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Print.js
"I returned to the patterns that many people had been making for this class—my kinetic patterns, Daniel's stock element creations, John's repeats, Catherine's typographic layerings. I went about trying to print these. "print.js" is a file that, in theory, you can simply put into the end of your head tag and it will create an @media print{} style sheet that translates your screen output into something printable. With it, one can easily specify paper output size that crops the pattern before printing."
print  print.js  lukaswinklerprins  code 
july 2018 by robertogreco
James Ryan on Twitter: "Happenthing On Travel On (1975) is a novel that integrates prose, source code, computer-generated text, and glitch art, to rhetorical effect https://t.co/Ex9zItG3xt"
"Happenthing On Travel On (1975) is a novel that integrates prose, source code, computer-generated text, and glitch art, to rhetorical effect"

[via: https://twitter.com/tealtan/status/892523355794001920 ]

"instead of making exaggerated claims about the creative (or even collaborative) role of the computer, she describes it as an expressive tool"
https://twitter.com/xfoml/status/892169553806901249

"Carole Spearin McCauley should be better recognized as a major innovator in the early period of expressive computing"
https://twitter.com/xfoml/status/892170816623751168
novels  writing  computing  computers  prose  code  coding  computer-generatedtext  text  glitchart  1975  carolespearinmccauley  collaboration  cyborgs 
august 2017 by robertogreco
GitHub - Microsoft/ELL: Embedded Learning Library
"The Embedded Learning Library (ELL) allows you to build and deploy machine-learned pipelines onto embedded platforms, like Raspberry Pis, Arduinos, micro:bits, and other microcontrollers. The deployed machine learning model runs on the device, disconnected from the cloud. Our APIs can be used either from C++ or Python.

This project has been developed by a team of researchers at Microsoft Research. It's a work in progress, and we expect it to change rapidly, including breaking API changes. Despite this code churn, we welcome you to try it and give us feedback!

A good place to start is the tutorial, which allows you to do image recognition on a Raspberry Pi with a web cam, disconnected from the cloud. The software you deploy to the Pi will recognize a variety of common objects on camera and print a label for the recognized object on the Pi's screen."
machinelearning  embedded  arduino  ai  raspberrypi  microsoft  code  microcontrollers  via:clivethompson 
july 2017 by robertogreco
Eyeo 2016 – Patricio Gonzalez Vivo on Vimeo
"What Are The Chances? – This talk investigates the relationships between chaos and chance, cause and effect. It is built from volcanoes, ashes, wind, love, and new life. Along the way Patricio talks about The Book of Shaders, mapping at Mapzen, and other recent collaborations and works in progress.

Many of these slides are interactive: patriciogonzalezvivo.github.io/eyeo16/# "

[The Book of Shaders: http://thebookofshaders.com/ ]
expressivearttherapy  lygiaclark  mapzen  processing  code  coding  arttherapy  psychology  2016  eyeo  eyeo2016  psychoanalysis  freud  carljung  dreams  collectiveunconscious  caseyreas  shaders  nightmares  community  opensource  maps  mapping  openframeworks  fragility  jenlowe  thebookofshaders  mandalas  synchronicity  interconnectedness  patriciogonzalezvivo  edg  raspberrypi  classideas  interconnected  interconnectivity 
august 2016 by robertogreco
WOVNS
"This tutorial will show you how to design textiles using code, specifically the Processing software. Using code makes it easy to create complex and precise patterns that would be difficult to draw manually – and to quickly explore a lot of different variations."



[from http://www.wovns.com/about :

"WOVNS is the first platform of its kind, a San Francisco/Maui based company that is a textile studio and technology platform, giving designers access to the means of textile production.

Working with US textile manufacturers, we have developed a patent pending system for jacquard looms that enables textile production in quantities as small as a single yard. Customers simply access our selection of colors and qualities, apply them to their own designs, and submit for purchase / production. In addition, our platform promotes independent designers through the WOVNS Collection, a curated fabric and product collection that offers royalties to contributors on every yard sold. We proudly offer this collection to the design community.

In the era of digital fabrication platforms, desktop 3D printers and milling machines, our goal is to revolutionize textile production, creating access and immediacy for woven textile development. Start bringing your designs to life!"]

[See also: https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/wovns/wovns-a-platform-for-on-demand-production-of-woven
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gq4baT5bKF4 ]
processing  code  learning  patterns  textiles  denamolnar  chelseamolnar  glvo  coding  wovns 
june 2016 by robertogreco
Sha Hwang - Keynote [Forms of Protest] - UX Burlington on Vimeo
"Let’s close the day by talking about our responsibilities and opportunities as designers. Let’s talk about the pace of fashion and the promise of infrastructure. Let’s talk about systematic failure — failure without malice. Let’s talk about the ways to engage in this messy and complex world. Let’s throw shade on fame and shine light on the hard quiet work we call design."
shahwang  2015  design  infrastructure  fashion  systemsthinking  complexity  messiness  protest  careers  technology  systems  storytelling  scale  stewartbrand  change  thehero'sjourney  founder'sstory  politics  narrative  narratives  systemsdesign  blame  control  algorithms  systemfailure  healthcare.gov  mythmaking  teams  purpose  scalability  bias  microaggressions  dignity  abuse  malice  goodwill  fear  inattention  donellameadows  leveragepoints  making  building  constraints  coding  code  programming  consistency  communication  sharing  conversation  government  ux  law  uxdesign  simplicity  kindness  individuals  responsibility  webdev  web  internet  nava  codeforamerica  18f  webdesign 
january 2016 by robertogreco
Random color generator for JavaScript - randomColor.js
"WHY DOES THIS EX­IST?

There are lots of clever one-lin­ers for gen­er­at­ing ran­dom col­ors:

'#' + Math.floor(Math.random()*16777215).toString(16);
Un­for­tu­nately, this code nat­u­rally pro­duces murky greys, browns and greens.

ran­dom­Color gen­er­ates at­trac­tive col­ors by de­fault. More specif­i­cally, ran­dom­Color pro­duces bright col­ors with a rea­son­ably high sat­u­ra­tion. This makes ran­dom­Color par­tic­u­larly use­ful for data vi­su­al­iza­tions and gen­er­a­tive art."
javascript  color  colors  code  davidmerfield  webdev  webdesign 
november 2015 by robertogreco
silentrob/superscript · GitHub
"SuperScript is a dialog system + bot engine for creating human-like conversation chat bots. It exposes an expressive script for crafting dialogue and features text-expansion using wordnet and Information Retrieval and extraction using ConceptNet."
bots  chatbots  code  github  ai 
august 2015 by robertogreco
Android Experiments
"Android was created as an open and flexible platform, giving people more ways to come together to imagine and create. Developers everywhere have used the unique capabilities of the platform to push the limits of what’s possible on phones, tablets, watches and beyond.

We’re working to document creative experiments like these and make them open source so anyone can see how they are made, or get inspired to create their own. Our hope is to encourage more developers to challenge how we interact with the devices we use every day.

Each experiment is submitted by the creator, and all kinds are welcome—no matter your skill level, the framework it uses or the device it runs on. If you’ve created something amazing on Android you’d like to share, please submit your own experiment."

