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robertogreco : codeofconduct   9

Unspoken Rules | Practical Theory
"I love using this clip as a way to spur people to think about the unspoken rules, policies and procedures that exist in schools.

[embedded video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=N16YkjFVAyE ]

The overwhelming majority of schools have a student handbook, codes of conduct, etc… but often, those are only the stated policies, and often, the unstated policies are as much what govern the school as anything else.

And while it’s my contention that we don’t want to create schools where every last behavior / idea / action is regulated by some 400 page handbook of student and teacher behavior, we also want to be aware of — and reflective about — the unspoken rules and practices of our schools. When we are, we create more intentional schools where the ideas and systems that power our communities are transparent and understood.

It’s worth noting, as well, another reason it is so very important to unpack unspoken policies. Schools live in the world – and that world is one where issues of racism, sexism, homophobia, ableism continue to do great harm. One very powerful way to combat the inequities of our world is through intentionality. When we examine the unspoken practices of our schools, we can unpack the questions, “Who is benefiting from this behavior? Who is harmed by it? And how can we ensure that the practices of our school are equitable?”

And, for me, this practice starts with adult behaviors and practices. It’s why I care so deeply about the relationship between a school’s mission and vision and the systems and structures that enable that mission. When mission and vision are shared and deeply understood and believed by everyone, and when the systems and structures that govern the school are aligned with that mission, then the practices – both those in the handbook and those that are not – can align and be understood by all.

There are ways to unpack the invisible or unspoken policies. Some questions a faculty can ask itself to spur the process:

• How are “everyday” decisions made at the school?
• Who is tapped to get work done when it falls outside the scope of an established job description?
• What voices are around the table when an issue arises?
• What is our first reaction to student behavioral issues?
• How are parents involved in the decisions of our school?
• Do we examine the mission of the school when we make big decisions? Small decisions?

And, inside the individual classroom, teachers can do this work as well with questions such as this (and these can be asked school-wide as well):

• How is the mission of the school made manifest in my class?
• Who does my grading policy benefit?
• How do students figure out how to succeed in my class?
• Why are the seats arranged in my classroom the way they are?
• Where is there space for students to influence the governance of my classroom?
• How does every student find space for their voice in my classroom?

And so on… I’m sure everyone can think of more questions to add to the list.

The purpose is that every school can be intentional in their process. We can unpack the unspoken (and spoken) rules such that we can create schools that more purposeful and more equitable in the ways in which they function."
chrislehmann  2016  schools  lcproject  vision  purpose  education  teaching  howweteach  rules  codeofconduct  studenthandbooks  behavior  power  community  communities  decisionmaking  voice  mission  grading  policy  grades  seating  governance  classrooms 
february 2016 by robertogreco
Building an inclusive culture | Vox Product Blog
"On the product team and throughout Vox Media, we've made a commitment to foster a welcoming, inclusive environment that's safe for people of all backgrounds, including historically underrepresented groups such as people of color, LGBTQ people, and women.

That's a big commitment. This year, the product team has started the work to formalize our hiring and interview processes to eliminate bias; established best practices for hiring and outreach in order to diversify our candidate pools; expanded a program of community events with a focus on inclusivity; formed a task group to identify harassment and abuse targeted at our staff and assess how we can help; and are exploring many other avenues, including participating in after school programs, identifying diverse conferences we can support and attend, and looking into training programs to educate our staff on topics around diversity.

And yet, we're only getting started.

In a recent newsletter, Deb Chachra defined her three laws of working towards diversity and inclusivity:

I. It is hard work.

II. You can never stop doing it.

III. You will definitely fuck up.

To which we'd add: you have to do it anyway, because it's right.

It's in that spirit that we have approached all the work we're undertaking with our diversity initiatives, including this one: we're sharing and open sourcing our product team code of conduct, both as a public commitment and in the hopes that other teams may find it inspirational or instructive.

You can find the code of conduct on GitHub at github.com/voxmedia/code-of-conduct. We anticipate it will evolve and grow with our team as well as with input from the community.

