you point out, dolphins and whales have long been subjects of utopian fantasy, as well as scientific communications research.

JOHN DURHAM PETERS: Cetaceans, the family of whales, porpoises, and dolphins, are often considered among the most intelligent animals on earth (especially dolphins), but they lack the infrastructures that anchor human existence such as feet, hands, fire, clothing, writing, right angles, celestial orientation, and all other forms of technology. Cetaceans thus present a kind of thought experiment about what it might be like to live in a technology-free habitat. Cetaceans could have techniques — say, of dancing, fishing, or communicating — but they could not have technologies, i.e., made materials that shape other materials, including their environments and minds. They live in habitats immune to fabrication, and thus offer a stark contrast to the human “technosphere,” our domesticated bubble of carbon and silicon, GMO crops and insulation. Intelligent marine mammals offer a radical alternative, at least in thought, to our essentially and externally technical history, and show us how much of what we take to be human depends on our technical supports."

[too much to quote]
johnduhampeters  matthomas  2015  interviews  media  feminism  clouds  cloud  infrastructure  hubris  cetaceans  anthropocene  technology  technosphere  technosolutionism  siliconvalley  writing  history  inderdisciplinary  silos  whitenoise  time  meaning  online  internet  tribalism  academia  mediatheory  slow  zoominginandout  multidisciplinary  crossdisciplinary  transdisciplinary 
july 2015 by robertogreco
Is It Time to Give Up on Computers in Schools?
"This is a version of the talk I gave at ISTE today on a panel titled "Is It Time to Give Up on Computers in Schools?" with Gary Stager, Will Richardson, Martin Levins, David Thornburg, and Wayne D'Orio. It was pretty damn fun.

Take one step into that massive shit-show called the Expo Hall and it’s hard not to agree: “yes, it is time to give up on computers in schools.”

Perhaps, once upon a time, we could believe ed-tech would change things. But as Seymour Papert noted in The Children’s Machine,
Little by little the subversive features of the computer were eroded away: … the computer was now used to reinforce School’s ways. What had started as a subversive instrument of change was neutralized by the system and converted into an instrument of consolidation.

I think we were naive when we ever thought otherwise.

Sure, there are subversive features, but I think the computers also involve neoliberalism, imperialism, libertarianism, and environmental destruction. They now involve high stakes investment by the global 1% – it’s going to be a $60 billion market by 2018, we’re told. Computers are implicated in the systematic de-funding and dismantling of a public school system and a devaluation of human labor. They involve the consolidation of corporate and governmental power. They involve scientific management. They are designed by white men for white men. They re-inscribe inequality.

And so I think it’s time now to recognize that if we want education that is more just and more equitable and more sustainable, that we need to get the ideologies that are hardwired into computers out of the classroom.

In the early days of educational computing, it was often up to innovative, progressive teachers to put a personal computer in their classroom, even paying for the computer out of their own pocket. These were days of experimentation, and as Seymour teaches us, a re-imagining of what these powerful machines could enable students to do.

And then came the network and, again, the mainframe.

You’ll often hear the Internet hailed as one of the greatest inventions of mankind – something that connects us all and that has, thanks to the World Wide Web, enabled the publishing and sharing of ideas at an unprecedented pace and scale.

What “the network” introduced in educational technology was also a more centralized control of computers. No longer was it up to the individual teacher to have a computer in her classroom. It was up to the district, the Central Office, IT. The sorts of hardware and software that was purchased had to meet those needs – the needs and the desire of the administration, not the needs and the desires of innovative educators, and certainly not the needs and desires of students.

The mainframe never went away. And now, virtualized, we call it “the cloud.”

Computers and mainframes and networks are points of control. They are tools of surveillance. Databases and data are how we are disciplined and punished. Quite to the contrary of Seymour’s hopes that computers will liberate learners, this will be how we are monitored and managed. Teachers. Students. Principals. Citizens. All of us.

If we look at the history of computers, we shouldn’t be that surprised. The computers’ origins are as weapons of war: Alan Turing, Bletchley Park, code-breakers and cryptography. IBM in Germany and its development of machines and databases that it sold to the Nazis in order to efficiently collect the identity and whereabouts of Jews.

The latter should give us great pause as we tout programs and policies that collect massive amounts of data – “big data.” The algorithms that computers facilitate drive more and more of our lives. We live in what law professor Frank Pasquale calls “the black box society.” We are tracked by technology; we are tracked by companies; we are tracked by our employers; we are tracked by the government, and “we have no clear idea of just how far much of this information can travel, how it is used, or its consequences.” When we compel the use of ed-tech, we are doing this to our students.

Our access to information is constrained by these algorithms. Our choices, our students’ choices are constrained by these algorithms – and we do not even recognize it, let alone challenge it.

We have convinced ourselves, for example, that we can trust Google with its mission: “To organize the world’s information and make it universally accessible and useful.” I call “bullshit.”

Google is at the heart of two things that computer-using educators should care deeply and think much more critically about: the collection of massive amounts of our personal data and the control over our access to knowledge.

Neither of these are neutral. Again, these are driven by ideology and by algorithms.

You’ll hear the ed-tech industry gleefully call this “personalization.” More data collection and analysis, they contend, will mean that the software bends to the student. To the contrary, as Seymour pointed out long ago, instead we find the computer programming the child. If we do not unpack the ideology, if the algorithms are all black-boxed, then “personalization” will be discriminatory. As Tressie McMillan Cottom has argued “a ‘personalized’ platform can never be democratizing when the platform operates in a society defined by inequalities.”

If we want schools to be democratizing, then we need to stop and consider how computers are likely to entrench the very opposite. Unless we stop them.

In the 1960s, the punchcard – an older piece of “ed-tech” – had become a symbol of our dehumanization by computers and by a system – an educational system – that was inflexible, impersonal. We were being reduced to numbers. We were becoming alienated. These new machines were increasing the efficiency of a system that was setting us up for a life of drudgery and that were sending us off to war. We could not be trusted with our data or with our freedoms or with the machines themselves, we were told, as the punchcards cautioned: “Do not fold, spindle, or mutilate.”

Students fought back.

Let me quote here from Mario Savio, speaking on the stairs of Sproul Hall at UC Berkeley in 1964 – over fifty years ago, yes, but I think still one of the most relevant messages for us as we consider the state and the ideology of education technology:
We’re human beings!

There is a time when the operation of the machine becomes so odious, makes you so sick at heart, that you can’t take part; you can’t even passively take part, and you’ve got to put your bodies upon the gears and upon the wheels, upon the levers, upon all the apparatus, and you’ve got to make it stop. And you’ve got to indicate to the people who run it, to the people who own it, that unless you’re free, the machine will be prevented from working at all!

We’ve upgraded from punchcards to iPads. But underneath, a dangerous ideology – a reduction to 1s and 0s – remains. And so we need to stop this ed-tech machine."
edtech  education  audreywatters  bias  mariosavio  politics  schools  learning  tressuemcmillancottom  algorithms  seymourpapert  personalization  data  security  privacy  howwteach  howwelearn  subversion  computers  computing  lms  neoliberalism  imperialism  environment  labor  publicschools  funding  networks  cloud  bigdata  google  history 
july 2015 by robertogreco
The Internet of Things You Don’t Really Need - The Atlantic
"We already chose to forego a future of unconnected software. All of your devices talk constantly to servers, and your data lives in the Cloud because there’s increasingly no other choice. Eventually, we won’t have unconnected things, either. We’ve made that choice too, we just don’t know it yet. For the moment, you can still buy toasters and refrigerators and thermostats that don’t talk to the Internet, but try to find a new television that doesn’t do so. All new TVs are smart TVs, asking you to agree to murky terms and conditions in the process of connecting to Netflix or Hulu. Soon enough, everything will be like Nest. If the last decade was one of making software require connectivity, the next will be one of making everything else require it. Why? For Silicon Valley, the answer is clear: to turn every industry into the computer industry. To make things talk to the computers in giant, secured, air-conditioned warehouses owned by (or hoping to be owned by) a handful of big technology companies.

But at what cost? What improvements to our lives do we not get because we focused on “smart” things? Writing in The Baffler last year, David Graeber asked where the flying cars, force fields, teleportation pods, space colonies, and all the other dreams of the recent past’s future have gone. His answer: Technological development was re-focused so that it wouldn’t threaten existing seats of power and authority. The Internet of Things exists to build a market around new data about your toasting and grilling and refrigeration habits, while duping you into thinking smart devices are making your lives better than you could have made them otherwise, with materials other than computers. Innovation and disruption are foils meant to distract you from the fact that the present is remarkably similar to the past, with you working even harder for it.