[See also: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ws0SQNPgQyw ]
android  applications  code  design 
august 2015 by robertogreco
Why the Great Glitch of July 8th Should Scare You — The Message — Medium
"Think of it as needing more space in your house, so you decide you want to build a second story. But the house was never built right to begin with, with no proper architectural planning, and you don’t really know which are the weight-bearing walls. You make your best guess, go up a floor and… cross your fingers. And then you do it again. That is how a lot of our older software systems that control crucial parts of infrastructure are run. This works for a while, but every new layer adds more vulnerability. We are building skyscraper favelas in code — in earthquake zones."



"Essentially, there is a lot of equivalent of “duct-tape” in the code, holding things together. If done right, that code will eventually be fixed, commented (explanations written up so the next programmer knows what the heck is up) and ported to systems built for the right scale — before there is a crisis. How often does that get done? I wager that many wait to see if the system comes crashing down, necessitating the fix. By then, you are probably too big to go down for too long, so there’s the temptation for more duct tape. And so on."



"This is a bit like knowing you have a chronic condition, but pretending that the costs you will face are limited to those you will face this month. It’s a lie, everyone knows it’s a lie, but it makes those numbers look good now, as long as we are all suspending disbelief. (Also, this is why a lot of educational technology efforts fail: nobody budgets for maintenance, some parts of the system goes down, and teachers and kids rightfully abandon it. I heard a lot about this “no maintenance money” problem from researchers looking into the one laptop per child project)."



"There is a lot of interest, and boondoggle money, in exaggerating the “cyber-terrorism” threat (which is not unreal but making software better would help that a lot more than anything devoted solely to “cyber-terrorism” — but, hey, you know which buzzword gets the funding), and not much interest in spending real money in fixing the boring but important problems with the software infrastructure. This is partly lack of attention to preventive spending which plagues so many issues (Hello, Amtrak’s ailing rails!) but it’s also because lousy software allows … easier spying. And everyone is busy spying on everyone else, and the US government, perhaps best placed to take a path towards making software more secure, appears to have chosen that path as well. I believe this is a major mistake in the long run, but here we are."



"I’m actually more scared at this state of events than I would’ve been at a one-off hacking event that took down the NYSE. Software is eating the world, and the spread of networked devices through the “internet of things” is only going to accelerate this. Our dominant operating systems, our way of working, and our common approach to developing, auditing and debugging software, and spending (or not) money on its maintenance, has not yet reached the requirements of the 21st century. So, yes, NYSE going down is not a big deal, and United Airlines will probably have more ground halts if they don’t figure out how to change their infrastructure (not a cheap or easy undertaking). But it’s not just them. From our infrastructure to our privacy, our software suffers from “software sucks” syndrome which doesn’t sound as important as a Big Mean Attack of Cyberterrorists. But it is probably worse in the danger it poses.

And nobody is likely going to get appointed the Czar of How to Make Software Suck Less.

So, yes. Be scared. Be very worried. Software is eating the world, and it sucks."
code  software  technology  2015  complexity  speed  zeyneptufekci 
july 2015 by robertogreco
The Internet of Things You Don’t Really Need - The Atlantic
"We already chose to forego a future of unconnected software. All of your devices talk constantly to servers, and your data lives in the Cloud because there’s increasingly no other choice. Eventually, we won’t have unconnected things, either. We’ve made that choice too, we just don’t know it yet. For the moment, you can still buy toasters and refrigerators and thermostats that don’t talk to the Internet, but try to find a new television that doesn’t do so. All new TVs are smart TVs, asking you to agree to murky terms and conditions in the process of connecting to Netflix or Hulu. Soon enough, everything will be like Nest. If the last decade was one of making software require connectivity, the next will be one of making everything else require it. Why? For Silicon Valley, the answer is clear: to turn every industry into the computer industry. To make things talk to the computers in giant, secured, air-conditioned warehouses owned by (or hoping to be owned by) a handful of big technology companies.

But at what cost? What improvements to our lives do we not get because we focused on “smart” things? Writing in The Baffler last year, David Graeber asked where the flying cars, force fields, teleportation pods, space colonies, and all the other dreams of the recent past’s future have gone. His answer: Technological development was re-focused so that it wouldn’t threaten existing seats of power and authority. The Internet of Things exists to build a market around new data about your toasting and grilling and refrigeration habits, while duping you into thinking smart devices are making your lives better than you could have made them otherwise, with materials other than computers. Innovation and disruption are foils meant to distract you from the fact that the present is remarkably similar to the past, with you working even harder for it.

But it sure feels like it makes things easier, doesn’t it? The automated bike locks and thermostats all doing your bidding so you can finally be free to get things done. But what will you do, exactly, once you can monitor your propane tank level from the comfort of the toilet or the garage or the liquor store? Check your Gmail, probably, or type into a Google Doc on your smartphone, maybe. Or perhaps, if you’re really lucky, tap some ideas into Evernote for your Internet of Things startup’s crowdfunding campaign. “It’s gonna be huge,” you’ll tell your cookout guests as you saw into a freshly grilled steak in the cool comfort of your Nest-controlled dining room. “This is the future.”"
2015  ianbogost  iot  internetofthings  design  davidgraeber  labor  siliconvalley  technology  power  authority  innovation  disruption  work  future  past  present  marketing  propaganda  google  cloud  cloudcomputing  computers  code  googledocs  ubicomp  ubiquitouscomputing  everyware  adamgreenfield  amazon  dropbox  kickstarter 
june 2015 by robertogreco
PICTURES - marclafia
"With these new works I want to re-imagine, reinvent time, to see it as a physical dimension, to create an object of the image, that doesn't obliterate it, but teases out its trajectories and brings it back from its overexposure in its continual transmission. Of course the image will never exhaust itself in its repetition but become so domesticated that all its initial charge is gone. How then to see these familiar pictures but to rework them and make them new again with other pictures.

With the use of perspective and lenses long before photography, western picture making, not unlike genres of movies were pretty stable. There were the genres of History, Landscape, Portraiture and Still Life. Picture and picture making was regulated by the church then academies and the discourse around them narrow. It was this controlled discourse, this decorum of the picture and its reception that artists worked against that created occasional shocks and outrage.

My first interest was in History paintings but over time it became the history of painting and with that the history of photography, and I suppose a history of image. I had always been taken by Manet's Execution of Maximilian and only learned at the outset of my project that what Manet had created and abandoned as a painting was also an event that was photographed. Manet's cool and dispassionate take on the event contrasted with Goya's painting Third of May and Goya was in conversation with Rubens and Rubens, Leonardo.

Pictures have often, if not always, been about and in conversation with other pictures. This led me to think of pictures in their many modes and many genres across time and to want to create conversations amongst and between them. I began to imagine new images, to see new things, new thoughts often times by simply placing one image on another, or layering images and cutting them out. These new pictures pointed to things sometimes difficult to discern but there was always a something.

Images in their traces, in their histories, carry forward their techniques, their textures, their surfaces and armatures, their politics. They enfold the world they come from and in conversation I imagined they could present new worlds.

Where images once were the preserve of national archives, ubiquitous digital transmission today is global and each of us has become our own archivists. As to what is, and is not in the archives, and there are a host of them, from a wide variety of transnational corporate search engines and social network services, that is something to discuss elsewhere.

To see these images, to sense their thoughts, we have to look at them with other images. we have to engage them in conversation, in the conversation of images.

