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robertogreco : compartmentalization   8

iFiasco in LA's Schools: Why Technology Alone Is Never the Answer | DMLcentral
"In our research on the incorporation of smartphones in classrooms we see a strikingly and unfortunately similar pattern to LAUSD’s venture. The story routinely begins with adults who have high hopes that these devices will motivate students and will level the playing field across race and class lines. Students are initially excited about these gadgets. Who wouldn’t be eager to get a brand new iPad or smartphone? But, when youth think of smartphones or tablets, they think YouTube, Facebook, music, and games. As soon as they figure out that the devices are restricted, they have two options: work around the controls or resign to the fact that it really isn’t an iPad or smartphone, but instead a “device for school.” Add into the mix, ambiguity about liability, and the grand plans of a 21st century classroom fizzle back into schooling-as-usual."



"Performing drill and kill math exercises on a digital display or reading a pixelated version of The Great Gatsby does not prepare students for an increasingly complex and digitally-connected world.  Transforming the learning opportunities for students in the District is not as simple as diverting $1 billion to iPads. Actualizing the transformative power of new digital technologies would require District officials to abandon their incessant and long-standing push for one-size-fits-all standardization and high-stakes testing that constrict and compartmentalize learning.  The rich potential of these devices is tied to students’ freedom to explore as learners and the professional expertise and flexibility of teachers as guides. The District wants both control and creativity, which leaves them with little more than hacked iPads."
lausd  ipads  anterogarcia  thomasphilip  2013  education  teaching  learning  edtech  schools  policy  creativity  standardization  control  compartmentalization  testing  high-stakestesting  ipad 
october 2013 by robertogreco
Change That Doesn’t Last | The American Conservative
"Because students compartmentalize in this way, faculty members in other disciplines often come up to those of us who teach English writing to complain that we haven’t taught students the basics of research, organization, grammar, and style. When we say that we do indeed teach all those skills, and that the very students who are so manifestly incompetent in their classes were once competent in ours, we’re greeted with disbelief. But it’s true. Students forget what they’ve learned — often.

But here’s the thing: when college students forget what they learned about writing in their freshman comp class, or when Chicago teenagers forget what they learned about nonviolent options in their group therapy sessions, they don’t do nothing: instead, they do something that they learned to do at an earlier point, something that they fall back on as natural. So, for example, college students frequently set aside everything they learned in their freshman-year composition class and resume the way they were taught to write in high school.

Now, this is not all just a matter of age and mental development. One reason high-school models of writing stick with students is that that tend to be inflexible and highly rule-based, and so are relatively easy to follow. But still all these examples raise for me a key question: when and how do young people form those strong and lasting habits — the ones that prove so difficult to dislodge later on?

Nobody is ever too old to learn, and I feel that I have had a good deal of success over the years in teaching my students new habits, but by the time people reach their nineteenth year they are remarkably, and often alarmingly, fully-formed in their mental approach to the world. So who are the teachers, and what are the social and familial and cultural forces, that are getting to young people at the age of maximal impressionability? And what might that age be for the various skills and tendencies that we want young people to form — or not to form?"
change  persistence  learning  teaching  schools  forgetting  compartmentalization  students  frustration  2013  alanjacobs  writing  retention 
july 2013 by robertogreco
show and tell - storify.com [Luke Neff]
"a cursory guide to the desktop pictures of my most frequently used spaces"
lukeneff  howwework  desktops  mac  osx  lion  spaces  productivity  compartmentalization  2011  storify  visualization  metaphor 
july 2011 by robertogreco
Salottobuono > projects > THE LEARNING CLOUD
"Education has often been intended as a social emancipatory tool by which previous social structures can be questioned. As the amount considered necessary to learn increased, so the edu system became increasingly compartmented. Formal & specialized education for the minority will become even more particularized & compartmented, requiring specific structures & facilities, which can be hosted in a circumscribed area as the Loop.