But it sure feels like it makes things easier, doesn’t it? The automated bike locks and thermostats all doing your bidding so you can finally be free to get things done. But what will you do, exactly, once you can monitor your propane tank level from the comfort of the toilet or the garage or the liquor store? Check your Gmail, probably, or type into a Google Doc on your smartphone, maybe. Or perhaps, if you’re really lucky, tap some ideas into Evernote for your Internet of Things startup’s crowdfunding campaign. “It’s gonna be huge,” you’ll tell your cookout guests as you saw into a freshly grilled steak in the cool comfort of your Nest-controlled dining room. “This is the future.”"
2015  ianbogost  iot  internetofthings  design  davidgraeber  labor  siliconvalley  technology  power  authority  innovation  disruption  work  future  past  present  marketing  propaganda  google  cloud  cloudcomputing  computers  code  googledocs  ubicomp  ubiquitouscomputing  everyware  adamgreenfield  amazon  dropbox  kickstarter 
june 2015 by robertogreco
#vaporfolk #hollyvoodoo. Sponsored by Amazon Readymades.
"With technology invented to fly us to the moon we write LMAO.

The internet tribe abandoned the global village when it started to resemble a shopping mall. After the digital natives were promised that their new ideas would lead to fame and success on global markets, they are now confronted with totalitarian networks and corporate structures. Consequently they turned their heads away from the screen. Facebook owns the copyrights to their ideas, shared infinitely to only disappear in the clouds.

Among all the possible realities imaginable, artists start to look for common ground in products, hardware and brands – commodities made from global materials. A form of recursive materialism emerges. The common ground between seven billion people is that we can all share a micro USB connector. An empty coke bottle will be found in the desert sands and nomads navigate the dunes with a Samsung tablet. Global materials seem to override all phantasies of unique visions and subjective expressions.

But the internet tribe moves to the outskirts of physical production, reusing artifacts from the world of corporate mythologies. They work with concepts of the “Archaic” instead of “New”, choosing to be ‘poorsumers’, transforming ideological waste into something magical. For them, art is a poetic freight and the trade system a collective parable of desire. By imitating commodities in almost shamanic rituals, a higher form of cargo is summoned: be it future wealth, success or even art.

Zsófia Keresztes, Angus McCullough, Alexandra Hackett (A.L.C.H.), Andreas Ervik, Stephanie Syjuco, Michele Gabriele, Pau Sampera, Peter Moosgaard, Bernhard Garnicnig

Opening: 3.6. 18:00
Exhibition: 5.6.–27.6.
Lust Gallery, Hollandstrasse 7 1020 Wien

“An approach to the now which looks widely, sharply, and especially at global materials ripe for use by our village of disenfranchised consumers.” (Quote and image of “Prototype: Axe” by Angus McCullough)

In cooperation with Making.Artistic.Technology (http://artistictechnology.at/) and the Palais des Beaux Arts Wien (http://www.palaisdesbeauxarts.at/). Supported by the Austrian Federal Chancellery.

#walmartsurrealism #hyperethnicity #vaporfolk #brandart #matrixbotanica #productshamanism #favelachic #holycargo #ritualfakes #ancientonline #poplatch #postdigital #ersatzculture #saintpepsi #refundutopia #parableofdesire #neomaterialism #summonwarhola #hollyvoodoo #digitalnaïve #artsypovera"
petermoosgaard  bernhardgarnicnig  pausampera  angusmccullough  alexandrahackett  andreaservik  stephaniesyjuco  michelegabriele  zsófiakeresztes  globalization  technology  art  vaporfolk  hollyvoodoo  capitalism  screens  digitalnatives  cloud  hardware  poorsumers  magic  cargocult  wealth  success  latecapitalism 
june 2015 by robertogreco
Ingrid Burrington - Crash Course in Digital Literacy - YouTube
"INGRID BURRINGTONARTIST WRITER, LIFEWINNINGIn our session ”Crash Course in Digital Literacy” Ingrid will give an overview of the physical infrastructure of the internet, share some of her own experiences trying to visit and map these infrastructures, and explain why it’s useful to think about the internet as a physical, tangible landscape.Ingrid Burrington lives and works on an island off the coast of America, where she writes, makes maps, and tells jokes about places, politics, and the weird feelings people have about both.Most recently, her work has appeared in Creative Time Reports. She is currently a fellow at the Data and Society Research Institute and an artist in residence at Eyebeam, an art and technology center in New York."
ingridburrington  2014  internet  infrastructure  digitalliteracy  online  datacenters  cloud 
march 2015 by robertogreco
The Collection and the Cloud – The New Inquiry
"Many platforms cease to be relevant and tend to go away wholesale. In engineering terms, the data becomes no longer relevant. As a result, our pasts can exist piecemeal in distributed systems, in more or less moribund conditions, with no consistent means of access."



"The job of an archivist is work outside interfaces, working with the documents outside their native context, often to make sense of a previous generation’s cast-off data for the interest of the current and future ones. “Processing” a collection is an exercise in not only “saving” the important things and anticipating the interests of future interested parties, but in weeding out the stuff that no one wants to see. My first job as a processing archivist was in a mathematics archive. One obscure Romanian mathematician would send a box of junk quarterly, using the archives as a junk drawer. My boss gave me curt instructions on throwing away his bills and divorce papers and told me to be very selective with his vacation photos.

But who would be qualified to make such decisions about the archives of activists who in part have protested their erasure from the historical record? I think of all the brilliant, give-no-fucks activists I follow on Twitter. I would never want to speak for bad_dominicana, or those on the ground in Ferguson — so how could I begin to speak for their archives?"



"From a collections standpoint, it’s clear that the Internet Archive isn’t the Internet Archive, but an Internet Archive, very much built and collected from a certain standpoint and position of power. Those who are actively collecting in the digital realm represent a specific set of values, a perspective, and as in traditional archives, this perspective reflects a certain hegemonic order of knowledge. The Internet Archive’s Grateful Dead collection is vibrant and exhaustive, developed in the image and enthusiasm of Kahle, an avid Deadhead. Archival institutions tend to have a point of view. University archives collect records of their institution; governmental archives collect government records. The Internet Archive, and other collections of its ilk, collect from the standpoint of old-guard Internet culture.

No one I know of is collecting and preserving from a position that stands to counter this. For the generation of artists, citizens and activists who has come of age in the era of social media platforms, the power of archives is deployed in the banality of surveillance. Distance from one’s data is a design feature, and ownership of one’s data profile seems impossible. What from our digital environments can become historical and archived?

Contemporary archival practices advocate a hybrid of two approaches first some interpretation of keeping the original order of things: respect des fons, and an a posteri organizing stuff into sensible categories. Of course, many of the collections that have been in archives for decades had been organized in ways that simply did not work. I’d been asked several times to “reprocess” a collection and organize it in a way that made more sense to me or my bosses. How often do archives get shifted now when algorithms adjust?

I wonder if the data collected by platforms will at some point become more transparent, and at what cost or contextual shift. Will my daughter be able to sift through my dark data profiles and learn about the egregious number of times I looked at someone else’s profile? Will there be a new round of data mausoleums, offering to sell us peeks at the past? Is data like defaulted debt, ready to be bought and sold at a fraction of the price and subject to a secondary market?

Where are the future archives? Moreover, where are the future points of canonical extinction?"
ameliaabreu  archives  archiving  collecting  socialmedia  2015  internetarchive  brewsterkahle  vintecerf  web  online  pauljaeger  friendster  jasbirpuar  tracebody  data  cloud 
march 2015 by robertogreco
Parsons :: Exhibitions and Events :: The Sheila C. Johnson Design Center :: Exhibitions :: Current and Upcoming Exhibitions
"Much of our common stock of knowledge -- from the inscriptions of early civilizations, the classic texts of the ancient world, the manuscripts of the Middle Ages, and the maps and scientific treatises of the Renaissance, to the tweets and open data sets of today -- now resides in The Cloud. That Cloud seems to have no boundaries, no place; it floats above us, bringing its intellectual riches to those of us who are connected to it, wherever we might be. Yet The Cloud isn’t nearly as ubiquitous as the weather. Its accessibility is limited by protocols and cables, and its “content” has to be shaped, formalized through various interfaces, in order for us to perceive and process it. While artists, designers, and researchers have acknowledged that The Cloud has an architecture -- from the routers generating wisps of wifi in our homes, to the massive data centers storing that “rain of data,” to the cables and satellites that function as the system’s plumbing -- we’ve paid little attention to the places where The Cloud meets our individual bodies. Furnishing the Cloud considers both how we have historically imagined the architectures and containers of our common stock of knowledge -- the universal library, the endless bookshelf, the collective brain, among other structural/architectural metaphors -- and proposes new infrastructures for storing, accessing, and processing The Cloud. What are our new ergonomics of reading and viewing and auditing digital content, and how can we design to support those postures and modes of perception? How might we Furnish the Cloud?

Related programs:

SENSORY INFRASTRUCTURES Roundtable Discussion
Friday, March 13, 6:30 - 8:30 p.m.
“Bark Room,” Sheila C. Johnson Design Center, 2 W 13th Street, Ground Floor
Free and open to the public; no RSVP required

How do we perceive the presence of data? How do our bodies interface with information streams and the digital technologies that bring them to us? What aspects of “the cloud” are rendered sensible to us — not only visible, but also audible and tangible? Join the curators for “Furnishing the Cloud,” Kimberly Ackert, Orit Halpern, Shannon Mattern, and Brian McGrath, who will offer short provocations, exploring the exhibition’s themes from the perspectives of furniture and exhibition design, history, media studies, architecture, and urbanism.

http://furnishingthecloud.net

Presented by the Sheila C. Johnson Design Center, with funding from the Provost Office Research Cluster Grant and the School of Constructed Environments, Parsons the New School for Design. With additional support from Historical Studies, New School for Social Research, and the School of Media Studies, New School for Public Engagement.