All images and sounds are code. As code, they are fluid, viral, infectious, malleable, erasable, moving easily in and out of a wide variety of indifferent contexts.

My interest lies less in photographing reality, and instead focuses on portraying the realities of photography and imaging in the regime of the network, as the world is a network of relations and the network is both a camera and archive, an apparatus of image exchange and circulation.

I want to be clear that when I say picture it may be a mathematical formula, a musical score, a line of code, each of them is a picture. Our capacity to produce Pictures is our capacity to think outside and beyond the present, to go backwards and forwards in time."

[via: https://twitter.com/MrZiebarth/status/593488088183283712 ]
marclafia  networks  internet  archives  cameras  pictures  images  imagery  2015  present  past  atemporality  history  conversation  web  online  time  memory  transmission  paintings  code  fluidity  virality  flexibility  erasability  context  exchange  communication  remixing  remixculture  socialmedia  socialnetworking  socialnetworks  arthistory 
april 2015 by robertogreco
Consider the Boolean - Learning - Source: An OpenNews project
"Ultimately though, I think the confusing thing about Boolean logic to most people is its strict precision in a world that is anything but. If I asked you “Are you interested in this essay or not?” and you answered “Yes,” that response is genuinely annoying, even though that is technically always the correct answer according to Boolean algebra. Ultimately, what things in this world are absolutely and precisely true? Not as many as we might think. This is a journalism tutorial and not a philosophical treatise, but the point still stands. As programmers, we often use Boolean values to represent conditional elements in our databases, but sometimes the ways we use them obscure and confuse the nuances of reality."
jacobharris  databases  design  news  boolean  booleanlogic  logic  code  coding  programming  journalism  data 
february 2015 by robertogreco
Eyeo 2014 - Claire Evans on Vimeo
"Science Fiction & The Synthesized Sound – Turn on the radio in the year 3000, and what will you hear? When we make first contact with an alien race, will we—as in "Close Encounters of the Third Kind"—communicate through melody? If the future has a sound, what can it possibly be? If science fiction has so far failed to produce convincing future music, it won’t be for lack of trying. It’s just that the problem of future-proofing music is complex, likely impossible. The music of 1,000 years from now will not be composed by, or even for, human ears. It may be strident, seemingly random, mathematical; like the “Musica Universalis” of the ancients, it might not be audible at all. It might be the symphony of pure data. It used to take a needle, a laser, or a magnet to reproduce sound. Now all it takes is code. The age of posthuman art is near; music, like mathematics, may be a universal language—but if we’re too proud to learn its new dialects, we’ll find ourselves silent and friendless in a foreign future."
claireevans  sciencefiction  scifi  music  future  sound  audio  communication  aesthetics  robertscholes  williamgibson  code  composition  2014  johncage  film  history  ai  artificialintelligence  machines  universality  appreciation  language  turingtest 
february 2015 by robertogreco
The All-Women Hacker Collective Making Art About the Post-Snowden Age | Motherboard
““There is something about the internet that isn’t working anymore,” is the line that opens filmmaker Jonathan Minard’s short documentary on Deep Lab—a group of women hackers, artists, and theorists who gathered at Carnegie Mellon University in December to answer the question of what, exactly, that disquieting “something” is. The film premieres on Motherboard today.

What Deep Lab represents is just as hard to pin down as the “something” invoked in the opening minutes of Minard’s short film. Is it a book, a lecture series, or Minard’s documentary—all of which were put together in under a month? Is it an ethos? Is it feminist? Is Deep Lab a charrette, a dugnad, or a “congress,” as its participants called it?

It’s hard to say what Deep Lab is in part because of its scattershot nature, both in terms of its products and its focus. The Deep Lab book—available for free online—is a 242-page collection of essays, fragments, and reflections on everything from encryption to cyberfeminism penned by a dozen different authors with divergent interests.
Deep Lab’s interdisciplinary approach is perhaps necessary to parse the complicated realities of the post-Snowden age. Since Snowden’s revelations regarding the scope of the US government’s online surveillance program broke in 2013, it seems as though the internet has taken on a new, dark, and confusing identity.

Larger-than-life interests in the form of corporate and governmental surveillance are now at play in our daily interactions on the internet, and interpreting those outsized realities so we can understand them is no small challenge.

“As an artist, I want to reinterpret culture in a way that society can parse.” said Addie Wagenknecht, the multimedia artist who organized Deep Lab during her ongoing fellowship at the STUDIO for Creative Inquiry at Carnegie Mellon. “You take these big events and try to encapsulate them in a way that you can present them concisely and quickly so that it’s defined for people who experience that piece or exhibition.”

A chapter in the book compiled by data artist Ingrid Burrington is comprised of 20 pages listing objects pulled from the Pentagon’s 1033 program—which has supplied military hardware to local police for decades—in plain black text. After four solid pages of “5.56 MILLIMETRE RIFLE,” it becomes clear that Deep Lab is not only artistically compelling and tantalizingly oblique in how it approaches issues of life and death, but deadly serious.

According to Wagenknecht, Deep Lab is also a medium for women to do more than just participate in digital culture—the tech world has been notoriously resistant to opening its ranks to women—but to interpret and define it, and to share and create tools and techniques for survival within it.

“Maybe for women, we’re more aware of protecting ourselves online because it’s always been a social problem,” Wagenknecht told me. “Think of contacting friends before you leave a party late at night so people can make sure you got home safe—men maybe don’t think about that and women always do. And it’s those same roles on the web. How do you protect yourself from a hack or doxing? The power shifts to the person with more knowledge.”

Deep Lab member Harlo Holmes, who works as the head of metadata for the Guardian Project, designed a system for victims of cyber bullying on Twitter to easily and painlessly map the digital connections between harassers called Foxy Doxxing.

There were also men present at Deep Lab, including Minard, though they weren’t collaborators per se. Multimedia artist Golan Levin is the director of STUDIO, where Deep Lab congregated. Playing host to Deep Lab, Levin—along with Wagenknecht, who was the group’s chief mastermind and organizer—was part of Deep Lab’s development from the very beginning.

“I’m enormously proud,” Levin said. “You’re looking at a book, a documentary, and a lecture series that was put together by a dozen people in a month. I think they’re side-effects of what Deep Lab actually was.”

So, to return to the question that started this article—what is Deep Lab?—Levin provided his own answer: “It’s punk.”

But even more than punk—more than a book, a documentary, a gathering, or a lecture series—Deep Lab is a beginning, according to Allison Burtch, a resident at the Brooklyn-based Eyebeam Art and Technology Center and Deep Lab member.

I don’t think Deep Lab has ended; it was the beginning of a camaraderie,” Burtch said. “Yeah, we did this thing and did some talks, but it’s not ending. This is the beginning of different affiliations with people. It was awesome. “

According to Wagenknecht, a Deep Lab lecture series is planned for later in 2015, and will take place at venues in New York City. Until then, we have a book, several lectures, and a documentary to contemplate what Deep Lab is, and what it all means.​"
2015  deeplab  art  digitalart  infrastructure  2014  ingridburrington  jenlowe  technology  data  jonathanminard  jordanpearson  cyberfeminism  enryption  interdisciplinary  coding  code  programming  surveillance  golanlevin  harloholmes  allisonburtch  hackercollectives  collectives  culture  addiewagenknecht  punk  documentary  poer  subversion  deepweb  freedom  privacy  security  socialmedia  facebook  google  socialnorms  safety 
january 2015 by robertogreco
Minority languages: Cookies, caches and cows | The Economist
"OUSMANE sweats under a tin roof as he thumbs through a Chinese smartphone that he is selling at the technology market in Bamako, Mali. Words in French, Mali’s official language, scroll down the screen. “A ka nyi?” (Is it good?) a customer asks him in Bambara, Mali’s most widely used tongue.