Many company diversity initiatives focus on hiring, an area we've also begun to work on. But hiring for diversity is worthless if it isn't followed up by a real commitment to inclusion: as the saying goes, it does not matter how good your pipeline is if it leads right into the sewer. Any work to improve the diversity of your job candidates needs to be met with equal or more effort towards ensuring that the culture they join is one that will unequivocally welcome them, learn from them, and adapt in response to their unique contributions.

Codes of conduct have been something of a hot topic in the tech community of late, with many people establishing them as litmus tests for industry events while others question their effectiveness. For our own purposes, we don't believe the sole purpose of a code of conduct is to prevent bad behavior: we've set very high standards for ourselves, and expect that many of us will, on occasion, fail to live up to them. In those situations, the code is useful not as a preventative but as a north star—an articulation of our values which we can use to reorient ourselves should we ever fall astray.

This code of conduct is undoubtedly imperfect—as any code will ever be. But we believe it to be a sincere representation of our hopes for our team and that to improve upon it we must first find a place to start. This is that place. Let's see where we can go from here."
mandybrown  codeofconduct  vox  voxmedia  diversity  feminism  2015  inclusivity  inclusion 
november 2015 by robertogreco
CODE OF CONDUCT - sfpc.hackpad.com
"Purpose:
Better articulate the values of the community and encourage collaboration within the space. We want to create a safe space for all SFPC members. 

For this conversation, we will collaboratively develop a Code of Conduct 
• What do we want to create? 
◦ community, interactive projects, 
◦ respectful communication 
▪ (being empathetic, listening)
▪ room for direct communication; honesty 
▪ Explicit/ Descriptive /   
▪ using constructive criticism - "be tough on ideas, not people"
◦ a shared experience
◦ Relationships of trust
◦ a space that celebrates making
• How do we make this an internationally welcoming environment?
◦ be patient, listen
◦ ask questions; be receptive to questions
◦ be conscious of your language
• Create a space where everyone's opinions are valid, no hesitation in asking questions, welcoming of all skillsets


Our suggestions:
• Work openly
◦ sharing, collaborative documents, transparency
◦ "what's said here stays here and what's learned here leaves here"
• Be generous
• What you put into this you will get out of it; full-time participation
• Speak with respect, assume the most respectful interpretation 
• Step up, step back

Principles of Conversation (via andrew zolli)
• Together we know more
• tough on ideas, gentle on people
• avoid jargon (unfamiliar language)
• threads beat points (making a thread, connect the dots)
• proceed with generosity

Unacceptable Behaviors:
• Violence, threats of violence or violent language directed against another person.
• Sexist, racist, homophobic, transphobic, ableist or otherwise discriminatory jokes and language.
• Posting or displaying sexually explicit or violent material nonconsensually. 2
• Personal insults, particularly those related to gender, sexual orientation, race, religion, or disability.
• Inappropriate physical contact. You should have someone’s consent before touching them.
• Unwelcome sexual attention. This includes, sexualized comments or jokes; inappropriate touching, groping, and unwelcomed sexual advances.
• Deliberate intimidation, stalking or following (online or in person).
• Advocating for, or encouraging, any of the above behavior.

Zach, Taeyoon, Allison, Casey and Tega are available to discuss any sort of unwelcome behavior and will work towards a resolution."
codeofconduct  sfpc  constructivecriticism  allisonburch  behavior  community  generosity  transparency  sharing  andrewzolli  communication  collaboration  honesty  relationships  trust  patience  listening  conversation  jargon  2015  schoolforpoeticcomputation 
march 2015 by robertogreco
Double Union | A hacker/maker space for women in San Francisco
"Base Assumptions

Things to keep in mind at Double Union

In discussions with one another, we’re all operating on the common ground that we "get" Feminism 101. For example, we assume that we all know "not all men" are like that — that when we talk about the bad behavior of one man, we all understand that this doesn’t suggest the non-existence of men who are not like that. This lets us not waste time repeating ourselves, and conversations go a lot more smoothly!

