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robertogreco : commuting   49

A bike commute you wont believe - Tom Lutz - YouTube
"Tom Lutz works at Google’s Chelsea Market offices and enjoys an unusual commute, 20 miles daily, year-round from his home in Leonia, NJ. You see, Tom commutes by Brompton – and boat!

Visit http://www.brompton.com to learn more about Brompton

Every morning when the the wind and tide permit, he unfolds his Brompton, attaches a trailer towing a homemade folding boat and then rides to the base of the George Washington Bridge, where he launches his curious craft – folded Brompton and all – into the Hudson River. As the Manhattan skyline grows near, Tom – carried by the currents – explains his deep need to break from routine and capture a sense of adventure while living and working in one of the most urban of urban landscapes. Tom lands at a canoe slip, unfolds his Brompton and rides to his office, where he casually strolls through the door wearing his lifejacket, folded Brompton – and folded boat – in hand."
nyc  tomlutz  commuting  commutes  boats  bikes  biking  2018  classideas 
july 2018 by robertogreco
The Harsh Beauty and Banality of the 110-105 Interchange – L.A. TACO
[See also: https://www.instagram.com/110_105/ ]

"The 110-105 interchange holds a unique place in the psyche of Los Angeles. I’ve always called it The Cathedral, because it feels like you’re inside one when you’re driving under the towering, chapel-like crests of the ramps connecting the highways. The sounds of speeding engines in trucks and cars amplify against the network of massive concrete pillars sustaining the bridges, so it almost sounds like voices singing from a hymnal.

At all levels the thing is intense. Driving overhead, it almost feels like you’re about to fly through the sky into the downtown skyline when you’re changing from the 105 West to the 110 North. And way underneath, at traffic-lane level, for commuters using the Metro bus and rail transit hub to get around, the setting is stark: extreme noise, exposure to harmful exhaust, and views of encampments in the concrete shadows.

But there are also wondrous aspects to the interchange. Its history is an epic read shaped by a protagonist federal judge named Harry Pregerson, who eventually redefined the process of bringing a massive government works project to an economically depressed and dense urban area, like the South Figueroa Street corridor was in the 1970s. The interchange had starring roles in 1994’s Speed (when the bus leaps over a gap in an unfinished overpass) and last year’s La La Land (the big opening dance number). And for photographer Lindsey Mysse, who began to regularly use the 110-105 transit station on a commute, the interchange offered a window into a side of Los Angeles he never thought he’d get to know.

Mysse is an artist and software developer by day, and in his free-time a devoted documentarian of the interchange with the IG account 110_105. In it Mysse captures the light, colors, and faces he sees in the soaring chapel of the interchange.

I spoke to him recently over the phone about the project. Below is a sample of some of his photos.

All photos by Lindsey Mysse

L.A. TACO: Tell us how the project got started.

Mysse: The specific Instagram account started earlier this year. … Well, really what happened was that I had just come back from New York City, had been dumped by a girl, and my art career had kinda fallen apart. Everyone was pissed at me, and I just needed to get a real job.

I live in San Pedro and I got a job in El Segundo, so I started commuting from San Pedro to El Segundo — the bus, from San Pedro, to get on the Green Line to get to El Segundo — and it was just this ugly, ugly place to me. It represented a defeat in life. It felt like the world was making fun of me. It actually started as a joke. I’d check-in at the 105-110 freeway, and start taking photos of it …

What is this place like, for someone who hasn’t been to the transit station?

It’s very loud, it’s very dirty, because the cars: there’s just chain-link fence between you and the highway. But you also kinda have the people there, they’re just getting to their jobs, there’s that sort of day-to-day negotiation of, How you get around, right?

Last week the trains broke down — it’s the Green Line, the trains are always breaking down — people were negotiating, like, My boss is stricter than your boss, and so on, negotiating who could get on the train because the trains were packed. And it’s democracy in action. That’s how the city works.

It’s one of the most hostile places in L.A. to humans, isn’t it?

I think so. People live there, though, under the 110 and 105. I don’t photograph them, so they tend not to be in my photographs, but yeah, there are people that live there. You see the encampments, how they hide themselves, and it really is shocking. A lot of people drive and just stare straight ahead, and there’s this whole world along the edges.

I take photographs every time I am there … four to six times a week.

What did you end up liking about it?

It’s banality at a grand scale, which is what Los Angeles is all about. If that place is beautiful to you or not is determined by how you feel. It’s your projection on the place, which is very L.A., too. … It’s this blank canvas, and it’s a massive artifact to a way of life that isn’t very sustainable also.

The freeways. You learn so much about the city when you really study them, right?

You find that everywhere in L.A. but most people just filter it out. With something like 110-105, people just drive by and you don’t really contemplate it, what it is or what it means.

What did you learn about this place over time?

I started to pay attention to how the light would change everyday I was there. The colors would always be different. As you go through the year, you get there at different times of dawn or sunset, you get those Southern California sunrises and sunsets and all the colors and how they reflect off the concrete. It really becomes something intriguing to follow."
2017  losangeles  freeways  110  105  danielhernandez  instagram  commuting  transportation  metro  greenline  lindseymysse  photography 
december 2017 by robertogreco
The Future of Cities – Medium
[video (embedded): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xOOWk5yCMMs ]

"Organic Filmmaking and City Re-Imagining

What does “the future of cities” mean? To much of the developing world, it might be as simple as aspiring to having your own toilet, rather than sharing one with over 100 people. To a family in Detroit, it could mean having non-toxic drinking water. For planners and mayors, it’s about a lot of things — sustainability, economy, inclusivity, and resilience. Most of us can hope we can spend a little less time on our commutes to work and a little more time with our families. For a rich white dude up in a 50th floor penthouse, “the future of cities” might mean zipping around in a flying car while a robot jerks you off and a drone delivers your pizza. For many companies, the future of cities is simply about business and money, presented to us as buzzwords like “smart city” and “the city of tomorrow.”