Exhibition Designers: Kimberly Ackert, with assistance from Jordana Maisie Goot
Curators: Kimberly Ackert, Orit Halpern, Shannon Mattern, and Brian McGrath
Web Development:Daniel Udell
Curatorial Assistant: Nadia Christidi
Students from Kimberly Ackert's Furniture, Detail and Space course: Dhafar Al-Edani, Mariam Alshamali, Tanyaporn Anantrungroj, Derick Brown, Felipe Colin, Kristina Cowger, Jo Garst, Jennifer Hindelang, Jacqueline Leung, Pei Ying Lin, Valter Lindgren, Mochi Lui, Matilda Maansdotter, Emmanuela Martini, Simon Schulz, Whitney Shanks, Raquel Sonobe
Web Projects: Zachary Franciose, Laura Sanchez, Eishin Yoshida
Students from Orit Halpern’s Making Sense: Methods in the Study of Media, Attention, and Infrastructure course: Jeffery Berryhill, Nicholas Cavaioli, Raquel DeAnda, Joseph Goldsmith, Angelica Huggins, Ian Keith, Kate McEntee, Awis Nari Mranani, Erika Nyame-Nseke, Kevin Swann, Shea Sweeney, Daniel Udell, Michal Unterberg, Kyla Wasserman"

[via (with images): https://twitter.com/shannonmattern/status/574656819517394944
https://twitter.com/shannonmattern/status/574653891184345088 ]
kimberlyackert  orithalpern  shannonmattern  brianmcgrath  2015  design  cloud  data  furniture  architecture  media  mediastudies  urbanism  reading  howweread  digital  datacenters  storage  access 
march 2015 by robertogreco
9 Facts About Computer Security That Experts Wish You Knew
1. Having a strong password actually can prevent most attacks…
2. Just because a device is new does not mean it's safe…
3. Even the very best software has security vulnerabilities…
4. Every website and app should use HTTPS…
5. The cloud is not safe — it just creates new security problems…
6. Software updates are crucial for your protection…
7. Hackers are not criminals…
8. Cyberattacks and cyberterrorism are exceedingly rare…
9. Darknet and Deepweb are not the same thing… "
2015  anneleenewitz  security  computers  passwords  updates  software  hackers  https  web  internet  online  cloud  darkweb  deepnet  cyberattacks  cyberterrorism 
march 2015 by robertogreco
Anab Jain, “Design for Anxious Times” on Vimeo
"As 2014 rushes past us, a venture capital firm appoints a computer algorithm to its board of directors, robots report news events such as earthquakes before any human can, fully functioning 3D printed ears, bones and guns are in use, the world’s biggest search company acquires large scale, fully autonomous military robots, six-year old children create genetically modified glow fish and an online community of 50,000 amateurs build drones. All this whilst extreme weather events and political unrest continue to pervade. This is just a glimpse of the increased state of technological acceleration and cultural turbulence we experience today. How do we make sense of this? What can designers do? Dissecting through her studio Superflux’s projects, research practice and approach, Anab will make a persuasive case for designers to adopt new roles as sense-makers, translators and agent provocateurs of the 21st century. Designers with the conceptual toolkits that can create a visceral connection with the complexity and plurality of the worlds we live in, and open up an informed dialogue that help shape better futures for all."
anabjain  superflux  2014  design  future  futures  via:steelemaley  criticaldesign  speculativedesign  speculativefiction  designfiction  designdiscourse  film  filmmaking  technology  interaction  documentary  uncertainty  reality  complexity  algorithms  data  society  surveillance  cloud  edwardsnowden  chelseamanning  julianassange  whistleblowing  science  bentobox  genecoin  bitcoin  cryptocurrency  internet  online  jugaad  war  warfare  information  politics  drones  software  adamcurtis  isolation  anxiety  capitalism  quantification  williamgibson  art  prototyping  present 
february 2015 by robertogreco
Syncthing
"Syncthing replaces proprietary sync and cloud services with something open, trustworthy and decentralized. Your data is your data alone and you deserve to choose where it is stored, if it is shared with some third party and how it's transmitted over the Internet."

[via: https://ind.ie/blog/focus/ ]
sync  syncing  syncthing  dropbox  data  cloud  tools  onlinetoolkit  mac  osx  windows  linux  open  opensource  android 
january 2015 by robertogreco
The Internet With A Human Face - Beyond Tellerrand 2014 Conference Talk
"Anyone who works with computers learns to fear their capacity to forget. Like so many things with computers, memory is strictly binary. There is either perfect recall or total oblivion, with nothing in between. It doesn't matter how important or trivial the information is. The computer can forget anything in an instant. If it remembers, it remembers for keeps.

This doesn't map well onto human experience of memory, which is fuzzy. We don't remember anything with perfect fidelity, but we're also not at risk of waking up having forgotten our own name. Memories tend to fade with time, and we remember only the more salient events.

Every programmer has firsthand experience of accidentally deleting something important. Our folklore as programmers is filled with stories of lost data, failed backups, inadvertently clobbering some vital piece of information, undoing months of work with a single keystroke. We learn to be afraid.

And because we live in a time when storage grows ever cheaper, we learn to save everything, log everything, and keep it forever. You never know what will come in useful. Deleting is dangerous. There are no horror stories—yet—about keeping too much data for too long.

Unfortunately, we've let this detail of how computers work percolate up into the design of our online communities. It's as if we forced people to use only integers because computers have difficulty representing real numbers.

Our lives have become split between two worlds with two very different norms around memory.

The offline world works like it always has. I saw many of you talking yesterday between sessions; I bet none of you has a verbatim transcript of those conversations. If you do, then I bet the people you were talking to would find that extremely creepy.

I saw people taking pictures, but there's a nice set of gestures and conventions in place for that. You lift your camera or phone when you want to record, and people around you can see that. All in all, it works pretty smoothly.

The online world is very different. Online, everything is recorded by default, and you may not know where or by whom. If you've ever wondered why Facebook is such a joyless place, even though we've theoretically surrounded ourselves with friends and loved ones, it's because of this need to constantly be wearing our public face. Facebook is about as much fun as a zoning board hearing.

It's interesting to watch what happens when these two worlds collide. Somehow it's always Google that does it."



"These big collections of personal data are like radioactive waste. It's easy to generate, easy to store in the short term, incredibly toxic, and almost impossible to dispose of. Just when you think you've buried it forever, it comes leaching out somewhere unexpected.
Managing this waste requires planning on timescales much longer than we're typically used to. A typical Internet company goes belly-up after a couple of years. The personal data it has collected will remain sensitive for decades.

Consider that the stuff in those "pink files" is peanuts compared to the kind of data now sitting on servers in Mountain View."



"REGULATE

It should be illegal to collect and permanently store most kinds of behavioral data.

In the United States, they warn us the world will end if someone tries to regulate the Internet. But the net itself was born of a fairly good regulatory framework that made sure de facto net neutrality existed for decades, paid for basic research into protocols and software, cleared the way for business use of the internet, and encouraged the growth of the commercial web.

It's good regulation, not lack of regulation, that kept the web healthy.

Here's one idea for where to begin:

1. Limit what kind of behavioral data websites can store. When I say behavioral data, I mean the kinds of things computers notice about you in passing—your search history, what you click on, what cell tower you're using.

It's very important that we regulate this at the database, not at the point of collection. People will always find creative ways to collect the data, and we shouldn't limit people's ability to do neat things with our data on the fly. But there should be strict limits on what you can save.

2. Limit how long they can keep it. Maybe three months, six months, three years. I don't really care, as long as it's not fifty years, or forever. Make the time scale for deleting behavioral data similar to the half-life of a typical Internet business.

3. Limit what they can share with third parties. This limit should also apply in the event of bankruptcy, or acquisition. Make people's data non-transferable without their consent.

4. Enforce the right to download. If a website collects information about me, I should be allowed to see it. The EU already mandates this to some extent, but it's not evenly enforced.

This rule is a little sneaky, because it will require backend changes on many sites. Personal data can pile up in all kinds of dark corners in your system if you're not concerned about protecting it. But it's a good rule, and easy to explain. You collect data about me? I get to see it.

5. Enforce the right to delete. I should be able to delete my account and leave no trace in your system, modulo some reasonable allowance for backups.

6. Give privacy policies teeth. Right now, privacy policies and terms of service can change at any time. They have no legal standing. For example, I would like to promise my users that I'll never run ads on my site and give that promise legal weight. That would be good marketing for me. Let's create a mechanism that allow this.

7. Let users opt-in if a site wants to make exceptions to these rules. If today's targeted advertising is so great, you should be able to persuade me to sign up for it. Persuade me! Convince me! Seduce me! You're supposed to be a master advertiser, for Christ's sake!

8. Make the protections apply to everyone, not just people in the same jurisdiction as the regulated site. It shouldn't matter what country someone is visiting your site from. Keep it a world-wide web.