The space is explicitly not a place for people to come and ask Feminism 101 questions to their heart's content. We like to talk about feminism a lot, but not explaining that it is allowed to exist or that sexism exists to endless streams of dudebros.

We are also working on a list of "jokes we’ve heard before" that are banned in the space, for prominent display. For example, asking if Double Union’s existence is "reverse sexism" is totally a faux pas here!

Values you can assume other members strive for:

• “Women” includes trans women, not all women have uteri/XX chromosomes/etc.
• LGBTQ-supportive
• Majority of gender-associated differences are socialized, not biological
• Feminism is good
• Technocracy is wrong, meritocracy is a joke
• Intersectionality is super important
• Classism is not okay
• Prioritizing women and our needs is perfectly awesome and needs no excuse
• If you get called out on something, apologize and learn from it

Stuff that isn’t okay in this space:

• Taking "reverse sexism" seriously
• Using the phrase "politically correct" (in a way that is not 100% obviously ironic)
• Requests for feminism 101 education
• Playing devil’s advocate
• Taking away someone’s keyboard
• Questioning the existence of privilege
• Telling people how to do feminism right
• Touching people without explicit verbal consent
• Policing others' bodies or food choices"
doubleunion  via:caseygollan  codeofconduct  gender  feminism  classism  politicalcorrectness  privilege  ethics 
january 2015 by robertogreco
typelevel.scala | Code of Conduct
"Typelevel is dedicated to providing a harassment-free community for everyone, regardless of gender or anything to do with it (identity, history, expression, non-binary gender, etc.), sexual orientation, disability, physical appearance, body size, race, religion, and programming background. We do not tolerate harassment of community participants in any form, and sexual language and imagery is not appropriate for any community activity. Community participants violating these rules may be sanctioned or expelled from the community at the discretion of the community organizers.

Harassment includes offensive comments related to gender or anything to do with it (identity, history, expression, non-binary gender, etc.), sexual orientation, disability, physical appearance, body size, race, religion, programming experience or background, sexual images in public spaces, deliberate intimidation, stalking, following, harassing photography or recording, sustained disruption of community activities, spaces, or other events, inappropriate physical contact, and unwelcome sexual attention. Participants asked to stop any harassing behavior are expected to comply immediately.

All participants in the community and community-associated activities are also subject to the anti-harassment policy. In particular, participants and community organizers should not use sexualized images, activities, or other material.

If a participant engages in harassing behavior, the community organizers may take any action they deem appropriate, including warning the offender or expulsion from the community.

If you are being harassed, notice that someone else is being harassed, or have any other concerns, please contact a member of the community staff immediately. A contact address can be found here.

Community staff will be happy to help participants contact local law enforcement or otherwise assist those experiencing harassment to feel safe. We value your participation.

We expect participants to follow these rules at all community venues (including online venues) and social events associated with the community.

For any questions or with any concerns at all, please contact any member of community staff.

This CoC was adapted from haskellnow.org, which is inspired from Geek Feminism."
codeofconduct  typelevel  community  behavior 
october 2014 by robertogreco
Why You Want a Code of Conduct & How We Made One | Incisive.nu
"Now, this is all stuff that many others have said better than I have—see the big list of resources below for evidence. The thing I want to add is that the opportunity to define a code of conduct—to set clear behavioral and safety expectations—is an extraordinary opportunity.

I’m writing this in the late summer of 2014, and the last few weeks have been rough ones where I live. From the tech world’s routine accounts of casual harassment to the grind of violence and systemic unfairness that defines some part of every human society, we are surrounded on all sides by news that is alternately heartbreaking and enraging. And most of the time, in the face of these wrongs, we are helpless. Some of us can vote, some can investigate and expose. That’s often as far as it goes.

But to define a code of conduct is to formally state that your community—your event or organization or project—does not permit intimidation or harassment or any of the other terrible things that we can’t seem to prevent in the rest of the world. It’s to express and nurture healthy community norms. In a small, limited way, it’s to offer sanctuary to the vulnerable: to stake out a space you can touch, put it under your protection, and make it a welcoming home for all who act with respect.