Mozilla, the foundation behind Firefox, an open-source web browser, wants Ousmane’s customers to have the option of a device that speaks their language. Smartphones with its operating system (OS) are already on sale in 24 countries, including Bangladesh, India and Mexico, for as little as $33. Other countries will be added as it makes more deals with handset manufacturers. And Bambara is one of dozens of languages into which volunteer “localisers” are translating the OS.

Mozilla has 230 localisation teams, says Jeff Beatty, who co-ordinates some from his office in Utah. Their work takes both time and ingenuity. Firefox for a computer uses about 40,000 words; for the phone OS, 16,000. Translators must express technological terms in languages shaped by livestock, farming and fishing, and choose alternatives for culture-specific words such as “cookie”, “file” and “mouse”.

Ibrahima Sarr, a Senegalese coder, led the translation of Firefox into Fulah, which is spoken by 20m people from Senegal to Nigeria. “Crash” became hookii (a cow falling over but not dying); “timeout” became a honaama (your fish has got away). “Aspect ratio” became jeendondiral, a rebuke from elders when a fishing net is wrongly woven. In Malawi’s Chichewa language, which has 10m speakers, “cached pages” became mfutso wa tsamba, or bits of leftover food. The windowless houses of the 440,000 speakers of Zapotec, a family of indigenous languages in Mexico, meant that computer “windows” became “eyes”.

The world speaks nearly 7,000 languages. Mali, with a population of 15m, has 13 national languages and 40-60 smaller ones, depending on where the border between language and dialect is drawn. Firefox is available in 90 languages, which serve almost all of the 40% of the global population already online. Apple’s most recent computer OS offers 33 languages out of the box, and the new iPhone, 35. Google offers 150, including dialects (and some spurious ones such as “Pirate”). But some languages spoken by millions are excluded, including Tibetan (3m-4m speakers) and Bambara (10m, including those for whom it is a second tongue). Bringing the rest of the world online is not just a technical challenge, but a linguistic one.

As a non-profit, Mozilla can put effort into languages that offer no prospect of a quick return. Songhai and Fulah, recently made available in Firefox, are spoken mainly by poor, illiterate herders and farmers in the Sahel, who do not have smartphones. But when such people eventually get online, they will benefit more if they can do so in their own tongues.

As more languages are added, the Firefox OS will create a sort of global Rosetta stone. It uses all parts of speech, and older, colourful words are pressed into service. Mozilla has created a statistical tool for linguistic analyses. And though 40,000 words is not a whole vocabulary, it is a significant part. As well as bringing the linguistically excluded online, localisation may keep small languages alive."
language  localization  mozilla  code  coding  2014  firefox  senegal  fulah  africa  nigeria  technology  metaphor 
september 2014 by robertogreco
BLDGBLOG: Procedural Forestry
"We looked at procedural Brutalism the other week—and, deep in the BLDGBLOG archives, we explored the moors of a procedurally generated British countryside—so why not procedural forestry?

Designer Florian Veltman tweeted two screen grabs the other week, along with the quick comment that he was "working on a procedural forest." The first image, which you can see in his tweet, is just a path or small clearing—almost a holloway—cutting forward through a forest of algorithmic leaves and branches.

But it's the picturesque errorscape seen in the opening image of this post, and in Veltman's second tweet, that really caught my eye. Captioned by Veltman as a "procedural forest gone wrong... or right?," it resembles a kind of upended tectonic plate overgrown with vegetation, pierced by the alien presence of a miscalculated substrate erupting from below.

Procedural forestry, procedural geology, procedural oceanography—the very idea of a procedural natural history is just incredible. Unstoppable worlds endlessly flowering from roots of code. Imagine landscape information modeling becoming weirdly sentient, self-generating, and aesthetically sublime, laced with errors, topographies gone wild—stuttering and mutated—in the infinite seams between digital worlds.

We watch in unearthly awe as coded terrains crack open or glitch apart just enough to reveal their mathematical interiors, buried operating systems indistinguishable from nature whirring away within the roots and leaves."
bldgblog  geoffmanaugh  procedural  forestry  geology  oceanography  naturalhistory  code  landscape  topography  math  mathematics  2014 
september 2014 by robertogreco
Sonic Pi
"Audible Computing.

A free sound synthesiser for live coding designed to support computing and music lessons within schools.

Use code to compose and perform in classical and contemporary styles ranging from Canons to Dubstep."
music  code  coding  sound  audio  raspberrypi  mac  osx  synthesizer  edg  classideas  learning  education  teaching  children  programming 
september 2014 by robertogreco
Ingrid Burrington - Crash Course in Digital Literacy - Video Archive - The Conference by Media Evolution
"In our session ”Crash Course in Digital Literacy” Ingrid will give an overview of the physical infrastructure of the internet, share some of her own experiences trying to visit and map these infrastructures, and explain why it’s useful to think about the internet as a physical, tangible landscape.

Ingrid Burrington lives and works on an island off the coast of America, where she writes, makes maps, and tells jokes about places, politics, and the weird feelings people have about both.

Most recently, her work has appeared in Creative Time Reports. She is currently a fellow at the Data and Society Research Institute and an artist in residence at Eyebeam, an art and technology center in New York."
ingridburrington  internet  networks  web  online  datacenters  servers  infrastructure  2014  digitalliteracy  julianoliver  drones  code 
august 2014 by robertogreco
one human heartbeat
"I've put my heartbeat on the internet.

It's March 25, 2014 and the best technology I've found to save my heartrate is the Basis watch. It saves an average heartrate for each minute. It fails to record any heartrate for ~17.5% of minutes. When there is no data for a minute, you'll see the heartrate from the previous minute.

Basis doesn't provide an open API, so I access the data using a variation of this code. The heartrate you see is from 24 hours ago. This is because the data can only be accessed via usb connection. Twice a day I connect the watch and upload my latest heartrates to the database. I've been doing this for 33 days now.

It's March 25, 2014, and statistics say I have about 16452 days left.

Gotta go.

How we spend our days is, of course, how we spend our lives... Each day is the same, so you remember the series afterward as a blurred and powerful pattern.

Annie Dillard The Writing Life [http://www.brainpickings.org/index.php/2013/06/07/annie-dillard-the-writing-life-1/ ]

See also...