DECENTRALIZE

I was very taken with Bastian Allgeier's talk yesterday on decentralization. And we'll be discussing a lot of these issues at Decentralize Camp tomorrow.

Folklore has it that the Internet was designed to survive a nuclear war. Bombs could take out lots of nodes, but the net would survive and route around the damage.

I think this remains a valuable idea, though we never quite got there. A good guiding principle is that no one company, or one country, should have the ability to damage the Internet, even if it begins to act maliciously.

We have a broad consensus on the need to decentralize the web; the question is how to do it. In this respect, I think even a little decentralization goes a long way. Consider how much better it is to have four major browser vendors, compared to the days of Internet Explorer.

Some kinds of services are just crying out for decentralization. Fifty years from now, people will be shocked that we had one social network that all seven billion people on the planet were expected to join.

Imagine if there was only one bar in Düsseldorf, or all of Germany, and if you wanted to hang out with your friends, you had to go there. And when you did, there were cameras everywhere, and microphones, and you were constantly being interrupted by people selling you stuff. That's the situation that obtains with Facebook today.

Surveillance as a business model is the only thing that makes a site like Facebook possible."



"One of the worst aspects of surveillance is how it limits our ability to be creative with technology. It's like a tax we all have to pay on innovation. We can't have cool things, because they're too potentially invasive.

Imagine if we didn't have to worry about privacy, if we had strong guarantees that our inventions wouldn't immediately be used against us. Robin gave us a glimpse into that world, and it's a glimpse into what made computers so irresistible in the first place.

I have no idea how to fix it. I'm hoping you'll tell me how to fix it. But we should do something to fix it. We can try a hundred different things. You people are designers; treat it as a design problem! How do we change this industry to make it wonderful again? How do we build an Internet we're not ashamed of?"
maciejceglowski  memory  forgetting  internet  community  privacy  surveillance  2014  regulation  decentralization  cloud  amazon  google  googleglass  maciejcegłowski 
may 2014 by robertogreco
Our Comrade The Electron - Webstock Conference Talk
"Termen had good timing. Lenin was just about to launch a huge campaign under the curiously specific slogan:

COMMUNISM = SOVIET POWER + ELECTRIFICATION OF THE WHOLE COUNTRY

Why make such a big deal of electrification?

Well, Lenin had just led a Great Proletarian Revolution in a country without a proletariat, which is like making an omelette without any eggs. You can do it, but it raises questions. It's awkward.

Lenin needed a proletariat in a hurry, and the fastest way to do that was to electrify and industrialize the country.

But there was another, unstated reason for the campaign. Over the centuries, Russian peasants had become experts at passively resisting central authority. They relied on the villages of their enormous country being backward, dispersed, and very hard to get to.

Lenin knew that if he could get the peasants on the grid, it would consolidate his power. The process of electrifying the countryside would create cities, factories, and concentrate people around large construction projects. And once the peasantry was dependent on electric power, there would be no going back.

History does not record whether Lenin stroked a big white cat in his lap and laughed maniacally as he thought of this, so we must assume it happened."



"RANT

Technology concentrates power.

In the 90's, it looked like the Internet might be an exception, that it could be a decentralizing, democratizing force. No one controlled it, no one designed it, it was just kind of assembling itself in an appealing, anarchic way. The companies that first tried to centralize the Internet, like AOL and Microsoft, failed risibly. And open source looked ready to slay any dragon.

But those days are gone. We've centralized the bejesus out of the Internet now. There's one search engine (plus the one no one uses), one social network (plus the one no one uses), one Twitter. We use one ad network, one analytics suite. Anywhere you look online, one or two giant American companies utterly dominate the field.

And there's the cloud. What a brilliant name! The cloud is the future of online computing, a friendly, fluffy abstraction that we will all ascend into, swaddled in light. But really the cloud is just a large mess of servers somewhere, the property of one American company (plus the clouds no one uses).

Orwell imagined a world with a telescreen in every room, always on, always connected, always monitored. An Xbox One vision of dystopia.

But we've done him one better. Nearly everyone here carries in their pocket a tracking device that knows where you are, who you talk to, what you look at, all these intimate details of your life, and sedulously reports them to private servers where the data is stored in perpetuity.

I know I sound like a conspiracy nut framing it like this. I'm not saying we live in an Orwellian nightmare. I love New Zealand! But we have the technology.

When I was in grade school, they used to scare us with something called the permanent record. If you threw a spitball at your friend, it would go in your permanent record, and prevent you getting a good job, or marrying well, until eventually you'd die young and friendless and be buried outside the churchyard wall.

What a relief when we found out that the permanent record was a fiction. Except now we've gone and implemented the damned thing. Each of us leaves an indelible, comet-like trail across the Internet that cannot be erased and that we're not even allowed to see.

The things we really care about seem to disappear from the Internet immediately, but post a stupid YouTube comment (now linked to your real identity) and it will live forever.

And we have to track all this stuff, because the economic basis of today's web is advertising, or the promise of future advertising. The only way we can convince investors to keep the money flowing is by keeping the most detailed records possible, tied to people's real identities. Apart from a few corners of anonymity, which not by accident are the most culturally vibrant parts of the Internet, everything is tracked and has to be tracked or the edifice collapses.

What upsets me isn't that we created this centralized version of the Internet based on permanent surveillance.

What upsets me, what really gets my goat, is that we did it because it was the easiest thing to do. There was no design, forethought, or analysis involved. No one said "hey, this sounds like a great world to live in, let's make it". It happened because we couldn't be bothered.

Making things ephemeral is hard.

Making things distributed is hard.

Making things anonymous is hard.

Coming up with a sane business model is really hard—I get tired just thinking about it.

So let's take people's data, throw it on a server, link it to their Facebook profiles, keep it forever, and if we can't raise another round of venture funding we'll just slap Google ads on the thing.

"High five, Chad!"

"High five, bro!"

That is the design process that went into building the Internet of 2014.

And of course now we are shocked—shocked!—when, for example, the Ukrainian government uses cell tower data to send scary text messages to protesters in Kiev, in order to try to keep them off the streets. Bad people are using the global surveillance system we built to do something mean! Holy crap! Who could have imagined this?

Or when we learn that the American government is reading the email that you send unencrypted to the ad-supported mail service in another country where it gets archived forever. Inconceivable!

I'm not saying these abuses aren't serious. But they're the opposite of surprising. People will always abuse power. That's not a new insight. There are cuneiform tablets complaining about it. Yet here we are in 2014, startled because unscrupulous people have started to use the powerful tools we created for them.

We put so much care into making the Internet resilient from technical failures, but make no effort to make it resilient to political failure. We treat freedom and the rule of law like inexhaustible natural resources, rather than the fragile and precious treasures that they are.

And now, of course, it's time to make the Internet of Things, where we will connect everything to everything else, and build cool apps on top, and nothing can possibly go wrong."



"What I'm afraid of is the society we already live in. Where people like you and me, if we stay inside the lines, can enjoy lives of comfort and relative ease, but God help anyone who is declared out of bounds. Those people will feel the full might of the high-tech modern state.

Consider your neighbors across the Tasman, stewards of an empty continent, who have set up internment camps in the remotest parts of the Pacific for fear that a few thousand indigent people might come in on boats, take low-wage jobs, and thereby destroy their society.

Or the country I live in, where we have a bipartisan consensus that the only way to preserve our freedom is to fly remote controlled planes that occasionally drop bombs on children. It's straight out of Dostoevski.

Except Dostoevski needed a doorstop of a book to grapple with the question: “Is it ever acceptable for innocents to suffer for the greater good?” And the Americans, a more practical people, have answered that in two words: “Of course!”

Erika Hall in her talk yesterday wondered what Mao or Stalin could have done with the resources of the modern Internet. It's a good question. If you look at the history of the KGB or Stasi, they consumed enormous resources just maintaining and cross-referencing their mountains of paperwork. There's a throwaway line in Huxley's Brave New World where he mentions "800 cubic meters of card catalogs" in the eugenic baby factory. Imagine what Stalin could have done with a decent MySQL server.

We haven't seen yet what a truly bad government is capable of doing with modern information technology. What the good ones get up to is terrifying enough.

I'm not saying we can't have the fun next-generation Internet, where everyone wears stupid goggles and has profound conversations with their refrigerator. I'm just saying we can't slap it together like we've been doing so far and expect everything to work itself out.

The good news is, it's a design problem! You're all designers here - we can make it fun! We can build an Internet that's distributed, resilient, irritating to governments everywhere, and free in the best sense of the word, like we dreamed of in the 90's. But it will take effort and determination. It will mean scrapping permanent mass surveillance as a business model, which is going to hurt. It will mean pushing laws through a sclerotic legal system. There will have to be some nagging.