And I think that’s what’s going to win. Enough of us clearly stating that in our spaces, this fuckery will not pass. And continuing to do it—one home, school, workplace, and community at a time—until the ground we cover with a mandate of mutual respect is larger than the gaps in between. Not out of any special benevolence, but because that’s what the world should be.

That’s enough to get me out of bed in the morning."
erinkissane  events  codeofconduct  ethics  community  2014  srccon  inclusion  safety  pocketsofresistance  planning  conferenceplanning  accessibility  behavior  conferences  howto  inclusivity  eventplanning  inlcusivity 
september 2014 by robertogreco
No more Computer Use Agreements | A Stick in the Sand
"I think the day of the computer use agreement is over.

Like most schools I know, my school, Mulgrave School in Vancouver, asked students sign a computer use agreement every year–this time of year actually. This was the document that spelled out what students could and couldn’t do with their devices either online or off. Two years ago we updated that–removed the thou-shalt-nots, gave it a more positive tone and called it a responsible use policy or RUA.

This year we tore it up.

Instead, we rolled the spirit of that document into the school’s general code of conduct. Technology is so tightly integrated into our day-to-day that we no longer make any distinction between teaching and learning offline or online. The digital space is just one of the places we work. And we expect everyone in our community to act decently wherever they are. That’s all there is to it."



"Mulgrave School has high academic, social and ethical standards. Students are expected to beindustrious, respectful and responsible citizens who support a safe, positive and caring learning environment. They are expected to exhibit good citizenship in the classroom and during all school-related activities; they are expected to be courteous and considerate towards all members of the community. The expectations that follow suggest the kind of community we wish to build for all who are associated with Mulgrave.

All members of the Mulgrave community are expected to demonstrate:

SAFETY

● We will keep ourselves and others safe.

RESPECT

● We will respect the rights and dignity of others and ourselves.
● We will respect the property of the school and others in our community.

RESPONSIBILITY

● We will take responsibility for our own behaviour, consistent with school and classroom guidelines.
● We will take responsibility for academic growth and honesty.
● We will take responsibility for knowing and maintaining uniform and appearance standards.

RESPONSIVENESS

● We will respond to each other in a caring and supportive way.

RESOURCEFULNESS

● We will strive to use our inner resources and the resources that exist around us for our own personal growth and for the greater good of our community

Students are subject to the school’s Code of Conduct while attending school and school related functions, while travelling to and from school or school activities, including while on the school bus and on field trips and expeditions such as Global Outreach trips and Outdoor Education trips.

The Code of Conduct may also apply to behaviour off school grounds when it affects the welfare of a member of the Mulgrave community and/or affects school life within our community. This would include, for example, field trips and expeditions such as Global Education Outreach (GEO) and Outdoor Education (OE) trips.

The Code of Conduct also applies to online behaviour including using email, SMS, and various social media, such as Facebook, YouTube and Twitter and web­ and cloud­based services such as Google Apps for Education. Mulgrave does not ask students to sign a separate Computer Use Agreement because it does not see our digital life and work as something distinct. It is very important that all members of the community understand our Code of Conduct. Students with questions or concerns about behaviour expectations should consult a teacher, counsellor or administrator."
acceptableuse  edtech  codeofconduct  technology  schools  behavior  2014  policies  acceptableusepolicies  online  internet  mulgraveschool  bradovenell-carter 
september 2014 by robertogreco
CODE OF CONDUCT - ISTE UNPLUGGED
"ISTEunplugged Code of Conduct

All attendees, speakers, sponsors and volunteers at our event are required to agree with the following code of conduct. Organizers will enforce this code throughout the event. We are expecting cooperation from all participants to help ensuring a safe environment for everybody.

tl;dr: Don’t be a Jerk

The Quick Version
Our event is dedicated to providing a harassment-free experience for everyone, regardless of gender, age, sexual orientation, disability, physical appearance, body size, race, or religion (or lack thereof). We do not tolerate harassment of participants in any form. Sexual language and imagery is not appropriate for any event venue, including talks, workshops, parties, Twitter and other online media. Event participants violating these rules may be sanctioned or expelled at the discretion of the conference organizers.

