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robertogreco : computerscience   13

42: Tuition Free Coding University in the Silicon Valley
[See also: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/42_(school)
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9OKfktv3k-0
http://www.42.fr/
https://twitter.com/42born2codeUS/
https://twitter.com/42born2code
https://twitter.com/studios_42 ]

"Goals

According to The Boston Consulting Group, the United States is the leading economic power in the world and the sixth in terms of the digital economy. The quality of a country’s digital environment helps to support strong economic growth. If the United States wishes to maintain its place, it will need to continue developing its digital economy.

The future economic growth of the United States is specifically related to its innovative capacity and to the digital transformation of its businesses. The shortage of competent developers delays the transformation of these projects, which may also become the sources of other jobs.

On top of this, studies in the United States are very expensive and do not allow everyone to receive an education. 42 is a high quality, computer-programming training program, which provides its curriculum completely free-of-charge to its students.

The United States has always been the country of entrepreneurship and innovation. Thanks to the prevailing open-minded spirit, Americans allow for differing solutions and for innovative thought, notably in the field of education."



"Worldwide

Since its creation in France in 2013, 42 has received more than 150,000 applications worldwide. Today, 42 welcomes 2,500 students that train themselves every day to become the best developers of tomorrow.

Thus far, we have welcomed international students hailing from a wide array of countries around the globe:

– from the Americas: (United States, Mexico, Bolivia, Ecuador and Brazil)
– from Asia: (Singapore, China, and Japan)
– from the Middle East: (Israel),
– from Europe: (Belgium, Switzerland, Italy, and Sweden)
– from Africa: (Morocco, Senegal, and South Africa).

These students come to 42’s French and American campuses in order to have access to a free, top-level training in computer programming.

42 allows students who have successfully completed the selection tests to continue their training at the Paris or Silicon Valley campuses (provided that they have the necessary immigration visa for their campus choice. Please note: All visa formalities must be completed by the student. For any applicants in need of visas: 42 is prevented by law from providing you with this service, so please do not request it. (This would include any paperwork pertaining to verification of attendance.)

42‘s Paris campus offers students nothing but the best in terms of pedagogy, technical resources (the best infrastructure in Europe), as well as top-notch logistical resources. We feature an attractive and sizable physical plant— with a 4,242 m² building called “the Heart of Code.” The facility is open to our students 24/7.

The American site, situated in the Silicon Valley city of Fremont, includes a state-of-the-art coder development training facility, featuring a space of approximately 10,960m² building called “the Soul of Code” housing 1024 workstations. As with our Paris campus, this campus is open to our students 24/7. The nearby dormitory facility and cafeteria support 42’s goal of delivering high-quality living & learning experiences to our diverse, international student population."



"Tuition Free

An NPO and contrary to nearly all other universities in the United States, 42 proposes a unique training program, which is completely free-of-charge for all of its students.

Tuition fees are neither required before, during nor after attending 42. All of the student tuition fees are covered up-front by the private investment of Xavier Niel for a combined total of $100 million.

University studies in the United States are very expensive and prevent some students from receiving a top-rate education.

- As of the end of 2014, the total of U.S. student loans amounts to 1,160 billion dollars (6.6% of the U.S. GDP), which is greater than the collective American credit card debt. (source: New York Federal Reserve)

- Approximately 40 million Americans have contracted a student loan for an average sum of $30,000; this staggering figure is resulting from the dramatic increase in higher education tuition costs. (These costs overall are up more than 440% in 25 years/an increase of more than 1,225% since 1978). (source: U.S. Department of Education)

- Almost three quarters of all college graduates have had to contract a loan. (source: Forbes magazine)

The increase of the student debt bears a huge percentage of the financial burden of these students and on their credit capabilities. It can have negative consequences on their spending abilities and on their housing budgets. Consequently, this debt can also have a delaying influence on some of these students who seek to start new families."



"Pedagogical Innovation

42’s directors have proven that a rigorous, open curriculum, one that actively involves students in passionate and collaborative projects, is the type of training method that forms the most inspired developers and computer scientists.