But if we don't design this Internet, if we just continue to build it out, then eventually it will attract some remarkable, visionary people. And we're not going to like them, and it's not going to matter."
internet  surveillance  technology  levsergeyevichtermen  theremin  electricity  power  control  wifi  intangibles  2014  maciejceglowski  physics  music  invention  malcolmgladwell  josephschillinger  rhythmicon  terpsitone  centralization  decentralization  cloud  google  facebook  us  government  policy  distributed  anonymity  ephemeral  ephemerality  tracking  georgeorwell  dystopia  nsa  nest  internetofthings  erikahall  design  buran  lenin  stalin  robertmoog  clararockmore  maciejcegłowski  iot  vladimirlenin 
february 2014 by robertogreco
Data Havens of Iceland // Culture Digitally
[Also available here: http://savageminds.org/2014/02/06/data-havens-of-iceland/ ]

"Since Iceland’s pretty spectacular financial crash, and the subsequent protests that kicked the government out of office, information technology and politics have cropped up in many projects of reform.  In a lot of ways the crisis was framed as a problem of secrecy – too much secrecy had allowed for massive banking risks and backroomban deals, and this was a problem more public information could solve.  The politics of information freedom, then, have been appealing and are taken up in a range of ways: for example, the so-called “crowdsourced constitution,” Iceland’s ongoing connections with WikiLeaks, and most recently the election of three Pirate Party MPs – the first Pirates elected to a national parliament.

But the part of this turn that interests me most – and the piece that my research aims to address – is the way that information is used to carve Iceland out a new niche.  In recent years Iceland has been pitched as an “information haven”: an attractive place to store the data of the world.  The idea is that data stored in Iceland is subject to Icelandic laws – so by passing “information friendly” legislation (favoring free speech, online privacy, and intermediary liability protection), and building data centers where information can live (an easy sell in Iceland thanks to the cool climate and inexpensive geothermal power), Iceland can change the rules of the game. In my research I ask how these efforts reconfigure the internet and re-imagine the nation, by following the “information haven” as it’s materially made."
cloud  iceland  infrastructure  data  2014  secrecy  transparency  datahavens  privacy  law  legal  information  freespeech  datacenters 
february 2014 by robertogreco
ownCloud.org | Your Cloud, Your Data, Your Way!
"ownCloud provides universal access to your files via the web, your computer or your mobile devices — wherever you are.

It also provides a platform to easily view & sync your contacts, calendars and bookmarks across all your devices and enables basic editing right on the web."



"ownCloud gives you universal access to your files through a web interface or WebDAV. It also provides a platform to easily view & sync your contacts, calendars and bookmarks across all your devices and enables basic editing right on the web. Installation has minimal server requirements, doesn’t need special permissions and is quick. ownCloud is extendable via a simple but powerful API for applications and plugins.

ownCloud started with a keynote by Frank Karlitschek at Camp KDE’10 where he talked about the need of a self-controlled free and open source cloud."
cloud  dropbox  opensource  php  sync  storage  bookmarks  calendars  onlinetoolkit  rollyourown 
january 2014 by robertogreco
UNHOSTED - Freedom from web 2.0's monopoly platforms
"By "unhosted web apps" we mean browser-based apps with no server-side backend. Unlike server-side or client-server apps, unhosted web apps leave users in control of their valuable user data and privacy, by default.

Unhosted web apps are also more resilient and more scalable. Most importantly, unlike Apple/iOS, Flash, and Facebook apps, the web platform is open and free: controlled by you and not by stockholders."
privacy  webapps  unhostedwebapps  tools  hosting  web  webdev  unhosted  cloud  opensource  webdesign 
august 2012 by robertogreco
Cory Doctorow: The Coming Century of War Against Your Computer - The Long Now
"Recognizing that we are necessarily transitory Users of many systems, such as everything involving Cloud computing or storage, Doctorow favors keeping your own box with its own processors and storage. He strongly favors the democratization and wide distribution of expertise. As a Fellow of the Electronic Frontier Foundation (who co-sponsored the talk) he supports public defense of freedom in every sort of digital rights issue.

"The potential for abuse in the computer world is large," Doctorow concluded. "It will keep getting larger.""
storage  propertyrights  rights  content  property  cloudcomputing  cloud  internet  computing  web  ownership  2012  corydoctorow 
august 2012 by robertogreco
HowTo: EC2 for Poets
"Most people think they can't run a server, but servers aren't any more complicated than a laptop. The main difference is that a server is always on and always connected to the Internet.

EC2 for Poets is a tutorial that shows you how to set up a server in Amazon's "cloud." All you need is a net connection, credit card, and a basic understanding of how to use computers."
servers  s3  cloud  server  hosting  setup  howto  amazon  ec2 
july 2012 by robertogreco
dotEPUB — download any webpage as an e-book
"dotEPUB is software in the cloud that allows you to convert any webpage into an e-book.

For content consumers (readers), we have developed a bookmarklet for modern browsers (desktop or mobile). And, if you are a Chrome, Firefox or Safari for Mac user, you can install the dotEPUB extension in your browser.

For content producers (editors, authors), we offer Creator and a widget. Creator lets you make an e-book from a text of your own. The widget helps your users getting the content of your website in e-book form (see the tips for webmasters). And, if you have a blog, we provide a WordPress plugin that automatically embeds our widget.

For more customizable results, developers can use our API (read the documentation).

Features
Download webpages to any epub-compatible device: e-readers, tablets, smartphones, netbooks, desktop computers...

Save now and immersively read later (even offline) those long and deep articles you didn’t have time to read while browsing.

Build a personal library of your favorite blog posts, news articles, etc.

Compatible with the iPad, the iPhone, the iPod Touch, the Sony Reader, the Nook, the iLiad, the BeBook, the Cool-er, the CyBook, the Alex eReader, the Kobo eReader, the Elonex eBook, the eSlick, the eClicto, the Hanlin eReader, the QUE ProReader, the Papyre, the Leqtor...

Finally, infinite content for your e-reader... with a single click!

And, because it is software in the cloud, you benefit from the improvements of future releases without having to re-install anything."
epub  onlinetoolkit  publishing  ebooks  cloud 
december 2011 by robertogreco
History, our future - Preoccupations [Thoughtful, link-and-quote-rich post by David Smith on cloud computing and digital archiving]
"I’m no programmer, though decades ago I learned to use Fortran, writing my own program for an A level Biology project, and played with BASIC. Now, I’m playing with a Mac Mini server and a Pegasus R6. I want to know that we can hand on certain things … music, audio, photos, text and, increasingly important, video. History for the future.<br />
<br />
Last Christmas, I was hoping we’d see some development in 2011 around the Mac Mini, though I suspected the game plan was more likely to be centred on the ecosystem that individuals, families and groups weave around multiple Apple devices. There’s room for both and it seems that Apple thinks so, too. I use cloud services a great deal, and this won’t stop as I play with creating our own, centralised repository of music, audio, photos, text and videos. I want our own backup and personally maintained server and store, but I know the cloud offers us so much, too."
cloud  cloudcomputing  icloud  future  history  archives  archiving  computers  digital  2011  davidsmith  memory  persistence  privacy  socialsoftware  mobility  digitallife 
august 2011 by robertogreco
Jolicloud - Joli OS
"Joli OS is a free and easy way to turn any computer up to 10 years old into a cool new cloud device. Get on the Web and instantly connect to all your Web apps, files and services using the computer you already own. You may never need to buy a new computer again.<br />
<br />
It’s easy. Just download Joli OS. It installs in just 10 minutes."
software  free  opensource  freeware  os  jolicloud  joli  jolios  linux  cloud  web  netbooks 
august 2011 by robertogreco
The Coming Cloud Wars: Google+ vs Microsoft (plus Facebook) | Epicenter | Wired.com
"Right now, it’s easy to share links, pictures, location and videos on Google+. Soon, it’ll be equally easy to share maps, office documents, news and shopping deals.

That’s where things really get interesting — particularly if Google can turn its identity system into the kind of purchasing system that Apple and Amazon have, pairing it with its advertising power and ever-present mobile phones to create a virtual mobile wallet.

If Silicon Valley were hosting a basketball tournament for consumer money and mindshare in the cloud, right now we’d be looking at a Final Four of Google, Apple (plus Twitter), Microsoft (plus Facebook) and Amazon (especially if they can make a compelling tablet). Apple just had its earnings call; Microsoft’s is tomorrow.

The stakes are high, the players are ready. It’s a fun time to be a fan."
timcarmody  google+  google  amazon  apple  facebook  microsoft  skype  twitter  social  cloud  cloudcomputing  identity  sharing  notification  communication  bing  search  spotify 
july 2011 by robertogreco
How To Run A News Site And Newspaper Using WordPress And Google Docs - 10,000 Words
"A former colleague of mine, William Davis, understands what a “web first” workflow is, and has made it happen through software at his newspaper in Maine. The Bangor Daily News announced this week that it completed its full transition to open source blogging software, WordPress. And get this: The workflow integrates seamlessly with InDesign, meaning the paper now has one content management system for both its web and print operations. And if you’re auspicious enough, you can do it too — he’s open-sourced all the code!"

[See also: http://publisherblog.automattic.com/2011/06/20/bangor-daily-news-a-complete-publishing-system-on-wordpress/ ]
wordpress  googledocs  workflow  cloud  journalism  editing  classideas  publishing  news  newspapers  howto  opensource  open  maine  blogging  indesign  print  digital  2011  tutorials  williamdavis 
june 2011 by robertogreco
The Future Of College: Forget Lectures And Let The Students Lead | Co.Design
"The technological power of the "cloud" as an aggregator of global knowledge & social network capital combines w/ natural tendency to learn through sharing & playing to create a multidimensional, interconnected network that solves complex problems. Simply put: Purpose & play drive learning.