I started shooting the “The Future of a Cities” as a collaboration with the The Nantucket Project, but it really took shape when hundreds of people around the world responded to a scrappy video I made asking for help.

Folks of all ages, from over 75 countries, volunteered their time, thoughts, work, and footage so that I could expand the scope of the piece and connect with more people in more cities. This strategy saved me time and money, but it also clarified the video’s purpose, which inspired me to put more energy into the project in order to get it right. I was reading Jan Gehl, Jane Jacobs, Edward Glaeser, etc. and getting excited about their ideas — after seeing what mattered to the people I met in person and watching contributions from those I didn’t, the video gained focus and perspective.

If I hired a production services outfit to help me film Mumbai, it would actually be a point of professional pride for the employees to deliver the Mumbai they think I want to see. If some young filmmakers offer to show me around their city and shoot with me for a day, we’re operating on another level, and a very different portrait of a city emerges. In the first scenario, my local collaborators get paid and I do my best to squeeze as much work out of the time period paid for as possible. In the second, the crew accepts more responsibility but gains ownership, hopefully leaving the experience feeling more empowered.

Architect and former mayor of Curitiba Jaime Lerner famously said “if you want creativity, take a zero off your budget. If you want sustainability, take off two zeros.” It’s been my experience that this sustainability often goes hand-in-hand with humanity, and part of what I love about working with less resources and money is that it forces you to treat people like human beings. Asking someone to work with less support or equipment, or to contribute more time for less money, requires a mutual understanding between two people. If each person can empathize for the other, it’s been my experience that we’ll feel it in the work — both in the process and on screen.

Organic filmmaking requires you to keep your crew small and your footprint light. You start filming with one idea in mind, but the idea changes each day as elements you could never have anticipated inform the bigger picture. You make adjustments and pursue new storylines. You edit a few scenes, see what’s working and what’s not, then write new scenes. Shoot those, cut them in, then go back and write more. Each part of the process talks to the other. The movie teaches itself to be a better movie. Because organic is complicated, it can be tricky to defend and difficult to scale up, but because it’s cheap and low-resource, it’s easier to experiment. Learning about the self-organizing, living cities that I did on this project informed how we made the video. And looking at poorly planned urban projects reminded me of the broken yet prevailing model for making independent film in the U.S., where so many films are bound to fail — often in a way a filmmaker doesn’t recover from — before they even begin.

Jane Jacobs said that “cities have the capability of providing something for everybody, only because, and only when, they are created by everybody.” I’ve worked on videos for companies, for the guy in the penthouse, for nobody in particular, in the developing world, with rich people and poor people, for me, for my friends, and for artists. I’m so thankful for everybody who allowed me to make this film the way we did, and I hope the parallels between filmmaking and city building — where the stakes are so much higher — aren’t lost on anyone trying to make their city a better place. We should all be involved. The most sustainable future is a future that includes us all.

“The Future of Cities” Reading List

(There’s a longer list I discovered recently from Planetizen HERE but these are the ones I got into on this project — I’m excited to read many more)

The Death and Life of American Cities by Jane Jacobs
The Triumph of the City: How Our Greatest Invention Makes Us Richer, Smarter, Greener, Healthier, and Happier by Edward Glaeser
Cities for People and Life Between Buildings by Jan Gehl
The Well-Tempered City: What Modern Science, Ancient Civilizations, and Human Nature Teach Us About the Future of Urban Life by Jonathan Rose(just came out — incredible)
Walkable City: How Downtown Can Save America, One Step at a Time by Jeff Speck
The City of Tomorrow: Sensors, Networks, Hackers, and the Future of Urban Life by Carlo Ratti and Matthew Claudel
Happy City: Transforming Our Lives Through Urban Design by Charles Montgomery
Dream Cities: Seven Urban Ideas That Shape the World by Wade Graham
Connectography: Mapping The Future of Global Civilization by Parag Khanna
Delirious New York by Rem Koolhaas
Low Life and The Other Paris by Luc Sante
A History of Future Cities by Daniel Brook
Streetfight: Handbook for the Urban Revolution by Janette Sadik-Khan and Seth Solomonow
Tactical Urbanism: Short-term Action for Long-Term Change by Mike Lydon & Anthony Garcia
Living In The Endless City, edited by Ricky Burdett and Deyan Sudjic

“The Future of Cities” Select Interviewees:
David Hertz & Sky Source
Vicky Chan & Avoid Obvious Architects
Carlo Ratti: Director, MIT Senseable City Lab Founding Partner, Carlo Ratti Associati
Edward Glaeser: Fred and Eleanor Glimp Professor of Economics, Harvard University Author of The Triumph of the City
Helle Søholt: Founding Parner & CEO, Gehl Architects
Ricky Burdett: Director, LSE Cities/Urban Age
Lauren Lockwood, Chief Digital Officer, City of Boston
Pablo Viejo: Smart Cities Expert & CTO V&V Innovations, Singapore
Matias Echanove & Urbz, Mumbai
Janette Sadik-Khan: Author, Advisor, & Former NYC DOT Commissioner
Abess Makki: CEO, City Insight
Dr. Parag Khanna: Author of Connectography
Stan Gale: CEO of Gale International, Developer of Songdo IBD
Dr. Jockin Arputham: President, Slum Dwellers International
Morton Kabell: Mayor for Technical & Environmental Affairs, Copenhagen
cities  urban  urbanplanning  urbanism  bikes  biking  cars  singapore  nyc  losangeles  janejacobs  jangehl  edwardglaeser  mumbai  tokyo  regulation  jaimelerner  curitiba  nantucketproject  carloratti  vickchan  davidhertz  hellesøholt  rickyburdett  laurenlockwood  pabloviejo  matiasechanove  urbz  janettesadik-khan  abessmakki  paragkhanna  stangale  jockinarputham  slumdwellersinternational  slums  mortonkabell  urbanization  future  planning  oscarboyson  mikelydon  anthonygarcia  danielbrook  lucsante  remkoolhaas  dayansudjic  rickyburdettsethsolomonow  wadegraham  charlesmontgomery  matthewclaudeljeffspeck  jonathanrose  transportation  publictransit  transit  housing  construction  development  local  small  grassroots  technology  internet  web  online  communications  infrastructure  services  copenhagen  sidewalks  pedestrians  sharing  filmmaking  film  video  taipei  seoul  santiago  aukland  songdo  sydney  london  nairobi  venice  shenzhen  2016  sustainability  environment  population  detroit  making  manufacturing  buildings  economics  commutes  commuting 
december 2016 by robertogreco
Four Million Commutes Reveal New U.S. 'Megaregions'
"As economic centers grow in size and importance, determining their boundaries has become more crucial. Where do you fall on the map?"
data  demographics  maps  transportation  visualization  mapping  us  megaregions  2016  cities  commuting 
december 2016 by robertogreco
Metafoundry 54: Nominative Determinism
"EPICYCLES:

[…]

Probably what I appreciate most about the holiday break is not commuting. When I started driving in suburban Boston, I almost immediately generated a working hypothesis about why dense urban areas tend to lean left politically and why suburban areas lean right (in my hometown of Toronto, there was a pronounced political divide between the city proper and the surrounding '905ers', named after the area code for the immediate suburbs). Living in a city teaches you that strangers can co-exist and even cooperate (like everyone standing aside to let subway passengers disembark, for example). But if you live in the suburbs, your primary interaction with strangers is almost certainly in your car, and cars are sociopathy machines: people do many things in cars (like cut into a line) that they would never do on foot. Driving in the suburbs sends the message that, given the opportunity, a significant fraction of people put their own interests first regardless of the effect on others, so it doesn't seem like a big step to deciding that you need political systems that do similarly to ensure that you don't lose out to the people around you. Whereas living in cities, especially ones with good public transit, make it clear that strangers can work together and that homophily is not a requirement for everyone to benefit from shared resources; hence, left-wing. Getting a few days' break from driving definitely helps me with that seasonal 'good will towards one and all' thing. [While we're into amateur theories of political sociology, I'm a fan of the zombie apocalypse vs utopian future [http://slatestarcodex.com/2013/03/04/a-thrivesurvive-theory-of-the-political-spectrum/ ] dichotomy.]

ON FRIENDSHIPS, SOCIAL MEDIA, AND HOUSING: Speaking of the suburbs, I was struck by this article [http://www.vox.com/2015/10/28/9622920/housing-adult-friendship ] on how American choices in land use affect their ability of adults to make and maintain friendships: the norms of single-family homes and driving mean that social interactions need to be deliberately scheduled (or, in many sad cases, not scheduled). The evidence is that there are two key requirements for friendships to form: repeated, spontaneous interactions, and an environment where people can confide in each other. There's been a lot of discussion in my circles recently about the modes and affordances of social media sites, and a quiet exodus from public Twitter to small private accounts, or to Slack, or to mailing lists, or to, yes, newsletters. For many of us, Twitter was--and remains--an excellent place for those repeated, spontaneous interactions. But it's shifted from the 'small world growth phase' [http://hlwiki.slais.ubc.ca/index.php/File:SNSPrivacy.png ] to one where our experience is dominated by context collapse [http://hlwiki.slais.ubc.ca/index.php/Context_collapse_in_social_media ]. It's therefore no longer a safe environment for that second component of a nascent friendship, sharing with others, as the norms of civil inattention [https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Civil_inattention ] fail to keep pace with the site's phenomenal growth (This was most memorably demonstrated to me when a well-known author and speaker jumped into a conversation that a friend of mine and I were having about relationships to inform us--and the rest of his many followers--that 'women like bad boys'. Welp.) So this type of trust-building personal sharing is moving to more private fora. In my case, because I travel a fair bit, that includes the offline world. This use of Twitter and travel probably goes a long way to explaining why I'm an outlier in that, while I have a few good friends that I made in and kept from my teens and early twenties, I also have a number of very close friends that I've made in the last five years or so (the second major reason is likely because I do live in a dense urban walkshed where I run into friends spontaneously, in a city that draws out-of-town friends to visit). But I'm interested in seeing how people use different types of social media differently in the near future."
debchachra  2016  friendship  socialmedia  twitter  cities  cars  suburbs  sociopathy  housing  thewaywelive  urban  urbanism  toronto  boston  commuting  sociology  politicalsociology  suburbia 
january 2016 by robertogreco
How our cars, our neighborhoods, and our schools are pulling us apart - The Washington Post
"Americans are pulling apart. We're pulling apart from each other in general. And, in particular, we're pulling apart from people who differ from us.

The evidence on this idea is varied, broad and often weird.

We are, as Robert Putnam famously put it, less likely to join community bowling leagues.

We're more likely, as I mentioned yesterday after a police confrontation with a group of black teens at a private swimming pool, to swim in seclusion, in gated community clubs and back-yard pools that have taken the place of public pools.

We're more likely to spend time isolated in our cars, making what was historically a communal experience — the commute to work — a private one. In 1960, 63 percent of American commuters got to work in a private car.

Now, 85 percent of us do. And three-quarters of us are riding in that car alone.

Within large metropolitan areas, we live more spread out, more distant, from each other than we once did. The population density in central cities plummeted by half after the 1950s, as many residents left for the suburbs.

As a result, writes economist Joseph Cortright in a new City Observatory report, in metropolitan America we now have fewer neighbors, on average, and we live farther from them than we did five decades ago.

It's little wonder, then, that we now socialize with them less often, too.

Add up all of these seemingly disconnected facts, and here you are: "There is compelling evidence," Cortright writes in the new report, "that the connective tissue that binds us together is coming apart."

