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robertogreco : cms   27

Sanity.io - The fully customisable headless CMS
"Distribute to any device or channel over flexible APIs. Fully customizable React.js editor."
react.js  javascript  cms  api  webdev 
7 weeks ago by robertogreco
enoki
"An experimental platform tool for peer-to-peer publishing

Free
Culture wants to be free. No monthly hosting fees or billing to keep up with.

Decentralized
Instead of being confined to a centralized platform, publish directly with Dat.

Offline first
No internet? No problem. Sync changes automatically when reconnecting.

Own your content
This is a tool! Your content stays with you, not a greedy platform.

Archival
Easily go back in time and revert to previous versions of your site whenever!

Open source
Built with open source projects; released as an open source project."
enoki  p2p  publishing  web  online  internet  webdev  webdesign  cms  free  opensource  archives  archival  offline  decentralization  beakerbrowser  dat  p2ppublishing  decentralizedweb  p2pweb  distributed  dweb 
october 2018 by robertogreco
Economy
"An easy, powerful, and flexible authoring system for websites that grow with your organization."



"Magic modules

Each site begins with a bespoke set of beautifully designed modules, created for you by the design studio Linked by Air. These modules have programmatic and interactive intelligence as well as good looks. Your authors combine them in any order to create millions of possible pages. This visual grammar becomes a functional language your website can use for years."



"Responsive layouts

Pages automatically optimize themselves for display on smartphones and tablets, and just as important, for use on the go. On desktop, images and layouts stretch to immerse users with the largest displays, while preserving great typography."



"Fun and easy to use

Economy is powerful, but its interface is beautifully simple and foolproof. With just a couple satisfying gestures you know almost everything you need to create and improve pages. Many users describe a feeling of “flow,” and Economy might be the only content management system that is often called “fun to use.”"



"Version history

Economy encourages experimentation and continuous iteration. When content or a site area no longer meets your requirements, improve it. A complete visual history is kept of every page, including an automatic screenshot of each version. All edits are attributed to the user who made them, and a page can be rolled back to any previous version. Drafts can be created which are only visible to staff – not yet to the public."



"Bring in data

You can craft pages one by one using your flexible kit of magic modules, but sometimes you need a more structured approach to your data. Economy features beautiful indexes and forms that give you access at a glance to all your calendar events, exhibitions, books, products, artworks, artists, users… or almost anything else."



"Smart automation

Your site can run itself. Pages update automatically to feature the latest Twitter posts, today’s events, upcoming exhibitions, or content relevant to the logged-in user. Use the time you gained to dream up new projects. Or get some fresh air."



"Commerce as content
For sites with e-commerce, Economy has handled shops with as few as ten distinct products, and as many as 40,000. Economy integrates product delivery throughout the site, in addition to a distinct “shop” area. For example, purchasing a printed exhibition catalog is as seamless as reading a text online, and either can be done directly on a relevant exhibition page or blog post. In this way, all the amazing content on your site helps support your sales conversions. At the same time, users will value your physical products for their substance, not only as merchandise. Products are integrated with all other search results. A visible shopping cart appears throughout the site once a user has selected the first product for purchase, and Economy’s checkout flow is best of breed and highly customizable. Economy is a great mobile commerce solution, and can also integrate with an in-store point of sale system for unified inventory management."

[See also:
https://www.linkedbyair.net/
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YhOnOzAj5wY ]
via:caseygollan  cms  webdev  webdesign 
august 2017 by robertogreco
Static Site CMS - Forestry.io
"A full-featured CMS for your static site with support for Jekyll, Hugo and Git"
cms  webdev  jekyll  hosting  web  static  via:jarrettfuller  webdesign 
june 2017 by robertogreco
Siteleaf - A friendly CMS for your static site
"Built for developers, Loved by everyone
Siteleaf is a content management system designed for a better web.

Develop with existing tools
Code offline with Jekyll, sync with GitHub

Edit in the cloud
Easy for non-technical clients, writers, and producers

Free your content
Access by API or generate static sites to S3, GitHub, FTP"
cms  webdev  jekyll  hosting  web  static  via:jarrettfuller  webdesign 
june 2017 by robertogreco
Introducing WordPress.com for Google Docs: A New Way Forward for Collaborative Editing — The WordPress.com Blog
"We are happy to announce WordPress.com for Google Docs, a new add-on that lets you write, edit, and collaborate in Google Docs, then save it as a blog post on any WordPress.com or Jetpack-connected WordPress site. Your images and most formatting will carry over too. No more copy-and-paste headaches!"
googledocs  wordpress  2017  cms 
march 2017 by robertogreco
Taxonomy and Recirculation — Responsive Web Design
"We identified five distinct ways that posts could be sorted, each with its own purpose and rules:

categories and tags have no overlap. A term can exist in one list or the other, but not both. Categories are the primary grouping of the post, and the terms are quite broad: “Food”, “Race”, “Art”. If taxonomy is branding, then these top-level categories convey the major themes that make up The Toast. The category is relatively prominent in the homepage and article page metadata.