Roy Scranton's Learning How to Die in the Anthropocene
[http://opinionator.blogs.nytimes.com/2013/11/10/learning-how-to-die-in-the-anthropocene/ ]

Cheryl Strayed's Rumpus Advice Column #64: Tiny Beautiful Things
[http://therumpus.net/2011/02/dear-sugar-the-rumpus-advice-column-64/ ]"
jenlowe  2014  heart  heartrates  data  code  coding  time  life  mortality  anniedillard  royscranton  cherylstrayed 
march 2014 by robertogreco
F J O R D S by Kyle Reimergartin
Yes, please: "FJORDS PROGRAM ORIGINALLY CONCEIVED AS A SERIES OF EXPRESSIONS CONTAINING AND ITERATING THE VARIABLES OF THE SHARECART1000 PROJECT WITH EVENTUAL ILLUMINATION FOR MULTIPLE WORLDS CONSTRUCTION TIPS AND BEST PRAXIS. NOW ASSEMBLING AND MANIFESTING IN RELATIVELY STABLE FORMS ALLOWING EXPLORATION AND TESTING BY ALL SCIENCE PRACTITIONERS, IT IS OUR HONOR AND PRIVILEGE TO PRESENT AS INVITATION THE EXCITING COLLABORATION OPPORTUNITY FOR PUBLIC SCIENCE AND EDIFICATION, A TRANSFORMATIVE MOMENT FOR PARTICIPATION AND FURTHER COLLABORATION IN OUR SHARED VISION." 
videogames  wishlist  kylereimergartin  code  sharecart1000  games  gaming  worldbuilding  via:jbushnell 
january 2014 by robertogreco
The colours of tūhonohono « fog on water
"A few mornings ago I was sitting at my laptop drinking coffee. The previous evening’s Tūhonohono pairing was open in one tab and a Cooper-Hewitt object detail page in the next. My tired mind folded one into the other. I started wondering what Virginia’s year of photography would looks like if the subjects faded away and the dominant colours expanded to fill the image.

So, I started playing…

First, I needed some data. I wrote a mini-harvester to scrape post details and download the images from Tūhonohono’s monthly archive pages. The code isn’t exactly crash hot, but it does the job. Then it was on to the fun playing with colour stuff.

As noted above, the Cooper-Hewitt colour classification code partitions RGB colour space into a finite set of buckets. An algorithm inspects each image, assigning every pixel to a colour bucket according to Euclidean distance. This technique works really well for the Cooper-Hewitt and it makes a heap of sense if you want to search across colours.

I travelled a slightly different route. Instead of matching pixels to a small set of predetermined colours, I used a machine learning technique called k-means clustering to divide similar pixels into groups to find dominant colours. The clever way k-means clustering mashes together nearest-neighbour analysis with Voronoi polygons makes it a great method for finding approximate clusters centres when you’re unconcerned about the partition borders. I also like that the results emphasise distinctness over raw frequency counts. I began writing my own clustering algorithm before stumbling across a Python implementation by Charles Leifer, which I used without modification.

With metadata and colours in hand, I started playing with the photographs. I was unsure what I was making except that I wanted to see all of the colours in Virginia’s year at once and there a sense of dynamism. I wanted the screen to pulse and change and fade and glow. The colours of Tūhonohono is a small attempt to share what has been like to follow this photography project over the course of the year. I wanted to provide a space for people to make their own connections from Virginia’s photographs. It is a thing built out of impressions, glimpses and intuition. And I think that’s all I have to say about it."
tūhonohono  code  color  data  datavisualization  cooper-hewitt  virginiagow  photography  chrismcdowall  visualization 
december 2013 by robertogreco
The CSS-Tricks License | CSS-Tricks
"SUPER IMPORTANT LEGAL DOCUMENT
------------------------------
I don't give two hoots what you do with any of the design or code you find here.

Actually, I do. I hope you take it and use it, uncredited, on a super commercial website and get wicked rich off it. I hope you use it at work and your boss is impressed and you get a big promotion. I hope it helps you design a website and that website impresses somebody you think is super hot and you get married and have smart, chill babies. I hope you use the code in a blog post you write elsewhere and that website gets way more popular and awesome than this one.

If you feel like telling me about it, cool. If not, no big deal. If you feel better crediting it, that's cool. If not, don't sweat it.

If you copy an entire article from this site and republish it on your own site like you wrote it, that's a little uncool. I won't be mad at you for stealing, I just think you're better than that and want to see you do better. I'm not going to come after you though. I'd rather play ball with my dog. The only time I'll be mad at you is if you go out of your way to try and hurt me somehow. And again I probably won't even be mad, just sad. Unless I'm having a bad day too, in which case I apologize in advance for my snarky replies.

I want the web to get better and being all Johnny Protective over everything doesn't get us there. I understand other people feel differently about this and might have semi-legit reasons for protecting certain code, design, writing, or whatever. I work on some closed-source projects myself. CSS-Tricks isn't one of them. Go nuts."
via:maxfenton  css-tricks  sharing  attribution  code  opensource  copyright  licensing  creativecommons 
november 2013 by robertogreco
Learning - Source: An OpenNews project
"In-depth case studies by the best journalist-developers in the field. Get schooled on how journo-coders find and build web-native stories, what kinds of questions they ask of data, how choices in presenting the news affects how it’s interpreted, and the ethics they encounter along the way."
opennews  learning  journalism  code  coding  source  howto  storytelling  ethics 
march 2013 by robertogreco
Piet (programming language) - Wikipedia
"Piet is an esoteric programming language designed by David Morgan-Mar, whose programs are bitmaps that look like abstract art. The compilation is guided by a "pointer" that moves around the image, from one continuous coloured region to the next. Procedures are carried through when the pointer exits a region.

There are 20 colours for which behaviour is specified: 18 "colourful" colours, which are ordered by a 6-step hue cycle and a 3-step brightness cycle; and black and white which are not ordered. When exiting a "colourful" colour and entering another one, the performed procedure is determined by the number of steps of change in hue and brightness. Black cannot be entered; when the pointer tries to enter a black region, the rules of choosing the next block are changed instead. If all possible rules are tried, the program terminates. Regions outside the borders of the image are also treated as black. White does not perform operations, but allows the pointer to "pass through". The behaviour of colours other than the 20 specified is left to the compiler or interpreter.

Variables are stored in memory as signed integers in a single stack. Most specified procedures deal with operations on that stack, others with input/output and with the rules by which the compilation pointer moves.

Piet was named after the Dutch painter Piet Mondrian. The originally intended name, Mondrian, was already taken."

[See also: http://www.dangermouse.net/esoteric/piet.html and http://www.rapapaing.com/piet/piet.html ]
art  code  coding  computing  visual  color  colors  programming  pietmondrian  piet  edg  srg 
february 2013 by robertogreco
cityofsound: Journal: Fabrica
"a type of school, or studio, or commercial practice, or research centre. Fabrica, hovering between all these things yet resisting the urge to fall into becoming any one of them, is perhaps genuinely without parallel. This makes it a little tricky to explain, but this ability to avoid pigeonholes is also to its credit."

"hybrid organisation—part communications research centre…but also part arts and design school, part think-thank, part studio. My kind of place."

"While I might occasionally characterise Fabrica as the pugnacious upstart, or startup, whose agility might challenge the established institutions, it’s clear we also have a lot to learn from the likes of the exemplary creative centres like the RCA, and from Paul in particular. His experience across the Design Museum, Cooper Hewitt and the RCA will be invaluable, and he’s beginning to draw together a great advisory board. Watch that space. I’m also exploring various newer models for learning environments, from Strelka and CIID to MIT Media Lab and School of Everything, alongside the centres of excellence like the RCA and others. My father and mother, more of an influence on me than perhaps even they realise, were both educators and learning environments and cultures may well be in my DNA, to some degree."

"…the other idea that I’m incredibly interested in pursuing at Fabrica is that of the trandisciplinary studio."