The shared experiences and communal spaces where our lives intersect — even if just for a ride to a work, or a monthly PTA meeting — have grown seemingly more sparse. And all of this isolation means that the wealthy have little idea what the lives of the poor look like, that people who count on private resources shy away from spending on public ones, that misconceptions about groups unlike ourselves are broadly held.

Cortright's underlying point is the same as Putnam's 20 years ago. We're receding from the public realm in ways that could undermine communities and the will that arises when people within them know and trust each other.

We're even living further apart from each other within our own homes. As our houses have gotten bigger — and the size of the average household has declined — we're a lot less likely today in America to share bedrooms.A particularly curious data point Cortright unearths: In 1960, 3.5 percent of U.S. households lived in a home where bedrooms outnumbered occupants. Today, 44 percent of households do.

Here's another: We no longer even share the same experience of public safety. In the 1970s, Cortright points out that there were about 40 percent more private security officers in this country than public law enforcement officers. By the 1990s, there were twice as many. And their presence — monitoring gated communities, private clubs, quasi-public spaces like shopping malls — marks a kind of "anti-social capital." It implies that private guards must manage communities where that missing "connective tissue" can't.

When we retreat into these private spaces and separate enclaves, now increasingly sorted by income, too, we have less and less in common. And when we have little left in common, it's hard to imagine how we'll agree on fixes to big problems, or how we'll empathize with the people touched by them.

This familiar argument is particularly relevant now to many of the bitter debates we're having around racial unrest and even poverty. If rich and poor, black and white, don't share the same commons — if they attend separate schools, live in separate neighborhoods, swim in separate pools, rely on separate transportation — then there's little reason for them to mutually invest in any of these resources.

Historically in American cities, the ghetto didn't just separate black homes from white ones. It ensured that the rest of the city would never share in the concerns — shoddy trash pickup, weak policing, meager public investments — of the people who lived there.

The relationships that run between social capital, trust and the public realm, as Cortright writes, are complicated (likely even more so by modern technology). But they feel tremendously relevant today.

"Arguably," he writes, "the decline in social capital is both a cause and an effect of the decline of the public realm: people exhibit less trust because they have fewer interactions; we have fewer interactions, so we have lower levels of trust and less willingness to invest in the public realm that supports it.""
segregation  us  cities  urbanism  urban  cars  transportation  schools  education  2015  emilybadger  robertputnam  race  class  commuting  josephcortright  neighborhoods  community  communitities  isolation  trust  publiccommons  gatedcommunities  social  capitalism  security  lawenforcement  income 
june 2015 by robertogreco
Commuting with Invisible Disability: An NYCSeatShare Idea — Medium
"The lightbulb moment came when it occurred to me that there actually should be an NYCSeatShare badge, but it shouldn’t be worn by those who need a seat. The NYCSeatShare badge should be worn by those who will gladly give their seat up. The badge serves as a promise that if someone needs and asks for a seat, they will be given one. No questions asked.

To be successful, the NYCSeatShare badge will still need to be covetable and beautiful so that SeatSharers will want to wear them. SeatSharers will take pride in the freedom they will be providing to those who need it most. And best of all, for the person with the invisible illness, the person feeling a little flu like, or the person who is struggling with pain, all it will take is a quick nod or a glance at the pin to get your needs met. This interaction could be done on a crowded subway without anyone else even taking notice, it may not even require an exchange of words.

The NYCSeatShare badge will be a token both of fashion and inclusive thought, of understanding. It doesn’t need to be large, but it must be universal in design so that a person can scan a train to see if someone is wearing it. Also it needs to look just as good on a cashmere coat or blazer as it does on a gym or school bag.

The logo will be reinforced through repetition. I imagine stickers on the back of handicapped seating and I dream of an MTA advertising campaign. But most importantly, the NYCSeatShare badge must be affordable. The beauty and message of the badge will make it a status symbol, the affordability will assure that the status isn’t one’s financial acuity but their willingness to give. Perhaps various designers could be given permission to use the logo on a variety of products.

So here’s what NYCSeatShare needs.

NYCSeatShare needs the support of local politicians. I’ll be reaching to the Mayors Office for People with Disabilities as well as Senator David Carlucci and Assemblywoman Sandy Galef who made New York State the first state to update the traditional handicapped sign with the more inspiring and inclusive Accessible Icon.

NYCSeatShare needs approval of the MTA. This means I’ll be reaching out to the board.

NYCSeatShare needs the skills of a world class fashion designer. Where else is the NYCSeatShare logo and badge going to come from?

NYCSeatShare needs the backing of a local hospital. Both doctors and patients can help inform one another about the program. Also, it would be amazing if the Center for Independent Living hopped on board.

NYCSeatShare would also benefit from the support of every affected Society, Association and Foundation. Some of the first that come to mind are the MS Society, the Invisible Disabilities Association, and American Heart and Lung Associations, and the Lupus and Arthritis Foundations, etc. Is it possible for a handful of organizations to band together to make this idea come to life?

I don’t expect anything to happen overnight, but I am dedicated and would love your support. I’ll be updating when and if there are updates. If you have thoughts, ideas or if you know really important people, you can reach me at thegirlwiththepurplecane [at] gmail."
lizjacson  disability  invisibility  disabilities  commuting  2015  via:ablerism  ableism  nyc  nycseatshare  communication  signaling  visibility 
march 2015 by robertogreco
Bringing Kids to School by Peter Biľak (Works That Work magazine)
"Taking children to school is a normal part of everyday life for millions of people, yet the details of this routine vary widely according to location, weather, public transportation options and local traditions. We sent four photographers to four different locations to document the way parents take their kids to school."
schools  transportation  children  peterbiľak  commuting  education  learning  travel  international 
january 2015 by robertogreco
Cities in motion: why Mumbai's new air terminal has gone off the rails | Cities | theguardian.com
"The difference between the two terminuses demonstrates just what's going wrong with Mumbai. After two decades of economic liberalisation, its middle class has been so brainwashed into believing privatisation is the solution for all their problems that the city seems to have forgotten what public actually means. As art historian Rahul D'Souza points out: "Richer residents are quite willing to accept the idea that an art exhibition can be public, even if it can accessed only by people who have bought an international air ticket." This attitude will surely have a profound effect on Mumbai's politics in the near future.