tags are much more topical. Topical tags are displayed on the front-end, but their real purpose is to drive the “recirc” modules that help users explore the site. (More on that in a second.) Keeping these tags functional means that we can automagically show more posts about “Buddhism” or “Shakespeare” as long as everything is tagged consistently.

fake tags are actually fake. The funny tags (like truckin’ and the continuation thereof) are a vital and hilarious part of The Toast experience, but the little information architect in our hearts wept whenever a user clicked through to the archive page for one of the 6,152 tags that only had a single post in them. On the new site, those “tags” are still presented on the front-end, but on the back-end they’re just a plain text field. (The fake tags link out to a Google Search, which we think is hilarious. We’re fun at parties.) We kept the funny and the functional, but gave them each their own field so they could be used differently. Deep breaths, taxonomists. It’s all going to be OK.

series have their own taxonomy list. The series are a major draw, and a huge source of multiple page views – it’s hard to read something like Mallory’s Two Monks Inventing Bestiaries and not immediately want more in the same vein. The next thing a user wants to see is probably not another article related to “animals”, but more inventions from the monks: perhaps maps, or dinner parties. By separating the series into their own taxonomy–rather than grouping them under Tags or Categories—we were able to build recirc modules that give preference to series-siblings over topic-siblings.

authors are managed only as people, not tags. Wordpress has a built-in way to create authors, with a byline and a gravatar. But the old taxonomy included many author names as tags, too—this was unnecessary, and we are all about avoiding unnecessary work. In the new system it’ll be easy to see more articles by a given author, so you can catch up on the back catalog written by your favorites.

Migration: Like cleaning out your closet, but with more robots
Migrating from the old taxonomy to our new and shiny five-part taxonomy required some human effort—with a lot of help from automated scripts. It wasn’t feasible to manually re-tag every single post and launch a new site during this century. But the new taxonomy wouldn’t work unless the existing posts were converted to the new system.

We started by exporting the full list of all tags on the site to a spreadsheet. We sorted and grouped by the number of posts in each entry, so tags with more than five posts could be handled first, leaving tags with only one post for later. We tasked Nicole and Mallory with recategorizing the list, which was the best client trolling we’ve ever done. They sorted each entry into:

• topic for tags that were topical and should stay as true tags.
• series for tags that should be converted to the new Series taxonomy.
• author for tags that are people. Tags are people!
• joke for the funny tags that should be converted to entries in each post’s plain text field.
• delete for tags that were no longer relevant or had no entries in them.

This sorting of tags into their new buckets could only be done by real people who were familiar with all the content in question, then the work after that could be automated. We also hope that this process will prophylactically prevent their tags from getting out of control in the future."
via:tealtan  tags  tagging  taxonomy  2015  cms  thetoast  webdev  webdesign  archives 
october 2015 by robertogreco
Time Borrowed - The Awl
"A Facebook that treats native posts without favor will still inherently favor them because they are closer in form to the things that Facebook users share the most—and any link that would be widely shared on Facebook would be more widely shared if it weren’t a link to a website. Publishers early to accept Facebook’s proposition will enjoy an additional, larger advantage: For a short and glorious time, they alone will reap enormous the benefits of this heightened context. Their presence in News Feed will seem slightly easier and more natural than the presence of their competitors, whose manipulative headlines—which have been carefully optimized to convince you to leave Facebook to go to another site—will read an awful lot like spam. By serving as shining examples to those on the outside, they will create additional pressure to come in, given the opportunity. Publishers who join later will enjoy a perpetually diminishing advantage, gaining access to an audience pursued by ever more publishers instead of a few. Eventually, publications that once competed with each other for Facebook’s audience from the outside will find themselves doing the same from the inside, using Facebook’s platform not just to reach their audiences but to turn those audiences into revenue.

How exactly this will go remains to be seen. But Facebook has been pushing native video for months. It has been wildly successful—the raw numbers achieved by Facebook videos are enormous. My feed is now filled with auto-playing Facebook videos."



"Years of free referral traffic from Facebook have posed the question: When will Facebook want to keep this traffic for itself? Supposing years of future success—and putting out of mind that another law of platforms is eventual death—partner journalism poses its own version of this question: If Facebook knows what works, why outsource it?