These students help us discern what is valuable about higher-ed learning & what needs to be shed to save it from complete ossification. The insular nature of academia could lead to its demise, but these students also see tremendous value in its ability to incubate. Unis become testing grounds where students can find mentors, receive funding, & iterate initiatives with real-world consequences. The design community can debate where innovation comes from, but we can no longer look to authoritarian, top-down dictation to drive societal change. If the blossoming of this pattern doesn’t point to a new trend in education, then it at least represents what these higher-ed institutions must become."
unschooling  deschooling  hierarchy  trungle  highereducation  highered  colleges  universities  organizations  education  learning  mentoring  mentorship  apprenticeships  problemsolving  criticalthinking  realworld  entrepreneurship  lcproject  johndewey  life  sugatamitra  peterthiel  via:lukeneff  play  purpose  academia  networkedlearning  networks  cloud  socialnetworks  authority  authoritarianism 
june 2011 by robertogreco
The Cloud Institute for Sustainability Education
"We prepare K-12 school systems and their communities to educate for a sustainable future by inspiring educators and engaging students through meaningful content and learner-centered instruction."
education  sustainability  environment  via:steelemaley  cloud  learner-centered  instruction  content  schools  lcproject  curriculum  community  communities 
april 2011 by robertogreco
Daring Fireball: Cutting That Cord
"The announcement many people seem to be waiting for is for Apple to tell iOS users they no longer need iTunes on the Mac or Windows. The announcement I’d like to see is for iOS users to no longer need to pay for MobileMe to wirelessly sync calendars, contacts — and any other small bits of data from apps from the App Store…

And those third-party iOS developers that are depending upon Dropbox…have a far better syncing experience than Apple’s own creative apps.…Google Docs has none of the UI panache, but the syncing is invisible. You just open Google Docs, and there are your files. Doesn’t matter which machine you used to edit or create them, or which machine you’re using now, they’re all just there. That’s part of the overall experience.

That’s where Apple is behind."
apple  cloud  ipad  ios  google  daringfireball  2011  cloudcomputing 
april 2011 by robertogreco
Print from your phone with Gmail for mobile and Google Cloud Print - Official Gmail Blog
"Let’s say you need to print an important email attachment on your way to work so that it’s waiting for you when you walk in the door. With Gmail for mobile and Google Cloud Print — a service that allows printing from any app on any device, OS or browser without the need to install drivers — you can.

To get started, you’ll first need to connect your printer to Google Cloud Print. For now, this step requires a Windows PC but Linux and Mac support are coming soon. Once you’re set up, just go to gmail.com from your iPhone or Android browser and choose “Print” from the dropdown menu in the top right corner. You can also print eligible email attachments (such as .pdf or .doc) by clicking the “Print” link that appears next to them."
google  mobile  cloud  gmail  printing  googlecloudprint  printers 
january 2011 by robertogreco
Musing about 2011 and an un-national generation – confused of calcutta
"The internet, Web, Cloud, these are essentially disruptive global constructs for many of us. The atoms that serve as infrastructure for these global constructs are physically located in specific countries; the laws & regulations that govern the industries disrupted by these constructs are themselves usually national in structure; the firms doing the disrupting are quasi-stateless in character, trying…to be “global”; emerging & future generations have worldviews that are becoming more & more AmazonBay, discarding the national middle for edges of global & hyperlocal.

We are all so steeped in national structures for every aspect of this: the law, governance model, access & delivery technologies, ways of doing business — that we’re missing the point.

Everything is becoming more stateless, more global. We don’t know how to deal with it. So we’re all trying very hard to put genies back in bottles, pave cowpaths, turn back waves, all with the same result.

Abject failure."
postnational  global  globalization  globalism  nationalism  national  business  law  culture  mobility  cv  jprangaswami  digital  analog  thirdculture  un-national  generations  internet  web  cloud  government  wikileaks  taxes  regulation  fundraising  residency  identity  statelessness  open  closed  trade  copyright  regional  local  hyperlocal  williamstafford  poetry  borders 
january 2011 by robertogreco
Preoccupations's Wikileaks Bookmarks on Pinboard
Through his bookmarks on Delicious, David Smith is building a valuable reference on the topic of Wikileaks surrounding Cablegate. See also his bookmarks for Julian Assange: http://pinboard.in/u:preoccupations/t:Julian_Assange
wikileaks  2010  davidsmith  julianassange  privacy  us  security  amazon  espionage  paypal  search  hosting  internet  web  information  dns  freespeech  sweden  france  cloud  cloudcomputing  censorship  democracy  policy  politics  whistleblowing  secrecy  government  activism  journalism 
december 2010 by robertogreco
ge.tt | gett sharing
"With ge.tt you can share any number of files, no matter how large, within seconds. Click on select files. Share the files with your friends. Move on - because you've simply got better things to do."
alternative  collaboration  cloud  dropbox  sharing  filesharing 
december 2010 by robertogreco
Dawn of a New Day « Ray Ozzie
"to cope with the inherent complexity of a world of devices, a world of websites, and a world of apps & personal data that is spread across myriad devices & websites, a simple conceptual model is taking shape that brings it all together. We’re moving toward a world of 1) cloud-based continuous services that connect us all and do our bidding, and 2) appliance-like connected devices enabling us to interact with those cloud-based services."
rayozzie  cloudcomputing  2010  2005  1939  mobile  technology  microsoft  computing  future  complexity  trends  cloud  connecteddevices  continuousservices  ubicomp  networkedurbanism 
october 2010 by robertogreco
Matt Webb – What comes after mobile « Mobile Monday Amsterdam
"Matt Webb talks about how slightly smart things have invaded our lives over the past years. People have been talking about artificial intelligence for years but the promise has never really come through. Matt shows how the AI promise has transformed and now seems to be coming to us in the form of simple toys instead of complex machines. But this talks is about much more then AI, Matt also introduces chatty interfaces & hard math for trivial things."

[via: http://preoccupations.tumblr.com/post/1157711285/what-comes-after-mobile-matt-webb ]
mattwebb  berg  berglondon  future  mobile  technology  ai  design  productinvention  invention  spacebinding  timebinding  energybinding  spimes  internetofthings  anybot  ubicomp  glowcaps  geography  context  privacy  glanceableuse  cloud  embedded  chernofffaces  understanding  math  mathematics  augmentedreality  redlaser  neuralnetworks  mechanicalturk  shownar  toys  lanyrd  iot  ar 
september 2010 by robertogreco
Crowdmap
"Crowdmap allows you to...<br />
<br />
1. Collect information from cell phones, news and the web.<br />
2. Aggregate that information into a single platform.<br />
3. Visualize it on a map and timeline."
crowdmap  mapping  maps  ushahidi  tools  visualization  mobile  phones  collaborative  communication  geolocation  emergency  crowdsourcing  aggregator  cartography  cloud  sms 
august 2010 by robertogreco
Paperworks / Padworks | the human network
"We know that children learn by exploration – that’s the foundation of Constructivism – but we forget that we ourselves also learn by exploration. The joy we feel when we play with our new toy is the feeling a child has when he confronts a box of LEGOs, or new video game – it’s the joy of exploration, the joy of learning. That joy is foundational to us. If we didn’t love learning, we wouldn’t be running things around here. We’d still be in the trees."
education  future  ipad  paper  sharing  technology  web  markpesce  gmail  google  cloudcomputing  computing  play  constructivism  twitter  facebook  dropbox  paperless  learning  unschooling  deschooling  2010  schools  tcsnmy  curriculum  wikipedia  cloud  lego 
august 2010 by robertogreco
New Work Flow with Tech - Practical Theory
"I've always just carried my laptop to and from school every day, but with the launch of the iPad, I thought it might be time for a change. The laptop is good enough, but there were starting to be too many times when I wanted more screen real estate, and I found myself really envying my wife's big honking desktop, but the big issue was really that I didn't want files in two places. My laptop was organized to the point where it was pretty much hardwired to my brain. (My knapsack is like that too, but even it is wearing out... some might argue, so's my brain.) With the summer hitting, and with a realization that carrying my laptop and my iPad to and from school every day was really counter-productive, I made the leap."
chrislehmann  ipad  computing  workflow  newutilitybelt  onlinetoolkit  dropbox  mobileme  evernote  googleapps  googledocs  cloud  productibity  portability  iwork  productivity 
august 2010 by robertogreco
Universal acid « Snarkmarket
"The philoso­pher Dan Den­nett, in his ter­rific book Darwin’s Dan­ger­ous Idea, coined a phrase that’s echoed in my head ever since I first read it years ago. The phrase is uni­ver­sal acid, and Den­nett used it to char­ac­ter­ize nat­ural selection—an idea so potent that it eats right through other estab­lished ideas and (maybe more impor­tantly) institutions—things like reli­gion. It also resists con­tain­ment; try to say “well yes, but, that’s just over there” and nat­ural selec­tion burns right through your “yes, but.”"
robinsloan  snarkmarket  danieldennett  evolution  religion  capitalism  globish  english  computing  cloudcomputing  cloud  comments  naturalselection  universalacid  understanding  creativity  whoah  gamechanging  conciousness 
june 2010 by robertogreco
State of the Internet Operating System Part Two: Handicapping the Internet Platform Wars - O'Reilly Radar
"This post provides a conceptual framework for thinking about the strategic and tactical landscape ahead. Once you understand that we're building an Internet Operating System, that some players have most of the pieces assembled, while others are just getting started, that some have a plausible shot at a "go it alone" strategy while others are going to have to partner, you can begin to see the possibilities for future alliances, mergers and acquisitions, and the technologies that each player has to acquire in order to strengthen their hand.