The middle-class aspiration for exclusivity is a jarring disjuncture with the mythology and history of a city that lives the best part of its life in full view of its neighbours, with one of the highest population densities in the world (it packs 22,937 people into each square kilometre, compared to 5,285 people in London). The size of the average Mumbai family is 4.5 people, and the average home size is 10 square metres, so some of their most private moments transpire in the midst of a crowd.

Much of Mumbai's easy urbanity has been forged in the sweaty confines of its public transport system, by far the most extensive in India. In its compartments, people of different castes and communities are forced to share benches and be wedged together in positions of daring intimacy. This is only to be expected when 5,000 commuters are stuffed into trains built to carry 1,800 – a density that the authorities describe as the "super-dense crushload". The commonplace negotiations of the commute – such as the convention of allowing a fourth traveller to sit on a bench built for three, but only on one buttock – force an acknowledgement of other people's needs that characterises Mumbai life.

The Mumbai commute, in addition to being compacted, is very long – for some, it could involve a journey of two hours each way. This has given rise to the institution of "train friends", people who travel in a group in the same section of the same compartment every morning, sharing stories of their triumphs and disappointments and even celebrating their birthdays by bringing in sweets for their companions.

Despite the enormous effort they sometimes entail, the accommodations of the commute are barely perceptible to the outsider. Because of the unavoidable press of bodies at peak hours, women travel in separate carriages – but every so often, couples who cannot bear to be parted or a clueless out-of-town pair will blunder into the "general compartment". When this happens, the other men will strain to provide the woman a millimetre or two of space around her, creating a cocoon in which she is magically insulated from the accidental nudge of limbs and torsos.

This isn't to suggest that life on the rails is all smiles and sunshine. As is to be expected on a long, sweaty journey, arguments do break out, mostly over trivial matters involving the placement of a limb or a bag in awkward proximity to a fellow passenger's face. But these exchanges rarely culminate in fisticuffs. The crowd around the belligerents can be counted on to defuse the tension quickly, usually with the remark, "These things happen. You have to adjust".

Sadly, though, the spirit of compromise so evident on the trains is evaporating on the streets outside. To watch Mumbai traffic in motion is to see the ferocious sense of entitlement in which India's moneyed classes have wrapped themselves. Mumbai's vehicles refuse to give way to ambulances, and honk furiously at old people and schoolchildren trying to cross the street. They never stops at zebra crossings, frequently jump red lights, and routinely come down the wrong way on no-entry streets. Because an estimated 60% of cars are driven by chauffers, more than in most other parts of the world, car owners have the fig-leaf of pretending that they aren't responsible for transgressions they actually encourage. And this sense of self-importance is pandered to by the government's budgetary allocations. Though the vast majority of Mumbai residents use the overburdened public transport system to get around, a disproportionate amount of development money has been poured into road projects.

The city has built approximately 60 flyovers and elevated roadways in recent years – facilities that have paradoxically made the congestion on the roads far worse. As incomes expand, traffic is growing at a rate of 9% a year, with an estimated 450 new vehicles being added to Mumbai's narrow streets every day. As a result, peak-hour traffic crawls ahead at an average of 10kmh – less than half the speed clocked by winners of the city's annual marathon. It merely proves the adage so beloved of planners around the world: "Building more roads to prevent traffic congestion is like a fat man loosening his belt to prevent obesity."

The imbalance so apparent between Mumbai's transport system and its airport seem sure to polarise political attitudes in the city even more sharply. The city's middle classes have become so enamoured of their privatised comforts, they are forgetting that great cities get their reputation not from the access-restricted pleasures they afford the few, but the public amenities that are available to all. The chasm between the elite and the working classes has long been the playground for populist politicians, here and elsewhere. But over the last few years, such divisions in Mumbai have literally been reinforced by concrete. Unless this changes, my city will lose the common ground on which to make common cause."
2014  mumbai  publictransportation  publictransit  transportation  privatization  publicspace  cities  urbanism  urban  nareshfernandes  commuting  class  segregation  exclusivity  community 
february 2014 by robertogreco
Google cars versus public transit: the US’s problem with public goods | ... My heart’s in Accra
"There’s something very odd about a world in which it’s easier to imagine a futuristic technology that doesn’t exist outside of lab tests than to envision expansion of a technology that’s in wide use around the world. How did we reach a state in America where highly speculative technologies, backed by private companies, are seen as a plausible future while routine, ordinary technologies backed by governments are seen as unrealistic and impossible?

The irony of the Google car for my circumstances is that it would be inferior in every way to a train. A semi-autonomous car might let me read or relax behind the wheel, but it would be little faster than my existing commute and as sensitive to traffic, which is the main factor that makes some trips 2.5 hours and some 4 hours. Even if my Google car is a gas-sipping Prius or a plug-in hybrid, it will be less energy efficient than a train, which achieves giant economies of scale in fuel usage even at higher speeds than individual vehicles. It keeps me sealed in my private compartment, rather than giving me an opportunity to see friends who make the same trip or meet new people.

There’s a logical response to my whiny demands for an easier commute: if there were a market for such a service, surely such a thing would exist. And if train service can’t be profitably provided between Pittsfield and Boston, why should Massachusetts taxpayers foot the bill for making my life marginally easier?