"With this stew of perspectives at hand, we might find project teams that contain graphic designers, industrial designers, neuroscientists, coders, filmmakers, for instance. Or product design, data viz, sociology, photography, economics, architecture and interaction design, for instance. These small project teams are then extremely well-equipped to tackle the kind of complex, interdependent challenges we face today, and tomorrow. We know that new knowledge and new practice—new ideas and new solutions—emerges through the collision of disciplines, at the edges of things, when we’re out of our comfort zone. Joi Ito, at the MIT Media Lab, calls this approach “anti-disciplinary”."

"And living in Treviso, a medieval walled Middle European city, our new home gives me another urban form to explore, after living in the Modern-era Social Democratic Nordic City of Helsinki, the Post-Colonial proto-Austral-Asian Sprawl of Sydney, the contemporary globalised city-state of London, and the revolutionary industrial, and then post-industrial, cities of the north of England."
1994  australia  uk  finland  venice  helsinki  london  sydney  domus  josephgrima  danielhirschmann  bethanykoby  technologywillsaveus  tadaoando  alessandrobenetton  rca  schoolofeverything  strelkainstitute  joiito  medialab  mitmedialab  ciid  paulthompson  nontechnology  crossdisciplinary  multidisciplinary  marcosteinberg  jocelynebourgon  culturalconsumption  culturalproduction  code  darkmatter  fabricafeatures  livewindows  colors  andycameron  richardbarbrook  californianideology  discourse  sitra  italy  treviso  helsinkidesignlab  benetton  culture  culturaldiversity  socialdiversity  diversity  decisionmaking  sharedvalue  economics  obesity  healthcare  demographics  climatechange  research  art  design  studios  lcproject  learning  education  2012  antidisciplinary  transdisciplinary  cityofsound  danhill 
november 2012 by robertogreco
The Nature of Code
"Can we capture the unpredictable evolutionary and emergent properties of nature in software? Can understanding the mathematical principles behind our physical world help us to create digital worlds? This book focuses on the programming strategies and techniques behind computer simulations of natural systems using Processing."

"Read the Entire Book Online for Free

The complete book is available as HTML with interactive Processing.js examples.

Download the book's code

All of the source files for building the book and the Processing code examples are available on github."
howto  via:jenlowe  2012  coding  edg  srg  danielsciffman  books  code  processing  programming 
november 2012 by robertogreco
Push
"Push is a journal dedicated to publishing original research on writing with source code.

Push’s mission is:

* to help develop writers and researchers working with source code, both through the published issues of the journal and the active, open process by which submissions are reviewed and improved on the road to publication;

* to advocate for individuals working to incorporate source-level writing into their research, classrooms, and professional development;

* and most of all, to improve the sophistication of digital writers writing in a software-neutral, source-level way.
github  open  push  source-levelwriting  sourcecode  digitalwriting  digital  journals  writing  git  code  via:savasavasava  openaccess 
october 2012 by robertogreco
Initializr - Start an HTML5 Boilerplate project in 15 seconds!
"Initializr is an HTML5 templates generator to help you getting started with a new project based on HTML5 Boilerplate. It generates for you a clean customizable template with just what you need to start!"
boilerplate  html5boilerplate  responsivedesign  html  initializr  webdev  template  blueprint  tools  code  css  css3  webdesign  generator  framework  html5  responsivewebdesign 
august 2012 by robertogreco
Sorting and searching at the library
"If you ever want to screw over a library, just walk up to any shelf, pick up any book, and put it on another shelf where it doesn’t belong.

Eventually a librarian will stumble across it, see that it’s out of place, and pull it off the shelf. Until then, that book is hopelessly lost. It might as well be on the surface of the moon. Finding a needle in a haystack is easy. When it comes down to it, needles are not hay. Finding one book lost among a million other books? That’s hard.

The only reason such a thing as a library is possible is that it is a gigantic, life-sized, walk-in data structure, tuned for fast lookup.

This post is about searching and sorting, two fundamental aspects of data processing, and what the library has to teach us about them."
sort  code  library  books  search  mergesort  algorithm  quicksort  via:migurski 
august 2012 by robertogreco
Tom Sachs: Working to Code
"HOW TO SWEEP
Part 1 of "Energies and Skills" trilogy
By Tom Sachs. Directed by Van Neistat. 2012"
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Kt-VlZpz-8E

"LOVE LETTER TO PLYWOOD
Part 2 of "Energies and Skills" trilogy
By Tom Sachs. Directed by Van Neistat. 2012"
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pVxldyIa0Bg

"SPACE CAMP
Part 3 of "Energies and Skills" trilogy
By Tom Sachs. Directed by Van Neistat. 2012"
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=e-jSSTGqU5c

"COLOR
THE COMPREHENSIVE COLOR CODE
By Tom Sachs. Directed by Van Neistat. 2011"
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eBM_9W_e_D4

"TEN BULLETS
THE STUDIO MANUAL
By Tom Sachs. Directed by Van Neistat. 2010"
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=49p1JVLHUos

10 Bullets, INTRO
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=28reJVNLk80

10 Bullets, #1: "WORK TO CODE"
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lAIYVmRCX-Q

10 Bullets, #2: "SACRED SPACE"
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=C1GL4JT0sa4

10 Bullets, #3: "BE ON TIME"
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=D6pUonbzPLU

10 Bullets, #4: "BE THOROUGH"
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=R-gVtV67Gnc

10 Bullets, #5: "I UNDERSTAND"
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bGn84iuBdHw

10 Bullets, #6: "SENT DOES NOT MEAN RECEIVED"
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0n06LcXljbM

10 Bullets, #7: "KEEP A LIST"
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FRl1WOzo1zg

10 Bullets, #8: "ALWAYS BE KNOLLING"
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=s-CTkbHnpNQ

10 Bullets, #9: "SACRIFICE TO LEATHERFACE"
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=d8heORFuGOY

10 Bullets, #10: "PERSISTENCE"
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JDbJQoEjfbo
studios  work  2010  2012  howwework  tenbullets  tomsachs  video  art  color  space  wood  plywood  sweeping  vanneistat  2011  knolling  persistence  lists  listmaking  confirmation  understanding  thoroughness  time  punctuality  code 
june 2012 by robertogreco
Field Report: Project Argo | Contents Magazine
"Project Argo’s Thompson is among those explaining why more open sharing of processes, code, and theory is good for everyone, for reasons both selfish and altruistic…