The publishing industry is gloomy and threatened and increasingly claustrophobic. Most publishers, even the ones who claim otherwise, are not tech companies in any meaningful way (though one might ask, “How would you describe a company that designs, produces, and distributes branded content for advertisers for enormous fees?”), so any access to the world of tech is an intoxicating prospect. It’s a cynical oversimplification to say that news organizations and apps exist for the same reason—to gather human attention—but their revenue models suggest that this is at least their shared business model. Facebook—that is, News Feed—is succeeding on a different scale than any publication can dream of. That it is willing to share some of this time and attention is understandably very exciting.

So Facebook offers to let publishers into News Feed. It offers, probably, a great CMS—better than most publishing companies could come up with on their own. It offers a revenue sharing plan that offers at least partial participation in Facebook’s sector of the attention business. It offers ways to target stories like never before. And so the publishers feel like they’ve made it. That they have crossed over, at least a little, from a dying industry to a booming one."



"Facebook has been trying to find the next Facebook for years now. In 2013, before it purchased WhatsApp and fitness tracking company Moves, it purchased a company called Onavo. Onavo, which offered a free app that reduces data usage, was ostensibly valuable to Facebook’s international Internet.org project. But it had also built an enormously valuable app analytics service. With a rare and nearly complete view of its users’ internet activity, Onavo was able to see which apps were succeeding before anyone else but Apple and Google—it was, I was told in early 2014, the only outside firm that knew exactly how big Snapchat was. This analytics service—once widely used by venture capitalists and tech companies—was shut down shortly after purchase.

There is a helpful symmetry here, if you’ll grant it. Online publishers, with more readers than ever, are looking desperately for the next thing; Facebook, with more people using its core product than ever, is doing the same. The difference, of course, is that publishers’ next thing already belongs to someone else. Their future belongs to Facebook’s past."
facebook  journalism  publishing  2015  johnherrman  advertising  video  cms  onavo  snapchat  whatsapp  contentwars  instagram  news  newsfeed  media  content 
march 2015 by robertogreco
Kirby
:Kirby is a file-based cms
Easy to setup, easy to use, flexible as hell:
webdev  via:maxfenton  framework  cms  php  webdesign 
june 2014 by robertogreco
Review: Composition Tools Fargo, Medium, Editorially, Marquee, and More | MIT Technology Review
"A new crop of startups is gearing up to change the way we write, taking on traditional authoring tools such as Microsoft Word, Google Docs, and WordPress. The newcomers don’t just promise to make it easy to create documents or write blog posts—they promise to make you smarter."



"Things reviewed
Fargo
Editorially
Medium
Svbtle
Marquee
Scroll Kit
Quip
Ghost"

[Not mentioned:
http://docs.withdraft.com/
https://poetica.com/ ]
writing  software  cms  design  paulford  quip  ghost  scrollkit  marquee  svbtle  medium  editorially  fargo  2013  onlinetoolkit  collaborativewriting 
october 2013 by robertogreco
Jekyll • Simple, blog-aware, static sites
"Transform your plain text into static websites and blogs."

"Free hosting with GitHub Pages

Sick of dealing with hosting companies? GitHub Pages are powered by Jekyll, so you can easily deploy your site using GitHub for free—custom domain name and all."

[Migration from Wordpress, Tumblr, Drupal, Posterous, Blogger, etc.: http://jekyllrb.com/docs/migrations/ ]
cms  ruby  web  webdev  jekyll  migration  github  hosting  static  blogging  webdesign 
august 2013 by robertogreco
Siteleaf
"Own Your Data
Manage your website in the cloud and publish to your own FTP, Amazon S3, or Rackspace Cloud account. Your data is archived forever, independent of our service.

Collaborate
Send invitations to clients, colleagues, and others to edit and review sites. Managing content in Siteleaf is easy enough anyone can do it, with nothing to install.

Develop Locally
Develop templates locally using HTML and Liquid syntax. Test your sites locally using the same data on your live site. Built-in support for Anvil and Pow.

Mobile-friendly
Need to update your website from the beach? Lucky you. With Siteleaf, you can manage and publish sites on the go with your favorite mobile devices, including iPad, iPhone, and Android."
cms  siteleaf  via:caseygollan  webdev  hosting  ftp  blogging  webdesign 
july 2013 by robertogreco
Anchor CMS — Make blogging beautiful
Anchor is a super-simple, lightweight blog system, made to let you just write."

[via: http://odonnellweb.com/anchor/ ]
cms  blogging  php  webdev  webdesign 
may 2013 by robertogreco
Ghost: Just a Blogging Platform
"A beautifully designed platform dedicated to one thing: Publishing.