This line of reasoning became popular in the US during the Reagan/Thatcher revolution and has remained influential ever since. What government services can be privatized should be, and government dollars should go only towards services, like defense, that we can’t pay for in private markets. As the US postal service has reminded us recently, they remain open during the government shutdown because they are mandated by Congress to be revenue neutral. Ditto for Amtrak, which subsidizes money-losing long distance routes with profitable New England services and covers 88% of expenses through revenue, not through government support. Our obsession with privatization is so thorough in the US that we had no meaningful debate in the US about single payer healthcare, a system that would likely be far cheaper and more efficient than the commercial health insurance mandated under the Affordable Care Act – even when governments provide services more efficiently than private markets, the current orthodoxy dictates that private market solutions are the way to go.

The problem with private market solutions is that they often achieve a lower level of efficiency than public solutions. Medicare has tremendous power to negotiate with drug manufacturers, which brings down healthcare costs. Private insurers have less leverage, and we all pay higher prices for drugs as a result, especially those whose healthcare isn’t paid for my a government or private organization and who have no negotiating power. The current system works very well for drug companies, but poorly for anyone who needs and uses healthcare (which is to say, for virtually everyone.)"



"This unwillingness to consider the creation of new public goods restricts the solution space we consider. We look for solutions to the crisis in journalism but aren’t willing to consider national license models like the one that supports the BBC, or strong, funded national broadcasters like NHK or Deutsche Welle. We build markets to match consumers with health insurance but won’t consider expanding Medicare into a single-payer health system. We look towards MOOCs and underpaid lecturers rather than considering fundamental reforms to the structure of state universities. We consider a narrow range of options and complain when we find only lousy solutions."
government  infrastructure  politics  rail  transportation  ethanzuckerman  trains  googlecars  cars  self-drivingcras  2013  publicgoods  commuting  privatization  crowdfunding 
january 2014 by robertogreco
commutingandcommuning
"he New York City Subway is an city unto itself with 24 train lines and 468 train stations serving more than 5.3 million people each weekday (MTA Authority). The subway both alienates and unites. It inspires and it aggrevates. It is a district of paradoxes.

The Museums and the Network class at Pratt Institute, explores several facets of the act of commuting on the NYC subway. As part of the course, we have organized an exhibition that explores the subway's sights and sounds, the interactions that occur with people as well as objects and the virtual communities that come together as a result of their commuter experience.

This tumblr page serves as both a repository for the items featured in the exhibition as well as a forum to discuss subway musings and experiences. We hope not only to provide a virtual catalog but to encourage exploration and conversations. Please share with us!"
cities  infrastructure  nyc  subways  mta  museums  museumsandthenetwork  networks  commuting  sebchan 
december 2013 by robertogreco
The City from the Valley, 2012 | Stamen Design
"Fundamental shifts are underway in the relationship between San Francisco and Silicon Valley.

Historically, workers have lived in residential suburbs while commuting to work in the city. For Silicon Valley, however, the situation is reversed: many of the largest technology companies are based in suburbs, but look to recruit younger knowledge workers who are more likely to dwell in the city. An alternate transportation network of private buses—fully equipped with wifi—thus threads daily through San Francisco, picking up workers at unmarked bus stops (though many coexist in digital space), carrying them southward via the commuter lanes of the 101 and 280 freeways, and eventually delivers them to their campuses.

What does this flow tell us about Silicon Valley, and the City it feeds?"
privatebuslines  privatebuses  process  walkingpapers  observation  shuttles  googleshuttles  movement  commuting  alternatetransportationnetwork  buses  design  siliconvalley  transit  transportation  mapping  maps  2012  stamen  stamendesign 
september 2012 by robertogreco
Samuel Beckett Used to Drive Andre the Giant to School | Geekosystem
"Samuel Beckett, Nobel Prize winner (literature) and esteemed playwright, probably most noted for Waiting for Godot, bought some land in 1953 near a hamlet around forty miles northeast of Paris and built a cottage for himself with the help of some locals. One of the locals that helped him build the cottage was a Bulgarian-born farmer named Boris Rousimoff, who Beckett befriended and would sometimes play cards with. As you might’ve been able to guess, Rousimoff’s son was André the Giant, and when Beckett found out that Rousimoff was having trouble getting his son to school, Beckett offered to drive André to school in his truck — a vehicle that could fit André — to repay Rousimoff for helping to build Beckett’s cottage. Adorably, when André recounted the drives with Beckett, he revealed they rarely talked about anything other than cricket."
unlikelypairs  folklore  carcommuting  commuting  trivia  cricket  samuelbeckett  andrethegiant 
february 2012 by robertogreco
Copenhagen's novel problem: too many cyclists | Amelia Hill | Environment | guardian.co.uk
"Can there be too many bikes in a city for safety? It's not a question usually asked: the received wisdom, supported by research and backed by campaigning groups, is that the more cyclists there are, the safer the roads become for everyone.

But in Copenhagen – one of the most bike-friendly cities in the world in which 36% of its inhabitants cycle to work or school, and which has committed to increasing that figure to 50% by 2015 – there are controversial voices coming from unexpected places.