The gift of Project Argo’s resources and practices marks an opportunity to move more industries toward openness, but this sort of public learning and teaching doesn’t schedule or pay for itself. Genuinely helpful public resources appear when we recognize their value and set aside resources to make them happen. Whether we’re coding, editing, or running projects, that’s something each of us can work toward in the year to come."
florilegium  npr  cv  howweshouldwork  howwework  publicresources  altruism  collectivegood  2012  workinginpublic  publicteaching  publiclearning  processes  process  theory  code  opensource  sharing  journalism  mattthompson  projectargo  argo  contentsmagazine  erinkissane 
january 2012 by robertogreco
Obsessions: No-Code Sites — Imprint-The Online Community for Graphic Designers
"So in this case, to make the website run, an image is dropped onto a specific folder which Hazel watches to get filenames ready for the web. The app then copies it to the Dropbox folder, which then shoots it off to the Dropbox servers, which then syncs with a webserver folder. Everything’s then presented by Stacey, which you’ll remember is devised to operate without much coding."
howto  via:maxfenton  nocodesites  no-codesites  dropbox  portfolios  code  stacey  tutorials 
january 2012 by robertogreco
Edit like an Ace - GitHub
"Ace is a code editor written in JavaScript. It powers Cloud9 IDE and, as of today, file editing on GitHub."
github  javascript  code 
august 2011 by robertogreco
[map=yes]
"Most online maps are designed to help you get around in a car. This generally means displaying: roads, businesses, buildings, on-ramps, parks, oceans and traffic congestion. Nothing wrong with that! Designers get handed a tool kit that has as many tools as a good swiss army knife, and the maps reflect these tools. Millions of people use them to make appointments across town, find restaurants, and drive home for the holidays.<br />
<br />
But what if, instead of a swiss army knife, we used a box of crayons? Or charcoal and newsprint? Or play-doh? What would those maps look like? What could they tell us about the world?<br />
<br />
"map=yes" is a collaboration between MapQuest Open and Stamen Design, using data from the OpenStreetMap project. The project is an exploration of new frontiers in online cartography and the mapping of open data.<br />
<br />
All the code used to generate these maps is available for download and liberal re-use."
design  art  maps  mapping  data  stamen  mapquest  openstreetmap  osm  2011  code 
july 2011 by robertogreco
Curveship: Interactive Fiction + Interactive Narrating
"Curveship is an interactive fiction system that provides a world model (of characters, objects, locations, and things that happen) while also modeling the narrative discourse, so that the narration and description of the simulated world can change. Curveship can tell events out of order, using flashback and other techniques, and can tell the story from the standpoint of particular characters and their perceptions and understandings.<br />
The system has been developed up to this point with advanced users, such as researchers and programmer/authors, in mind. Some understanding of narrative theory, some understanding of interactive fiction, some ability to program in Python, and a willingness to use a command-line system are important to effective use of Curveship at this point. While I hope that Curveship, or components of it, will eventually be of use to a wide variety of users and developers, my initial goal has been to develop a system that will be of value to these groups of people:"
writing  interactive  fiction  development  code  via:robinsloan  classideas 
february 2011 by robertogreco
Rule 30 - Wikipedia
"Rule 30 is a one-dimensional binary cellular automaton rule introduced by Stephen Wolfram in 1983. Wolfram describes it as being his "all-time favourite rule" and details it in his book, A New Kind of Science. Using Wolfram's classification scheme, Rule 30 is a Class III rule, displaying aperiodic, chaotic behaviour.

This rule is of particular interest because it produces complex, seemingly-random patterns from simple, well-defined rules. Because of this, Wolfram believes that rule 30, and cellular automata in general, are the key to understanding how simple rules produce complex structures and behaviour in nature."
math  science  wikipedia  chaostheory  stephenwolphram  mathematics  complexity  rule30  via:britta  patterns  rules  cellularautomata  behavior  nature  beauty  code  chaos 
december 2010 by robertogreco
App Inventor for Android
"Because App Inventor provides access to a GPS-location sensor, you can build apps that know where you are. You can build an app to help you remember where you parked your car, an app that shows the location of your friends or colleagues at a concert or conference, or your own custom tour app of your school, workplace, or a museum.
appinventor  android  api  wysiwyg  programming  scratch  diy  education  glvo  classideas  tcsnmy  code  applications  google  gui  howto  mobile  software 
july 2010 by robertogreco
Announcing A Book Apart | Jason Santa Maria
"I crafted a very simple page design to let the text take the spotlight. It’s a thin book, both in width and thickness, and I spent a long time fiddling with column widths and grids before settling on a comfortable line length. Our books are brief enough that we can’t predictably print on the spines; so I decided to wrap the title from the spine around to the back cover, giving the spine and back cover some identification and texture."
books  pamphletbooks  coding  css  webdev  html  typography  code  html5  alistapart  webdesign 
may 2010 by robertogreco
Unlink Your Feeds - Format for your medium.
"All of the characters used for placing the message in a context on Twitter are noise now. They aren’t clickable. They don’t make any sense. They don’t refer to anything (there is no @chr1sa on Facebook). They may as well be assembly code. Why are you polluting your Facebook stream with assembly code?"
twitter  code  links  feeds  facebook  context 
february 2010 by robertogreco
Try Coding Dear Boy - Laughing Meme
"Laziness Impatience Hubris: This is the dark side of the geek virtue of laziness.

The belief that if one just thinks hard enough, or cleverly enough, that problems will have an “elegant solution”. And by “elegant” we mean a solution that doesn’t involve much code. (elegant, such a tricky word, it can also mean writing tons of code for problems that will likely never manifest) And by “think hard and clever”, a good short cut is probably just be to ask someone. So I’ve come up with a response that looks something like: We generally try do the dumbest thing that will work first. And that’s usually as far as we get. Almost everything we do is pretty straightforward, and as such is well documented around the Web, sometimes by us, generally by others. And when we do get fiendishly clever, as we do now and again, it’s usually a highly tuned (read idiosyncratic) solution for the problems we’re trying to solve.”
humor  programming  flickr  code  laziness  problemsolving  doing  iteration  gtd  practical  practice  howwework  howwelearn  via:migurski  asksomeone 
september 2009 by robertogreco
Let's make the web faster - Google Code
"There are many ways to make websites run faster. In this section, you can discover performance best practices that real web professionals employ in their everyday work. These practices have improved the user experience for millions of users and we hope they are useful for other web developers."
google  webdev  webdesign  tips  speed  optimization  bestpractices  javascript  tutorial  css  html  code  programming  web  development  tutorials  performance  coding  php  design 
august 2009 by robertogreco
route-me - Project Hosting on Google Code
"A slippy map library for the iPhone. Fast! Completely written in objective-c using CoreAnimation. Runs like the built-in app. Currently OpenStreetMap Microsoft VirtualEarth and CloudMade are supported as map sources. Use it in your iPhone project. It's licensed under the new BSD license. You are responsible for getting permission to use the map data."
mobile  software  maps  mapping  iphone  opensource  openstreetmap  osm  programming  gis  gps  iphonesdk  api  google  code  open  cloudmade 
july 2009 by robertogreco
haque :: design + research :: Haunt
"Using humidity, temperatures and electromagnetic and sonic frequencies that parapsychologists have associated with haunted spaces, this project aims at building an environment that feels "haunted": a non-visual architecture."
via:kazys  usmanhaque  technology  art  paranormal  psychology  architecture  installation  perception  audio  design  science  code  poetry  physical 
february 2009 by robertogreco
Pasto colorido « Terreno
"Este código processing crea un array de objetos de una clase. Fué interesante llenar los parámetros con números al azar que pudieran cambiar gradualmente de cuadro a cuadro."