42 implements a particular training method that is different than most traditional educational institutions. Our commitment to this unique pedagogy stems from twenty plus years of research and experimentation in France in the field of programming education by Nicolas Sadirac and his team. 42’s pedagogy represents the quintessence of this peer-to-peer methodology and the integration of our determined and continuous efforts to perfect it over time.

42 attracts and accepts the best-of-the-best students who acquire a variety of abilities, while inventing new solutions when faced with new obstacles. Students practice and learn to work efficiently in teams as well as individually. Acquiring programming and problem-solving skills, which are highly in-demand in today’s technology-driven workplace, allows these students to be fully prepared for their careers upon completion of their studies.

PEER-TO-PEER LEARNING
There are no classes and no professors: at 42, the students are the ones in charge of their success and the success of their classmates. In order to progress on the projects that are offered to them, they must rely on the strength of the group, giving and receiving information while alternating between training and learning. This dynamic, removes the subordinate relationship of students as each student within the group is responsible for a part of the project’s completion and success within the group just as it would be in the workplace.

PROGRESS GAMIFICATION
Collecting grades has never been the best form of motivation. Progress at 42 is accounted for using experience points, (which was inspired by the way this happens in video games). Students develop their competencies through each of the proposed projects and receive experience in exchange for this. Each completed project unlocks the next project(s); each successive project is increasingly more substantial and more highly-rewarded. This gamification mindset allows all learning to be fun, while enhancing students’ passion, persistence, and motivation to get to the next level.

REMOVING TIME BARRIERS
Each student advances at his or her own pace. Some concepts are instinctively easier to develop, while others will require additional effort. Based on these observation, the education received at 42 is nearly void of time barriers. This means that each students are not restricted to progressing at the same rhythm as the rest of their graduating class where the student who is the furthest behind slows down the rest of the group; rather, they are able to proceed at their own pace.

When following 42’s educational curriculum, it is difficult to fall behind because the pace of the curriculum is adaptable and individualized to the extreme."
education  computerscience  free  edg  srg  programming  coding  fremont  paris  peerlearning  siliconvalley 
december 2016 by robertogreco
Lauren Ipsum
"A story about com­put­er sci­ence and other im­prob­able th­ings.

Laurie is lost in User­land. She knows where she is, or where she's going, but maybe not at the same time. The only way out is through Jargon-infested swamps, gates guar­ded by per­fect logic, and the per­ils of break­fast time at the Philosop­her's Diner. With just her wits and the help of a li­zard who thinks he's a di­nosaur, Laurie has to find her own way home.

“In­spir­ing students to be­come the de­velop­ers, en­gine­ers, and in­novators who will create sol­u­tions to some of the Nation's toug­hest chal­lenges."
— The White House"
carlosbueno  books  education  kids  classideas  fiction  compsci  computerscience  programming  children  toread 
september 2016 by robertogreco
From AI to IA: How AI and architecture created interactivity - YouTube
"The architecture of digital systems isn't just a metaphor. It developed out of a 50-year collaborative relationship between architects and designers, on one side, and technologists in AI, cybernetics, and computer science, on the other. In this talk at the O'Reilly Design Conference in 2016, Molly Steenson traces that history of interaction, tying it to contemporary lessons aimed at designing for a complex world."
mollysteenson  2016  ai  artificialintelligence  douglasenglebart  symbiosis  augmentation  christopheralexander  nicholasnegroponte  richardsaulwurman  architecture  physical  digital  mitmedialab  history  mitarchitecturemachinegroup  technology  compsci  computerscience  cybernetics  interaction  structures  computing  design  complexity  frederickbrooks  computers  interactivity  activity  metaphor  marvinminsky  heuristics  problemsolving  kent  wardcunningham  gangoffour  objectorientedprogramming  apatternlanguage  wikis  agilesoftwaredevelopment  software  patterns  users  digitalspace  interactiondesign  terrywinograd  xeroxparc  petermccolough  medialab 
february 2016 by robertogreco
Eyeo 2014 - Leah Buechley on Vimeo
"Thinking About Making – An examination of what we mean by making (MAKEing) these days. What gets made? Who makes? Why does making matter?"