I'll hope in future to provide a more thorough drill-down into the strengths and weaknesses of each player. But for now, here's a summary chart that highlights some of the key components, and where I believe each of the major players is strongest.

[chart here]

The most significant takeaway is that the column marked "other" represents the richest set of capabilities. And that gives me hope."
amazon  facebook  google  twitter  apple  microsoft  yahoo  future  cloudcomputing  cloud  timoreilly  web  payment  infrastructure  mediaaccess  media  monetization  location  maps  mapping  claendars  scheduling  communication  chat  email  voice  video  speechrecognition  imagerecognition  mobile  iphone  nexusone  internet  browsers  safari  chrome  books  music  itunes  photography  content  advertising  ads  storage  computing  computation  hosting  browser 
may 2010 by robertogreco
Google Docs Gets More Realtime; Adds Google Drawings To The Mix
"Google Drawings is not really a drawing app, it’s more of an online whiteboard. The app is designed to help people visualize ideas through flow charts, diagrams, and stencils. There is a chat window where participants can chime in. Images can be imported and moved around. But sadly there is no freehand drawing option. Google Drawings is best experienced in an HTML5 browser (Chrome, Safari, Firefox, IE9 if it supports SVG). Google Docs will also be discontinuing offline access via Google Gears on May3, and will bring it back later via HTML5.
virtualwhiteboard  googledocs  realtime  tcsnmy  cloud 
april 2010 by robertogreco
Backupify :: Secure Online Backup and Archiving for Gmail, Facebook, Twitter, and Wordpress
"Your company has important data locked up in cloud based applications. Backupify provides daily automatic backups, archiving, and export for all your social media and SaaS data. Take back control of your online data with Backupify."
backup  cloud  data  facebook  flickr  gmail  google  googledocs  del.icio.us  wordpress  picasa  webservice  twitter  lifestream  media  online  services 
april 2010 by robertogreco
My Head is in the Cloud
"My phone tells me numbers, Facebook reminds me of birthdays, my nav system gives me directions, Google tells me how to spell, my bookmarks remind me of what I’ve read, my inbox tells me who I’m having a conversation with – my mind has been distributed across several devices and services.

My head is in the cloud.

