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robertogreco : copypaste   10

Project Naptha
"Project Naptha automatically applies state-of-the-art computer vision algorithms on every image you see while browsing the web. The result is a seamless and intuitive experience, where you can highlight as well as copy and paste and even edit and translate the text formerly trapped within an image.

Words on the web exist in two forms: there’s the text of articles, emails, tweets, chats and blogs— which can be copied, searched, translated, edited and selected— and then there’s the text which is shackled to images, found in comics, document scans, photographs, posters, charts, diagrams, screenshots and memes. Interaction with this second type of text has always been a second class experience, the only way to search or copy a sentence from an image would be to do as the ancient monks did, manually transcribing regions of interest.

This entire webpage is a live demo. You can watch as moving your cursor over a block of words changes it into the little I-beam. You can drag over a few lines and watch as a semitransparent blue box highlights the text, helping you keep track of where you are and what you’re reading. Hit Ctrl+C to copy the text, where you can paste it into a search bar, a Word document, an email or a chat window. Right-click and you can erase the words from an image, edit the words, or even translate it into a different language.

This was made by @antimatter15 (+KevinKwok on Google+), and Guillermo Webster."
chrome  extensions  ocr  text  browsers  projectnaptha  guillermowebster  kevinkwok  copypaste  browser 
july 2015 by robertogreco
Project Naptha
"highlight, copy, and translate text from any image."

"Project Naptha automatically applies state-of-the-art computer vision algorithms on every image you see while browsing the web. The result is a seamless and intuitive experience, where you can highlight as well as copy and paste and even edit and translate the text formerly trapped within an image.

Words on the web exist in two forms: there’s the text of articles, emails, tweets, chats and blogs— which can be copied, searched, translated, edited and selected— and then there’s the text which is shackled to images, found in comics, document scans, photographs, posters, charts, diagrams, screenshots and memes. Interaction with this second type of text has always been a second class experience, the only way to search or copy a sentence from an image would be to do as the ancient monks did, manually transcribing regions of interest.

This entire webpage is a live demo. You can watch as moving your cursor over a block of words changes it into the little I-beam. You can drag over a few lines and watch as a semitransparent blue box highlights the text, helping you keep track of where you are and what you’re reading. Hit Ctrl+C to copy the text, where you can paste it into a search bar, a Word document, an email or a chat window. Right-click and you can erase the words from an image, edit the words, or even translate it into a different language."
chrome  extension  copypaste  tools  onlinetoolkit 
april 2014 by robertogreco
PopClip for Mac
"PopClip appears when you select text with your mouse on your Mac. Instantly copy & paste, and access actions like search, spelling, dictionary and over 100 more."

[Extensions: https://pilotmoon.com/popclip/extensions/ ]
[More: http://brettterpstra.com/projects/bretts-popclip-extensions/ ]
mac  osx  via:sebastienmarion  tools  copypaste  popclip  extensions  software  utilities 
march 2014 by robertogreco
CopyPasteCharacter.com
"What is CopyPasteCharacter.com?

A web and iPhone application for copying the ‘hidden’ characters that comes with the computer’s typefaces, to be pasted into emails, tweets, text documents, forums and whatever else you might need to spice up with an extra ♔, ฿ or, ❒.
Copy Paste Character is developed in St☃ckholm, Sweden, by Konst & Teknik & Martin.
If you have any questions, feedback or praise, feel free to send us a tweet (@copypastechar) or email.
Oh, and we of course welcome any PayPal donation you would want to send our way — thanks! Or get the official mug here."

"Click to copy — press down ❮alt❯ for multiple"
via:robinsloan  characters  reference  tools  typography  web  symbols  copypaste  onlinetoolkit 
february 2013 by robertogreco
Select and copy text within Quick Look previews | Macworld
"To make text selectable in Quick Look previews, you just need to enable a hidden Finder setting. Select and copy the code below, open Terminal (/Applications/Utilities), paste that code at the prompt, then press Return:

defaults write com.apple.finder QLEnableTextSelection -bool TRUE; killall Finder

After a second or two, the Finder will restart. Once it does, you'll be able to select text in Quick Look previews and copy it to the Clipboard for use elsewhere.