[uninscusive covers of Make Magazine and composition of Google employment]

“Meet the new boss, same as the old boss”

"I'm really tired of setting up structures where we tell young women and young brown and black kids that they should aspire to be like rich white guys."

[RTd these back than, but never watched the video. Thanks, Sara for bringing it back up.

https://twitter.com/arikan/status/477546169329938432
https://twitter.com/arikan/status/477549826498764801 ]

[Talk with some of the same content from Leah Buechley (and a lot of defensive comments from the crowd that Buechleya addresses well):
http://edstream.stanford.edu/Video/Play/883b61dd951d4d3f90abeec65eead2911d
https://www.edsurge.com/n/2013-10-29-make-ing-more-diverse-makers ]
leahbuechley  making  makermovement  critique  equality  gender  race  2014  via:ablerism  privilege  wealth  glvo  openstudioproject  lcproject  democratization  inequality  makemagazine  money  age  education  electronics  robots  robotics  rockets  technology  compsci  computerscience  computing  computers  canon  language  work  inclusivity  funding  google  intel  macarthurfoundation  opportunity  power  influence  movements  engineering  lowriders  pottery  craft  culture  universality  marketing  inclusion 
may 2015 by robertogreco
Radical Computer Science — )
"It was such an honor and pleasure exploring the limits of computation with you all this semester. You are all brilliant, talented, and brave people. Together, we all asked and answered questions that most computer science and art programs avoid for a variety of reasons. That was only possible because of your consistent hard work and presence, and I thank you for that.

Endings are just beginnings. As Zan said on our last day together, we’re still in the cave painting era of programming languages. What little actual magic is inside these tools has been revealed to you, and you’ve wielded it well. All that’s left is to think about people, thought, society, politics, and how all those manifest themselves as code, and how code steers them in return. The important questions are human questions, not technical ones.

This blog will live until tumblr shuts down or the current internet stops resolving URLs, whichever comes first. Until then, you have access to the videos, homework, and articles whenever you want. I will continue to post links to this blog as I come across relevant things in my practice, and may use it in the future for a rerun of the same class. This blog is yours forever. Use it.

My final bits of advice will be in the form of a list (lisp hackers amirite):

• You can learn to do anything in this field. I mean this literally. Between online resources, academic papers, and free tools, the only things impeding your ability to code is the amount of time you have available and your drive to keep learning. This is not true of e.g. brain surgery.

• Don’t ever stop asking questions. I also mean this literally. I cannot count the number of times that “accepted wisdom” or “best practices” or “just the way it’s done” has turned out to be horseshit. Question everything. Adopt what makes sense to you, reinvent everything else.

• Don’t ever let anyone tell you your questions are anything but crucially important. Those people are toxic. There are no bad questions, only toxic people.

• Value the process of learning programming as much as (or as more than) the knowledge itself. If you can take joy in the feeling of being bad at something then slowly getting better at it, you will be unstoppable.

• Being really superhumanly good at one particular tool is overrated. It’s great to have something you are fluent in, and it’s a decent goal to have, but certainly not the be-all-and-end-all of programming. See previous point.

• Have fun and be silly. I brought this up in class but it bears repeating. If you are working on something and its not fun, take that as a sign that you should try something else.

• Be kind to one another. The world is a shitty place, and the tech world in particular tends to be racist and sexist, but you can change that just by being yourselves, being kind, and being visible. Often, code speaks louder than words, and code that generates code (compilers!) can be super loud.

• Teach someone what you know. Pass on the torch of knowledge. Its one of the most important ways you can give back, and one of the most gratifying experiences you can have.