Now, after a few years of this, I realize that when I look up from the screen I know almost nothing. And maybe that would be fine if the absent phone numbers and upcoming dates were freeing space for deeper and more introspective thought. But I sense that my addiction to the realtime stream is only making room for the consumption of a faster stream."
cloud  facebook  culture  mobile  phones  memory  data  consumption  streams  birthdays  calendars 
march 2010 by robertogreco
Weblogg-ed » The New National Ed Tech Plan…Pinch Me
"I’m trying not to get overly optimistic here, but suffice to say, if the rhetoric is any indication of the direction, we may have actually turned a corner.
schools  schooling  willrichardson  edtech  gamechanging  reform  change  optimism  tcsnmy  education  rttt  policy  technology  cloud  broadband  learning  lcproject  unschooling  deschooling  networkedlearning  collaboration  personallearning 
march 2010 by robertogreco
Google Apps Now Disaster Proof
"Many of us take the disaster readiness of servers and data centers for granted. But for IT admins from both small and large companies, being prepared for disaster and emergency situations is complicated and expensive issue. Google has made an announcement today for any enterprise users of Google Apps; assuring IT admins that the suite is now fully prepared for disaster recovery. Rajen Sheth, Senior Product Manager, Google Apps, tells us that as of recently, Google is prepared for disaster recovery for all of its products in the Google Apps suite, which include Gmail, Google Docs, Google Sites, Google Calendar, Google Talk and Google Video."
cloud  google  security  googleapps  business  backup 
march 2010 by robertogreco
What Do We Want? Our Data. When Do We Want It? Now! | Epicenter | Wired.com
"Data portability is a rapidly growing movement among cloud-computing supporters. The idea that the online services we’ve herded ourselves into should let us at least pass from one pen to the next is key, although the nuts and bolts of how open standards will work are still being hammered out.
dataportability  cloud-computing  cloud  privacy  socialmedia  google  data  portability  gmail  googledocs  picasa  youtube  amazon  kindle  itunes  apple  kodak 
february 2010 by robertogreco
On Overestimation - Artichoke's Wunderkammern
"I am interested in what is claimed - in how I can know. This statistic surprised me - I had bought into the hype around the role of Twitter in the Iranian protests. My distrust of the motives of media and commerce moves me towards an increasing normlessness. Is there anything I can aspire to or hold as true? Leadbeater's analysis of "the cloud" is powerful and expressed with a simple elegance and logic. It has many other insights that provoke new thinking about stuff I thought I knew. Leadbeater is someone who has oftentimes provided a balance to what I hear claimed at educational conferences and read in blogs and other media. This article in The Edge reminds me that I must always seek the measured commentary."
twitter  iran  charlesleadbeater  artichoke  media  estimation  overestimation  truth  statistics  cloud  hypertext  artichokeblog  pamhook 
february 2010 by robertogreco
rc3.org - Is the iPad the harbinger of doom for personal computing?
"What bothers me is that in terms of openness, the iPad is the same as the iPhone, but in terms of form factor, the iPad is essentially a general purpose computer. So it strikes me as a sort of Trojan horse that acculturates users to closed platforms as a viable alternative to open platforms, and not just when it comes to phones … The question we must ask ourselves as computer users is whether the tradeoff in freedom we make to enjoy Apple’s superior user experience is worth it. … If Apple is really successful, it’s likely that other companies will be more emboldened to forsake openness as well. … The other question that arises for me is whether, in the the long term, the computer you hold in your hand really matters. … A future where applications and data in the cloud are more our own than the computers on our desks seems bizarre, but I can see things playing out that way."
via:preoccupations  ipad  apple  open  cloudcomputing  cloud  decentralization  mac  freedom  computers  applications  iphone  creativity  computing  hardware  technology  future  closed  ios 
january 2010 by robertogreco
Safari Books Online 6.0: A Cloud Library as an alternate model for ebooks - O'Reilly Radar
"Here’s the rub: most people thinking about ebooks are focused on creating an electronic recreation of print books, complete with downloadable files and devices that look and feel like books. This is a bit like pointing a camera at a stage play and concluding that was the essence of filmmaking!"
publishing  libraries  ebooks  database  oreilly  media  cloudcomputing  online  mobile  books  web  cloud  future  ui 
november 2009 by robertogreco
Pasta&Vinegar » Ben Cerveny at Urban Labs
"idea of an operating systems for the built environment various layers of the urban stack are differentially accessible to citizen input: *sensor networks: not so much *dynamic infrastructural services *collaborative modeling: everybody is expressing their aspiration for the city, this is captured in a software model that represents a parallel state: the “cloud city”, a set of information that is dynamic, active & aggregated…spirit of the city…all of human information & the history of the city lives in a dataset...real-time model of urban scale space: reflects politics of situation, model does not reflect entire reality. What type of model do we want to represent the city? Ben claims that we don’t want one, we want a thousands! like web-services… there are going ways to bring models on space. The other side of the model is who is in the model, who takes advantage of the model: social networks are the inhabitants, which leads to massively multi-participant models… like an offline game."
design  cities  urban  vurb  computing  crowdsourcing  ubicomp  data  ubiquitous  games  gaming  cloud  bencerveny  information 
october 2009 by robertogreco
When Gmail Fails, Users Adapt
"Thanks to free (but less reliable) web services, we can face a failure and move on to the next tool in our arsenal with only a few minutes of complaining. Yes, it’s a lowering of standards to accept nothing but the fabled “five nines” provided by the wireline phone business, but it’s a road we’ve been on for years. Think about what you will accept from a cell phone in terms of lost connections and dropped calls. Reliability is not keeping us tethered to our landlines by any stretch of the imagination."
gmail  twitter  diversification  cloud  reliability  adaptability 
march 2009 by robertogreco
Dare Obasanjo aka Carnage4Life - Asking "should we trust the cloud" is like asking "should we trust horseless carriages"
"First of all, it doesn't really matter if people trust the cloud or not. What matters is whether they use it or not. ... These days, I just put all the files and photos I'm sure I'd miss on SkyDrive and treat any file not worth uploading the cloud as being transient anyway. It is actually somewhat liberating since I no longer feel like I'm owned by all my digital stuff I have to catalog, manage and archive. ... progress will march on despite our Luddite concerns because the genie is already out of the bottle. For most people the benefits of anywhere access to their data from virtually any device and being able to share their content with people on the Web far outweighs the costs of not being in complete control of the data. ... The cloud Web is already here and it is here to stay. It's about time we stopped questioning it and got used to the idea."
via:preoccupations  cloud  risk  trust  computing  backup  technology  cloudcomputing  internet  luddism  luddites 
january 2009 by robertogreco
Kevin Kelly on the next 5,000 days of the web | Video on TED.com
"At the 2007 EG conference, Kevin Kelly shares a fun stat: The World Wide Web, as we know it, is only 5,000 days old. Now, Kelly asks, how can we predict what's coming in the next 5,000 days?"
onemachine  kevinkelly  via:grahamje  spimes  ubicomp  internet  ubiquitous  cloudcomputing  cloud  brain  convergence  digital  ai  semanticweb  future  futurism  predictions  technology  ted  statistics  data  email  communication  computing  computers  trends  media  web  networks 
july 2008 by robertogreco
Infoporn: Tap Into the 12-Million-Teraflop Handheld Megacomputer
"next stage in technological evolution is...the One Machine...hardware is assembled from our myriad devices, its software is written by our collective online behavior...the Machine also includes us. After all, our brains are programming & underpinning it"
computing  wired  cloud  kevinkelly  cloudcomputing  evolution  singularity  science  innovation  infodesign  collectiveintelligence  intelligence  computers  human  networks  mobile  mind  visualization  internet  future  brain  crowdsourcing  ai  data  it  learning2.0  trends  storage 
july 2008 by robertogreco
lonelysandwich - Why Me?
"Think about this for a second. Apple is removing the Mac from the Apple computer experience and laying the foundation for a browser-based OS, the thing that Google has been threatening all this time. Of course, it’s not a new idea...But it’s never be
apple  mobileme  cloud  cloudcomputing  web  internet  trends  marketing  mac  iphone  socialgraphy  communication  conversation  identity  language  psychology  mobility  calendar  contacts 
june 2008 by robertogreco
Seth's Blog: The clowd
"PS your privacy is fairly shot...clowd also knows where you are, camera or no camera..This is going to happen. The only question is whether you are one of the people who will make it happen. I guess there's an even bigger question: will we do it right?"
cloud  cloudcomputing  computing  crowdsourcing  datamining  future  gps  privacy  phones  mobile  sethgodin  socialmedia 
june 2008 by robertogreco
I.T. 2.0 - ReadWriteWeb
"With all these changes, the new I.T. person will be very different than they are today. Those that have the skills of an engineer and the knowledge needed to run I.T. 2.0 are going to be superstars, but they also might be rare."
business  technology  enterprise2.0  it  ict  readwriteweb  mobile  internet  enterprise  trends  cloud  mobility  work  cloudcomputing 
june 2008 by robertogreco
Pleasing Google's Tech-Savvy Staff - WSJ.com
"Unlike many IT departments that try to control technology workers use...Google employees download software on their own, choose between several types of computers & operating systems, use internal software built by company's engineers."
business  it  google  work  management  security  freedom  technology  internet  liberalism  cloud  computers  computing  enterprise  trends 
march 2008 by robertogreco
Pew Research Center: Seeding The Cloud: What Mobile Access Means for Usage Patterns and Online Content
"move to cloud computing...shifts power to users as they create & share digital content...Groups that have in past trailed in "traditional" internet access are in better position to shape cyberspace as internet becomes more accessible using wireless devic
cloud  computing  cloudcomputing  games  gaming  internet  trends  mobile  phones  future  pew  research  access  wireless 
march 2008 by robertogreco
Annotation (Harper's Magazine): Keyword: Evil: Google's addiction to cheap energy
Annotated blueprint of Google's The Dalles, Oregon data center and discussion of the concessions, handouts received, influence wielded, energy consumption, etc.
cloud  cloudcomputing  google  datacenters  oregon  energy  environment  power  servers  sustainability  green  technology  infrastructure  trends  internet  information  data  politics  electricity  networks  web  capitalism  influence  government 
february 2008 by robertogreco
Near Future Laboratory » Sliding Friction: The Harmonious Jungle of Contemporary Cities
"Through 15 topics & 4 themes...focus lenses on sparkles generated by many frictions between ideas, practices & infrastructures that populate cities...hope to provide raw food for thoughts to consider city of future. Do we want to mitigate, or eliminate t
cities  future  julianbleecker  nicolasnova  brucesterling  space  insfrastructure  gamechanging  urban  urbanism  photography  semiotics  interface  interaction  fabiengirardin  pareidolia  signs  street  devices  computing  cloud  technology 
february 2008 by robertogreco
The MacBook Air could easily be the only machine - (37signals)
"I think we’ve reached the point where the computational firepower for laptops is simply Good Enough in the Innovator’s Dilemma sense of the term. Meaning that the puck is going to go somewhere else. That we’ll start caring about other things now."
computers  computing  laptops  mac  macbookair  future  power  cloud  cloudcomputing  trends 
february 2008 by robertogreco
Stephen Fry » Blog Archive » Deliver us from Microsoft
"2 great pillars of Open Source are GNU project & Linux. I shan’t burden you with too much detail, just make outrageous claim that your computer will be running some descendant of 2 within next 5 years & that your life will be better & happier as result
cloudbook  cloud  cloudcomputing  Linux  gnu  eeepc  technology  future  via:preoccupations 
february 2008 by robertogreco
Twitter killed the Status Star | Mike Butcher - mbites
"The key difference is that people who say "take this conversation over into IM" don't get it. IM can't do what Twitter does. You can't instant message into "the cloud". With Twitter you can...Of course, the problem comes when people abuse this."
twitter  socialsoftware  communication  cloud  cloudcomputing  broadcasting  im  messaging  via:hrheingold 
january 2008 by robertogreco
The big switch may turn off jobs | Technology | The Guardian
"The displacement of workers by machines is nothing new. But whereas industrialisation created far more jobs than it destroyed, computerisation is taking a very different course."
cloud  computing  economics  internet  technology  work  jobs  nicholascarr 
january 2008 by robertogreco
Q&A: Author Nicholas Carr on the Terrifying Future of Computing
"What's amazing is that this shift from private to public software has happened without us even noticing it." "We're transferring our intelligence into the machine, and the machine is transferring its way of thinking into us."
interviews  nicholascarr  cloud  computing  internet  futurism  future  newmedia  networks  convergence  computers  cloudcomputing  privacy  technology  predictions 
january 2008 by robertogreco
[this is aaronland] Things I Am Not Talking About
"We like things -- books, the plastic arts, schwag, otherwise cheap souvenirs that become valued artifacts -- because they afford mystery and the room for an object to adapt to the world around them and not the other way around."
via:preoccupations  internet  abstract  curation  culture  physical  maps  mapping  location  printing  paper  objects  making  make  life  craft  web  art  books  newspapers  publishing  cloud  computing  location-based  gamechanging 
december 2007 by robertogreco
GDrive: Three Ways it Could be a Game Changer
"1. Your files will become computable on a massive scale 2. Mobile access 3. Gears + GDrive"
cloud  google  sharing  storage  computing  gdrive 
november 2007 by robertogreco
Zonbu: reen doesn't have to make you Blue!
"a computer that works when you plug it in, is always up-to-date, continuously backed up, and benefits the environment with lower energy use. Zonbu is built on two strong pillars: the open-source community and a green computing concept."
cloud  computing  computers  pc  Linux  laptops  hardware  sustainability 
november 2007 by robertogreco
Computing Heads for the Clouds
"IBM, Yahoo!, and Google are all putting the power of cloud computing to work. Here's a short primer on how the new technology works"
cloud  computing  internet  networking  collaboration  ibm  yahoo  google  cloudcomputing 
november 2007 by robertogreco
Rough Type: Nicholas Carr's Blog: Look, ma, no servers
"Think of how much more efficiently computing assets are used in this model - and, equally important, the way it renders IT essentially invisible to the users."
cloud  servers  internet  web  business  computing  entrepreneurship  nicholascarr 
november 2007 by robertogreco
Rough Type: Nicholas Carr's Blog: Google, Apple and the future of personal computing
advantages that a Google-Apple Cloud Computer offers: cheap ($99-199 for device + free storage and apps), energy efficient (no motors, LED screen), low-maintenance (no moving parts), flexible (mobile, auto-backup, files not tied to machine)
cloudbook  apple  google  computers  computing  future  mac  mobile  phones  technology  trends  networking  networks  cloud  collaboration  collaborative  gamechanging  online  internet  technium  nicholascarr  nearfuture  applications 
november 2007 by robertogreco
Kevin Kelly -- The Technium - A Cloudbook for the Cloud
"Eventually we'll have the intercloud, the cloud of clouds. This intercloud will have the dimensions of one machine comprised of all servers and attendant cloudbooks on the planet." Benefits: reliable, auto back-up, infinite storage/apps, seamless sharing
cloudbook  mobile  computers  computing  cloud  networks  networking  collaboration  collaborative  gamechanging  google  online  internet  technium  kevinkelly  future  nearfuture  phones  applications 
november 2007 by robertogreco

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