According to the Danish Cyclists' Federation and Wonderful Copenhagen, the official tourism organisation for Denmark, the sheer success of the drive to get more locals and tourists on bikes is creating a dangerous, intimidating and unpleasant climate for cyclists in the city."
bikes  biking  denmark  copenhagen  transportation  commuting  urban  urbanism  cities  policy  bikelanes  2011 
september 2011 by robertogreco
Long commutes cause obesity, neck pain, loneliness, divorce, stress, and insomnia. - By Annie Lowrey - Slate Magazine
"It is commuting, not the total length of the workday, that matters, he found. Take a worker w/ a negligible commute & a 12-hour workday & a worker with an hourlong commute and a 10-hour workday. The former will have healthier habits than the latter, even though total time spent on the relatively stressful, unpleasant tasks is equal…

So, in summary: We hate commuting. It correlates with an increased risk of obesity, divorce, neck pain, stress, worry, and sleeplessness. It makes us eat worse and exercise less. Yet, we keep on doing it…

…Isn't the big house & the time to listen to the whole Dylan catalog worth something as well? Sure, researchers say, but not enough when it comes to the elusive metric of happiness. Given the choice between that cramped apartment and the big house, we focus on the tangible gains offered by the latter. We can see that extra bedroom. …we forget that additional time in the car is a constant, persistent, daily burden—if a relatively invisible one."
culture  science  economics  psychology  commuting  time  money  perception  tangibles  intangibles  work  health  happiness  well-being 
may 2011 by robertogreco
Delicious (I) - Preoccupations
"I’ve been more struck in the last few months with how I’m storing material up in Instapaper, going back to it, archiving things that once I would have bookmarked straightaway in Delicious, ruminating over others and then, finally, sending myself an email reminder to bookmark X later. And later frequently, now, means Saturday — when I have the time to deal with what has become a sizeable backlog. More filtering happens at that stage, too.

Delicious (backed up locally and in Pinboard) has assumed a different role in my life. No longer the bank of preference for instant notes, it’s where I’m putting things that I’ve generally sifted or gone back to (sometimes a number of times)… I’m much more interested now, much more able now, to use Delicious as a repository for things which I’ve had the time, and the perspective, to weigh.

All of which makes Delicious, or something like it, even more important. And I haven’t even begun to talk about the network."
davidsmith  del.icio.us  pinboard  networks  bookmarks  bookmarking  reading  instapaper  community  commuting  attention  memory  commonplacebooks  blogs  digitallife  ipad  timeshifting  timeshiftedreading 
january 2011 by robertogreco
How Mobile Devices Could Lead to More City Living - Science and Tech - The Atlantic
"mobile devices tapping on wireless networks can exert a powerful social influence, as we've all noticed. They could help tip the scales towards denser city living, or at least shorter commutes, for the wired workforce."
alexismadrigal  transmobility  cars  commuting  masstransit  density  cities  urban  urbanism  mobile  phones  mobiledevices  transportation  media  technology 
august 2010 by robertogreco
Joel Kyack (MFA '08) launches Superclogger, large-scale public project presented by LA><ART - Roski School of Fine Arts
"Joel Kyack's (MFA '08) first large-scale public project, Superclogger, will present various puppet shows to L.A. drivers caught in afternoon traffic jams from a mobile theater housed in the back of a nondescript white pickup truck. Broadcasting soundtracks discretely to the viewer's car stereo, Superclogger, curated by Cesar Garcia (MPAS '09), aims to briefly halt the progression of chaos by temporarily drawing the audience out of the commute experience and placing them within an intimate space of engagement and performance that highlights their own individual presence within the broader structure of the traffic jam."