That’s all I got.
Change the world, you crazy kids.
R"
ramneynasser  advice  art  life  programming  teaching  learning  howweteach  howwelearn  compsci  computerscience  sfpc  kindness  sharing  coding  time  bestpractices  questioning  schoolforpoeticcomputation 
december 2014 by robertogreco
How one college went from 10% female computer-science majors to 40% – Quartz
"Yes, we know there aren’t enough women in tech. Yes, we know we need to change the ratio.

One college has found the answer.

With a three-step method, Harvey Mudd College in California quadrupled its female computer science majors. The experiment started in 2006 when Maria Klawe, a computer scientist and mathematician herself, was appointed college president. That year only 10% of Harvey Mudd’s CS majors were women. The department’s professors devised a plan.

They no longer wanted to weed out the weakest students during the first week of the semester. The new goal was to lure in female students and make sure they actually enjoyed their computer science initiation in the hopes of converting them to majors. This is what they did, in three steps.

1. Semantics count

They renamed the course previously called “Introduction to programming in Java” to “Creative approaches to problem solving in science and engineering using Python.” Using words like “creative” and “problem solving” just sounded more approachable. Plus, as Klawe describes it, the coding language Python is more forgiving and practical.

As part of this first step, the professors divided the class into groups—Gold for those with no coding experience and Black, for those with some coding experience. Then they implemented Operation Eliminate the Macho Effect: guys who showed-off in class were taken aside in class and told, “You’re so passionate about the material and you’re so well prepared. I’d love to continue our conversations but let’s just do it one on one.”

Literally overnight, Harvey Mudd’s introductory CS course went from being the most despised required course to the absolute favorite, says Klawe.

But that was just the beginning.

2. Visualize success

After successfully completing the introductory class, how to ensure female students voluntarily signed up for another CS class? The female professors packed up the students and took them to the annual Grace Hopper Conference, which bills itself as a celebration of women in technology. Klawe says the conference is a place for students to visualize women in technology; humans who happened to be female who love computers. Not everyone looks like the dudes in the trailer for HBO’s Silicon Valley.

3. Make it matter

Finally, the college offered a summer of research between freshman and sophomore years so female students could apply their new skills and make something. “We had students working on things like educational games and a version of Dance Dance Revolution for the elderly. They could use computer technology to actually work on something that mattered,” says Klawe.

The three-step strategy resulted in a domino effect. Female students loved the CS introductory course. They loved going to the conference. So they took “just one more course” and they loved that.

Before they knew it, women were saying, “‘I could be a computer science major, I guess.’ And so they are!” says Klawe.

By the time the first four-year experiment was over the college had gone from 10% female computer science majors to 40% female. UC Berkeley, Duke, Northwestern have had some success with similar tactics."
education  gender  women  girls  programming  coding  compsci  computers  computerscience  harveymuddcollege  semantics  support  learning  mariaklawe  manoushzomorodi  2014  via:sha 
march 2014 by robertogreco
Colab | Creative Technologies at AUT
"Colab is the collaboratory for Design and Creative Technologies at the Auckland University of Technology (AUT), New Zealand.

Our aim is to encourage researchers, students and stakeholders to imagine, construct, articulate and navigate rapidly changing social, economic, technological and career environments.

We are a diverse community of creative people, working together in an environment from which new ideas emerge on a daily basis. Colab researchers come from a range of backgrounds, including art, design, computer science, animation, game design, engineering, mechatronics, architecture, business and organisational development.

Colab has also established a Faculty Labs Network within AUT, to manage and develop a number of high-end technology facilities, researching subjects ranging from textile design and production, 3D printing, to motion capture, interactive technologies and virtual worlds.