If you decide you don’t deserve to select text in Quick Look, you can turn this feature off with another Terminal command:

defaults delete com.apple.finder QLEnableTextSelection; killall Finder "
tips  previews  copypaste  copy  text  via:justincharles  mac  osx  macosx  terminal  quicklook 
august 2012 by robertogreco
Cut/Copy/Paste: Remixing Words (Spring 2011) - Whiki
"In 1959, a German computer scientist programmed a Zuse Z22 computer to cut up and recombine phrases from Franz Kafka's novel The Castle. The string of words spit out by the program reads like a Mad Libs mash-up of Kafka's original work. Who authored these computer-generated texts – the program, the programmer, or Kafka? Are they original poems, or merely derivative experiments? If derivative, where does "fair use" borrowing end and plagiarism begin? And can we consider the computer program itself a "text" in the same way as Kafka's novel?

This computer program is only one in a long history of experimental writing that cuts up, remixes and recombines language as a way of destroying the cohesiveness of writing. In this course, we'll look at ancient Latin cut-up poems; we'll play with seventeenth-century German paper instruments used to produce poetry during live performances; and we'll pull apart simple generative computer programs. Because these "texts" were written to be experienced, we will interact with them experimentally, pulling apart and remaking them – and our own writing – as a community. By engaging in these acts of intentional destruction, we will, together, crack open the mechanisms that make good writing work. Observing where language breaks down will lead us to a better understanding of what language is, as well as what it can do.

You cannot read the texts of this class without, in some sense, writing them, and we'll spend a good deal of time doing both in and out of class. As we test the limits of language, you will produce weekly short reflective blog posts on your discoveries. You will also be expected to respond at least twice a week to one of your classmates' posts. The point of this weekly writing is not to produce beautifully structured, perfectly grammatical compositions, but to get you in the habit of writing down your thoughts. In other words, the aim is for you to become comfortable participating in a written dialogue as a member of a community.

Once throughout the semester, you will design and carry out your own writing experiment in class. This can be something as simple as setting up a series of surrealist writing exercises for the class to participate in, or sharing and leading a discussion on a work of recombinant literature you've found. The week after, you will be expected to turn in lab report discussing what your experiment taught you about the practice of writing"
digitalhumanities  via:ayjay  remixing  copypaste  kafka  writing  classideas  reading  remixculture 
august 2012 by robertogreco
Daring Fireball: Tynt, the Copy/Paste Jerks
"All of this nonsense — the attribution appended to copied text, the inline search results popovers — is from a company named Tynt, which bills itself as “The copy/paste company”.
daringfireball  usability  seo  spam  copypaste  attribution  javascript  webdev  publishing  wastingourtime  copyright  chrome  ads  internet  web  advertising  webdesign 
may 2010 by robertogreco
Pastebot — Command Copy & Paste Review | iPhone Productivity App | Macworld
"Pastebot is a beautifully designed, tactile pleasure that brings the power of a clipboard manager to your iPhone or iPod touch. Tapbots’ $3 app is simple to use. Copy (or cut) a text snippet, photo, URL, or anything of your choosing from within any iPhone app and then open PasteBot. As soon as the app opens, it imports your clipboard data and stores it in PasteBot for later use."
iphone  applications  pastebot  copypaste  utilities  ios 
january 2010 by robertogreco
Pastebot | Tapbots
"Pastebot is a powerful clipboard manager that stores text & images copied from your iPhone/iPod Touch. Organize, apply filters to, and copy clippings to be pasted or sent to other apps.
iphone  applications  clipboard  copypaste  ios 
december 2009 by robertogreco

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