Learning has always taken place throughout life, independent of any peculiar educational structure. Due to the "One country, two systems" policy, learning in btwn Hong Kong & Shenzhen can’t be just a matter of study or curiosity, but has much to do w/ the notion of border, crossing, & the related difficulty to move & to know what’s behind the fence.

By instituting in HK’s boundary closed area a net of sprawled light structures hosting students from all ages, from K to uni. Education & learning for the ‘cross-boundary students’ here could…"
saluttobuono  thelearningcloud  china  shenzen  hongkong  policy  learning  agesegregation  compartmentalization  boundaries  borders  society  education  formal  informal  lifelonglearning  interdisciplinary  multidisciplinary  crossdisciplinary  specialization  generalists  curiosity  unschooling  deschooling  specialists 
march 2011 by robertogreco
Children as the Trojan horse | The Fifth Conference
"I guess the problem begins with our educational system, which is rotten. Children hate school. The problem is that they hate education, while they love to learn. All children love to learn. There are two things—essential things—we do not teach at school: functional technology and money...We need to teach kids to learn to navigate a world that is becoming more and more technological...Children must learn to play with maths. And we must teach them to work with resources like Wikipedia, but as critical thinkers, as people who understand how that knowledge system is put together. Ultimately it is all about teaching kids to learn and to think...“Today what we teach is confusion.”
olpc  it  education  learning  tcsnmy  lcproject  children  highered  compartmentalization  interdisciplinary  multidisciplinary  culture  europe  innovation  us  criticalthinking  skepticism  wikipedia  unschooling  deschooling  business  walterdebrouwer  belgium  curiosity 
may 2010 by robertogreco
Ask the Author Live: Dana Goodyear with Neil Gaiman: Ask the Author : The New Yorker
"Authors like Michael Chabon have been cru­sad­ing for awhile to break down the bar­ri­ers between so-called ‘lit­er­ary fic­tion’ and ‘genre fic­tion’. Do you have any idea why lit­er­a­ture remains so com­part­men­tal­ized? Is there any end in sight?
neilgaiman  writing  interviews  michaelchabon  confluence  comics  lowbrow  glvo  cv  literature  fiction  barriers  compartmentalization  art  culture 
january 2010 by robertogreco
PDK International | Thinking Big: A Conceptual Framework for the Study of Everything - Marion Brady
"Our current fervor for highly specified standards for each academic discipline requires students to view reality as composed of fragmented and unrelated bits of information. Mr. Brady argues that what students really need is a system for organizing and integrating what they know so that they can understand the "big picture."" ... "If Buckminster Fuller were alive today, he would surely accelerate his timetable for "the undoing of [American] society." Today's major education-related debates do not even hint at the problem to which he was calling attention. No major participant in those debates is raising a single question about the aims of education, its proper scope, the validity or relative importance of particular standards, or the deeper meanings of "quality." It is being assumed, wrongly, that the institution is basically sound, that it merely needs a tune-up, which can be provided by the play of market forces."

[via: http://borderland.northernattitude.org/2008/12/01/harder-vs-smarter/ ]
education  policy  change  reform  schools  learning  teaching  interdisciplinary  bigpicture  multidisciplinary  systems  buckminsterfuller  knowledge  wisdom  history  crossdisciplinary  lcproject  tcsnmy  academics  gamechanging  startingover  compartmentalization  society  us  curriculum  administration  leadership  government  management  organization  marionbrady  deschooling  unschooling  homeschool 
december 2008 by robertogreco
The asymmetry of the indescribable :: Architectures of Control :: Dan Lockton
"If you’re in search of a term, how about ‘Philological Cladistics’ to describe the exploration of ways in which knowledge/fields-of-study can be compartmentalised (also see http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dewey_decimal ), and ‘Philological determinism’ to describe how any compartmentalisation inhibits interdisciplinary exploration."
research  interdisciplinary  crossdisciplinary  multidisciplinary  neologisms  terminology  taxonomy  categorization  invention  innovation  academia  language  description  compartmentalization 
august 2008 by robertogreco

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