The Less Quick Version
Harassment includes offensive verbal comments related to gender, age, sexual orientation, disability, physical appearance, body size, race, religion, sexual images in public spaces, deliberate intimidation, stalking, following, harassing photography or recording, sustained disruption of talks or other events, inappropriate physical contact, and unwelcome sexual attention.

Participants asked to stop any harassing behavior are expected to comply immediately.

If a participant engages in harassing behavior, the conference organizers may take any action they deem appropriate, including warning the offender or expulsion from the event.

If you are being harassed, notice that someone else is being harassed, or have any other concerns, please contact a member of event staff immediately. We will help participants contact hotel/venue security or local law enforcement, provide escorts, or otherwise assist those experiencing harassment to feel safe for the duration of the event. We value your attendance.

We expect participants to follow these rules at any event venues and event-related social events."

[via: https://twitter.com/audreywatters/status/476386286580686848 ]
2014  isteunplugged  conduct  codeofconduct  harassment  behavior  via:audreywatters 
june 2014 by robertogreco
ARCHITECTURE and RESISTANCE « LEBBEUS WOODS
" RESISTANCE CHECKLIST:

Resist whatever seems inevitable.

Resist people who seem invincible.

Resist the embrace of those who have lost.

Resist the flattery of those who have won.

Resist any idea that contains the word algorithm.

Resist the idea that architecture is a building.

Resist the idea that architecture can save the world.

Resist the hope that you’ll get that big job.

Resist getting big jobs.

Resist the suggestion that you can only read Derrida in French.

Resist taking the path of least resistance.

Resist the influence of the appealing.

Resist the desire to make a design based on a piece of music.

Resist the growing conviction that They are right.

Resist the nagging feeling that They will win.

Resist the idea that you need a client to make architecture.

Resist the temptation to talk fast.

Resist anyone who asks you to design only the visible part.

Resist the idea that drawing by hand is passé.

Resist any assertion that the work of Frederick Kiesler is passé.

Resist buying an automobile of any kind.

Resist the impulse to open an office.

Resist believing that there is an answer to every question.

Resist believing that the result is the most important thing.

Resist the demand that you prove your ideas by building them.

Resist people who are satisfied.

Resist the idea that architects are master builders.

Resist accepting honors from those you do not respect.

Resist the panicky feeling that you are alone.

Resist hoping that next year will be better.

Resist the assertion that architecture is a service profession.

Resist the foregone conclusion that They have already won.

Resist the impulse to go back to square one.

Resist believing that there can be architecture without architects.

Resist accepting your fate.

Resist people who tell you to resist.

Resist the suggestion that you can do what you really want later.

Resist any idea that contains the word interface.

Resist the idea that architecture is an investment.

Resist the feeling that you should explain.

Resist the claim that history is concerned with the past.

Resist the innuendo that you must be cautious.

Resist the illusion that it is complete.

Resist the opinion that it was an accident.

Resist the judgement that it is only valid if you can do it again.

Resist believing that architecture is about designing things.

Resist the implications of security.

Resist writing what They wish you would write.

Resist assuming that the locus of power is elsewhere.

Resist believing that anyone knows what will actually happen.

Resist the accusation that you have missed the point.

Resist all claims on your autonomy.

Resist the indifference of adversaries.

Resist the ready acceptance of friends.

Resist the thought that life is simple, after all.

Resist the belated feeling that you should seek forgiveness.

Resist the desire to move to a different city.

Resist the notion that you should never compromise.

Resist any thought that contains the word should.

Resist the lessons of architecture that has already succeeded.

Resist the idea that architecture expresses something.

Resist the temptation to do it just one more time.

Resist the belief that architecture influences behavior.

Resist any idea that equates architecture and ownership.

Resist the tendency to repeat yourself.

Resist that feeling of utter exhaustion."
architecture  truisms  lebbeuswoods  2009  resistance  compromise  values  persistence  cv  codeofconduct  canon 
february 2013 by robertogreco

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