Ghost is an Open Source application which allows you to write and publish your own blog, giving you the tools to make it easy and even (gasp) fun to do. It's simple, elegant, and designed so that you can spend less time messing with making your blog work - and more time blogging."

[New url (redirects from old one): https://ghost.org/ ]
cms  opensource  blogging  ghost  platform  webdev  bloggingplatform  webdesign 
april 2013 by robertogreco
Marquee: Easier, Faster, more Beautiful Publishing
"Marquee is an easy to use, flexible platform that's perfect for telling stories."

[Update 27 June 2013: http://team.marquee.by/introducing-marquee/ ]
blogging  dropbox  markdown  cms  webdev  marquee  webpublishing  webdesign 
march 2013 by robertogreco
Koken - Creative website publishing
"Koken is a free system designed for photographers, designers, and creative DIYs to publish independent websites of their work."
via:anne  webdev  portfolios  koken  photography  design  cms  webdesign 
march 2013 by robertogreco
Barley, Coming Soon...
"Barley is a this-generation content editor. We're still watering the seeds. But you can read the Barley FAQ, or about the company building it, or the draft of the template documentation.

Watch our teaser video.

Type in your email address and we'll keep you up-to-date with Barley's growth."

[From Plain: http://plainmade.com/ ]
cms  content  wysiwyg  webdev  barley  plain  plainmade  contenteditors  webdesign 
february 2013 by robertogreco
Stop Publishing Web Pages - Anil Dash
"Start publishing streams. Start moving your content management system towards a future where it outputs content to simple APIs, which are consumed by stream-based apps that are either HTML5 in the browser and/or native clients on mobile devices. Insert your advertising into those streams using the same formats and considerations that you use for your own content. Trust your readers to know how to scroll down and skim across a simple stream, since that's what they're already doing all day on the web. Give them the chance to customize those streams to include (or exclude!) just the content they want."
facebook  pinterest  api  internet  web  cms  html5  content  advertising  ads  twitter  apps  tumblr  streams  anildash  2012  socialmedia  media  design  streaming  publishing  scrolling  pagination 
august 2012 by robertogreco
Omeka
"Omeka is a free, flexible, and open source web-publishing platform for the display of library, museum, archives, and scholarly collections and exhibitions. Its “five-minute setup” makes launching an online exhibition as easy as launching a blog.

Omeka falls at a crossroads of Web Content Management, Collections Management, and Archival Digital Collections Systems"

[Via: http://learningthroughdigitalmedia.net/teaching-and-learning-with-omeka-discomfort-play-and-creating-public-online-digital-collections ]
opensource  omeka  publishing  online  web  software  cms  web-publishing  exhibitions  museums  education  libraries  webdev  contentmanagement  archives  archiving  digitalcollections  webdesign 
april 2011 by robertogreco
The End in Mind » The CMS and the PLN
"This is far from a comprehensive list, but it begins to clarify the picture in my mind. If we persist in an either-or debate about the CMS versus the PLN, we will be falling victim to what Jim Collins calls the “tyranny of or.” When faced with difficult decisions, we often cast them–artificially–as dichotomies. We must do this *or* that. Collins argues that the alternative is to find ways to leverage the “genius of and,” to bring together the best of both alternatives and create a chimerical best-of-both-worlds solution."
pln  cms  ples  lms 
february 2010 by robertogreco
Flexknowlogy – Jared Stein » Strengths and Weaknesses of PLN/PLE & CMS/LMS
"To be clear, we don’t really know what a model PLN looks like, or how it works, or if it’s efficient; we may not even know what the difference between a PLE and a PLN is. It may be that the one thing we can say definitively is we don’t know what a PLN looks like, for any two are unlikely to be the same. It may be that we want a PLN to resist being reified. When I think of a PLN/PLE I try to keep it open-ended; I conjecture that it is shaped by habits formed in the accomplishment of daily tasks, is connected to resources for discovery of new information, and is fostered by social relationships that may be authentic and trusting or merely incidental, built by one-to-one/one-to-many communications. Many of the facets of a PLN–but especially the social aspects–are increasingly open to the world."
lms  cms  ples  pln 
february 2010 by robertogreco
Insidious pedagogy: How course management systems affect teaching ~ Stephen's Web ~ by Stephen Downes
"She argues that Content management Systems (CMSs) "are not pedagogically neutral shells for course content." Indeed, "a CMS may not only influence, but control, instructional approaches." And "Few instructors are consciously aware that CMS design is influencing their pedagogy." This is a good paper, well-argued, and I agree with the conclusion."
cms  online  teaching  pedagogy  control  tcsnmy  freedom  influence  technology  web  closedsystems  stephendownes 
october 2009 by robertogreco

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