[More here: http://terreno.wordpress.com/2008/07/31/pasto-colorido-en-corriendo-version-web/ ]
processing  organics  organic  coding  code  edg 
july 2008 by robertogreco
Thinkmap visualization software facilitates communication, learning, and discovery.
"Thinkmap is composed of a number of loosely coupled components that can be quickly reconfigured to fulfill many different visualization tasks."
visualization  data  thesaurus  software  code  flowchart  generator  webdesign  interface  thinkmap  webdev 
june 2008 by robertogreco
Ned Batchelder: CSS Homer, animated
"Here's Román Cortés' Homer, animated to show the structure. I haven't done anything to Román's amazing work other than to annotate the divs with ids and add a bit of jQuery to show them in sequence so that you can see the characters being added one at
css  animation  design  code  webdesign  hacks  typography  thesimpsons  webdev 
may 2008 by robertogreco
iPhone JavaScript Character Counts
"Now, I don't have an iPhone, but I do have the SDK. Typing with a mouse in the iPhone simulator, I found the interval pattern to be the most responsive. Of the 4 techniques, only the instant updating one failed to provide an accurate count (it was always
iphone  javascript  keyboard  typing  performance  code  browser  browsers 
april 2008 by robertogreco
Flickr Code [see also: http://blog.flickr.net/en/2008/04/16/codeflickrcom-new-flickr-developer-site/]
"Your one-stop shop for information, gossip and discussion with the Flickr developer community"
api  flickr  code  development  programming  documentation 
april 2008 by robertogreco
Datawocky: More data usually beats better algorithms
"To sum up, if you have limited resources, add more data rather than fine-tuning the weights on your fancy machine-learning algorithm. Of course, you have to be judicious in your choice of the data to add to your data set."
algorithms  code  computers  computing  database  databases  datamining  efficiency  statistics  semanticweb  programming  netflix  research  metadata  learning  search 
april 2008 by robertogreco
Zombie Infection Simulation - The Original
"Zombies are grey, move very slowly and change direction randomly and frequently unless they can see something moving in front of them, in which case they start walking towards it. After a while they get bored and wander randomly again."
simulator  processing  code  chaos  zombies  simulations  programming  behavior  visualization 
february 2008 by robertogreco
Why Should I Care What Color the Bikeshed Is?
"This is metaphor indicating that you need not argue about every little feature just because you know enough to do so. Some people have commented that amount of noise generated by a change is inversely proportional to complexity of the change."
code  collaboration  development  software  engineering  programming  productivity  opensource  management  etiquette  wisdom 
february 2008 by robertogreco
How YOU Can Make the Web More Structured - ReadWriteWeb
"Putting meta information into page headers is easy and should be a must-do thing for everyone. Beyond that, providing information such as author, date, and location makes data that much more valuable."
advice  blogging  code  content  metadata  microformats  semanticweb  internet  markup  standards  folksonomy  findability  semantic  webdesign  webdev  users  usability  tagging  tags  howto  format  meta 
january 2008 by robertogreco
S5: A Simple Standards-Based Slide Show System
"S5 is a slide show format based entirely on XHTML, CSS, and JavaScript. With one file, you can run a complete slide show and have a printer-friendly version as well. The markup used for the slides is very simple, highly semantic, and completely accessibl
presentations  free  opensource  pdf  powerpoint  alternative  code  communication  speaking  tutorials  howto  slideshow  css  xhtml 
january 2008 by robertogreco
malwarez cyber threats - data visualization & visual design - information aesthetics
"series of visualization of worms, viruses, trojans and spyware code. for each piece of disassembled code, API calls, memory addresses and subroutines are tracked and analyzed. their frequency, density and grouping are mapped to the inputs of an algorithm
visualization  worms  viruses  spyware  code  visual  information  infographics 
january 2008 by robertogreco
Welcome :: Indexhibit
"Indexhibit is a web application used to build and maintain an archetypal, invisible website format that combines text, image, movie and sound."
art  artists  webdesign  web  layout  css  design  webapps  webdev  website  templates  portfolio  opensource  free  gallery  photography  portfolios  onlinetoolkit  freeware  artist  programming  internet  software  html  code  indexhibit 
january 2008 by robertogreco
Themes - Google Code
"iGoogle provides users with a personalized view of the web. You can leverage the themes API and tools to build themes about outer space, cartoons, dogs, or anything you can dream up, helping to further personalize iGoogle. This is your chance to redesign
api  igoogle  themes  reference  webdesign  development  design  code  google  webdev 
january 2008 by robertogreco
Toy Chest (Online or Downloadable Tools for Building Projects) - UCSB English Department Knowledge Base
"toys humanities students&others w/out programming skills can use to create interesting projects. Most...free or relatively inexpensive...books, essays, digital projects--that illustrate kinds of projects software thinking tools/toys might help create."
books  onlinetoolkit  collaboration  tools  education  humanities  thinking  freeware  download  computers  software  learning  reference  mapping  mashup  communication  community  research  online  teaching  technology  lists  internet  english  via:preoccupations  tcsnmy  visualization  data  code  humanitiescomputing  digitalhumanities 
january 2008 by robertogreco
abstractmachine » registerDraw()
"I’ve even started making classes inside of classes, so I don’t really want to be bothered with all that complexity once I’ve gotten it right. Processing is all about making code as simple as possible, non?"
processing  code  programming 
december 2007 by robertogreco
distellamap | ben fry
"Seeing the operation of code in Atari 2600 games. This is a dual reprise of my dismap and mariosoup pieces that look at the code of cartridge games, and how the graphics are mixed in."
code  coding  complexity  processing  programming  atari  graphics  flow  videogames  games  gaming  graphs  datavisualization 
november 2007 by robertogreco
mario soup
"This piece examines the unpacking of a Nintendo game cartridge, decoding the program as a four-color image, revealing a beautiful soup of the thousands of individual elements that make up the game screen."
gaming  games  graphics  information  nintendo  videogames  processing  programming  design  code  color 
november 2007 by robertogreco
traer.physics
"a particle system physics engine for processing. Just a simulation, it tells you where particles are and it's your job to draw them. No collisions, you can take care of them yourself if you want!"
processing  algorithms  animation  code  physics  programming  library  visualization  libraries 
november 2007 by robertogreco
Dare Obasanjo aka Carnage4Life - Facebook: The Social Graph Roach Motel
"When it comes to contact lists (i.e. the social graph), Facebook is a roach motel. Lots of information about user relationships goes in but there’s no way for users or applications to get it out easily. Whenever an application like FacebookSync comes a
socialgraph  api  applications  code  collaboration  communication  community  development  distributed  information  networking  networks  open  openid  people  portability  privacy  profile  socialnetworking  social  socialsoftware  socialnetworks  relationships  reputation 
september 2007 by robertogreco
zengestrom.com: Opening up the social graph
"People look for two qualities in this type of infrastructure provider: 1) critical mass and 2) ethics. It should appear stable enough that it's reasonable to expect it to stick around...and since we trust it with our data its intentions have to come acro
socialgraph  api  applications  code  collaboration  communication  community  development  information  networking  networks  open  openid  people  portability  privacy  profile  socialnetworking  social  socialsoftware  socialnetworks  relationships  reputation  facebook  jaiku  identity  standards  distributed  google  ambientintimacy  ambient  jyriengestrom 
september 2007 by robertogreco
Brad's Thoughts on the Social Graph
"People are getting sick of registering and re-declaring their friends on every site., but also: Developing "Social Applications" is too much work."
socialgraph  api  applications  code  collaboration  communication  community  development  distributed  information  networking  networks  open  openid  people  portability  privacy  profile  socialnetworking  social  socialsoftware  socialnetworks  relationships  reputation 
september 2007 by robertogreco
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