We pride ourselves on having great relationships with industry and organisational bodies throughout Auckland and abroad, and welcome the opportunity to collaborate with researchers, organisational partners, creative-thinkers, and entrepreneurs. Perhaps, even you?"
newzealand  aukland  openstudioproject  lcproject  via:chrisberthelsen  aut  art  design  compsci  computerscience  animation  gamedesign  architecture  research  makerspaces 
february 2014 by robertogreco
Audrey Tang - Wikipedia
"Audrey Tang (born April 18, 1981; formerly known as Autrijus Tang) is a Taiwanese free software programmer, who has been described as one of the "ten greats of Taiwanese computing."[1]

Tang showed an early interest in computers, beginning to learn Perl at age 12.[2] Two years later, Tang dropped out of high school, unable to adapt to student life.[1] By the year 2000, at the age of 19, Tang had already held positions in software companies, and worked in California's Silicon Valley as an entrepreneur.[2] In late 2005, she changed both her English and Chinese names from male to female ones and began to live her life as a woman, citing a need to "reconcile [her] outward appearance with [her] self-image".[3] Taiwan's Eastern Television reports that she has an IQ of 180.[1] She is a vocal proponent for autodidacticism[4] and individualist anarchism."
audreytang  womenincomputing  women  computing  compsci  computerscience  autodidacts  deschooling  unschooling  dropouts  via:robinsloan  programming  gender 
august 2011 by robertogreco
Eric Schmidt, chairman of Google, condemns British education system | Technology | The Guardian
""Over the past century, the UK has stopped nurturing its polymaths. You need to bring art and science back together."…

"It was a time when the same people wrote poetry and built bridges," he said. "Lewis Carroll didn't just write one of the classic fairytales of all time. He was also a mathematics tutor at Oxford. James Clerk Maxwell was described by Einstein as among the best physicists since Newton – but was also a published poet."

Schmidt's comments echoed sentiments expressed by Steve Jobs, the chief executive of Apple, who revealed this week that he was stepping down. "The Macintosh turned out so well because the people working on it were musicians, artists, poets and historians – who also happened to be excellent computer scientists," Jobs once told the New York Times."
ericschmidt  stevejobs  technology  science  polymaths  generalists  well-rounded  education  art  uk  2011  math  mathematics  teaching  learning  creativity  innovation  lewiscarroll  jamesclerkmaxwell  alberteinstein  isaacnewton  apple  poets  historians  newliberalarts  liberalarts  digitalhumanities  computers  computerscience  compsci 
august 2011 by robertogreco
Google: Exploring Computational Thinking
"Easily incorporate computational thinking into your curriculum with these classroom-ready lessons, examples, and programs. For more resources, including discussion forums and news, visit our ECT Discussion Forums."

[See also: http://googleresearch.blogspot.com/2010/10/exploring-computational-thinking.html ]
computerscience  computationalthinking  via:lukeneff  algebra  biology  calculus  compsci  geometry  python  programming  math  lessons  teaching  thinking  edtech  education  elearning  danmeyer  google  science  learning  glvo  edg  srg 
november 2010 by robertogreco
If you were hacking since age 8, it means you were privileged. « Restructure!
"at least 75% of male CS undergraduates had parents who were affluent enough to be able to afford computers at a time when computers were very expensive. Clearly, enrollment in CS is a social product of class privilege, not innate ability. Furthermore, this implies that computer geek prestige is an indicator of class privilege, in addition to being connected to technical proficiency. A child’s gender modulates how her parents invest in their child’s education, as mentioned earlier. For example, girls, on average, typically receive their first computer at age 19, as opposed to boys at age 15. Note that age 19 is no longer high school, but university, when undergraduates have already chosen their major. If women typically receive their first computer as adults, & boys typically receive their first computer as children, then of course there is going to be a gender gap in CS enrollment."

[via: http://scudmissile.tumblr.com/post/866787875/ ]
computerscience  privilege  programming  racism  sexism  technology  class  gender  race  computing  hacking  wealth  education  tcsnmy  1to1  1:1 
july 2010 by robertogreco
Teach Computer Science without a computer! | Computer Science Unplugged
"Computer Science Unplugged is a series of learning activities that reveals a little-known secret: computer science isn't really about computers at all!"
education  learning  programming  children  science  teaching  games  computers  compsci  algorithms  puzzles  computerscience  tcsnmy  edg  srg  coding 
august 2009 by robertogreco

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