[via: http://www.clusterflock.org/2010/06/superclogger.html ]
art  california  cars  traffic  losangeles  puppets  theater  cesargarcia  commuting  joelkyack 
june 2010 by robertogreco
Commuting : The Frontal Cortex
"David Brooks, summarizing the current state of happiness research: "The daily activity most injurious to happiness is commuting. According to one study, being married produces a psychic gain equivalent to more than $100,000 a year." In other words, the best way to make yourself happy is to have a short commute and get married. I'm afraid science can't tell us very much about marriage so let's talk about commuting. A few years ago, the Swiss economists Bruno Frey and Alois Stutzer announced the discovery of a new human foible, which they called "the commuters paradox". They found that, when people are choosing where to live, they consistently underestimate the pain of a long commute. This leads people to mistakenly believe that the big house in the exurbs will make them happier, even though it might force them to drive an additional hour to work."
commuting  happiness  davidbrooks  housing  urbanplanning  suburbia  marriage  neuroscience  jonahlehrer  behavior  cars  driving  psychology  estimation  planning  urban  urbanism  transportation  traffic  suburbs  lifestyle  living  satisfaction 
april 2010 by robertogreco
Bicycle Cargo. Chapter 1: Racks And Bags (revised) : TreeHugger
"Bicycles are, as we keep telling our readers ad nausem, the most efficient means of transport humankind has ever devised. Mostly people take that to mean in the transportation of people. But what might have gone unnoticed by many was that bikes are not only brilliant for commuting, recreation or racing, they are also excellent at hauling cargo." Continues here: http://www.treehugger.com/files/2009/08/bicycle-cargo-chapter-one-racks-and-bags.php?page=2
bikes  commuting  biking  bags  racks  cargo 
november 2009 by robertogreco
British Cycling's Guide to Commuting: How to Commute Part 3 - What to wear?
"Travel at a slow pace, wear normal clothes and dress about 10 degrees colder than you would if you were driving and you'll be just fine. If you ride slowly, you'll sweat less, meaning that you'll save valuable time at the end of your journey when the proto-racers are getting changed. Swings and roundabouts, as they say.
bikes  biking  commuting 
july 2009 by robertogreco
Fixed-gear rider or granny-bike dawdler: who will win the race? | Matthew Sparkes | Environment | guardian.co.uk
"A few miles later and everyone crossed the finish line in varying states of disarray. Fixed-gear rider was first, but sweaty enough to star in a Lynx commercial; hybrid commuter next and only slightly less moist. Last place on the podium went to road-bike racer, who was in need of a shower and a trip to the office first aid box before starting his working day.
bikes  biking  slow  fixedgear  sustainability  culture  commuting  via:migurski 
july 2009 by robertogreco
Slugging
"Slugging is a self-organized carpooling system in the Washington D.C. area that developed in the early 70s."
slugging  carpooling  washingtondc  bayarea  sanfrancisco  casualcarpooling  transportation  commuting  alternative  cars  kottke  carpool  dc 
february 2009 by robertogreco
GOOD » Superb Idea: Bike Lane That Travels With You»
"The system projects a virtual bike lane (using lasers!) on the ground around the cyclists, providing drivers with a recognizable boundary they can easily avoid. The idea is to allow riders to take safety into their own hands, rather than leaving it to the city. And just in case you need to be convinced about the need for better cycle safety, watch this video about the stupidest bike lane in America."
bikes  gadgets  commuting  safety  lights  bikelanes  streets 
january 2009 by robertogreco
Bike Hugger · Tax Break for Employers of Bike Commuters
"The $700 bazillion Wall Street bailout package has just one tiny thing that any cyclist should be pleased about. There is a $20/month tax break for employers for each bike commuter employee as an incentive for companies to reduce petrol consumption and infrastructure demands.
bikes  policy  incentives  green  commuting  tcsnmy  taxes  sustainability 
october 2008 by robertogreco
metacool: My new car is a...
"I think black bikes with fenders are like wearing Timberland boots in a world of Blahniks -- the durable, practical,sensible choice. That happens to also look killer in its own way. Is the commuter bike the new Prius? Yes."
bikes  commuting  trends  transportation  bikeoptions 
july 2008 by robertogreco
NuRide - the Rewarding Way to Go
"online ridesharing community where you can find friends and neighbors going your way, share a ride whenever you like, and earn rewards from local and national sponsors."
commuting  community  sharing  ridesharing  transportation  environment  carpool  traffic  carpooling  transit 
july 2008 by robertogreco
GoLoco
"GoLoco is a service that helps people and communities create their own personal public transportation network. Your cars, your friends, your trips, your expenses -- GoLoco puts them all together for a seamless way to share travel and expenses."
travel  transportation  community  carpool  commuting  ridesharing  sustainability  driving  environment  zipcar  carpooling 
july 2008 by robertogreco
How to hitch a ride on the Web | csmonitor.com
"Ride-sharing sites take a page from Facebook to match riders with rides."
transportation  sustainability  commuting  online  tools  networks  ridesharing  cars 
july 2008 by robertogreco
Bikestation [via: http://www.springwise.com/transportation/urban_bike_stations/]
"Bikestation is a not-for-profit organization that offers secure bicycle parking and related services to make cyclists' lives easier. Park your bike at one of our facilities and you can be assured that your vehicle is secure and covered. "
bikes  storage  activism  us  seattle  washingtonstate  losangeles  california  sustainability  transportation  commuting 
june 2008 by robertogreco
RideLink - Commuter Services - Biking
"RideLink is here to make sure that you know how to be safe, where to ride, and where you can go for help. Even if you’re just getting started, RideLink can help you turn biking for recreation into biking for transportation."
bikes  commuting  sandiego  transportation 
june 2008 by robertogreco
Mundo Utility Bikes: affordable bikes to carry cargo and to transport stuff by bike for sustainable transportation
"The Mundo Utility Bike is designed to promote affordable, scaleable transportation for cargo and people, particularly for developing parts of the world that rely heavily on human-powered mobility in rugged conditions. Of course, it works just as well car
bikes  commuting  utility  cargo  longtails  bikeoptions  mobility  transport  longtail 
april 2008 by robertogreco
Marginal Revolution: How to choose an apartment
Tyler Cowen answers a reader question and solicits comments: "So, readers, when we are looking for an apartment, what is the bias we are most likely to have?
economics  happiness  life  realestate  apartments  renting  homes  psychology  lifehacks  commuting  transportation  mobility  neo-nomads  nomads  time 
april 2008 by robertogreco
Space & Culture » Blog Archive » Neo-Geo and the Mapping of Non-Motorized Transport
"The responsibility, then, falls to we cyclists to take matters (and maps) into our own hands. Nicole Freedman, Boston’s first bike czar, has done that with the help of the cycling community and Google Maps."
bikes  commuting  transportation  activism  urban  urbanism  maps  mapping 
march 2008 by robertogreco
Bike Hugger · A Bike to Work Book
"It’s a quick read and perfect to hand to your co-workers or friends that ask about your commute, urban cycling, and how to do it."
bikes  commuting  books 
march 2008 by robertogreco
I (heart) Public Space: "We make the city and the city makes us" --<em>Jan Gehl</em>
"In Copenhagen, 40% of city residents commute to work by bike. 70% of these commuters continue to bike in the winter, because when it snows, the city's bike lanes are plowed first -- then sidewalks, and finally, roads."
bikes  denmark  cities  copenhagen  via:cityofsound  design  urban  planning  policy  commuting  transportation  pedestrians  safety 
february 2008 by robertogreco
Dynamic Time-Travel Maps From MySociety and Stamen
"innovative time-travel maps. The snapshot of the map that you see above shows where you can live in London with a commute between 30 to 60 minutes where the median house price is over £230, 000."
london  location  geocoding  maps  mapping  urbancomputing  visualization  time  stamendesign  data  homes  commuting  neighborhoods  housing 
january 2008 by robertogreco
byCycle.org » Home
"byCycle.org's mission is to promote alternative forms of transportation by building software tools that help users plan safe trips and making those tools freely available to the public."
activism  bikes  commuting  environment  green  mapping  maps  online  oregon  portland  urbanism  walking  transportation  traffic  resources  googlemaps 
july 2007 by robertogreco
Tools to Keep You Moving: Home Free Guarantee
"If you use a PugetPass and work in downtown Seattle, you're eligible for the Home Free Guarantee – provides a free taxi ride home (up to 8 rides a year) in case an unexpected event makes it necessary for you to leave work during the workday."
seattle  transportation  cascadia  commuting  urban 
may 2007 by robertogreco
SCIENCE HOBBYIST: Traffic Waves, physics for bored commuters
"Have you ever been driving on an interstate highway when traffic suddenly slows to a crawl?"
behavior  cars  commuting  transportation  traffic  travel  urban  simulations  seattle  physics  society  social  patterns 
may 2007 by robertogreco

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